Dr Jin Yu Huang

Lecturer
Biomedical Sciences, School of Medical Sciences

Telephone 9351 9065

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Research interests

Humans have two eyes and they allow us to see the world around us. So how do we see? How is the image processed? The answer lies in the eyes and rest of the brain.

The retina is made up of light sensitive tissue that is located at the back of the eye. It contains nerve cells (neurons) that are important in the first stage of visual perception and visual processing. One of the types of neurons in the retina is called ganglion cells. These neurons project from the retina to other regions within the brain (such as the lateral geniculate nucleus) and are important in the modification of complex visual signals. Ganglion cells also receive a variety of excitatory and inhibitory signals from other neurons within the retina. Hence, the properties of ganglion cells depend on how these signals are integrated. An important aspect of this integration is related to the relative magnitude and timing of these inputs, as this helps to determine the spatial and temporal properties of ganglion cells. However, we do not know at present exactly how these inputs to ganglion cells impact on their activity. To investigate this, we are using intracellular recording techniques (such as patch-clamp and dynamic-clamp) to examine the changes in ganglion cells activity in response to different types of inputs. Our project also looks at the effects of drug-simulation on the responses of ganglion cells, as this can also help us in understanding the receptive filed properties of ganglion cells.

We published a video article recently and this video will provide an overview of the techniques we use and some of the projects we are working on at the moment.

For full access of the video, click on the link below and type in your Unikey and password:

http://www.jove.com.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/video/50400/implementing-dynamic-clamp-with-synaptic-artificial-conductances

For partial access, click the link below:

http://www.jove.com/video/50400/implementing-dynamic-clamp-with-synaptic-artificial-conductances

This research is done in collaboration with Dr Dario Protti in the Discipline of Physiology.

Teaching and supervision

Dr Huang teaches Neuroanatomy, Neurophysiology and Anatomy to undergraduate and postgraduate students. Dr Huang is a member of the Learning and Teaching Committee of Discipline of Biomedical Science and is the subject/unit co-ordinator for: - Neuroscience (BIOS1171, Semester 1) - Clinically Based Neuroscience (BIOS5091)

Selected grants

2014

  • Understanding retinal ganglion cell function in glaucoma; Protti D, Huang J; Rebecca L Cooper Medical Research Foundation/Equipment Grant.

Selected publications

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Journals

  • Protti, D., Di Marco, S., Huang, J., Vonhoff, C., Nguyen, V., Solomon, S. (2014). Inner retinal inhibition shapes the receptive field of retinal ganglion cells in primate. The Journal of Physiology, 592(1), 49-65. [More Information]
  • Huang, J., Stiefel, K., Protti, D. (2013). Implementing dynamic clamp with synaptic and artificial conductances in mouse retinal ganglion cells. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 75, 1-7. [More Information]
  • Wang, C., Huang, J., Bardy, C., Fitzgibbon, T., Dreher, B. (2010). Influence of 'feedback' signals on spatial integration in receptive fields of cat area 17 neurons. Brain Research, 1328, 34-48. [More Information]
  • Bardy, C., Huang, J., Wang, C., Fitzgibbon, T., Dreher, B. (2009). 'Top-down' influences of ipsilateral or contralateral postero-temporal visual cortices on the extra-classical receptive fields of neurons in cat's striate cortex. Neuroscience, 158(2), 951-968. [More Information]
  • Wang, C., Bardy, C., Huang, J., Fitzgibbon, T., Dreher, B. (2009). Contrast dependence of center and surround integration in primary visual cortex of the cat. Journal of Vision, 9(20), 1-15. [More Information]
  • Huang, J., Wang, C., Dreher, B. (2007). The effects of reversible inactivation of postero-temporal visual cortex on neuronal activities in cat's area 17. Brain Research, 1138, 111-128. [More Information]
  • Bardy, C., Huang, J., Wang, C., Fitzgibbon, T., Dreher, B. (2006). 'Simplification' of responses of complex cells in cat striate cortex: suppressive surrounds and 'feedback' inactivation. The Journal of Physiology, 574(3), 731-750. [More Information]

2014

  • Protti, D., Di Marco, S., Huang, J., Vonhoff, C., Nguyen, V., Solomon, S. (2014). Inner retinal inhibition shapes the receptive field of retinal ganglion cells in primate. The Journal of Physiology, 592(1), 49-65. [More Information]

2013

  • Huang, J., Stiefel, K., Protti, D. (2013). Implementing dynamic clamp with synaptic and artificial conductances in mouse retinal ganglion cells. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 75, 1-7. [More Information]

2010

  • Wang, C., Huang, J., Bardy, C., Fitzgibbon, T., Dreher, B. (2010). Influence of 'feedback' signals on spatial integration in receptive fields of cat area 17 neurons. Brain Research, 1328, 34-48. [More Information]

2009

  • Bardy, C., Huang, J., Wang, C., Fitzgibbon, T., Dreher, B. (2009). 'Top-down' influences of ipsilateral or contralateral postero-temporal visual cortices on the extra-classical receptive fields of neurons in cat's striate cortex. Neuroscience, 158(2), 951-968. [More Information]
  • Wang, C., Bardy, C., Huang, J., Fitzgibbon, T., Dreher, B. (2009). Contrast dependence of center and surround integration in primary visual cortex of the cat. Journal of Vision, 9(20), 1-15. [More Information]

2007

  • Huang, J., Wang, C., Dreher, B. (2007). The effects of reversible inactivation of postero-temporal visual cortex on neuronal activities in cat's area 17. Brain Research, 1138, 111-128. [More Information]

2006

  • Bardy, C., Huang, J., Wang, C., Fitzgibbon, T., Dreher, B. (2006). 'Simplification' of responses of complex cells in cat striate cortex: suppressive surrounds and 'feedback' inactivation. The Journal of Physiology, 574(3), 731-750. [More Information]

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