The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders

ACADEMIC RESEARCH SEMINARS


22 November 2016 Tuesday 1-2 pm Level 6 Seminar room CPC Professor Louise Baur, Professor of Child & Adolescent Health at the University of Sydney and Head of The Children’s Hospital at Westmead Clinical School
The Centre of Research Excellence in the Early Prevention of Obesity in Childhood (EPOCH). What is happening, and what lies ahead?

29 November 2016 Tuesday 1-2 pm Level 6 Seminar room CPC Ms Danielle Maloney, Acting Director & NSW Statewide Eating Disorders Coordinator, The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders
Statewide Strategic Change for Eating Disorders and their Treatment in NSW

6 December 2016 Tuesday 1-2 pm Level 6 Seminar room CPC Professor Paul Aveyard, Professor of Behavioural Medicine at the University of Oxford and Dr Amanda Daley, Reader in Behavioural Medicine at the University of Birmingham
Effectiveness of: Screening and brief intervention for obesity in primary care, and Regular weighing and feedback by community midwives in preventing excessive gestational weight gain


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Participants at a Boden Institute seminar

ACADEMIC RESEARCH SEMINARS

The Centre of Research Excellence in the Early Prevention of Obesity in Childhood (EPOCH). What is happening, and what lies ahead?

Tuesday 22 November 2016 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Professor Louise Baur from the University of Sydney and the Children’s Hospital at Westmead Clinical School.

RSVP via online registration

Summary of talk
In early 2016, the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in the Early Prevention of Obesity in Childhood (EPOCH CRE) was established, involving researchers from 7 universities, 4 Australian states and 3 countries. The CRE is primarily based at the University of Sydney, with Professor Louise Baur being its Director. The CRE has a “stretch aim”: to reduce the prevalence of obesity and obesity-related behaviours in the first five years of life in order to transform the health trajectories of the next generation.

The CRE plans to do this by:

  • analysing data from intervention trials, including shared data from the first high-quality early childhood obesity prevention randomised controlled trials to have been conducted internationally
  • developing new methods and tools to monitor obesity-related behaviours in this age group
  • assessing the economic implications of different early childhood interventions
  • identifying the factors that promote successful implementation, at scale, of prevention programs
  • accelerating research translation by expediting collaboration and knowledge-exchange between researchers, practitioners and policy-makers.


Louise will talk about the initial work of the CRE, "what we have learnt to date, and our grandiose plans for the future!"

For more information about the EPOCH CRE, please visit: www.earlychildhoodobesity.com

About the presenter
Louise Alison Baur AM, MBBS, BSc(Med), PhD, FRACP, FAHMS is the Professor of Child & Adolescent Health at the University of Sydney and Head of The Children’s Hospital at Westmead Clinical School. In addition, Louise is a consultant paediatrician at the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network where she is an active member of Weight Management Services, a multidisciplinary clinical service for children and adolescents affected by obesity. She is Director of the NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in the Early Prevention of Obesity in Childhood (EPOCH) which is primarily based in the Charles Perkins Centre Hub.

Louise has made research contributions to the prevention of obesity, especially in early childhood; the impact of food marketing to children; the antecedents of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in young people; the complications of obesity; the management of obesity and related disorders in a variety of clinical settings; and the measurement of body composition, dietary intake & physical activity in young people.

In 2014 Louise became a Founding Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health & Medical Sciences, and is a member of the Academy’s Council.

Statewide Strategic Change for Eating Disorders and their Treatment in NSW

Tuesday 29 November 2016 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Ms Danielle Maloney from the Eating and Dieting Disorders group in the Boden Institute.

RSVP via online registration

Summary of talk
People with eating disorders in NSW, and elsewhere in Australia, have historically met with difficulties when trying to access the health system to receive appropriate care, despite the fact that this group of illnesses present with often serious physical conditions and have one of the highest mortality rates among the mental illnesses.

In NSW, the Ministry of Health deemed a high level strategic directive was needed to ensure eating disorders were provided with the access and care needed across the health system. The NSW Service Plan for People with Eating Disorders 2013-2018 set out to ensure eating disorders form part of the core business of the local health districts in NSW and mandated the development of a local service plan within each district to address identification, access and range of local treatment options for people with eating disorders by the end of 2015.

The presentation will examine what has been achieved to date and what will drive it into the future.

About the presenter
Danielle Maloney is the Acting Director & NSW Statewide Eating Disorders Coordinator. She has an Honours degree in Psychology and a Masters in Public Health as well as an International Masters of Mental Health Policy and Services. She has worked for over 20 years in public health with the last 16 years in the mental health sector.
Danielle has worked more recently on clinical service redesign and clinical interventions to address early psychosis, personality disorder, eating disorders and clinical responses to trauma, abuse and neglect. Danielle is passionate about child, adolescent and youth mental health, in particular about early intervention and ensuring a client focused, trauma informed approach to the delivery of mental health services. She is also passionate about redesigning systems and translating research into practice to ensure that clients and their families get access to the best quality care possible.

Effectiveness of: Screening and brief intervention for obesity in primary care, and Regular weighing and feedback by community midwives in preventing excessive gestational weight gain

Tuesday 6 December 2016 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Professor Paul Aveyard from the University of Oxford and Dr Amanda Daley from the University of Birmingham.

RSVP via online registration

The Boden Institute is delighted to bring you two half hour academic research seminars for the price of one by two international scholars from the United Kingdom:

First talk: EFFECTIVENESS OF SCREENING AND BRIEF INTERVENTION FOR OBESITY IN PRIMARY CARE: A RANDOMISED TRIAL

About the first speaker
Professor Paul Aveyard is a public health physician, practising GP, and Professor of Behavioural Medicine at the University of Oxford. Most of his work has been in tobacco control and for the last five years he has also worked on the issue of obesity. In particular, his focus is on high reach low intensity interventions that can provide treatment options for the many people who suffer from being overweight and the ill-health consequences that follow this. The focus of his work is therefore on intervention development and testing in randomised trials.

Summary of first talk
Guidelines recommend physicians screen and offer brief advice to motivate weight loss through referral to behavioural weight loss programmes. However, physicians rarely do so and no trials show whether physician brief intervention is acceptable or effective. In this trial, patients consulting 137 primary care physicians in England were screened. At the end of the consultation, the physician randomised participants to one of two 30-second interventions. In the active intervention, the physician offered referral to a weight management group, if accepted the physician ensured the patient made an appointment, and offered follow-up. In the control intervention, the physician advised the patient their health would benefit from weight loss. Participants rated the appropriateness and helpfulness of the physician intervention.

The primary outcome was weight change at 12 months assessed blind to allocation. 8403 patients screened; 2728 (32%) were obese. Of these, 83% agreed to participate and 1882 were eligible, enrolled, and analysed using intention to treat. In the talk Paul will examine how people felt about the intervention, whether patients in the intervention took up the offer of referral and whether they lost weight. Finally, Paul will examine the results of some modelling where we examine the impact on the UK health economy and obesity prevalence of GPs offering a brief intervention once a year to patients who are obese.

Second talk: EFFECTIVENESS OF REGULAR WEIGHING AND FEEDBACK BY COMMUNITY MIDWIVES IN PREVENTING EXCESSIVE GESTATIONAL WEIGHT GAIN: POPS RANDOMISED CONTROLLED TRIAL

About the second speaker
Dr Amanda Daley is a Reader in Behavioural Medicine in the Department of Primary Care Clinical Sciences at the University of Birmingham. Most of her work is focused on developing and testing lifestyle interventions and women’s health. Amanda also has a particular interest in testing interventions that can be delivered within routine healthcare systems.

Summary of second talk
Excessive weight gain is common during pregnancy, but no country has an evidence-based intervention to prevent it. High gestational weight gain is associated with an increased risk of complications during pregnancy and childbirth. Regular weighing during pregnancy is part of standard antenatal care in many developed countries (e.g. USA & Canada), but in England, Australia and New Zealand this practice is not recommended because of a lack of evidence that it is effective.

In the POPS trial our aim was to investigate the effectiveness of a behaviourally-enhanced very brief intervention based on routine antenatal weighing in preventing excessive weight gain. Women between 10-14 weeks of pregnancy not requiring specialist obstetric care and a BMI more than 18.5 kg/m2 were recruited. 103 community midwives were trained to deliver the intervention which involved regularly weighing women at antenatal appointments, setting maximum weight gain limits between appointments and providing brief feedback. Women were encouraged to monitor their own weight each week to assess their progress. The comparator was usual maternity care. 656 women were recruited from four maternity centres. The proportions gaining excessive gestational weight did not differ between the trial groups and in this presentation Amanda will talk about possible reasons why these null results might have occurred. She will also discuss other possible interventions that could be helpful in preventing excessive gestation weight gain.

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Details of our other upcoming seminars and how to RSVP will be COMING SOON