Global partnership - USA

Forging a relationship with Harvard

 Dr Peter Kench

Discussions are at an advanced stage between the Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences at the Faculty of Health Sciences led by Dr Peter Kench and the School of Medical Imaging and Therapeutics Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences.

The agreement will facilitate our students working with globally leading researchers based at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Fostering collaboration

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Through IDPF funding, Dr Warren Reed is working to establish a network of world-class experts in the field of visual search and detection optimisation in diagnostic breast imaging for research and teaching collaborations.

The project will consolidate the international collaboration of researchers from the University of Sydney, Harvard University and MIT. The funding would provide resources to two early career researchers from the University of Sydney to support the international development of their research opportunities. This would be in the form of reciprocal visits with international leading researchers such as Professor Jeremy Wolfe and his team from the world renowned visual attention lab in Cambridge Massachusetts. He is Professor of Ophthalmology and Radiology at Harvard Medical School and a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences at MIT.

The aim of the project is to foster ongoing international partnerships in research, teaching and learning, capacity building and other areas with these high profile world class partners.

Researchers visit American Board of Radiology in USA

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Dr Warren Reed with Dr Becker (executive director of the ABR)

In 2009, Professor Patrick Brennan and Dr Warren Reed travelled to Louisville, USA to gather data on image interpretation at the invitation of the American Board of Radiology

Professor Brennan has established a long collaboration with the American Board of Radiology (ABR), where at meetings in Louisville each year up to 300 globally leading radiologists are available to examine images and perform observation studies.

Having this number of experts available to a study, not only facilitates rigorous statistical analyses, it also encourages the generation of international standards and widespread adoption of the data produced. To date, this collaboration has led to two PhD theses, seven publications in international journals and over 10 presentations at the most prestigious international imaging conferences.

This year four studies were run concurrently and have generated a great deal of useful data. For example, a prevalence study with 31 participants was conducted where experienced radiologists had their accuracy and eye position recorded while interpreting chest x rays.

The resulting information will shed light on the often hidden world of image interpretation which has the potential to provide valuable insight as to how prior information held by the reader, such as prevalence of disease, impacts upon experts' observations and detection of disease.

This collaboration will be further cultivated in the future to provide more exciting projects.