Neurosciences and Mental Health


Research on the workings of the brain and the nervous system at the Sydney Medical School covers a complex span of enquiry from structure to function of the brain, spinal cord, peripheral nerves and muscle, through genetics, biochemistry and physiology to pharmacology and pathology. While our neurophysiologists diagnose human motor control disorders and our clinical neuroscientists investigate and treat the neuromuscular disorders that are a major cause of ongoing disability in childhood, others investigate diseases of the brain and mind, including substance abuse, clinical depression and dementia.

Our researchers demonstrate a wide range of expertise in both basic and clinical science, from the molecule through to systems approaches and on to the diagnosis and management of patients with neurological and psychiatric diseases. Researchers and therapists in all areas work closely to ensure that laboratory discoveries today are translated into real answers for affected patients and their families tomorrow.

Theme Co-leaders

Professor Bernard Balleine and Associate Professor Anthony Harris

Sydney Neuroscience Network (SNN)

The recently launched Sydney Neuroscience Network (SNN) is a member-based pan-University network for neuroscience and mental health researchers. The overarching goal of the Network will be to provide a framework to foster and coordinate synergies to create more and better connections of a multidisciplinary nature in neuroscience and mental health research and teaching across the University, including all relevant faculties and affiliated teaching hospitals and institutes.

Click here for the Sydney Neuroscience Network

Brain and Mind Research Institute

The University's Brain and Mind Research Institute brings together patients, support groups and front-line carers with scientists and clinicians working in neurosciences and brain research, providing hope for those affected by diseases of the brain and mind, including substance abuse, clinical depression and dementia. Click here to visit the BMRI website