Brain research from the University of Sydney

Brain Awareness Week (BAW), from 13 – 19 March, is a global campaign aiming to increase public awareness about the progress and benefits of brain research.

An initiative of The DANA Foundation, this important week brings together scientists, families, schools and communities worldwide to raise awareness about the progress of brain research, as well as diagnosis, treatment and prevention of brain disorders, such as dementia, Parkinson’s, Alzheimers and schizophrenia.

In support of this initiative, the University of Sydney shares its recent updates and progress on brain research, detection and treatment.



Brain Awareness Week

1. Physical and mental exercises protect memory by rewiring the brain

University of Sydney researchers have revealed that progressive resistance exercise (high intensity strength training) and computerised cognitive training (brain training) can help combat the effects of aging and Alzheimer’s disease.

Read the full article here.






Brain Awareness Week

2. Training program helps ‘chemo brain’ symptoms in cancer patients

An online learning program may help cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced neurological problems, research reveals.

Read the full article here.








Brain Awareness Week

3. Brain training (CCT) may help fight dementia: research

University of Sydney researchers have found that brain training – or Computerised Cognitive Training (CCT) – can improve memory in people with mild cognitive impairment, suggesting it may prevent dementia.

Read the full article here.







Brain Awareness Week

4. Act early to stop eyewitnesses from developing lasting distress

What are the causes and possible symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)? Early intervention is the key to treating PTSD, writes Dr Lauren Monds, Research Fellow at the University of Sydney.

Read the full article here.







Brain Awareness Week

5. Neuroplasticity: the science behind rewiring the brain

Scientists have long thought that the adult brain is unchangeable, but new evidence is emerging to challenge this belief by revealing that the brain is capable of lifelong change and adaptation.

Watch the video here.