Dr Sarah Wayland


Biographical details

Sarah is a Lecturer in Health and Lifelong Disability and qualitative research methods in the Faculty of Health Sciences. Prior to joining the Faculty in 2018, she was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Australian Centre for Population and Public Health, UTS and also holds a Lecturer position in the School of Social Work at the University of New England.

Prior to starting a career as an academic, Sarah has worked since 1999 as a trauma counsellor and manager of state-wide counselling services as a Social Worker. She received her PhD, along with the Chancellors Medal, in 2015 from the School of Health, University of New England.

Research interests

Sarah has research interests in psychosocial disability and trauma. She has received funding to progress small scale research projects relating to mental health needs of people left behind when someone is missing and the post incarceration health needs of people with blood borne viruses. She is also a Chief Investigator on an NHMRC funded project that uses a facilitated community development approach to better support young Aboriginal women leaving prison.

As a qualitative researcher, and previously as a mental health clinician, she actively engages consumers in her research and specialises in data collection and analysis of participants from vulnerable and marginalised population groups. Current projects focus on the needs of people who care for those who suicide attempt and the evaluation of support groups for people who suicide attempt.

Sarah is also a renowned researcher in the space of missing people. She regularly provides comment to mainstream media on the experiences of people left behind when someone is missing.
Recent work, with colleagues from the Faculty of Health Sciences includes the narratives of recovery project (Associate Professor Jen Smith-Merry and Dr Nicola Hancock).

Teaching and supervision

Sarah currently supervises students at USYD and at other universities with research areas related to mental health, program evaluation and health care communication experiences of people with disability.

Sarah is interested in recruiting students who seek to better understand models of care relating to mental health, especially in a crisis setting. As well as supporting students who seek to conduct projects using narrative analysis.

Current research students

Project title Research student
Developing a person centered low secure model of care for forensic populations in NSW: Exploring the challenges and opportunities for Credentialed Mental Health Nurses. Cephas CHIDUKU

Current projects

- ;Acknowledging the empty space: understanding how to better support families of missing people' - a project funded by the Australian Federal Police to develop and disseminate a technical report for service providers.

Sarah is also keen to progress research relating to missing people.

Associations

- Australian Association of Social Workers.

- Missing Persons Advocacy Network (Board member)

Awards and honours

- Chancellors Medal, University of New England (2015)

- UNE winner - 3 minute thesis (2014)

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Kendall, S., Redshaw, S., Ward, S., Wayland, S., Sullivan, E. (2018). Systematic review of qualitative evaluations of reentry programs addressing problematic drug use and mental health disorders amongst people transitioning from prison to communities. Health and Justice, 6(1), 1-11. [More Information]
  • Hancock, N., Smith-Merry, J., Jessup, G., Wayland, S., Kokany, A. (2018). Understanding the ups and downs of living well: the voices of people experiencing early mental health recovery. BMC Psychiatry, 18(1), 1-10. [More Information]
  • Wayland, S., Maple, M., McKay, K., Glassock, G. (2016). Holding on to hope: A review of the literature exploring missing persons, hope and ambiguous loss. Death Studies, 40(1), 54-60. [More Information]
  • Wayland, S. (2014). Hope in the liminal space. Grief Matters, 17(1), 25-25.

Conferences

  • Wayland, S., Smith-Merry, J., Kokany, A., Hancock, N. (2016). Identifying ways to broaden recovery narratives - the lived experience of mental health consumers of Western Sydney recovery services. TheMHS Conference on "People: Authenticity Starts in the Heart", Auckland: TheMHS Learning Network Inc.

Report

  • Llewellyn, G., Wayland, S., Hindmarsh, G. (2016). Disability and child sexual abuse in institutional contexts.

2018

  • Kendall, S., Redshaw, S., Ward, S., Wayland, S., Sullivan, E. (2018). Systematic review of qualitative evaluations of reentry programs addressing problematic drug use and mental health disorders amongst people transitioning from prison to communities. Health and Justice, 6(1), 1-11. [More Information]
  • Hancock, N., Smith-Merry, J., Jessup, G., Wayland, S., Kokany, A. (2018). Understanding the ups and downs of living well: the voices of people experiencing early mental health recovery. BMC Psychiatry, 18(1), 1-10. [More Information]

2016

  • Llewellyn, G., Wayland, S., Hindmarsh, G. (2016). Disability and child sexual abuse in institutional contexts.
  • Wayland, S., Maple, M., McKay, K., Glassock, G. (2016). Holding on to hope: A review of the literature exploring missing persons, hope and ambiguous loss. Death Studies, 40(1), 54-60. [More Information]
  • Wayland, S., Smith-Merry, J., Kokany, A., Hancock, N. (2016). Identifying ways to broaden recovery narratives - the lived experience of mental health consumers of Western Sydney recovery services. TheMHS Conference on "People: Authenticity Starts in the Heart", Auckland: TheMHS Learning Network Inc.

2014

  • Wayland, S. (2014). Hope in the liminal space. Grief Matters, 17(1), 25-25.

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