Zeiss LSM 510 Meta Spectral Confocal Microscope

In February 2007, the Bosch Institute purchased a brand new state-of-the-art laser scanning confocal microscope from Carl Zeiss Australia – the LSM 510 Meta. Funding for this microscope was supported by an NHMRC Equipment grant 2006, a University of Sydney Large Equipment grant 2007, RIBG funding and also the Rebecca L. Cooper Medical Research Foundation.

This Zeiss LSM 510 Meta is based on one of the new inverted research Zeiss AxioObserver microscopes that has a touch screen display and thereby opens a new dimension in automated operation. It is provided with a number of lasers for excitation of fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins. These include a 405 nm laser for UV excitation, an Argon (458, 477, 488 and 514 nm lines), 561 nm DPSS and 633 nm HeNe laser. The LSM software allows for multi-channel imaging, z-sectioning, time-lapse imaging, live-cell imaging, quantitative co-localisation, FRET analyses and photo-bleaching methods.

The unique scanning module has three conventional and one Meta detector with 32-spectral channels. The Meta detector enables Emission Fingerprinting (a technique developed by Carl Zeiss) to be carried out so that the emission spectra of different dyes is separated precisely. This can eliminate cross-talk, auto-fluorescence bleed-through and can even reliably separate dyes with close emission signals.


Manuals Available:

Leica SPE-II Confocal Microscope

SPEII

This upright confocal microscope was purchased using RIBG and Bosch funding in November 2010. This is the second confocal microscope in the Bosch Institute and it allows users increased confocal imaging hours together with the older workhorse Zeiss LSM 510 meta spectral confocal microscope.

The Leica SPE-II confocal microscope is located in Rm S443, Anderson Stuart Building. It is a high resolution spectral confocal microscope that is compact and easy-to-use. It consists of four solid-state lasers (405 nm 488 nm, 532 nm and 635 nm) that allows a broad spectrum of dyes to be imaged. It has one spectral detector only but allows spectral detection between 430-750 nm.

Perfect co-localisation can be acheived on this system using Advanced Correction System (ACS) Technology. The system runs on the Leica LAS AF software platform that is both esay-to-use and modular in design. Besides the one variable spectral detector, the system has a transmitted light detector which allows a bright-field image to be overlayed onto the fluorescence image. For full training on this system, please contact Dr Louise Cole, Bosch Institute Advanced Microscopy Core Facilities Manager.

Mouse fibroblast by Leica


Manuals Available: