Dr Shawn Wilson

Lecturer and Sub-Dean (ECR) for Rural Health
University Centre for Rural Health, School of Public Health

Telephone +61 2 6620 7331
Fax +61 2 6620 7270

Website Related website
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Research interests

I am Opaskwayak Cree from northern Manitoba, Canada with doctorate in Social Sciences / Indigenous Studies. My expertise is in research methodology and epistemologies, particularly in ways of knowing and conducting research used by Indigenous peoples. I have applied these within the contexts of Indigenous education, counselling and counsellor education, Indigenous mental health and general Indigenous studies through comparison between Indigenous peoples internationally. My current role is in building research capacity with primary health care workers. Previously, I have documented ideas about just what an Elder is and how they can be supported. My latest book 'Research is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods' examines some of the similarities in philosophy underlying Indigenous peoples┬┐ research methodologies in Canada and Australia. In addition to further articulating Indigenous philosophies and research paradigms, my research focuses on the inter-related concepts of identity, health and healing, culture and wellbeing.

Selected publications

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Books

  • Wilson, S. (2008). Research is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods. Halifax, Canada: Fernwood Publishing.

Book Chapters

  • Wilson, S., Wilson, A. (2013). Neyo way in ik issi: A family practice of indigenist research informed by land. In Donna Mertens, Fiona Cram, Bagele Chilisa (Eds.), Indigenous Pathways into Social Research: Voices of a New Generation, (pp. 333-352). Walnut Creek, USA: Left Coast Press.
  • Wilson, S. (2013). Using Indigenist Research to Shape Our Future. In Mel Gray, Johns Coates, Michael Yellow Bird, Tiani Hetherington (Eds.), Decolonizing Social Work, (pp. 311-322). Farnham: Ashgate.

Journals

  • Bennett-Levy, J., Wilson, S., Nelson, J., Stirling, J., Ryan, K., Rotumah, D., Budden, W., Beale, D. (2014). Can CBT be effective for aboriginal Australians? Perspectives of aboriginal practitioners trained in CBT. Australian Psychologist, 49(1), 1-7. [More Information]
  • Rix, E., Barclay, L., Wilson, S., Stirling, J., Tong, A. (2013). Service providers' perspectives, attitudes and beliefs on health services delivery for Aboriginal people receiving haemodialysis in rural Australia: a qualitative study. BMJ Open, 3(10), 1-10. [More Information]
  • Wilson, S. (2003). Progressing Toward an Indigenous Research Paradigm in Canada and Australia. Canadian Journal of Native Education, 27(2), 161-178.

2014

  • Bennett-Levy, J., Wilson, S., Nelson, J., Stirling, J., Ryan, K., Rotumah, D., Budden, W., Beale, D. (2014). Can CBT be effective for aboriginal Australians? Perspectives of aboriginal practitioners trained in CBT. Australian Psychologist, 49(1), 1-7. [More Information]

2013

  • Wilson, S., Wilson, A. (2013). Neyo way in ik issi: A family practice of indigenist research informed by land. In Donna Mertens, Fiona Cram, Bagele Chilisa (Eds.), Indigenous Pathways into Social Research: Voices of a New Generation, (pp. 333-352). Walnut Creek, USA: Left Coast Press.
  • Rix, E., Barclay, L., Wilson, S., Stirling, J., Tong, A. (2013). Service providers' perspectives, attitudes and beliefs on health services delivery for Aboriginal people receiving haemodialysis in rural Australia: a qualitative study. BMJ Open, 3(10), 1-10. [More Information]
  • Wilson, S. (2013). Using Indigenist Research to Shape Our Future. In Mel Gray, Johns Coates, Michael Yellow Bird, Tiani Hetherington (Eds.), Decolonizing Social Work, (pp. 311-322). Farnham: Ashgate.

2008

  • Wilson, S. (2008). Research is Ceremony: Indigenous Research Methods. Halifax, Canada: Fernwood Publishing.

2003

  • Wilson, S. (2003). Progressing Toward an Indigenous Research Paradigm in Canada and Australia. Canadian Journal of Native Education, 27(2), 161-178.

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