Academics


 

Associate Professor Brian Hawkett

Brian Hawkett

Associate Professor Brian Hawkett

Director
School of Chemistry
The University of Sydney NSW 2006
Room 351
T: +61 2 9351 6973
F: +61 2 9351 3329
E:
W: http://sydney.edu.au/science/people/brian.hawkett.php

Controlled radical polymerization allows a control of polymer and nanoparticle architecture that was previously only dreamt of. Reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) is the most versatile of the currently available controlled radical processes. We exploit this new capability in our research to design and synthesize polymer particles and composite nanoparticles for a wide range of applications.


Associate Professor Chiara Neto

Chiara Neto

Associate Professor Chiara Neto
School of Chemistry
The University of Sydney NSW 2006
Room 349
T: +61 2 9351 2752
F: +61 2 9351 3329
E:
W: http://sydney.edu.au/science/people/chiara.neto.php

Chiara Neto received her Masters degree in Chemistry (1998) and PhD (2001) at the University of Florence, Italy. Her PhD work focused on experiments on surface forces and interfaces using the atomic force microscope. In 2002-2003 she worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Ulm in the Department of Applied Physics, headed by Prof. Stephan Herminghaus and at Saarland University, in the group of Prof. Karin Jacobs, working on the dewetting of thin polymer films. Between 2003 and 2006 she worked as an Australian Research Council postdoctoral fellow at the Australian National University in the Department of Applied Mathematics, working on nanorheology and micropatterning. In 2007 she moved to the University of Sydney, where she is currently Associate Professor in Physical Chemistry. Since 2012 Chiara Neto is on the Board of Directors of the Australasian Colloid and Interface Society.

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Dr Mohammad Choucair

Mohammad Choucair

Dr Mohammad Choucair
School of Chemistry
The University of Sydney NSW 2006
Room 354
T: +61 2 9351 5843
F: +61 2 9351 3329
E:
W: http://sydney.edu.au/science/people/mohammad.choucair.php

My research interests are focused within nanomaterials chemistry, in particular the development of safer and more feasible chemical pathways to carbon nanostructures. My research involves tuning the physical properties of carbon nanomaterials by inducing defects or chemical modifications, to provide ideal architectures for the next generation of advanced materials that can address global challenges relating to human health, the environment, and reliable energy storage.


Professor Greg Warr

Greg Warr

Professor Greg Warr
School of Chemistry
The University of Sydney NSW 2006
Room 310
T: +61 2 9351 2106
F: +61 2 9351 3329
E:
W: http://sydney.edu.au/science/people/gregory.warr.php

Our research is aimed at understanding the behaviour of amphiphilic compounds in bulk phases (solutions, liquid crystals, complex fluids), in colloidal systems (emulsions, foams, dispersions), and at interfaces. We have been pursuing a wide range of projects examining the structure and dynamics of bulk phases and dispersions using techniques including neutron and x-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS), optical microscopy, rheology and calorimetry, and interfacial structure by neutron reflectometry, atomic force microscopy, and surface force measurements. By combining these techniques we are discovering new structures formed when surface-active molecules adsorb at the solid/liquid interface or when complex fluids abut an interface, and use this to design new nanostructured materials.


Dr Markus Muellner

Markus Muellner

Dr Markus Muellner
School of Chemistry
The University of Sydney NSW 2006
Room 454
T: +61 2 8627 0953
F: +61 2 9351 3329
E:

Markus Muellner studied polymer and colloid chemistry at the University of Bayreuth, Germany. He received his Doctorate in polymer chemistry under the supervision of Prof. Axel H.E. Müller in 2012. He subsequently joined The University of Melbourne, as a Postdoctoral Researcher mentored by Prof. Frank Caruso. In 2013, he was awarded a 3-year McKenzie Postdoctoral Fellowship by The University of Melbourne and continued to work with the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering within the Nanostructured Interfaces and Materials Science group. In 2015, Markus became a lecturer in the School of Chemistry at the University of Sydney and joined the Key Centre for Polymers and Colloids.

His research emphasis is on the design and study of macromolecules with a focus on elaborate polymeric architectures, such as cylindrical polymer brushes (CPBs), which can be subsequently used in template chemistry and biomedical applications.