The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders

Upcoming events in the 2015 Boden Institute Academic Research Seminar Series

Online courses available


SEMINARS

What impact does obesity stigma have on the management of obesity?

Professor Andrew Hill

Tuesday 17 March 2015 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006

Presenter: Professor Andrew Hill is Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry & Behavioural Sciences and Director of Student Progression at Leeds University School of Medicine.

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Summary of the talk
The rise in interest in anti-fat bias parallels the recognition of obesity as a public health problem and a general failure to bring about change. Calls to ‘wage war’ on obesity and using stigma to change obesity-relevant behaviour have been challenged on human rights and social justice grounds. This presentation will address a series of questions. Namely, what is anti-fat bias? Who holds anti-fat attitudes and at what age do these attitudes become apparent? What is the resultant experience of those who are obese? What are the consequences of anti-fat bias? And what should our professional response be?

The main components of anti-fat bias are dislike (the aesthetics of appearance), judgements of health (weight as a metric of health; weight change indicative of health improvement/decline), and morality (blame, lack of willpower). The overarching emotion is fear, as the stereotyping of fat is a mainly negative portrayal of character, social exclusion, and poor health. Such views are widely held, implicitly by most, and explicitly by the majority of general public, health professionals and people who are obese. Anticipated and actual discrimination and victimization experiences are evidenced in questionnaires, diary records and qualitative interviews with children and adults who are obese. The associated disparity and disadvantage is evidenced in all areas of life; education, the workplace, health care, socially, and in increased psychological distress. Behavioural justice sits within a broader social justice view of equality and valuing diversity. Specifically, it points to inequalities in access to health-promoting resources. I will argue that the obesogenic environment requires attitudinal as well as physical adjustment.

About the presenter
Andrew Hill is Professor of Medical Psychology, Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry & Behavioural Sciences, and Director of Student Progression at Leeds University School of Medicine. Andrew is also Visiting Professor at Sydney Medical School for 3 years from 2015. He was Chairman of the UK Association for the Study of Obesity from 1999-2002 and is currently a member of the UK Department of Health’s Obesity Review Group. Over the last 25 years or so his research interests have ranged from human appetite control to the development of weight and shape concerns in children, and the variety of psychological issues inherent in obesity and eating disorders.


Calorie consciousness, social habits, and beverage taxes

Nathalie Mathieu-Bolh

Thursday 16 April 2015 12:00–1:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006

Presenter: Associate Professor Nathalie Mathieu-Bolh from the University of Vermont (USA)

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Summary of the talk
The consumption of Sugar Sweetened Beverages is linked to obesity in children and adults. Not only is it a concern for public health professionals, but it is also a concern for economists who care about the social cost of obesity. What is the potential of taxes to reduce Sugar Sweetened Beverage consumption and body weight? To answer this question, Associate Professor Nathalie Mathieu-Bolh will firstly review the empirical and theoretical economic literature on this topic. Secondly, Nathalie will propose a new theoretical model for Sugar Sweetened Beverage consumption. The model captures the interactions between habits and calorie consciousness, which are important to understand Sugar Sweetened Beverage consumption and assess the effects of beverage taxes on consumption and body weight.

About the presenter
Nathalie Mathieu-Bolh is an Associate Professor of Economics at the University of Vermont (USA). Her expertise is in Public Finance and Macroeconomic Theory, with a concentration on optimal taxation and tax reforms. Her publications essentially relate to the welfare and distributional effects of capital income taxes, labour income taxes, and consumption taxes among income groups and generations. Nathalie's research has also consisted in modelling the interactions between health and the environment to better understand the effects of environmental tax reforms. Her most recent research focuses on the effects of food, ingredients, and beverage taxes on body weight.


Evidence-based VLCD and LCD therapy for diabetes: cost effective, safe and predictable weight loss and maintenance, with sustained health benefit

Image of low calorie diet sachets

Tuesday 28 April 2015 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006

Presenter: Dr Anthony Leeds is visiting senior fellow in the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey and visiting professor in the Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen.

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Summary of Talk
Dietary energy restriction improves metabolic control in people with diabetes. This idea is recorded in documents from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. With rising prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, on a global scale, more therapeutic options are needed. Formula diet weight loss and maintenance programs may contribute increasingly for the following reasons:
(a) Formula VLCD and low-calorie diets (LCD, 800-1200kcal/d) enable the compliant patient to lose 1–2kg/week safely with metabolic improvement in glucose, insulin, blood lipids and blood pressure (Snel et al).
(b) Formula VLCD and LCD can be followed by effective maintenance interventions to achieve weight maintenance for up to 4 years (Christensen et al).
(c) Weight loss with formula VLCD can improve 5 out of 6 people with obstructive sleep apnoea (a common co-morbidity in obese people with diabetes) and ‘cure’ 1 in 10 people – an effect largely maintained for one year (Johansson et al).
(d) Formula VLCD and LCD can ‘switch-off’ or down-regulate obesity-associated inflammatory processes as demonstrated in elderly obese people with knee osteoarthritis (Ballegaard et al) and in those with psoriasis (Jensen et al; Geiker et al).

Major clinical trials in early type 2 diabetes; pre-diabetes (one arm of the PREVIEW study is currently taking place in Sydney, see: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01777893 and in insulin-treated diabetes are now underway.

References

About the Presenter
Anthony Leeds is visiting senior fellow in the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey and visiting professor in the Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen. He practices part-time in the NHS at the Central Middlesex Hospital in Diabetes and Endocrinology and at The Whittington Hospital within the North London Obesity Surgery Service. His current research interests concern the use of low energy diets and very low energy diets in weight management in clinical practice; he works with colleagues at the Parker Institute, Frederiksberg hospital, Copenhagen, where he is an honorary senior research fellow.

In 2010 and 2011 he contributed to the BBC web-site ‘scrubbing up’ series discussing obesity, sleep apnoea and road traffic accidents; the costs of obesity treatment with surgery and the need for training of doctors in obesity management. He was Senior Lecturer at King's College London until September 2007 and is now Medical Director of the Cambridge Weight Plan.

Recent publications


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ONLINE COURSES

Diagnosing, Managing and Assessing Eating Disorders – an online course for health professionals

Who is this course for?

General and mental health professionals including GPs, Psychologists, Nurses, Dietitians, Psychiatrists, Occupational Therapists, Social Workers and Counsellors

Who runs the course?

The Centre for Eating and Dieting Disorders (CEDD) as part of the Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders

Level of assumed knowledge

The course is open to all interested health professionals

Course overview

This course covers:

  • Understanding Eating Disorders
  • Assessment
  • Preparation for Treatment
  • Treatment Approaches
  • Management

Course duration

Each of the 5 core modules contain 3.5 hours of learning so 17.5 hours in total

How is the course assessed?

Online quizzes at the end of each module

Method of delivery

The course is delivered online and registered participants will have 3 months to complete the course

Course cost

  • Australia - AUD$280
  • International – AUD$280
  • One Month Extension – AUD$50

Course dates

The course is self-directed learning and participants have 3 months from registration to complete it

Is this course accredited for CME points?

This course has been accredited as professional development training by the ACMHN (up to 18 points), the RACGP (2 category 2 points for each hour completed) and the Australian Counselling Association (34 points). Accreditation has been recently requested and is pending for the RCNA and ACRRM

Can this course contribute to an academic degree?

No

HOW TO REGISTER

To register click here

Contacts and further information

Blagica Miceska
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For further information download the course brochure or visit the CEDD website