student profile: Ms Orsi Kokai


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Thesis work

Thesis title: Compression garments: fit and factors related to use

Supervisors: Sharon KILBREATH , Elizabeth DYLKE

Thesis abstract:

�strong�Compression garments: fit and factors related to use�/strong��br /� �strong�Abstract for Progress Review 17/7/17�/strong��br /� �br /� Compression is commonly used for the management of lymphoedema. Multiple guidelines exist suggesting the amount of pressure to be applied to the limb for managing the disease at its various stages. However, there is no evidence to inform the level of compression needed to manage the disease. For upper limb lymphoedema it is typically advocated that 15-20 mmHg compression is applied for a mild form and up to 50-70mmHg for severe stages of the disease.�br /� A wide range of compression garments is currently available on the Australian market, however it is unknown if the pressure values of these garments indicated by the manufacturers correspond to the actual pressure exerted in vivo. Furthermore, factors like wear and tear, timing of replacement, changes in limb size and patients’ compliance can affect the compression garment.�br /� Very little research has been undertaken to determine whether the advocated pressures are being applied when using compression. Of the few studies that have quantified pressure, a handful of devices have been described. The validity and reliability of these devices has not been thoroughly investigated. Determining interface pressure under compression is essential as it can influence treatment outcomes in the management of lymphoedema.�br /� The aims of this program of research are: �ol� �li�To conduct a systematic review to investigate the validity and or reliability of devices measuring interface pressure under compression�/li� �li�To conduct a cross sectional study to describe what factors are related to the use and fit of compression garments�/li� �/ol�

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