Ms Irene Mok

BA (Psychology), MRC
Associate Lecturer, Work Integrated Learning
Teaching Fellow, Discipline of Behavioural and Social Sciences in Health, Sessional Academic, Discipline of Rehabilitation Counselling, PhD Candidate, Ageing, Work and Health Research Group

Telephone 9351 9044
Fax +61 2 9351 9166

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Biographical details

Irene Mok is a doctoral researcher, associate lecturer and postgraduate teaching fellow at the Faculty of Health Science. Irene's doctoral research focuses on the relationship between age and workforce participation. This research project explores the experiences, meaning and importance of older workers' work-life transitions, employer attitudes and workplace policy. This project is supervised by Associate Professor James Athanasou, Dr Kate Thomson and Associate Professor Lynette Mackenzie. Irene is also a qualified rehabilitation counsellor with experience in consulting and private sectors.

Research interests

  • Ageing workforce
  • Human resource management
  • Career development
  • Vocational rehabilitation
  • Public health policy
  • Disability employment policy

Teaching and supervision

Irene has taught undergraduate and postgraduate subjects in:

  • qualitative and quantitative research methods
  • rehabilitation policy
  • health and disability
  • vocational rehabilitation and assessments
  • workers compensation
  • post-traumatic stress disorder and rehabilitation
  • alcohol and drug misuse rehabilitation
  • public offenders rehabilitation

Thesis work

Thesis title: Planning for an Ageing Workforce: A Mixed Methods Investigation on Stakeholder Perspectives

Supervisors: James ATHANASOU , Kate THOMSON , Lynette MACKENZIE

Thesis abstract:

This doctoral research aims to examine the extent to which Australian policies on the ageing workforce have contributed to enabling older workers aged 45 or above to remain at work or extend their working life. Previous research on the impact of public policy on ageing workforce and age pension reforms have often focused solely on the macroeconomic simulations on anticipated work participation rates of older workers. These macroeconomic simulations often assumed older workers are completely motivated to work due to anticipated financial gains. They also assume that older workers will always be in a condition to work until retirement age and beyond. However, these macroeconomic simulations often lack consideration about how individual incentives to remain at work and perception of human resource policies in the workplace affect older workers' actual work participation rates.

In reality, older workers' intention to remain at work is often not solely defined by anticipated financial gain and the majority of older workers actually do not or cannot work until retirement age due to health conditions, family commitments, changed needs for leisure time and career development. Furthermore, workplace human resource practices targeted at older workers are often not fully utilized by this population group.

To address the gap in research, this research will focus on how translation of government initiatives to retain older workers need to take place at the organizational and individual levels. It will focus on stakeholder perspectives (i.e. employers, human resource professionals and older workers) on which workplace practices are effective in retaining ageing workers and the reasons why older workers choose to utilize them.

Awards and honours

Postgraduate Teaching Fellowship
Dean's Scholar Award
Higher Degree by Research Peer Mentoring Program Award
Australian Society of Rehabilitation Counsellors Trevor Hawkins Prize
Dean's Scholar AwardDegree by Research Peer Mentoring Program Award
Australian Society of Rehabilitation Counsellors Trevor Hawkins Prize
Dean's Scholar Award
Higher Degree by Research Peer Mentoring Program Award
Australian Society of Rehabilitation Counsellors Trevor Hawkins Prize
Dean's Scholar Award
Higher Degree by Research Peer Mentoring Program Award
Australian Society of Rehabilitation Counsellors Trevor Hawkins Prize
Dean's Scholar Award

Themes

Disability and Mental Health; Physical Activity, Lifestyle, Ageing and Wellbeing

Selected publications

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Report

  • Matthews, L., Bohle, P., Quinlan, M., Kimber, D., Ngo, M., Finney Lamb, C., Mok, I. (2016). Death at work: Improving support for families.

2016

  • Matthews, L., Bohle, P., Quinlan, M., Kimber, D., Ngo, M., Finney Lamb, C., Mok, I. (2016). Death at work: Improving support for families.

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