Centre for Disability Research and Policy

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Image artwork copyright Helen Cooke, an artist supported by Sunshine's Community Access Program Art Studio.

A better life for people with disabilities in Australia and around the world

Our centre aims to change the disadvantage that occurs for people with disabilities. We do this through addressing their social and economic participation in society, and their health and wellbeing. By focusing on data that demonstrates disadvantage, we can develop models of policy and practice to better enable support and opportunity for people with disabilities.



CDRP/NDS Research to Action One Day Conference - REGISTRATIONS OPEN

Wednesday 29 June, the University of Sydeny

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Evidence based practice means making choices based on the best available research and evaluation. To achieve evidence based practice, service providers must keep up to date with what works, for whom and under what circumstances. The recent Audit of Disability Research in Australia found that the evidence base for disability is not fit for purpose and difficult to access. In other words, for research evidence to support day to day provision of service for people with disabilities, it needs to be more effectively communicated.

NDS and the CDRP are hosting a Research to Action one day conference focusing the interface of disability support services and the health system under the NDIS. The conference will showcase new and exciting work being undertaken with a focus on health. This is an important opportunity to share knowledge and learn new skills.

People with disability, their families and carers, researchers, support service practitioners and policy writers are encouraged to attend this timely conference - just 2 days before the role out of the NDIS in NSW.

Participants will hear from researchers, service providers, people with disability and their families throughout the day.

To register and view the program click here.

Latest Publications

Sport in the Lives of Young People with Intellectual Disabilities: Negotiating Disability, Identity and Belonging

Whilst there is now a growing body of sociological research on the role of sport in the social gender and identity rehabilitation of people with physical impairments, research on the role of sport in the lives of people with intellectual disabilities primarily focuses on improving fitness, health and social interactions. Yet sport is not only a form of physical exercise, competition or leisure – it is also a powerful social institution within which social structures and power relations are reproduced and, less frequently, challenged. This paper provides insights into the role of sport and physical activity in the lives of four young Australians with intellectual disabilities or cognitive limitations from their own perspectives.

Smith, L., Wegwood, N., Llewellyn, G., Shuttleworth. R. Sport in the Lives of Young People with Intellectual Disabilities: Negotiating Disability, Identity and Belonging. Journal of Sport for Development. 2015; 3(5): 61-70

Participatory Monitoring of Community-Based Rehabilitation and other Disability- Inclusive Development Programmes: the Development of a Manual and Menu

This paper describes a three-year research project leading to the development of the CBR Monitoring Manual and Menu (MM&M). The MM&M is a practical toolkit that meets the needs of CBR managers and stakeholders, and is consistent with the philosophy of CBR and community-based disability-inclusive development. It is designed to produce meaningful and locally useful information and data, based on international data standards where possible, to enable aggregation at regional, national and international levels.

Madden, R., Lukersmith, S., Millington, M., Scarf, D., Fortune, N., Hartley, S., & Llewellyn, G. (2016). Participatory Monitoring of Community-Based Rehabilitation and other Disability- Inclusive Development Programmes: the Development of a Manual and Menu. Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development, 26(4), 26-52. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.5463/dcid.v26i4.472Available at:
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.5463/dcid.v26i4.472