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CPAT3201

Course Aims

  • To give students an overall understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis in human beings.
  • To introduce to students basic concepts of the pathogenesis, natural history and complications of common human diseases.
  • To demonstrate and exemplify differences between normality and disease.
  • To explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes.
  • To enable students to gain an understanding of how different organ systems react to injury and to apply basic concepts of disease processes.
  • To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees.


Timetable Overview
Lectures: Monday, Thursday and Friday 8am
Research Project: Wednesday 3 - 6pm, various locations depending on the type of project selected.

Learning Formats
Students will be able to choose from a research project based on a pathogenesis project (centred on a case study using specimens - macroscopic [bottle] specimens and tissue sections) from the Interactive Centre for Human Diseases or a laboratory-based project (centred on an experiment within a lecturer's laboratory). The subject areas vary year to year.

Assessment
The course is designed in relation to the learning objectives, and the assessment is an integral part of this. The assessment is designed to test understanding, not regurgitation of "facts". The final exam in CPAT3201 will consist of MCQ questions and short answer questions that will focus on understanding pathological processes.

Formative Assessment
The Learning Management System (LMS) quizzes give students the opportunity to undertake formative assessment. The format of the LMS quizzes is similar to the examination for this course.

Summative Assessment

Theory Examination  60% 
Research Project Essay 20%
Two In-Semester Examinations 20% 

CPAT3202

Course Aims

  • To give students an overall understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis in human beings.
  • To introduce to students basic concepts of the pathogenesis, natural history and complications of common human diseases.
  • To demonstrate and exemplify differences between normality and disease.
  • To explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes.
  • To enable students to gain an understanding of how different organ systems react to injury and to apply basic concepts of disease processes.
  • To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees.


Practical Competencies
At the end of the course students will:

  • Have acquired practical skills in the use of a light microscope.
  • Have an understanding of basic investigative techniques for disease detection in pathology.
  • Be able to evaluate diseased tissue at the macroscopic and microscopic level.
  • Have the ability to describe, synthesise and present information on disease pathogenesis.
  • Transfer problem-solving skills to novel situations related to disease pathogenesis.


Timetable Overview
Microscope Tutorials - Blackburn Building, Room 559: Friday 1 - 3pm or 3 - 5pm
Museum Tutorials - Interactive Centre for Human Diseases (Pathology Museum, Level 5 Blackburn Building): Tuesday 1 - 3pm; 3 - 5pm; Friday 1 - 3pm or 3 - 5 pm.

Learning Formats
Microscopic Tutorials: The features of disease states revealed in microscope slides of processed tissue will be demonstrated and discussed by use of the video microscope. Students will also examine the features of the slides using microscopes themselves. These are highly interactive sessions.

Museum Sessions: The museum sessions will vary slightly with the different segments of the course. In general, students will investigate, singly or in groups, microscopic and macroscopic specimens of examples of human diseases.

Assessment
The course is designed in relation to the learning objectives, and the assessment is an integral part of this. The assessment is designed to test understanding, not regurgitation of "facts".

Formative Assessment
The Museum Tutorial Worksheets/Quizzes on the Learning Management System (LMS) give students the opportunity to undertake formative assessment weekly. Model answers are provided to students who submit their responses.

Summative Assessment

Museum Practical Reports 30% 
Practical Examination 70%

Cell Pathology Major

For a major in Cell Pathology, the minimum requirement is 24 credit points from (i) CPAT3201 and CPAT3202; and (ii) any two of the listed senior units of study. The Bachelor of Medical Science does not have majors.

The completion of 6 credit points of MBLG units of study is highly recommended.

Senior units of study:

  • HSTO3001 Microscopy and Histochemistry Theory
  • HSTO3002 Microscopy and Histochemistry Practical
  • HSTO3003 Cells and Development: Theory
  • HSTO3004 Cells and Development: Practical (Advanced)
  • BCHM3071 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry - Genes
  • BCHM3971 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry - Genes (Advanced)
  • BCHM3972 Human Molecular Cell Biology (Advanced)
  • BCHM3081 Mol Biology and Biochemistry- Proteins
  • BCHM3981 Mol Biology and Biochemistry- Proteins (Advanced)
  • BCHM3082 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry
  • BCHM3982 Medical and Metabolic Biochemistry (Advanced)
  • MICR3011 Microbes in Infection
  • MICR3911 Microbes in Infection (Advanced)
  • MICR3012 Molecular Biology of Pathogens
  • MICR3912 Molecular Biology of Pathogens (Advanced)
  • MICR3022 Microbial Biotechnology
  • MICR3922 Microbial Biotechnology (Advanced)
  • PHSI3005 Human Cellular Physiology: Theory
  • PHSI3905 Human Cellular Physiology (Advanced): Theory
  • PHSI3006 Human Cellular Physiology: Research
  • PHSI3906 Human Cellular Physiology (Advanced): Research