Project documents

In the development of the Kinship project as funded through the Office for Learning and Teaching, a number of papers, journal articles, conference presentations and book chapter have been written. These outline much more extensively many of the concepts and processes written about in the ‘Kinship Module Teaching and Learning Framework’. These papers are provided as PDFs.

Book chapters

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Riley, L., Howard-Wagner, D., Mooney, J. & Kutay, C. (2013). Embedding Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge in Curriculum at University Level through Aboriginal Community Engagement (pp 251 - 276). In: Craven, R. G. & Mooney, J. (2013). Seeding Success in Indigenous Australian Higher Education (Diversity in Higher Education, volume 14). Emerald Group Publishing Limited. United Kingdom. (ISBN: 978-1-78190-686-6) ISSN: 1479-3644 (Series) This chapter outlines the successful community engagement process used by the authors for the Kinship Online project in the context of Indigenous methodological, epistemological, and ethical considerations. It juxtaposes Indigenous and western ways of teaching and research, exploring in greater detail the differences between them.

PDF (672 KB)

Conference – referred papers

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Kutay, C., Mooney, J., Riley, L. & Howard-Wagner, D. (2013). Teaching through story mapping. International Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society. (ISSN: 2277-3754) This Teaching cultural education relies on individual teachers providing their particular perspective, yet culture-education is about providing a community perspective. This paper describes the design process for creating such an online system to share multiple experiences of Aboriginal Culture in New South Wales (NSW), Australia in a coherent and social-constructivist framework.
The focus of the material is Aboriginal Kinship systems used for thousands of years in this region. This topic was chosen as the history of conflict through government policy, social inclusion and technology take-up has continually returned to issues of Kinship and cultural knowledge maintenance within respective societies, areas in which Aboriginal and European societies are markedly different. There is a pressing need to improve knowledge of Aboriginal cultural heritage and technology provides a novel means of sharing this understanding.
Narratives from Aboriginal communities are used to augment an interactive face-to-face Kinship presentation which has been videoed and will be available as part of the learning material. Using innovative authoring tools, teachers will be able to select Aboriginal people’s narratives that are relevant to their course of study, and map these to a range of scenarios being developed. The scenarios enable students to select ways they relate to the on-line characters, listen to various narratives, and become aware of their own role in the wider community, in relation to working for or with Aboriginal people.

PDF (460KB)
Kutay, C., Mooney, J., Riley, L. & Howard-Wagner, D. (2012). Experiencing Indigenous knowledge on‐line as a community narrative. Vol. 41, pp 47-59, doi:10.1017/jie.2012.8. The Australian Journal of Indigenous Education. University of Queensland. (ISSN: 1326-0111) This article explores a project at the Koori Centre, University of Sydney, funded by the Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) in 2011, titled ‘Indigenous On-Line Cultural Teaching and Sharing’. One of the team members (Kutay) was also a project team member on the ALTC-funded project ‘Exploring PBL in Indigenous Australian Studies’, which has developed a teaching and learning process (PEARL) for Indigenous Australian studies. In this article, we present the ‘Indigenous On-Line Cultural Teaching and Sharing’ project as an exemplar of this teaching process. The project turns a highly successful interactive kinship workshop into an interactive online experience for all students and staff of the University of Sydney. The project is developing a sharing portal for Aboriginal people in New South Wales (NSW) to incorporate their stories and experiences of cultural, historical and educational issues within a knowledge-sharing workshop. The site will use voices of Aboriginal participants to express the knowledge of their culture in a comparative and affirmative context. An interface for uploading audio and video has been generated to combine example stories from different perspectives. The interactive kinship workshop and Aboriginal voices will then be used in an online game, embedding Aboriginal knowledge and values within different professional learning contexts, such as law, social policy, health, and education. PDF (1MB)
Riley, L., Howard-Wagner, D., Mooney, J. & Kutay, C. (2013). The Kinship On-Line Project and Aboriginal Community Engagement. Paper presented at the Australian Association for Research in Education Conference, December 1, 2013. Adelaide, Australia. (ISSN: 1324-9320) This paper is an account of Aboriginal community engagement in relation to the design and development of a Project being undertaken through an Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) grant to develop Indigenous Online Cultural Teaching & Sharing (Kinship On-line Project), which is an on-line cultural education workshop based around Aboriginal Kinship systems used in Australia. The Project is built on an existing face-to-face interactive presentation based on the theme of Australian Aboriginal Kinship systems developed by Lynette Riley.

The online cultural education workshop is being designed as an experiential learning environment for two reasons. Firstly, there is a long denial of Aboriginal knowledges and their importance in contemporary Australia. Secondly, the experiential format is used in Aboriginal learning and is therefore an appropriate way of conveying these knowledge systems. The Project reflects where possible Aboriginal knowledge sharing processes, bringing this into mainstream teaching of humanities and social science related to subjects, such as sociology, law, education and social work. Aboriginal knowledge sharing has been adapted to this experiential learning environment via software design.

The paper outlines the community engagement process for the Kinship On-line Project in the context of Indigenous methodological, epistemological and ethical considerations by juxtaposing Indigenous and western ways of teaching and research and exploring in greater detail the differences between them. 
PDF (950KB)
Howard-Wagner, D., Kutay, C., Riley, L., & Mooney, J. (2012). ‘Decolonising Sociology Curriculum: using an online immersive learning environment to deliver cross-cultural training’, in A. Broom and L. Cheshire (eds.), Emerging and Enduring Inequalities, the Australian Sociological Association Refereed Conference Proceeding, Brisbane 26-29 November 2012. ISBN: 978-0-646-58783-7. The paper describes an online cultural training workshop based around the complex Aboriginal Kinship systems used in Australia. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the learning environment where the thematic focus is on relationships and interaction, and how immersive learning and narrative teaching
styles work together within a social constructivist approach to deliver this outcome. Prior to discussing how both a social constructivist immersive learning environment achieves such outcomes, the paper will describe the online workshop design in the context of decolonising mainstream pedagogies. 
PDF (1MB)
Kutay, C., Howard-Wagner, D., Riley, L., & Mooney, J. (2012). ‘Teaching Culture as Social Constructivism’, in Popescu, E., Qing, L., Klamma, R., Leung, H., & Specht, M. (eds.), Advances in Web-based Learning - ICWL 2012, Springer Heidelberg, Dordecht, London, New York: 61-68, ISBN 978-3-642-33641-6 e-ISBN 978-3-642-33642-3 DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-33642-3, http://www.hkws.org/conference/icwl2012/ Teaching complex learning domains such as cultural awareness rely on individuals providing their particular perspective. In this paper we present the process and technology used to develop an online learning experience of Aboriginal Culture in NSW, Australia within a social-constructivist learning environment.
The focus of the material is the Kinship system used for thousands of years in this region. This topic exemplifies the knowledge used to maintain societies and provides the setting for social conflict with the non-Aboriginal people who came here in recent history.
We are using stories from the community to augment the learning material. Using innovative web services, teachers can select the stories that are relevant to their course, and link these within a range of scenarios being developed. The scenarios enable students to select the way they relate to the characters, listen to their stories, and become aware of their own role in the community.  
PDF (1.1MB)
Riley, L., Mooney, J., Howard-Wagner, D., & Kutay, C. (2012). ‘Teaching Aboriginal Culture Online’, in Brown, M., Hartnett, M., & Steward, T. (eds.), Future Challenges | Sustainable Futures, Australian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Refereed Conference Collection, November 2012, Wellington New Zealand, ISBN: 978-0-473-22989-4, http://www.ascilite2012.org/page.php?31 This paper is an account of a research project being undertaken for an Australian Learning and Teaching Council grant to develop Indigenous On-Line Cultural Teaching & Sharing. The project is built on an existing face-to-face interactive presentation based on the theme of Australian Aboriginal Kinship systems, which has been designed for teaching university and school students and their teachers and describes the process used to develop web services that aim to provide more interactive and exploratory learning environments.
We are collecting knowledge of the Aboriginal culture in relation to a theme and presenting this in a teaching framework that can be continually updated with community stories. We are consulting with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students and community members who attended interactive presentations to gather ideas for transferring the model to online format and presenting it with stories relevant to the specific professional areas of our students, such as sociology, law, education and social work. We present here the teaching framework developed in this project for Aboriginal cultural teaching online.
PDF (639KB)

Non-referred

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Howard-Wagner, D., Riley L., Mooney, J. & Kutay, C. (2012). Using An Online Immersive Learning Environment to Incorporate Aboriginal knowledge systems into mainstream sociology units. TASA Teaching Sociology Workshop, 30 November 2012, QUT Brisbane, Australia.

The paper describes a social constructivist immersive teaching project for online cross-cultural training at the university level based on an existing workshop designed and presented by Lynette Riley. This paper reflects on the pedagogical framework and development of the learning environment, and in doing so describes how the project adopts complementary approaches to teaching including: problem-based experiential learning; an immersive teaching style; a narrative teaching style; and a social constructivist approach.  The paper describes how the principles that underpin the designing of this program will enable educators to embed diverse Aboriginal knowledges in mainstream sociology subjects at university level through web services. PDF (1MB)
Mooney, J. & Howard-Wagner, D. (2012). Teaching Aboriginal Culture Online. Sydney Teaching Colloquium, Law Building Foyer.  4 October 2012. This paper presents an overview of a project being implemented through the Koori Centre, via an Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) Grants 2011, (now the Office of Learning and Teaching OLT) “Indigenous On-Line Cultural Teaching & Sharing”. The project aims to turn an already existing workshop, the ‘Kinship’ presentation which is the intellectual property of Lynette Riley, into an interactive on-line experience for all students and staff of the University of Sydney; as well as developing a sharing portal for other Indigenous people to incorporate their stories and experiences: cultural, historical and educational. We will be using the voices of Indigenous Australian community, students and elders to express the knowledge of their culture in a comparative and affirmative context. An interface for uploading audio and video has been generated to combine example stories from different perspectives. These will be used in an online interactive game embedding Indigenous knowledges and values within different professional learning contexts such as law, health, and education. In discussing this project the paper will also deliberate the following questions: Why is Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge relevant in the university sector? How can Australian Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge be imparted to a larger student body? PDF (1MB)
Mooney, J. & Riley, L. (2011). Indigenous on-line cultural teaching & sharing. Indigenous Knowledges in Latin America and Australia: Locating Epistemologies, Difference and Dissent Conference. December 8-10, 2011. University of Sydney. This paper looks at a project being implemented through the Koori Centre, via an Australian Learning and Teaching Council (ALTC) Grants 2011, “Indigenous On-Line Cultural Teaching & Sharing”. The project aims to turn an already existing workshop, the ‘Kinship’ presentation which is the intellectual property of Lynette Riley, into an interactive online experience for all students and staff of the University of Sydney; as well as developing a sharing portal for other Indigenous people to incorporate their stories and experiences: cultural, historical and educational. We will be using the voices of Indigenous Australian students and elders to express the knowledge of their culture in a comparative and affirmative context. An interface for uploading audio and video has been generated to combine example stories from different perspectives. These will be used in an online interactive game embedding Indigenous knowledges and values within different professional learning contexts such as law, health, and education. In discussing this project the paper will also deliberate the following questions: Why is Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge relevant in the university sector? How can Australian Aboriginal Cultural Knowledge be imparted to a larger student body? PDF (1MB)