Science

The Discipline of Pharmacology offers a general training in Pharmacology to students in the Faculty of Science. It provides two Intermediate 6-credit point units of study and four Senior 12-credit point units of study.

PCOL 2011 Pharmacology Fundamentals

Course Co-ordinator:
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, three workshops (5 sessions) and four laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: (6 credit points of Junior Chemistry) and (6 credit points of Junior Biology or MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) Prohibitions: PCOL2001 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, four in-semester quizzes, two oral presentations, three one page research reports and two practical group reports accompanied with an individual abstract. Associated degrees: BSc, BSc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), BSc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.
Note: BMedSci students may not take this unit.

This unit of study provides the fundamental grounding in four basic areas in Pharmacology: (1) principles of drug action (2) pharmacokinetics and drug metabolism (3) experimental design and autonomic pharmacology, and (4) drug design. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork skills. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to integrate information obtained in lectures in order to provide solutions to the problems. To encourage continual learning online quizzes accompany each module.

Textbooks
Rang & Dale's Pharmacology, 7th edn; Drs. Humphrey P. Rang, Maureen M. Dale, James M. Ritter, Rod Flower, and Graeme Henderson (Churchill Livingstone).

PCOL 2012 Pharmacology: Drugs and People

Course Co-ordinator:
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week; workshops and laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: (6 credit points of Junior Chemistry) and (6 credit points of Junior Biology or MBLG (1001 or 1901)). Prohibitions: PCOL2002, PCOL2003 Assumed knowledge: PCOL2011 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in-semester quizzes, reports (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, B Sc (Molecular Biology & Genetics), B Sc (Nutrition), UG Study Abroad Program.

This unit of study examines four important areas of Pharmacology: (1) drug action in the nervous system (2) drug discovery and development (3) pharmacotherapy of inflammation, allergy and gut disorders, and (4) drugs of recreation, dependence and addiction. The delivery of material involves lectures, practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. Practical classes provide students with the opportunity of acquiring technical experience and teamwork. Problem-based workshops are based on real-life scenarios of drug use in the community. These workshops require students to integrate information obtained in lectures in order to provide solutions to the problems. Online quizzes accompany each module.

Textbooks
Rang & Dale's Pharmacology, 7th edn; Drs. Humphrey P. Rang, Maureen M. Dale, James M. Ritter, Rod Flower, and Graeme Henderson (Churchill Livingstone).

Senior Courses in Pharmacology

Third year Pharmacology Units of Study are available in both first and second semester. Each Unit of Study is 6 credit points. In order to major in Pharmacology, 24 credit points are required. Each Unit of Study comprises 2 lectures per week and 3 hours of tutorials or practicals per week. Further information on each of the units of study is available below. Third year Pharmacology Units of Study are also available as Advanced options. Participation in the Advanced program is by invitation only followed by consultation with the Unit of Study coordinator. A distinction average or above in second year units of study is required for invitation into the Advanced units of study.

PCOL3011 Toxicology

Unit of Study Coordinator:
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per fortnight as well as two 3 hour practical sessions (weeks 4 and 8). Prerequisites: PCOL2001; OR PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802) Prohibitions: PCOL3001, PCOL3901, PCOL3911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tutorial presentations, assignments (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.

This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the discipline of toxicology. It considers the toxicology associated with therapeutic drugs (adverse drug reactions) and the associated issue of drug interactions. The pharmacogenetic basis of adverse reactions is also considered. The unit also considers aspects of environmental toxicology, particularly toxic reactions to environmental agents such as asbestos and pesticides, and its effects on different target organs (lung, liver, CNS). As a final consequence of exposure to toxins, the biology and causes of cancer are discussed. As part of the unit students are introduced to basic ideas about the collection and analysis of data from human and animal populations, both in the structured situation of clinical trials, forensic problems and in analysis of retrospective data.

Textbooks
Klaasen, Curtis D. Casarett and Doull's Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons. 8 ed. McGraw Hill. 2013.

PCOL3911 Toxicology (Advanced)

Unit of Study Coordinator:
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per fortnight as well as two 3 hour practical sessions (weeks 4 and 8). Prerequisites: Distinction average in PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSci: Distinction average in 18 cwredit points of BMED units including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). Prohibitions: PCOL3001, PCOL3901, PCOL3011Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tutorial presentations, assignments (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.
This unit will consist of the lecture and practical components of PCOL3011. Students will be set special advanced assignments related to the material covered in core areas. These may also involve advanced practical work or detailed investigation of a theoretical problem.

Textbooks
Klaasen, Curtis D. Casarett and Doull's Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons. 8 ed. McGraw Hill. 2013.

PCOL3012 Drug Design and Development

Unit of Study Coordinator:
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: PCOL2001; OR PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). Prohibitions: PCOL3001, PCOL3901, PCOL3912 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in class quizzes, assignments (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.

This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the field of medicinal chemistry associated with drug design and development. The course covers the fundamental aspects of drug discovery and development with reference to the essentials of chemistry and illustrates drug development with examples that include neuraminidase inhibitors and ACE inhibitors. The role of computers in drug design is emphasised by classwork and assignments on molecular modelling and structure-activity relationships. The course also extends to a section on the design of diverse pharmacological agents which include compounds for imaging by positron emission tomography (PET), and kinase inhibitors.

Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 6th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.

PCOL3912 Drug Design and Development (Advanced)

Unit of Study Coordinator:
Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lenka Munoz Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 3 hour tutorial/practical per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average in PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSci: Distinction average in 18 credit points of BMED units including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). Prohibitions: PCOL3001, PCOL3901, PCOL3012Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in class quizzes, assignments (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.

This unit will consist of the lecture and practical components of PCOL3012. Students will be set special advanced assignments related to the material covered in core areas. These may also involve advanced practical work or detailed investigation of a theoretical problem.

Textbooks
Patrick, Graham L. An Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry. 6th edition. Oxford University Press. 2013.

PCOL3021 Drug Therapy

Unit of Study Coordinator:
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, four 2 hour tutorials, two 3 hour practical/computer laboratories, elective project (equivalent to four 3 hour practicals). Prerequisites:PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802).Prohibitions: PCOL3002, PCOL3902, PCOL3921 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, on-line tests, tutorial and practical assignments and elective project (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.

This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the intermediate PCOL and BMED units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of the scientific basis of drug therapy. The activity of currently used drugs, and the development of new therapeutics, can be understood in the context of the physiological and biochemical processes associated with the action of those drugs. Lecture topics, tutorials and laboratory sessions cover drug treatment of arthritis and asthma, cardiovascular disorders, microbial infections, diabetes and cancer. In addition, new approaches to the development and delivery of therapeutics are introduced. Elective projects relate to current research areas in Pharmacology. Advanced students complete the same core lecture material as students in PCOL3021 but carry out advanced level elective projects and tutorials.

Textbooks
Rang & Dale's Pharmacology, 7th edn; Drs. Humphrey P. Rang, Maureen M. Dale, James M. Ritter, Rod Flower, and Graeme Henderson (Churchill Livingstone). 2012

PCOL3921 Drug Therapy (Advanced)

Unit of Study Coordinator:
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, four 2 hour advanced tutorials, two 3 hour practical/computer laboratories, elective project (equivalent to four 3 hour practicals). Prerequisites: Average grade Distinction in PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSci: Distinction average in 18 credit points of BMED units including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). Prohibitions: PCOL3002, PCOL3902, PCOL3021 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, on-line tests, tutorial and practical assignments and elective project (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.

This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the intermediate PCOL and BMED units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of the scientific basis of drug therapy. The activity of currently used drugs, and the development of new therapeutics, can be understood in the context of the physiological and biochemical processes associated with the action of those drugs. Lecture topics, tutorials and laboratory sessions cover drug treatment of arthritis and asthma, cardiovascular disorders, microbial infections, diabetes and cancer. In addition, new approaches to the development and delivery of therapeutics are introduced. Elective projects relate to current research areas in Pharmacology. Advanced students complete the same core lecture material as students in PCOL3021 but carry out advanced level elective projects and tutorials.

Textbooks
Rang & Dale's Pharmacology, 7th edn; Drs. Humphrey P. Rang, Maureen M. Dale, James M. Ritter, Rod Flower, and Graeme Henderson (Churchill Livingstone). 2012

PCOL3022 Neuropharmacology

Unit of Study Coordinator: Dr Tina Hinton
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSci: 18 credit points of BMED including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). Prohibitions: PCOL3002, PCOL3902, PCOL3922 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.

This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the intermediate PCOL and BMED units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Elective projects relate to current research areas in Pharmacology.

Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundation for Clinical Neuroscience, 2nd ed. McGraw Hill, 2009.

PCOL3922 Neuropharmacology (Advanced)

Unit of Study Coordinator: Dr Tina Hinton
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: Average grade Distinction in PCOL2011 and PCOL2012. For BMedSci: Distinction average in 18 credit points of BMED units including BMED2401 or (BMED2801 and BMED2802). Prohibitions: PCOL3002, PCOL3902, PCOL3022 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Associated degrees: B Med Sc, B Sc, UG Study Abroad Program.

This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the intermediate PCOL and BMED units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Elective projects relate to current research areas in Pharmacology.

Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundation for Clinical Neuroscience, 2nd ed. McGraw Hill, 2009.

Bachelor of Science (Medicinal Chemistry)

Medicinal Chemistry Liaison:

Medicinal Chemistry is an interdisciplinary major offered within the BSc. It is concerned with the chemistry underpinning the design, discovery and development of new pharmaceuticals, and is jointly administered by the School of Chemistry and the Discipline of Pharmacology. Medicinal Chemistry examines why some types of chemical compounds are toxic, why some have therapeutic value, and the mode of drug action at the molecular level. A major in Medicinal Chemistry includes the study of natural and synthetic compounds of biological and medicinal importance, how molecules interact with each other and how specific molecules can influence metabolic pathways in living organisms.

Pharmacology Honours

Course Co-ordinator:
Subject to a satisfactory standard being attained in Pharmacology, a student may arrange to read for the Honours degree in this subject area. Much of the work will be arranged to suit the interest of the individual. The student will participate in a research project in progress in the Discipline. A research plan, literature review and a 50-page thesis on the research project must be prepared. Seminars on the literature review, the project and another chosen topic will be given by the student.

Bachelor of Medical Science

Intermediate core coordinator (BMED240X): Dr Tina Hinton
BMED2402 coordinator: Dr Tina Hinton

BMED2401 Cellular Foundations of Medical Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Suzanne Ollerenshaw Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lec, 1 prac/wk Prerequisites: 42 credit points of Junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study
Prohibitions: BMED2801, BMED2802, IMMU2101, BIOL2006, BIOL2906, BIOL2016, BIOL2916 and all Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences except ANAT2009, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, MBLG2072, MBLG2972 and PCOL2012
Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%)
Campus: Camperdown/Darlington
Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit of study provides a basis for understanding cell structure and function, and response to drugs. It begins with a discussion of the characteristics of micro-organisms (bacteria, fungi and viruses) followed by the structure and function of human cells. Basic cell structure is examined by focussing on cell specialization and tissue organization in humans. The fundamentals of metabolism are introduced, in particular, the chemical reactions that are responsible for fuel processing. The molecular basis of drug action will then be discussed. Students will be introduced to the role of enzymes in the catalysis of cellular reactions and the pharmacological strategies employed to exploit our knowledge of these mechanisms. Intracellular signalling, cell to cell signalling, and pharmacological intervention in these processes are covered. To conclude this unit of study gives an introduction into embryology and how gene expression is regulated during development. Practical classes not only complement the lecture material but also introduce students to a wide range of technical skills. In addition, the sessions are also designed to provide students with generic skills such as record keeping, data collection and presentation, protocol planning and written communication.

Textbooks
Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations Devlin TM John Wiley and Sons Inc., 7th Edition, 2011; Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th Edition, 2010; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 7th Edition, 2012

BMED2402 Nerve and Muscle

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tina Hinton Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lectures and 2-4 hrs prac/tut per week. Prerequisites: 42 credit points of Junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study Prohibitions: BMED2806, IMMU2101, BIOL2006, BIOL2906, BIOL2016, BIOL2916 and all Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences except ANAT2009, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, MBLG2072, MBLG2972 and PCOL2012 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit of study begins with a description and analysis of the basic anatomical organization of the musculoskeletal and nervous (central and peripheral) systems. The structure and function of excitable cells, muscle and nerve, will lead to a discussion of membrane potential, synaptic transmission and neuromuscular junction. After consideration of the mechanisms of contraction, the way in which nerve signals are integrated and coordinated are covered in more detail. The receptors involved in normal modes of communications are discussed. This is complemented by discussion of the effects of drugs on the nervous system, with special reference to pain and analgesics. An appreciation is gained of how toxins and infections can disturb the normal neuromuscular coordination. Thus, pharmacological and pathological considerations are studied with relevance to the physiological concepts. Various senses such as vision and hearing are introduced. In practical classes, students perform experiments to illustrate the functioning of motor control, coordination and the senses. In addition, students extend their anatomical and histological expertise by examining prosections and prepared microscope slides. Practical classes also include the effects of analgesics on experimental pain and case studies of tetanus and botulism.

Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 3rd Edition, 2002; Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th Edition, 2010; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 7th Edition, 2012; Robbins Basic Pathology Kumar V, Cotran KS and Robbins SL Saunders, Philadelphia, 8th Edition, 2008

BMED2403 Cardiovascular and Respiratory Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Herkes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 lec, 1 tut & 1 prac/wk Prerequisites: 42 credit points of Junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study Prohibitions: BMED2803, IMMU2101, BIOL2006, BIOL2906, BIOL2016, BIOL2916 and all Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences except ANAT2009, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, MBLG2072, MBLG2972 and PCOL2012 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit of study focus is on the cardiovascular and respiratory systems and the many homeostatic processes responsible for the maintenance of constant conditions in the human body. The structure and function of the cardiovascular system is discussed and cardiac output, blood pressure and blood flow are studied. This is complemented by discussion of cardiovascular pathology and pharmacological intervention. Discussion of the respiratory system includes the structure of the respiratory organs, the mechanics of breathing, control of respiration, and description of the mechanism of gas exchange. Specifically, the actions of drugs for asthma are discussed and the pathology of obstructive versus restrictive airways disease examined. The unit of study then extends the students learning to pathogenic microbes involved in infectious diseases of the respiratory system. Practical classes are designed to nurture the same generic attributes taught in BMED2401 and BMED2402 but, in addition, students are introduced to a wider range of technical skills.

Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; Clinically Oriented Anatomy Moore KL and Dalley AF Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th edition, 2009; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 3rd Edition, 2002; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th Edition, 2010; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Rang and Dale's Pharmacology Rang HP, Dale MM, Ritter JM, Flower RJ and Henderson G Churchill Livingstone, 7th Edition, 2012

BMED2404 Microbes, Infection and Immunity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Helen Agus Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec & 1 prac/wk, 2 tut Prerequisites: 42 credit points of Junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study Prohibitions: BMED2807, IMMU2101, BIOL2006, BIOL2906, BIOL2016, BIOL2916 and all Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences except ANAT2009, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, MBLG 2072, MBLG2972 and PCOL2012 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit of study begins by introducing the concepts of disease transmission, pathogenicity and virulence mechanisms of microbes. For a full understanding of the process of infection, the structure and function of pathogenic microorganisms is examined. How the body deals with injury and infection is discussed by exploring barriers to infection and host response once those barriers are breached. The body's response to such physical damage is dealt with in a series of lectures on wound healing, clotting and inflammation, and is complemented by discussion of the pharmacological basis of anti-inflammatory drugs. This is followed by a comprehensive discussion of molecular and cellular immune responses to pathogen invasion. In particular, this gives students an appreciation of the processing of antigens, the structure, production and diversity of antibodies, the operation of the complement system and mechanisms for recognition and destruction of invading microbes. The unit concludes with an overview of microbial diseases, the characteristics of causative agents, pathogenesis and symptoms as well as treatment and control and culminates with exploring current issues of antibiotic resistance, important emerging infections and vaccination strategies. Practical classes illustrate and underpin the lecture content. Students will investigate normal flora, host defences and medically important microbes and will obtain experience in, and an understanding of, a range of techniques in bacteriology.

Textbooks
Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010; Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of the Immune System. Abass AK and Lichtman AH WB Saunders, 4th Edition, 2013; Robbins Basic Pathology Kumar V, Cotran KS and Robbins SL Saunders, Philadelphia, 9th Edition, 2012

BMED2405 Gut and Nutrient Metabolism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec, 1 tut & 1 prac/wk Prerequisites: 42 credit points of Junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study Prohibitions: BMED2804, IMMU2101, BIOL2006, BIOL2906, BIOL2016, BIOL2916 and all Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences except ANAT2009, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, MBLG(2072, MBLG2972 and PCOL2012 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit of study examines in detail the anatomy of the gastrointestinal tract, from the oral cavity to anal canal, and includes the liver, gallbladder and pancreas. This is complemented by description of the specialised cells in the gastrointestinal tract. This is followed by discussion of the transport mechanisms employed to absorb nutrients, and consideration of control systems used to regulate activity of the digestive process. The role of intestinal microflora in the gastrointestinal tract, contributing to both beneficial digestion and absorption of nutrients, as well as to pathogenic disruption, is also discussed. The pharmacokinetic perspective is explored with discussion of the metabolism and absorption of drugs including detoxification and excretion of xenobiotic compounds. The fate of the macronutrients (carbohydrate, fat and protein) is then considered in terms of their uptake, disposal and reassembly into storage fuels and cellular structures. The biochemical pathways involved in the extraction of energy from the macronutrient fuels are then covered. Examples of these metabolic processes are provided by considering fuel selection during starvation and in diabetes. Practical classes give students extensive experience with inspection of the gastrointestinal system at both the cellular and gross anatomical levels, and in theassay of biochemicals such as glucose. These sessions are designed to nurture observation, data analysis, record keeping and report writing skills.

Textbooks
Human Physiology: An integrated approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; Prescott's Microbiology Willey JM, Sherwood LM and Woolverton CJ McGraw-Hill, 8th Edition, 2010; The Anatomy Coloring Book Kapit W and Elson LM Benjamin Cummings, 3rd Edition, 2002; Histology: A text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th Edition, 2010; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012; Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations Devlin TM John Wiley and Sons Inc., 7th Edition, 2011

BMED2406 Hormones, Kidney and Reproduction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Isabel Arnaiz Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 lec, 1 tut & 1 prac/wk Prerequisites: 42 credit points of Junior Bachelor of Medical Science units of study Prohibitions: BMED2805, IMMU2101, BIOL2006, BIOL2906, BIOL2016, BIOL2916 and all Intermediate level units offered by the Schools of Molecular Bioscience, Medical Sciences except ANAT2009, BCHM2071, BCHM2971, MBLG2071, MBLG2971, MBLG 2072, MBLG2972 and PCOL2012 Assessment: One 2hr theory exam (60%), two in-semester assessments (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Delivery Mode: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day

This unit of study examines hormonal regulation of human body functions, including metabolism, growth and development, tissue function, and mood. Specifically, students will investigate the structure and function of endocrine glands, such as the pituitary, adrenal, thyroid and pancreas, at the cellular and gross anatomical level. The fundamentals of the feedback systems which are mediated via the hypothalamus and pituitary gland are discussed, in particular, the adrenal, gonadal and thyroid axes. Students will then cover the structure and function of the renal system at both the cellular and gross anatomical level. The fundamental homeostatic processes of the kidney, such as electrolyte, water and acid-base regulation of extracellular fluid, are explored. This unit of study also gives an introduction to the reproductive system, at both the anatomical and histological level. The hormones involved in reproduction, contraception, fertilization and pregnancy are discussed, leading on to an overview of pharmacological interventions in contraception. In the practical classes, students will investigate the structure and function of the endocrine glands, and specifically perform a glucose tolerance test to investigate how glucose levels are regulated. In addition, sessions are designed to nurture oral presentation skills, hypothesis testing and data analysis.

Textbooks
Textbook of Biochemistry with Clinical Correlations Devlin TM John Wiley and Sons Inc., 7th Edition, 2011; Clinically Oriented Anatomy Moore KL and Dalley AF Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th Edition, 2009; Histology: A Text and Atlas Ross MH and Pawlina W Lippincott, Williams and Wilkins, 6th Edition, 2010; Human Physiology: An Integrated Approach Silverthorn D Pearson/Benjamin Cummings, 6th Edition, 2013; Medical Pharmacology at a Glance Neal MJ Blackwell Science, 7th Edition, 2012