Advanced Microscopy Facility Micrograph of the Year Competition

Micrographs of 2016

TOP 20 IMAGES

The Top 20 images selected from 70+ entries to the Bosch Institute Advanced Microscopy Facility (AMF) Micrograph of the Year 2016 competition are now on display in the Anderson Stuart Common Room, Anderson Stuart Building F13, School of Medical Sciences at the University of Sydney.

The judges selected the Top 20 images and from these the Top 7 prize winners, based on the following criteria: Scientific relevance, technical difficulty, instrumentation, originality, aesthetics and suitability for the competition.

Special thanks to A/Prof. Bill Phillips (Physiology) and Prof. Tailoi Chan-Ling (Anatomy & Histology) for judging the competition and to all the sponsors who so generously supported this competition: Leica Microsystems Australia, Nikon Australia, Coherent Scientific, ATA Scientific, LasTek Australia, Bosch Institute and Anatomy & Histology (The University of Sydney).

And the winners are….

The Top 7 winners of the Bosch Institute AMF Micrograph of the Year 2016 Competition and the People’s Choice Award are as follows:

FIRST PRIZE: FILIP BRAET (ANATOMY & HISTOLOGY)

Correlative SEM & AFM on Hepatic Endothelial Cells
Correlative SEM & AFM on Hepatic Endothelial Cells

Scanning electron and atomic force microscopy of the porous surface of hepatic endothelial cells. Each individual pore has an average diameter of about 200 nm. The grey image represents scanning electron microscopy (SEM) information while the gold colour image represents corresponding atomic force microscopy (AFM) information of a grouping of pores also known as sieve plates. The same area of interest in both microscopes was located by using scratches as relocation tool.


SECOND PRIZE: LEYLA FOUANI (PATHOLOGY)

Divide and Conquer – Tripolar Metaphase in Aggressive Pancreatic Cancer
Divide and Conquer – Tripolar Metaphase in Aggressive Pancreatic Cancer

Cancers feature an inordinate number of abnormalities compared to their normal cell counterparts. These rapidly dividing, highly heterogeneous cells are clever, and constantly evolving to grow, spread, and develop strategies to evade death and therapeutics. With cancers rapid division, what was once a highly conserved and carefully controlled process now proceeds largely unchecked, facilitating the deadliness of the disease. This confocal micrograph depicts one such abnormality, a tripolar metaphase event during mitosis. The tripolar spindles are seen segregating the stained chromosomes in cells derived from deadly pancreatic cancer that had metastasised to the liver.


THIRD PRIZE: GERRY SHAMI (ANATOMY & HISTOLOGY)

Block-Face SEM: 3-D Reconstruction of hepatocytes & the bile canaliculi
Block-Face SEM: 3-D Reconstruction of hepatocytes & the bile canaliculi

This micrograph was acquired by means of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SEM) comprising 610 sequential images. The hepatic parenchymal cells (blue, binucleate; gold, mononucleate) and the bile canaliculi (green) were generated by means of manual segmentation; a highly labour intensive process taking three months to complete for a single model. The bile canaliculi represent the smallest branch of the biliary tree, formed by the opposing plasma membranes of adjacent hepatic parenchymal cells. These fine channels measure between 0.5 to 1.0 μm in diameter and transport bile – an exocrine secretion of hepatic parenchymal cells – to the gall bladder via ductules of increasing diameter.


FOURTH PRIZE: JIA HAO YEO (ANATOMY & HISTOLOGY)

Erythroblastic islands
Erythroblastic islands

Erythroblastic islands are multi-cellular clusters found within the bone marrow for red blood cell development. They consist of a central macrophage (yellow) surrounded by red blood cell progenitors. This image is a scanning electron micrograph of the erythroblastic island.


FIFTH PRIZE: NABIL AHMAD (PLANT BREEDING INSTITUTE)

Floral embryology of the Australian tomato (Solanum centrale) at post-fertilisation stage
Floral embryology of the Australian tomato (Solanum centrale) at post-fertilisation stage

This image shows a longitudinal section of the floral constituents at a post-fertilisation stage. Details show a style and many ovules within the ovary. Some ovules show the first zygotic division and early stages of endosperm development.


SIXTH PRIZE: STEVEN EAMEGDOOL (SAVE SIGHT INSTITUTE)

Quadruple immunohistochemistry of paraffin- embedded human retina-choroid cross-sections
immunohistochemistry of paraffin- embedded human retina-choroid cross-sections

Tissue was stained for ganglion cells [Beta3-tubulin (red)], the inner nuclei cell layer [Tau (green)], photoreceptors [rhodopsin (orange)] and nuclei (blue). Distinct stratified localisation of different cell types can be clearly visualised using multi-marker immuno-staining, which provides us with a more holistic view of cellular changes within the retina. This can be useful for understanding the early events of many eye diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, and enable future development of therapeutic interventions.


SEVENTH PRIZE: FILIP BRAET (ANATOMY & HISTOLOGY)

Human Trachea and the Respiratory Epithelium (H.E.S. Staining)
Human Trachea and the Respiratory Epithelium (H.E.S. Staining)

This type of epithelium, i.e. pseudo-stratified, gives the misleading appearance of having several cell layers. All cells are attached to the basement membrane even though not all of the cells reach the surface. The basal cells are replacement cells and lead to columnar epithelial cells. Goblet cells are mucous secreting epithelial cells providing a thin protective layer to the trachea. Note the highly vascularized connective tissue.


PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD: MONICA VOGIATZIS (ANATOMY & HISTOLOGY)

Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in the temporal lobe of a Down Syndrome patient
Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy in the temporal lobe of a Down Syndrome patient

A section of temporal lobe in a young trisomy-21 adult shows Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA), which is a large deposition of amyloid inside blood vessels. This image shows red arteries surrounded and filled with blue amyloid deposition.