Technical Reports

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Technical Report 3, 2015

The Disability Inclusive Disaster Resilience (DiDR) Tool: Development and Field Testing

This is the third Technical Report in a three part series for the two year DFAT Australian Aid funded project (2013-2015), Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. This report details the development, refinement and field–testing of the Disability Inclusive Disaster Resilience (DiDR) tool.

The purpose of the DiDR tool is to identify the resilience and capabilities of people with disabilities to natural disasters in their family and community setting. The tool is designed to be used by people with disabilities, their families or carers and thereby to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) policy making and strategy implementation.

The tool assesses the resilience of people with disabilities by bringing together four components known to be fundamental to disaster risk reduction: the individual’s functioning status, their level of participation in their communities, the physical vulnerability of their place of residence, and individual risk predictors known to influence the behaviour of the general population before, during and after a natural hazard emergency.

Technical Report 2, 2015

Capacity Building for Disability Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction in Indonesia

This Technical Report details the Capacity Building component of the Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia project. This project was funded by the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Australian Development and Research Awards Scheme 2013-2015. This award scheme promotes research and development programs through collaboration between researchers in Australia and elsewhere and INGOs and NGOs in country.

Relevant to capacity building, two aims of the Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia project were:

1. To increase the understanding of people with disabilities of Disaster Risk Reduction and their capacity to engage with Disaster Risk Reduction policy; and,

2. To understand and subsequently inform the knowledge base of village volunteers (Kaders subsequently referred to as cadres) and DRR administrators about DiDRR at local and national levels in Indonesia

Supplement to Technical Report 2, 2015

Practitioner Guidelines for Capacity Building for Disability Inclusive Disaster Risk Reduction in Indonesia

Disability inclusive disaster risk reduction (DiDRR) is increasingly recognised as an important component of community resilience in the event of a natural disaster as documented in the recent outcome of the 3rd World Conference, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030. Central to disability inclusive disaster risk reduction is people with disabilities themselves and their capacities to participate in, and contribute to disaster risk reduction policies, practices and programs.

These Practitioner Guidelines provide orientation to the Work Packages undertaken to build the capacity of people with disabilities in disaster risk reduction in Indonesia as part of the Australian Government Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Australian Development and Research Awards Scheme funded project, 2013-2015, Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. These Work Packages formed one component of the project with knowledge transfer and capacity building supplemented by other methods within the project, including coaching and sponsoring participation of select trainees at key post-2015 DRR policy events.

Technical Report 1, 2015

Mapping of organisations in Indonesia in disaster risk reduction (MOIDRR)

This is the first Technical Report in a three part series for the two year DFAT Australian Aid funded project (2013-2015), Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. This report details the mapping of organisations in Indonesia working in disaster risk reduction (DRR). The two year project was concerned with understanding the gaps between disability inclusive policy and practices in DRR and supporting opportunities to include people with disabilities in all phases of disaster risk management. The premise of this work was that reducing the vulnerability of people with disability during disasters is a key strategy to promote broader community resilience.

The direct and practical solutions that people with disability can offer to community-level DRR activities should be a key consideration within all phases of disaster risk management. Inclusion of people with disabilities in DRR before, during, and after disasters contributes to the “whole-of-community” approach to disaster resilience advocated in contemporary policy and enacted by DRR agencies. This project was initially framed within an increasing awareness of disability inclusion in DRR globally which is now articulated in the recently issued Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (UNDISR, 2015), and within an increasingly supportive policy environment in Indonesia.

Monitoring Manual and Menu for CBR and other community-based disability inclusive development programs

Community-Based Rehabilitation (CBR) is a valued community development approach but there is a lack of evidence of its efficacy (World Report on Disability 2011; and more recently confirmed in the Global Disability Action Plan 2014). Monitoring is a first step to build the evidence base and assist decision-making.

The Centre for Disability Research and Policy at the University of Sydney, in collaboration with CBR stakeholders from the Asia Pacific region, has produced a monitoring manual and menu (MM&M) for CBR and other community-based disability inclusive development programs.

The MM&M offers these programs guidance to plan and implement locally controlled monitoring activities that empower stakeholders with information – including but not limited to people with disabilities, their families and communities.

The MM&M is freely available for testing or use.

The MM&M was resourced principally by the University of Sydney. Key resources were also provided by Australian Aid whose ALA Fellowship funding enabled CBR stakeholders to inform and shape the design of the Menu; and CBM International which provided crucial funding for work on the Manual.

For more information please contact:
Ros Madden
T: +61 2 9351 9115
sydney.edu.au/health-sciences/cdrp/disability-development

Technical Report 2, Australian Supported Parenting Consortium

The number and characteristics of parents with intellectual disability from Centrelink income support administrative data: Technical report 2 – October 2014

This report reports the situation of parents with intellectual disability compared to parents with other disabilities and non-disabled parents in a national administrative data set. Compared with other Australian parents, parents with intellectual disability were more likely to be caring for a child with disability, more likely to be in public housing and more likely to live in the Northern Territory.

Technical Report 1, Australian Supported Parenting Consortium

Estimated prevalence and living circumstances of parents with intellectual disability in Australia from selected national surveys - July 2014

Analysis of SDAC 2009 data identified an estimated 0.41% of Australian parents had intellectual disability. This equates to an estimated 17,000 parents with intellectual disability residing in private dwellings in Australia.

Analysis of GSS 2010 data revealed that, compared with non-disabled parents and also compared with parents with other disabilities, parents with intellectual disability were significantly more likely to:

  • be in a jobless household
  • be in households in the lowest three deciles of equivalised weekly income
  • be on government pensions as the main source of personal income
  • have ever been without a permanent place to live
  • have ever stayed in a shelter, squatted in an abandoned building and/or slept rough
  • have less frequent contact with family and friends
  • have negative or mixed feelings about life
  • have poorer self-assessed health

Technical Report 1, 2014

LEFT BEHIND: Monitoring the social inclusion of young Australians with self reported long term health conditions, impairments or disabilities 2001-2012

The first Technical Report reporting on the time period 2001-2009, reported that disabled Australian adolescents and young adults were more likely to experience social exclusion than their non-disabled peers, and that the gap between the two actually widened between 2001 and 2011.

This report provides the latest update.

Technical Report 1, 2013

LEFT BEHIND: Monitoring the social inclusion of young Australians with self-reported long term health conditions, impairments or disabilities 2001 – 2011

This report maps the extent of social inclusion or exclusion of young disabled Australians, aged between 15 and 29, over the years 2001 to 2011. It found that although the social inclusion of young disabled Australians increased on a number of key indicators, the gap between disabled and non-disabled young Australians actually increased over the 11 year period.

Technical Report 1, 2011

LEFT BEHIND: Monitoring the social inclusion of young Australians with self-reported long term health conditions, impairments or disabilities 2001 – 2009

Adolescents and young adults with disabilities are at heightened risk of social exclusion. Exclusion leads to poor outcomes in adulthood which in turn affects individuals’ health and wellbeing and that of their families and society through loss of productive engagement in their communities. More...

Technical Report, UNICEF

The well-being of children with disabilities in the Asia Pacific region: an analysis of UNICEF mics 3 survey data from Bangladesh, Lao PDR, Mongolia and Thailand

´╗┐In this report we have used data from the third round of UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) conducted 2005-8 to describe the relative well-being of disabled and non-disabled children in four South Asian/Pacific countries: Bangladesh, Lao PDR, Mongolia and Thailand. Indicators of well-being were extracted to address issues such as the child’s right to education, health and a standard of living adequate for the child's physical, mental, spiritual, moral and social development. More...