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Cloud computing researcher a star


5 August 2013

Dr Javid Taheri was a standout PhD candidate who is now inspiring other students as a lecturer in algorithms and distributed computing.
Dr Javid Taheri was a standout PhD candidate who is now inspiring other students as a lecturer in algorithms and distributed computing.

A cloud computing researcher at University of Sydney has been selected as among the world's top 200 young computer scientists.

Dr Javid Taheri, a postdoctoral researcher whose interests include energy efficient grid, parallel and distributed computing, cloud-computing and artificial intelligence, has been selected to attend the inaugural Heidelberg Laureate Forum in Germany.

The Heidelberg Laureate Forum provides an opportunity for an elite group of young researchers to engage with recipients of the world's most prestigious prizes for mathematics and computer science.

Professor Albert Zomaya, Chair of High Performance Computing and Networking at the University and superviser of Javid's PhD titled Intelligent Mobile Management Schemes for Wireless Mobile Networks says Javid was a standout PhD candidate who is now inspiring other students as a lecturer in algorithms and distributed computing.

The Heidelberg Laureate Forum gives young researchers the chance to spend a week with recipients of the prestigious international awards including the Turing Award, Abel Prize, and Fields Medal.

Dr Taheri says he is delighted to have the opportunity to meet with two Turing Award recipients, Professors Juris Hartmanis and Richard Karp.

The Turing award is the Nobel prize of computing explains Dr Taheri.

"Professor Hartmanis received his Turing for ground breaking work on the computational complexity of algorithms. His work inspired me and pushed me to always searching for new algorithms. His work also sparked the imagination of many computer scientists across the world and led to the establishment of complexity theory as an integral part of the computer science," states Javid.

Similarly, Professor Karp received his Turing Award for his ongoing contributions to the theory of algorithms he says.

When Javid is not researching either cloud, parallel, or distributed computing he is focussed on inspiring the next generation of computer engineers lecturing on algorithms at the University's School of Information Technologies.

"I really enjoy teaching the basic concepts involved in computer science such as data structure, algorithm, dynamic programming and program analysis.

"Algorithms are a fun and fundamental aspect of all computing," states Dr Taheri.


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Media enquiries: Victoria Hollick, 9351 2579, 0401 711 361, victoria.hollick@sydney.edu.au