Technical Reports

Estimated prevalence and living circumstances of parents with intellectual disability in Australia from selected national surveys - July 2014

Analysis of SDAC 2009 data identified an estimated 0.41% of Australian parents had intellectual disability. This equates to an estimated 17,000 parents with intellectual disability residing in private dwellings in Australia.

Analysis of GSS 2010 data revealed that, compared with non-disabled parents and also compared with parents with other disabilities, parents with intellectual disability were significantly more likely to:

  • be in a jobless household
  • be in households in the lowest three deciles of equivalised weekly income
  • be on government pensions as the main source of personal income
  • have ever been without a permanent place to live
  • have ever stayed in a shelter, squatted in an abandoned building and/or slept rough
  • have less frequent contact with family and friends
  • have negative or mixed feelings about life
  • have poorer self-assessed health

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LEFT BEHIND: Monitoring the social inclusion of young Australians with self reported long term health conditions, impairments or disabilities 2001-2012

The first Technical Report reporting on the time period 2001-2009, reported that disabled Australian adolescents and young adults were more likely to experience social exclusion than their non-disabled peers, and that the gap between the two actually widened between 2001 and 2011.

This report provides the latest update and you can download the PDF document here.

LEFT BEHIND: Monitoring the social inclusion of young Australians with self-reported long term health conditions, impairments or disabilities 2001 – 2011

This report maps the extent of social inclusion or exclusion of young disabled Australians, aged between 15 and 29, over the years 2001 to 2011. It found that although the social inclusion of young disabled Australians increased on a number of key indicators, the gap between disabled and non-disabled young Australians actually increased over the 11 year period. . More...

LEFT BEHIND: Monitoring the social inclusion of young Australians with self-reported long term health conditions, impairments or disabilities 2001 – 2009

Adolescents and young adults with disabilities are at heightened risk of social exclusion. Exclusion leads to poor outcomes in adulthood which in turn affects individuals’ health and wellbeing and that of their families and society through loss of productive engagement in their communities. More...

The well-being of children with disabilities in the Asia Pacific region: an analysis of UNICEF mics 3 survey data from Bangladesh, Lao PDR, Mongolia and Thailand

´╗┐In this report we have used data from the third round of UNICEF’s Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) conducted 2005-8 to describe the relative well-being of disabled and non-disabled children in four South Asian/Pacific countries: Bangladesh, Lao PDR, Mongolia and Thailand. Indicators of well-being were extracted to address issues such as the child’s right to education, health and a standard of living adequate for the child's physical, mental, spiritual, moral and social development. More...