Putting Periodisation to Use

Putting Periodisation to Use

Periodisation is one of the most significant means by which knowledge is codified and professional practices organized within the humanities. This research group interrogates the conceptual work periodisation performs in the work of a variety of disciplines in reference to early modernity. Researchers from English, History, Musicology, Art History, and the History and Philosophy of Science work together, in a series of specifically focused research forums. This will provide a framework to examine and explore questions of periodisation, its impact on our research parameters, and the possibilities for new work that such reconsiderations might provoke.

For more information on the specific activities of Putting Periodisation to Use, contact or

Events

"Accompanied in our tears": Women, Shakespeare and sentiment in the eighteenth-century theatre

Covent Garden Theatre

Henry Brookes, English, Covent Garden Theatre, Etching on paper, 9.1 x 17.7 in.

Associate Professor Fiona Ritchie
Tuesday 9 December 2014
4-6pm

Room S325
John Woolley Building
The University of Sydney


Sponsored by Sydney Intellectual History Network Putting Periodisation to Use Group

This talk will examine the development of a sentimental response to theatre in the eighteenth century, particularly amongst women and particularly with regard to the staging of Shakespeare. Letter and diary accounts by female audience members frequently attest to them crying in the playhouse as they watched actors renowned for their emotional acting style (such as David Garrick) perform in adaptations of Shakespeare plays designed to augment the affective impact of the text. I will argue that the emphasis in these accounts on the shared nature of this emotional response with others in the audience enabled sentimental playgoing to function as an important form of affective community. The tears shed by female playgoers as they watched Shakespeare on stage therefore allowed women audience members to play a crucial role in the eighteenth-century cultural phenomena of sensibility and sociability.

Chair: Professor Penny Gay

Click here to RSVP.


Past Events

Ancient Historicity

Friday 10 October 2014
2-5pm
Woolley Common Room
The Woolley Building
The University of Sydney

A free workshop organized by the Power Institute, Putting Periodisation to Use and Undoing the Ancient.


Since Winckelmann (at least) scholars have tussled with historicizing the ancient. But how are we to account for, and make sense of, ancient cultures’ understanding of their own historicity – their own periodizations? Indeed, what is Historicity, and what are the stakes of historicizing cultures? The Ancient Historicity workshop will seek to address the questions, supported by a keynote talk exploring prehistoric Nubian and ancient Egyptian notions of Historicity by Whitney Davis, Professor of History & Theory of Ancient & Modern Art, University of California at Berkeley, and Visiting Professor, University of York (UK).
Professor Davis’ talk will be followed by a roundtable with responses and reflections by Professor Ian McLean, Michael Turner and Professor Mark Ledbury. The workshop will conclude with a discussion session with participants. For the discussion session, participants will read and discuss a theoretical text that informs Davis’ work, and respond from their own expertise areas – including ancient art of classical civilizations and Aboriginal art in Australia.

Schedule
2pm
Keynote talk: Professor Whitney Davis

Ancient Historicity: History in Petroglyphs at the Second Cataract of the Nile, 8000-2000 BCE

Whitney Davis is Professor of History & Theory of Ancient & Modern Art, University of California at Berkeley, and Visiting Professor, University of York (UK). He is the author of seven books and nearly a hundred articles on aspects of prehistoric, ancient, and modern arts, the history and theory of art history and visual culture and the history and theory of sexuality. His most recent book, A General Theory of Visual Culture, won the monograph prize of the American Society for Aesthetics in 2012.

3pm
Roundtable: responses and reflections

Chair, Dr. John Gagné, University of Sydney

Professor Ian McLean (Professor of Art History, University of Wollongong)
Michael Turner (Senior Curator, Nicholson Museum, University of Sydney)
Professor Mark Ledbury (Power Professor of Art History and Visual Culture
Director of the Power Institute for Art & Visual Culture)

4pm
Discussion and questions


5pm
Reception: drinks and canapés for all attendees


Reading
Hirsch, Eric and Stewart, Charles. Ethnographies of Historicity, 16 (2005), 261-74.


Rethinking the Long Reformation: Mobile Communities, Elastic Boundaries

Hollar The Augsburg Confession

Wenceslas Hollar, Czech , unknown, 40 x 28 cm P231

2 informal talks and a roundtable
Thursday 5 June 2014
2-5pm
Common Room, John Woolley Building


Gary K. Waite (University of New Brunswick), 'Exile, Emotion, Enlightenment: The Radical Reformation(s) as a Watershed Event'

Nicholas Terpstra (University of Toronto) 'Purity, Contagion, Purgation: Redefining (the) Reformation'

In these informal presentations, Gary K Waite and Nicholas Terpstra will explore the potential of rethinking the Reformation’s value as an analytical tool.

Waite will examine the radical reformation as a transformational force in redefining attitudes to religion, the cosmos, and the devil. Using the case of a key spiritualist, David Joris (1501-56), Waite will propose that experiences of persecution, exile, and intolerance contributed significantly to what we call the enlightenment, and will suggest the value of blurred periodisations.

Terpstra will propose that by articulating the cultural constituents of the Reformation, we can rethink when the Reformation as a period happened, and in such a way as to make non-Christians (Jews and Muslims) more fundamental to the narrative. The goal of both presentations – as well as the informal roundtable/discussion to follow – is to exert pressure upon the periodisation of the Reformation and to explore new and alternative conceptualisations.

Presented by the Department of History and 'Putting Periodisation to Use: Testing the Limits of Early Modernity', an interdisciplinary research group funded by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Collaborative Research Scheme and part of the Sydney Intellectual History Network.


In Conversation with Professor Nicholas Terpstra and Professor Gary Waite

Wednesday 4 June 2014
10:30am-12pm
Kevin Lee Room
University of Sydney

Gary K. Waite (University of New Brunswick)
Nicholas Terpstra (University of Toronto)

In this masterclass session for Postgraduate and Honours students, Professors Waite and Terpstra will speak to students about how they made their way from optimistic students to full-fledged scholars. They will also discuss their research and writing in Renaissance and Reformation history.


'Putting periodization to use': reflections on the idea of historical 'periods' in general, and on the 'Baroque' in particular

Monteverdi, Purcell and Bach

Professor Sergio Durante
Wednesday 12 March
5-6pm.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music
Room 2174
Macquarie St
Sydney


The paper examines theoretical aspects of music historiography, relating them to the use and meaning of periodization in the context of recent musicological debate as well as in teaching practice. Special attention is given to selected aspects of the ‘baroque’ concept and of its periodization, in the context of music history vis-à-vis other disciplines.

The lecture will be followed by drinks and an informal reception. All members of the university community are welcome to attend.

Sponsored by Sydney Intellectual History Network Putting Periodisation to Use Group and the Sydney Conservatorium of Music - Musicology Colloquium Series

Biography
Sergio Durante born Padua 1954 and studied music and musicology in Bologna and at Harvard University. He has published extensively on the history of singers and of the singing profession, developing among other things a historical dictionary of Italian vocal terminology (Lessico italiano del canto) which is soon to be published online. After his earlier research on Frescobaldi, Corelli and Tartini, he turned his main focus to Mozart studies with numerous essays devoted to vocal music, opera, oratorio and theory of dramaturgy and music analysis. Since 2000 he has been a member of the Mozart Akademie in Salzburg, and since 2012, a member of the Directorium of the International Musicological Society. He is Professor of music philology at the University of Padua.

Selected publications
Tartini and his Texts (2007); Die Opera seria zu Mozarts Zeit (2007); Studi su Mozart e il Settecento/Studies on Mozart and the 18th Century (2007); Musicological introduction to W.A. Mozart. La clemenza di Tito K. 621. Facsimile of the Autograph Score (2009); The trouble with Betulia (2013).


Verdi: visions and re-visions of Risorgimento music

Verdi by Boldini 1886

Professor Sergio Durante
Monday 17 March
5:30pm.

Sydney Conservatorium of Music
Macquarie St
Sydney


The contribution of Giuseppe Verdi's music to the cause of Italian Risorgimento and to the unification process of the country (ca. 1848-1870) has been a matter of controversy among music historians over the past two decades. Some believe in fact that the traditional image of Verdi as 'bard' of Risorgimento is really a later ideological construction. The terms of the problem are re-examined against the background of the broader soundscape of the revolutionary years in Italy, including rare relics of popular music.

Sponsored by Sydney Intellectual History Network Putting Periodisation to Use Group and the Sydney Conservatorium of Music - 'About Music' lecture series.

Sergio Durante


Biography
Sergio Durante born Padua 1954 and studied music and musicology in Bologna and at Harvard University. He has published extensively on the history of singers and of the singing profession, developing among other things a historical dictionary of Italian vocal terminology (Lessico italiano del canto) which is soon to be published online. After his earlier research on Frescobaldi, Corelli and Tartini, he turned his main focus to Mozart studies with numerous essays devoted to vocal music, opera, oratorio and theory of dramaturgy and music analysis. Since 2000 he has been a member of the Mozart Akademie in Salzburg, and since 2012, a member of the Directorium of the International Musicological Society. He is Professor of music philology at the University of Padua.

Selected publications
Tartini and his Texts (2007); Die Opera seria zu Mozarts Zeit (2007); Studi su Mozart e il Settecento/Studies on Mozart and the 18th Century (2007); Musicological introduction to W.A. Mozart. La clemenza di Tito K. 621. Facsimile of the Autograph Score (2009); The trouble with Betulia (2013).


A Masterclass with Professor Patricia Fumerton - The Digital Recovery of Moving Media: EBBA and the Early English Broadside Ballad

Patricia Fumerton

Click to download (PDF 564 kb)

Tuesday 30 July 2013
10-12pm
Rogers Room
John Woolley Building
University of Sydney


In this presentation Patricia Fumerton places the creation of the online English Broadside Ballad Archive (EBBA), within the history of scholarly criticism of broadside ballads. It explores the impact of digital media on the understanding of early modern broadside ballads as experienced in their own time.

Chair: Associate Professor Kate Lilley


Musical Manuscripts and Their Legacies: A Symposium in Honour Of Jane Morlet Hardie

Musical Manuscripts

Friday 14 June 2013
Level 2, Seminar Room,
Fisher Library
University of Sydney


Manuscripts of different sorts and from different parts of Europe (ca. 1450 to ca. 1750) offer their students a great and varied legacy of musical knowledge and inspiration. Symposium papers will present a range of examples of that legacy, speakers presenting results of research into or connected with musical manuscripts of a variety of types.

The Symposium is held in honour of Dr Jane Morlet Hardie, a leading Australian musicologist in the field of renaissance and early modern music manuscript studies. Dr Hardie is known to many former and current Conservatorium staff and students having been a member of the Musicology Unit staff at the Conservatorium during the 1980s and 1990s. Based now in the University of Sydney’s Medieval and Early Modern Centre, her research focuses on liturgical music manuscripts of Spanish origin owned by the University of Sydney Library.

Convened by Alan Maddox and Kathleen Nelson (Sydney Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney).


When Was Early Modernity?

Early Modernity

Click to download (PDF 323 kb)

Thursday 9 May 2013
2-5pm
John Woolley Common Room
University of Sydney


This is an interdisciplinary (and inter-period) seminar, drawing on expertise from medieval studies, early modern studies, and beyond. The focus is on a consideration of “languages of the self”, using this consideration to pose questions about the legitimacy of period boundaries and the work performed by periodization in our various disciplinary engagements with the past.

Seminar Speakers:

  • Emeritus Professor Conal Condren (UNSW)
  • Professor Hugh Craig (University of Newcastle)
  • Professor Simon During (University of Queensland)
  • Professor Antonina Harbus (Macquarie University)

Chair: Associate Professor Liam Semler (University of Sydney)