Symposia and Seminars

Gerald Postema’s Legal Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: The Common Law World Symposium

Legal Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: The Common Law World (Springer, 2011)

Monday 15 June 2015
10am-1pm

Common Room (Level 4)
New Law Building
University of Sydney


A symposium on Gerald Postema’s Legal Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: The Common Law World (Springer, 2011).

10:00am Welcome

10:05am Associate Professor Carlos Bernal-Pulido (Macquarie University)

10:25am Professor Ngaire Naffine (University of Adelaide)

10:45am Professor Miguel Vatter (University of New South Wales)

11:05am Dr Kevin Walton (University of Sydney)

11:25am Morning Tea

11:45am Response by Professor Gerald Postema (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)

Click here to register.

Gerald Postema

Professor Postema has published extensively in legal and political philosophy and ethics. In 2011 he published Legal Philosophy in the 20th Century: The Common Law World. He wrote Bentham and the Common Law Tradition (Clarendon 1986/1989) and edited Racism and the Law (Kluwer 1997); Rationality, Conventions, and the Law (Kluwer 1998); Jeremy Bentham: Moral, Political, and Legal Philosophy (Ashgate 2002) and Philosophy and the Law of Torts (CUP 2001). He is associate editor of the 12 volume, Treatise in the Philosophy of Law (Springer 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011).

A selection of the jurisprudential writings of Sir Matthew Hale will also be published by Oxford University Press under his editorship. Former Guggenheim and Rockefeller fellow, and fellow of the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies and the National Humanities Center, he was editor of Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Law (1995-2006) and was special issues editor of Law and Philosophy (1996-2001). In fall, 2012, he was awarded the George J. Johnson Prize for Distinguished Achievement in the Art and Humanities, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Past Seminars

SIHN Roundtable on the East-West Dialogue

East-West Dialogue

James Abbott McNeill Whistler, American, 18641748, Oil on wood panel, 19.7 x 27 in.

Tuesday 10 March 2015
3-5pm

Room 210
R.C. Mills Buidling
Unversity of Sydney


Participants: Professor Petra Chu (Art History and Museum Studies, Seton Hall), Professor Yixu Lu (Germanic Studies), Professor William Christie (English), Dr Stephen Whiteman (Art History) and Dr David Brophy (History). Followed by a lecture by Professor Petra Chu entitled Chinoiserie and Japonisme: Continuity or Rupture.


History and the Individual Life: a Symposium

Joan of Arc

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, French, 1854. Joan of Arc at the Coronation of Charles VII, Oil on canvas, 94 x 70 in. MI667

Monday 3 November 2014
1-6pm

CCANESA Boardroom
Level 4, Madsen Building
Unversity of Sydney


This symposium will move beyond current debates about the place of biography in history by exploring the different ways in which historians are currently using individual lives to explore and analyse particular questions in a range of different fields. The symposium will begin with a general discussion of this approach and then focus particularly on the use of individual lives in imperial and international history and in the history of animal human interaction.

1-2.30pm
Barbara Caine (University of Sydney), 'History and the Individual Life'

Glenda Sluga (University of Sydney), 'Can Women be Individuals? Writing women into the history of international politics'

3-4pm
Bill Schwarz (Queen Mary University of London), 'Coming Home to History. The Lives of Enoch Powell'

4.30-6pm
Andrew Fitzmaurice (University of Sydney), 'King Leopold's Ghostwriter?'

Iain McCalman (University of Sydney), 'JT jnr: the individual life story of an African vervet monkey'


Adorno's Changing Views of Kierkegaard

Wednesday 13 August 2014
3:30-5pm

Muniment Room
Room S401
Level 4 via Lobby B (Southern Vestibule)
Quadrangle
The University of Sydney


Prof Peter Gordon (Amabel B. James Professor of History, and Faculty Affiliate, Department of Philosophy, Harvard University)

Theodor Adorno, the philosopher and social theorist, devoted great energy throughout his life to the interpretation of Kierkegaard’s philosophy. In this paper I reconstruct the history of Adorno’s intellectual engagement with Kierkegaard, from the early habilitation (first published in 1933) to the more sympathetic reassessments of Adorno’s later years. The chief task of my paper is to explain what Adorno meant when he characterized his habilitation on Kierkegaard as an exercise in “inverse theology,” and, furthermore, to explain why, much later, Adorno equated this species of theological with materialism


Visual Manipulation and Auto/Biography

flyer

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Tuesday 25 February 2014
3-5 pm

Kevin Lee Room
Level 6, Lobby H
Quadrangle Building
the University of Sydney


This seminar will combine the work of two art historians researching the visual self-representation of royal woman at the French court during the seventeenth century.

Dr Gaehtgens (an independent scholar based at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles) explores how Anne of Austria used multiplied images as visual propaganda to change her image from a widowed queen to a self-assured regent. In turn, Dr De Vitis (National Art School) considers the theatrical performances of Elizabeth Charlotte as substantive acts of socio-political critique, calculated and incisive.

Discussion will focus on how the visual - in prints and performance - can be conceived as a form of writing biography.


Revolutionary Ideas

flyer

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16 November 2013

Public Symposium, co-sponsored by the Art Gallery of New South Wales, in conjunction with the exhibition America. Painting a Nation


Recovering untold stories

14 November 2013, 4-6pm
CANESSA Boardroom, Level 4, Madsen Building

This seminar will combine the work being done by Shane White on the little known Jeremiah G. Hamilton, 'the only Black millionaire in New York', with that being done by Laura Auricchio, from the New School in New York, seeking to re-interpret Lafayette and to re-insert him into his own time and place as a fallible human being.

Shane White, '"No Photograph, Howcum?": Writing a book about someone so obscure they didn’t even have a Wikipedia entry'

Laura Auricchio, 'Lafayette: Portrait of the American Hero as a French Man'


Putting yourself in the story

17 October 2013, 4-6pm
CANESSA Boardroom, Level 4, Madsen Building

The 'autobiographical turn' in humanities scholarship and the tendency of many contemporary scholars to link their own lives to their research has been the subject of much recent discussion. In this roundtable discussion, Sheila Fitzpatrick, Dany Celermajer and Barbara Caine will discuss their own work on autobiography within this framework. One of the questions on which they will reflect is how scholars make choices about positioning themselves as subjects in, in relation to, or outside their own research.