student profile: Mr Cephas Chiduku


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Thesis work

Thesis title: Developing a person centered low secure model of care for forensic populations in NSW: Exploring the challenges and opportunities for Credentialed Mental Health Nurses.

Supervisors: Jennifer SMITH-MERRY , Sarah WAYLAND

Thesis abstract:

�p��strong�Background�/strong��/p� �p�Forensic Psychiatry has not been a priority in Australasia when compared to well-developed systems in the UK and Canada. NZ took the lead in 1987 following the MASON inquiry which led to a model of regional forensic services. Some of the major findings from the Mason inquiry are wholly applicable to the Australian situation. The NSW adult prison population stood in excess of 11,600 and a significant number of these suffer some form of mental illness. Mentally ill offenders are often denied appropriate accommodation after release from custody and at times generic mental health services are markedly reluctant to accept a role in their treatment.�/p� �p��strong�Aims�/strong��/p� �p�To develop high quality, effective purpose built and person centred low secure forensic accommodation for patients transitioning from high and medium forensic units in NSW.�/p� �p��strong�Research Question�/strong��/p� �p�What would a person-centred recovery-oriented low secure model of care look like in NSW. How acceptable would this be to the sector”?�/p� �p��strong�Methods�/strong��/p� �p�A systematic narrative review of relevant literature and qualitative in-depth interviews with stakeholders to gain some insights and perspectives relevant to the research question will be conducted. Qualitative data will be collected through semi structured interviews and a peer review panel of experts. A flexible interview guide with broad questions focusing on the research topic will be used with probing questions to encourage comprehensive explanations and elaborate views and afford an opportunity to discuss experiences deemed pertinent by participants.�/p�

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.