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ANJeL/Ashurst Essay Prize

 

ANJeL / Ashurst Essay Prize in Japanese Law (formerly the ANJeL /Blake Dawson Essay Prize)

 

Ashurst (formerly Blake Dawson Waldron) one of Australia’s leading law firms, has sponsored an Essay Prize for ANJeL. The prize of $1000 is for the best research essay on Japanese law, primarily by a student (or group of students) enrolled in an Australian university (see detailed "Conditions of Entry", below).

 

The conditions of entry are:

  • (Eligibility) The essay competition is open to all undergraduate and postgraduate students, whether in law or non-law disciplines, who are currently enrolled in an Australian university. Students based at overseas institutions are also eligible if they are graduands or graduates of an Australian university and pursuing their overseas studies full-time. University lecturers pursuing part-time degrees overseas and lawyers engaged in part-time study overseas are not eligible. Past winners of the Prize are ineligible.
  • (Subject-matter) The essay may be on any topic relating to Japanese law or justice. The essay may focus exclusively on the Japanese legal system or feature Japan as a case study in a comparative analysis of the topic.
  • (Length) The essay may be written in either English or Japanese. The essay must be up to 10,000 words (if in English) or 25,000 characters (if in Japanese). This word length includes all references. The recommended minimum word length is 5,000 words (if in English) or 12,500 characters (if in Japanese), although ANJeL will accept shorter contributions.
  • (Judging) Essays will be judged by ANJeL’s three Co-Directors, consulting with representatives of Ashurst as required.
  • (Submission) Please submit the essay by e-mail.
  • All entries must be accompanied by a cover sheet.

It should be noted that the winning essays in this competition are often later published.

 The application period for the 2013 essay prize has now closed. Thank you for your submissions.

 

The 2011 ANJeL/Ashurst Essay Prize in Japanese Law was won by ANESTI PETRIDIS of Melbourne University, for his paper 'Knocking at the Door Of the Stone Fortress: Appeals to the Supreme Court Under Japan’s 1996 Code of Civil Procedure'. A Special Mention was awarded to SHANE CURRAN of the University of Sydney for his paper The Grey Crime Wave - Crime Amongst the Elderly of Japan.

 

The 2010  ANJeL / Blake Dawson Essay Prize in Japanese Law was won by MELISSA AHLEFELDT of the Australian National University, for her paper “Less than Family: Surrogate Birth and Legal Parent-Child Relationships in Japan”. A Special Mention was awarded to MARK SROUR of Macquarie University for his paper “Restrained Judicial Constitutionalism in Japan: A Reflection of Judicial Culture Rather than Political or Institutional Interests”.

 

The 2009 ANJeL / Blake Dawson Essay Prize in Japanese Law was won by ADRIAN WONG of the Australian National University, writing on "Continuity and Change: Judicial Review of Administrative Action in Japan in Light of the 2004 Amendments to the Administrative Case Litigation Act".

 

The 2008 ANJeL / Blake Dawson Essay Prize in Japanese Law has been won by MARI SAKURAI of the University of Melbourne, writing on Japan's recycling laws in a paper entitled "Take-Back Legislation in Japan: What Lessons Can Be Learned from Japan's Experience of Extended Producer Responsibility Laws?". A Special Mention goes to NADINE COURMADIAS of the University of New South Wales, writing on Japan's drink driving laws in a paper entitled "A Instrumentalist Based Model of Social Justice and Japanese Law: How Reform of the Road Traffic Act Drove Social Change in Japan".

 

The winner of the prize in 2007 was JOEL RHEUBEN of the University of Sydney with a paper on Japanís local government reform entitled "The Rumble in the Regions: Decentralisation and a ‘State System’ for Japan".

 

The co-winners of the prize in 2006 were LEAH AMBLER (ANU) who wrote "The People Decide: The Effect of the Introduction of the Quasi-Jury System (Saiban-in Seido) on the Death Penalty in Japan" and PETER LAWLEY (ANU) who wrote "Panacea or Placebo? An Empirical Analysis of the Effect of the Japanese Committee-System Corporate Governance Law Reform". ANJeL also awarded Special Mentions to CLAIRE HAZLETT (ANU) and ANTONIA ABELSON (USyd).

 

The co-winners of the prize in 2005 were EMILY FLAHIVE (ANU) who wrote "National Identity Crisis: The Politics of Constructing National Identity and Mandatory Detention of Asylum-Seekers in Australia and Japan" and CAROL LAWSON (UNSW) for "Japan's New Privacy Law in Context". ANJeL also awarded a Special Mention to ANNA HYLAND (UMelb) for "Victim's Rights in Japan: A New Framework for Reform?".

 

The winner of the prize in 2004 was TREVOR RYAN from the Australian National University, who wrote on "Creating ‘Problem Kids’: Juvenile Crime in Japan and Revisions to the Juvenile Act". ANJeL also awarded a Special Mention to MELANIE TREZISE (at Kyoto University, from the University of Sydney) for her research into "Compensating Australian Prisoners of War of the Japanese Imperial Army"; and EMILY FLAHIVE and TIM HEWITT (both from ANU) who wrote in Japanese on, respectively, "Comfort Women" and the Self-Defence Force in Iraq.

 

The winner of the prize in 2003 was TALI BUDLENDER from the University of Melbourne, who wrote on "The Privacy Rights of People Living with HIV/AIDS in Japan: A Challenge to ‘Asian Values’". ANJeL also awarded a special prize in research for the runner-up to AUDRIUS SKEIVYS from the University of Melbourne, who wrote on "A Change in Form, But Not in Substance? Evaluating Japan's ‘New’ Corporate Governance Regime". Those awarded Special Mention included MIKI SATO, who wrote on juvenile justice.

 

 

 

 

 

ANJeL Essay Prize Co-Winner for 2006, Ms LEAH AMBLER, with Kent Anderson at the ANU awards ceremony in March 2007.

 

 

 

ANJeL Essay Prize Co-Winner for 2006, Mr PETER LAWLEY, with Deputy Vice Chancellor (USyd) John Hearn at the ANJeL/BDW awards ceremony in March 2007.

 

 

Ms CLAIRE HAZLETT, who received special mention for the ANJeL Essay Prize for 2006, with Kent Anderson at the ANU awards ceremony in March 2007.

 

 

ANJeL Essay Prize Co-Winner for 2005, Ms Emily Flahive, with Kent Anderson at the ANU awards ceremony in March 2006.

   

 

ANJeL Essay Prize Winner for 2004, Mr Trevor Ryan, with Kent Anderson at the ANU awards ceremony in April 2005.

   

 


Last updated: 18 November 2013