The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders

ACADEMIC RESEARCH SEMINARS


TWO DAY INTERACTIVE OBESITY MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP


Friday 27 - Saturday 28 July 2018
Level 6 Seminar room, Charles Perkins Centre D17, The University of Sydney
Presented by the Boden Institute together with Royal Prince Alfred Hospital’s Metabolism and Obesity Services
Obesity Management Workshop for Health Professionals


ONLINE COURSES

Diagnosing, Managing and Assessing Eating Disorders – an online course for health professionals (PDF file)


Participants at a Boden Institute seminar

TWO DAY INTERACTIVE OBESITY MANAGEMENT WORKSHOP

Obesity Management Workshop for Health Professionals

Friday 27 July 2018 to Saturday 28 July 2018
TWO DAY WORKSHOP - view FLYER (PDF file)

Day 1: 8.30 am - 5.20 pm
Day 2: 10 am - 4.15 pm

Venue
Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map

Flyer
For details of the program, cost and cancellation policy please view flyer

How to register
Click here to register online with your credit card

Background
With 25% of children and 63% of adults in Australia afflicted by weight problems, our nation’s health professionals have an urgent need to become experts in the identification and treatment of overweight and obesity.

World obesity experts from the University of Sydney’s Boden Institute together with Royal Prince Alfred Hospital’s Metabolism and Obesity Services are pleased to offer an exciting, evidence- and case-based interactive two day professional training workshop that will bring health professionals up to speed on the latest practical ways to recognise when weight is a problem for their clients, and what to do about it then.

Who will benefit from attending
Licenced health professionals with clients that would benefit from weight loss, including:

  • General practitioners, physicians and surgeons
  • Dietitians
  • Psychologists
  • Nurses
  • Social workers
  • Other allied health professionals such as pharmacists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists

ACADEMIC RESEARCH SEMINARS

The IMPROVE Trial - Calcium-vitamin D supplementation and Periodontal Therapy for Improving Metabolic and Inflammatory Profile among Pregnant Women in the slums of Rio de Janeiro. Part 1 (feasibility study)

Monday 5 February 2018 12:00–1:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Professor Berit Heitmann from the Unit for Dietary Studies at the Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Denmark

Summary of talk
There is an increasing focus on the importance of vitamin D for pregnancy outcomes. Vit D together with Ca have been demonstrated to be potent immune-modulators and might affect the immune system function, reducing resistance to infection. Pregnant women, due to hormonal changes, are prone to develop periodontitis. Combined supplementation with Ca and Vit D might be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of periodontal disease, in which host-defence cells activated by bacterial release of inflammatory mediators result in the destruction of supporting periodontal tissues, including connective tissue and alveolar bone.

The IMPROVE feasibility trial aims to assess the effect size, ability to recruit, and acceptability of a randomised clinical trial (RCT) for evaluating effectiveness of a multi-component intervention for improving maternal metabolic and inflammatory status and oral health among low-income adult pregnant women with periodontitis in Rio de Janeiro (RJ), Brazil (BR).

About the speaker
Professor Berit L. Heitmann's main areas of expertise include diet and the determinants and consequences of obesity. She has more than 30 years of experience in these areas. Between 1996-98 she was president of the Danish Association for the Study of Obesity. From 2001 to 2015 Berit was a director for research at the Institute of Preventive Medicine and is currently a director for research at the Unit for Dietary Studies at the Parker Institute, Bispebjerg and Frederiksberg Hospitals, Denmark.


Diabetes, an emerging public health challenge in China

Monday February 12 2018 2:00–3:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Professor Duo Li from Qingdao and Zhejiang Universities, China

Summary of talk
Unlike the situation in the Western countries, in China over the past three decades the energy intake from fat has doubled and the consumption of daily edible oil nearly tripled. Correspondingly, the total daily energy consumed from carbohydrates has decreased by half. What causes the rapid growth of diabetes in China?

Professor Duo Li will present the recently published RCTs from his group and their potential application in diabetes prevention and management. He is also seeking opportunities to build up international collaboration with research teams in the University's Charles Perkins Centre.

About the presenter
Duo is the chief Professor of Nutrition in the Institute of Nutrition & Health at Qingdao University, Professor of Nutrition in the Department of Food Science & Nutrition at Zhejiang University, China, and also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Nutrition & Dietetics, Monash University, Australia.

As a member of the WHO Expert Advisory Panel on Nutrition and WHO Nutrition Guidance Expert Advisory Group (NUGAG) Subgroup on Diet and Health, he has been involved in the development of the WHO Dietary Guidelines. He is a member of the China National Health Care Food Safety Committee of Experts, and a standing council member of the Chinese Nutrition Society.

Duo has published more than 510 scientific publications (340 peer reviewed journal publications), 15 books or book chapters and 24 inventive patents.

Duo has integrated research themes on nutrition in some four areas: 1. Dietary intake and non-communicable diseases. 2. Nutrigenetics/nutrigenomics. 3. Metabolism of lipids and fatty acids. 4. Bioactivity and safety evaluation of novel food and potential natural nutrient resources.


Type 2 diabetes is beatable: primary outcome results from the diabetes remission clinical trial (DIRECT)

Monday March 12 2018 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Professor Mike Lean from Leeds Glasgow University and the Glasgow Royal Infirmary, UK

Summary of talk
It has long been assumed that Type 2 diabetes is a stand-alone disease, a common ‘co-morbidity’ of overweight and obesity, but requiring life-long treatment. Despite modern drugs and clinical guidelines, life expectancy remains substantially reduced through progressive disabling vascular complications, for people with Type 2 Diabetes, particularly with younger onset e.g. under 60 years old.

This paradigm has been challenged by the results from DiRECT, the largest single trial ever funded by Diabetes UK, a randomised trial in 298 patients. An intensive weight management intervention delivered within routine primary care led to remission of diabetes (HbA1c <48mmol/mol, off all anti-diabetes medications) for 46% of patients. Mean weight loss was 10kg: among the 24% with >15kg loss, 86% achieved remission (73% with >10kg loss). Prescriptions for antihypertensive drugs were also halved in the intervention group, without loss of BP control, and Quality of Life improved significantly compared to the Control group. The DiRECT study continues for 3 years, and includes Economic evaluation.

About the presenter
Professor Michael Lean is Chair of Human Nutrition at Glasgow University and Consultant Physician at the Glasgow Royal Infirmary. He is also Adjunct Professor of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, New Zealand and in the process of becoming an Honorary Professor in the Boden Institute at the University of Sydney. In his present position at Glasgow University, since 1993, Mike has maintained regular clinical National Health Service medical work and also recruited and established a new university department of Human Nutrition in Glasgow, the only one in a Scottish Medical School, with the benefits of being in a large multidisciplinary University. It is based on a ‘broad-focus’ strategy toward translational, integrative, research and teaching, encompassing the full range of scientific disciplines within Human Nutrition: basic sciences, epidemiology, clinical studies, and community/population-directed interventions. Outputs include regular writing for the general public in newspapers and TV for Public Understanding of Science, as well as scientific work.

Mike and his department have been successful in obtaining research grants from many UK and overseas sources (EU, Research Councils, Government agencies, Charities, Industry). He is currently Principal Investigator on the biggest research grant ever awarded by Diabetes UK, to optimise diet and weight-management for long-term remission of type 2 diabetes (DiRECT): additional support for extension and economic evaluation awarded 2017-2020. Parallel work has generated the first scalable low-cost on-line interventions for preventing obesity in young people.


Guided self-help for disordered eating: a user’s guide

Tuesday April 10 2018 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Professor Andrew Hill from Leeds University School of Medicine, UK

Summary of talk
Guided self-help (GSH) is a brief, low intensity psychological intervention. It is usually cognitive behavioural therapy-based and has been integral in the UK to IAPT (increasing access to psychological therapies) for the treatment of adult mood and stress disorders. GSH differs from pure self-help in the support and guidance offered around a self-help resource by a Guide. It is identified within the newly updated NICE guidance as a first approach to the treatment of binge eating disorder. However, GSH has a more extensive history having been used with different types of eating disorder presentation and in the various modes of guidance offered.

This presentation will summarise evidence on the effectiveness of GSH in eating disorders from a recent meta-analysis. Andrew will reflect on 15 years experience of one approach, Working to Overcome Eating Difficulties, and how they have recently revised the intervention for use by Children and Young People’s services. In addition, he will discuss how the approach may be useful within mainstream adult obesity services to help those with binge eating. Qualitative work with Guides and clients indicates that fostering early commitment to, and engagement with the approach is critical to success. The key role of Guides, their professional background, and how they are trained and supported to deliver the intervention will be described, along with some consideration of the digital future of GSH.

About the presenter
Andrew Hill is Professor of Medical Psychology at Leeds University School of Medicine. Andrew is also currently Honorary Professor at the Boden Institute. Over the last 25 years or so his research interests have ranged from human appetite control to the development of weight and shape concerns in children, and the variety of psychological issues inherent in obesity and eating disorders.

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