The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders

ACADEMIC RESEARCH SEMINARS

30 March 2017 Thursday 1-2 pm Level 6 Seminar room CPC Professor Berit Heitmann, Professor in nutritional epidemiology at Universities of Copenhagen and of Southern Denmark
Navigating Towards a Healthier Weight - The European NoHow Project

3 April 2017 Monday 10-11 am Level 6 Seminar room CPC Dr Michelle Harvie, research dietitian at the Nightingale and Prevent Breast Cancer Research Centre, University Hospital South Manchester Trust
Intermittent fasting: The ideal weight loss diet or the latest hype?

4 April 2017 Tuesday 1-2 pm Level 6 Seminar room CPC Professor Andrew Hill, Professor of Medical Psychology and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry & Behavioural Sciences at Leeds University School of Medicine and also currently Visiting Professor at the Boden Institute
Fat, bad, and always sad? Reconsidering psychological distress and childhood obesity


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Diagnosing, Managing and Assessing Eating Disorders – an online course for health professionals (PDF file)


Participants at a Boden Institute seminar

ACADEMIC RESEARCH SEMINARS

Navigating Towards a Healthier Weight - The European NoHow Project

Thursday 30 March 2017 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Professor Berit Heitmann from the Universities of Copenhagen and of Southern Denmark.

RSVP via online registration

Summary of talk
We know how to help people lose weight but we do not have the evidence to help people keep off the lost weight. Towards 90-95% of people who are overweight or obese have had one or more successful weight loss attempt, but only 5-10% have managed to keep the weight off in the long run. NoHoW is a European Union funded project investigating ways to help people maintain their weight loss. The project has put together a weight loss maintenance Toolkit, based on the latest research in behaviour change, which also includes self-tracking technologies (activity trackers, smart scales). Now, the project is recruiting almost 1600 subjects who have had a successful weight loss from Denmark, Portugal and the UK. The results of the trial will provide evidence on which weight loss maintenance techniques work. NoHoW has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 643309.

About the speaker
Professor Berit Heitmann is directing the Research Unit for Dietary Studies, the Parker Institute, Frederiksberg Hospital, and is professor in nutritional epidemiology at Universities of Copenhagen and of Southern Denmark. Dr Heitmann has 30 years of research experience in primary prevention and nutrition and obesity research. Specific current research themes include understanding of how lifestyle, stress, sleep and anxiety early in life may contribute to preventing later obesity (http://www.sundstart.nu) and other chronic diseases (http://www.D-tectingdisease.dk) as well as the testing and development of new ICT-based behaviour change techniques to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle and weight http://nohow.eu. More information on current projects can be found at: http://www.kostforskning.dk

Intermittent fasting: The ideal weight loss diet or the latest hype?

Monday 3 April 2017 10:00–11:00 am
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Dr Michelle Harvie from the Nightingale and Prevent Breast Cancer Research Centre, University Hospital South Manchester Trust

RSVP via online registration

Summary of talk
Intermittent energy restriction (IER) has become popular as a means of weight control amongst people who are overweight and obese, and is also undertaken by normal weight people hoping spells of marked energy restriction will optimise their health. This review summarises randomised comparisons of intermittent and isoenergetic continuous energy restriction for weight loss to manage overweight and obesity. It also summarises the potential beneficial or adverse effects of IER on body composition, adipose stores and metabolic effects from human studies, including studies amongst normal weight subjects and relevant animal experimentation.

Six small short term (<6 month) studies amongst overweight or obese individuals indicate that intermittent energy restriction is equal to continuous restriction for weight loss, with one study reporting greater reductions in body fat, and two studies reporting greater reductions in HOMA insulin resistance in response to IER, with no obvious evidence of harm. Studies amongst normal weight subjects and different animal models highlight the potential beneficial and adverse effects of intermittent compared to continuous energy restriction on ectopic and visceral fat stores, adipocyte size, insulin resistance, and metabolic flexibility. The longer term benefits or harms of IER amongst people who are overweight or obese, and particularly amongst normal weight subjects, is not known and is a priority for further investigation.

About the speaker
Dr Michelle Harvie is a research dietitian at the Nightingale and Prevent Breast Cancer Research Centre, University Hospital South Manchester Trust. She qualified as a dietitian in 1991. Her current research covers optimum diet and exercise strategies to prevent breast cancer and its recurrence. She has over 40 peer reviewed publications. She received the Association Study Obesity National Best practice award 2011 for her work on intermittent energy restricted diets. She is principal investigator for the B-AHEAD-2 trial and B-AHEAD 3 trials testing intermittent diets amongst early and advanced breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. Dr Harvie has published 3 self-help guides for the public to follow intermittent diets; The 2-day diet, The 2-day diet cook book and the quick and easy edition. All author proceeds go to the Prevent Breast cancer charity at www.preventbreastcancer.org.uk

Fat, bad, and always sad? Reconsidering psychological distress and childhood obesity

Tuesday 4 April 2017 1:00–2:00 pm
FREE SEMINAR

Venue: Level 6 Seminar Room, Charles Perkins Centre - D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road), The University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW 2006 View map (PDF file)

Presenter: Professor Andrew Hill from Leeds University School of Medicine

RSVP via online registration

Summary of talk
There can be little doubt about the stigma of obesity and the pervasive expression of anti-fat attitudes. The risk conferred by obesity to well-being in children and young people is now recognised alongside risks to physical health. Indeed, some have argued that victimization should be expected in every child with obesity who will, by implication, experience psychological distress. In this presentation, Professor Andrew Hill will look at the evidence on distress. The focus will be on self-esteem, a key concept to mental health. Moving from single global assessments of self-esteem to domain-based competencies has been helpful. Young people with obesity show low athletic and appearance self-appraisal but other areas of value are rated highly. Social perspectives use sociometry and networks to examine peer acceptance, rejection, and victimization. From these, the challenge faced by children with profound obesity is undeniable. But there is also huge variation. While obesity does present a risk to well-being, the majority of young people with obesity appear relatively unaffected. The practical implications of these observations will be considered.

About the speaker
Andrew Hill is Professor of Medical Psychology and Head of the Academic Unit of Psychiatry & Behavioural Sciences at Leeds University School of Medicine. Andrew is also currently Visiting Professor at the Boden Institute. Over the past 25 years or so his research interests have ranged from human appetite control to the development of weight and shape concerns in children, and the variety of psychological issues inherent in obesity and eating disorders.

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