Centre for Disability Research and Policy

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Image artwork copyright Helen Cooke, an artist supported by Sunshine's Community Access Program Art Studio.

A better life for people with disabilities in Australia and around the world

Our centre aims to change the disadvantage that occurs for people with disabilities. We do this through addressing their social and economic participation in society, and their health and wellbeing. By focusing on data that demonstrates disadvantage, we can develop models of policy and practice to better enable support and opportunity for people with disabilities.



Project Gets Underway: Disability Inclusive Disaster Preparedness in NSW

Enabling Local Community Resilience Through Collaboration

Flooding of Manning River at Taree (2011)

Flooding of Manning River at Taree (2011)

Natural disasters like floods and bushfires are common place in Australia, but what is not talked about are the experiences of people with disability during these emergencies. Recent research shows people with disability are at least twice as likely to die or be injured during a disaster – and in many cases purely due to a lack of planning.

The University of Sydney is partnering with the NSW Office of Emergency Management to put people with disability at the centre of disaster preparedness planning in New South Wales. The team is working with disaster-prone communities in Sutherland, Taree and the Hawkesbury to help community organisations, individuals and families better prepare for natural disasters to ensure people with disability aren’t left behind.

To read more about the project and participate click here.

Upcoming disaster preparedness workshops for people with disabilities, their families, carers and DPOs

Sutherland Shire - Local Knowledge Workshop

DATE: Friday 27 May 2016
TIME: 10am - 4am
VENUE: Stapleton Avenue Community Centre, 3A Stapleton Avenue, Sutherland
REGISTER: CLICK HERE


Latest news and publications

Latest Publications

Sport in the Lives of Young People with Intellectual Disabilities: Negotiating Disability, Identity and Belonging

Whilst there is now a growing body of sociological research on the role of sport in the social gender and identity rehabilitation of people with physical impairments, research on the role of sport in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities primarily focuses on improving fitness, health and social interactions. Yet sport is not only a form of physical exercise, competition or leisure – it is also a powerful social institution within which social structures and power relations are reproduced and, less frequently, challenged. This paper provides insights into the role of sport and physical activity in the lives of four young Australians with intellectual disabilities or cognitive limitations from their own perspectives.

Smith, L., Wegwood, N., Llewellyn, G., Shuttleworth. R. Sport in the Lives of Young People with Intellectual Disabilities: Negotiating Disability, Identity and Belonging. Journal of Sport for Development. 2015; 3(5): 61-70

Participatory Monitoring of Community-Based Rehabilitation and other Disability- Inclusive Development Programmes: the Development of a Manual and Menu

This paper describes a three-year research project leading to the development of the CBR Monitoring Manual and Menu (MM&M). The MM&M is a practical toolkit that meets the needs of CBR managers and stakeholders, and is consistent with the philosophy of CBR and community-based disability-inclusive development. It is designed to produce meaningful and locally useful information and data, based on international data standards where possible, to enable aggregation at regional, national and international levels.

Madden, R., Lukersmith, S., Millington, M., Scarf, D., Fortune, N., Hartley, S., & Llewellyn, G. (2016). Participatory Monitoring of Community-Based Rehabilitation and other Disability- Inclusive Development Programmes: the Development of a Manual and Menu. Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, 26(4), 26-52. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5463/dcid.v26i4.472Available at:
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5463/dcid.v26i4.472