student profile: Mr Thomas Law


Map

Thesis work

Thesis title: Stuttering in a Syllable-Timed Tone Language

Supervisors: Ann PACKMAN , Mark ONSLOW

Thesis abstract:

�p�Stuttering is a developmental speech disorder affecting the fluency of speech. It involves involuntary repeated movements, fixed postures and superfluous behaviors during the production of speech. There are no known causes of stuttering. However, evidence has suggested an underlying deficit in speech neural processing that is influenced by linguistic and environmental factors�/p� �p�A number of studies have identified the linguistic factors associated with stuttering in adults. However, most studies are conducted in stress-timed or non-tone languages, such as English, where there is a lack of data in syllable-timed or tone languages.�/p� �p�Stuttering is well-known to be controlled effectively by adopting a syllable-timed speech pattern and it has been used to form the basis of a number of treatment studies. Speakers can achieve a syllable-timed speech pattern by saying each syllable to a rhythmic beat. Cantonese is a syllable-timed language. In theory, speakers of Cantonese should be protected from stuttering by speaking in this syllable-timed rhythm. However, Cantonese speakers with stuttering indeed exist in the community. In addition, Cantonese is a tone language, where by varying the pitch pattern on a same syllabic structure can derive to distinctive lexical meaning.�/p� �p�According to the Vmodel, stuttering is triggered by the variation of linguistic stress, where linguistic stress could be realized by the variation of fundamental frequency. Due to the tonal nature of Cantonese, there is a constant variation of F0 due to the caused by the change of tones in each character. Hence, it would be interested to investigate whether this variation of F0 in tone realization is associated with the trigger of stuttering. To date, the association of tone to stuttering is unclear. Hence, the nature of Cantonese provides an ideal way to explore the syllable-timed nature and tonal contribution to stuttering.�/p� �p� �/p�

Selected publications

Download citations: PDF RTF Endnote

Journals

  • Law, T., Packman, A., Onslow, M., To, C., Tong, M., Lee, K. (2018). Lexical tone and stuttering in Cantonese. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 32(4), 285-297. [More Information]
  • Law, T., Packman, A., Onslow, M., To, C., Tong, M., Lee, K. (2018). Rhythmic speech and stuttering reduction in a syllable-timed language. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 32(10), 932-949. [More Information]
  • Law, T., Packman, A., Onslow, M., To, C., Tong, M., Lee, K. (2018). The Topography of Stuttering in Cantonese. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 69(3), 110-117. [More Information]

2018

  • Law, T., Packman, A., Onslow, M., To, C., Tong, M., Lee, K. (2018). Lexical tone and stuttering in Cantonese. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 32(4), 285-297. [More Information]
  • Law, T., Packman, A., Onslow, M., To, C., Tong, M., Lee, K. (2018). Rhythmic speech and stuttering reduction in a syllable-timed language. Clinical Linguistics and Phonetics, 32(10), 932-949. [More Information]
  • Law, T., Packman, A., Onslow, M., To, C., Tong, M., Lee, K. (2018). The Topography of Stuttering in Cantonese. Folia Phoniatrica et Logopaedica, 69(3), 110-117. [More Information]

Note: This profile is for a student at the University of Sydney. Views presented here are not necessarily those of the University.