Public Lectures

Reading the New Testament: The Book and its Significance

new testament

Professor Vrasidas Karalis
Monday 27 October 2014
6-7:30 pm

Law School Lounge
Sydney Law School
The University of Sydney


It would be an understatement to say that the whole of the Western culture revolves around the New Testament. Both as a point of reference and a point of departure, the New Testament has shaped all forms of thinking from politics to aesthetics, from sociology to psychology and of course from religion to spirituality. No aspect of social, intellectual and creative life has been unaffected by the New Testament over the last eighteen centuries. Furthermore despite its ruthless critique, the New Testament still retains a remarkable ability to renew its own interpretation, remain constantly relevant and be embraced by philosophers, researchers and politicians, Christians, lapsed Christians and atheists alike. The lecture explores the continuing significance of the foundational book of Christianity under the light of modern scholarship and the perspectives of recent discussions.

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

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Karalis


Professor Vrasidas Karalis has published extensively on Greek language, Byzantine literature and Christian tradition, as well as on the New Testament. He is currently working on a translation of two of Paul’s letters, with special emphasis on Paul’s psychological and existential anthropology.


The Philosophy of Pictorial Modernism: Hegel and the History of Painting

Folies Bergere

Édouard Manet, French, 1881-1882, Oil on canvas, 37.8 x 51.2 in.

Professor Robert Pippin
Monday 17 November 2014
6-7:30 pm

Law School LT 106
Sydney Law School
The University of Sydney


In his Berlin lectures on fine art in the 1820s, Hegel made two famous and very controversial claims. The first was that the content of fine art, religion and philosophy was essentially the same, and the second was that all the fine arts had become for us a "thing of the past," no longer an important vehicle of human self-knowledge. The "modern" art that Hegel considered was early nineteenth century romantic art. He died in 1831, and so did not witness the most revolutionary change in the history the arts, what we now loosely call "modernism." This lecture concentrates on modernist painting and asks about the bearing of both Hegel’s general approach to the meaning of art, and of his historical and diagnostic analysis, to modernist pictorial art. One version of the basic question would be: what should Hegel, given his philosophical and aesthetic commitments, have said about the achievement and historical significance of Édouard Manet’s revolutionary paintings of the 1860’s, generally credited with being the among the first modernist paintings? Or: what sort of crisis in the credibility of conventional painting was modernist experimentation responding to, and what would it mean to consider these issues as being of philosophical significance?

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

Click here to register.

Pippin


Robert B. Pippin is the Evelyn Stefansson Nef Distinguished Service Professor in the Committee on Social Thought, the Department of Philosophy, and the College at the University of Chicago. He is the author of several books on German idealism and the relation of philosophy to modern culture. These include, Hegel's Idealism: The Satisfactions of Self-Consciousness (1989); Modernism as a Philosophical Problem (1991); and Idealism as Modernism: Hegelian Variations (1997), Henry James and Modern Moral Life (1999), and After the Beautiful: Hegel and the Philosophy of Pictorial Modernism (2014). He is a winner of the Mellon Distinguished Achievement Award in the Humanities, is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and is a member of the American Philosophical Society.