PHSI3009: Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

PHSI3009 provides an exploration of mechanisms by which cells interact with and respond to the external environment. The lecture series will discuss how cells sense changes in the environment, attempt to accommodate and respond to these changes, how these responses are often defective in human disease. The large group tutorial sessions will offer training in skill development and re-inforce the material covered in the lecture series. In the problembased learning classes groups of students (supported by experienced research-focused academic) will explore specific human diseases and the physiology underlying these conditions. Practical classes will offer insight into the methods used to study cellular physiology.

Semester 1, 2016 | 6 Credit Points | Coordinator A/Prof Anuwat Dinudom

PHSI3010: Reproduction, Development and Disease

The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that regulate normal reproduction and development and how these may go awry leading to significant human disease. Lectures will focus on; male and female reproductive physiology, endocrinology of reproduction, physiology of fertilisation, cell cycle control and apoptosis, mechanisms of differentiation, gastrulation, cardiovascular development, tissue formation and organogenesis, stem cell biology and the link between developmental processes and cancer. Reprogramming and tissue regeneration will also feature in the lecture content. Problem-based learning will focus on reproductive physiology and regeneration. Practical classes will examine the processes regulating spermatogenesis, embryogenesis and stem cell biology.

Semester 1, 2016 | 6 Credit Points | Coordinator Dr Stuart Fraser

PHSI3011: Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology

The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of whole body physiology particularly at the molecular and cellular level. The processes regulating whole body homeostasis that will be explored include hormone signaling, bone metabolism, blood cell production, cardiovascular function, regulation of the body’s functions, metabolism and comparative physiology.

Semester 2, 2016 | 6 Credit Points | Coordinator Prof Phillip Poronnik



PHSI3012: Physiology of Disease

The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of the physiological processes that are defective or inappropriate leading to human disease. Lectures will focus on three themes: cancer (tumour physiology), cardiovascular disease and metabolic disease.
Problem-based learning sessions will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease. Practical classes will include the online Cancer eLab online learning environment. These teaching and learning systems will offer insight into the manner by which normal physiological processes become altered and lead to diseases afflicting the human population.

Semester 2, 2016 | 6 Credit Points | Coordinator A/Prof Matthew Naylor