News

Six Sydney academics recognised by the Australian Academy of the Humanities


2 December 2005

Fellows elected to the Academy are residents of Australia who have achieved the highest distinction in scholarship in the humanities
Fellows elected to the Academy are residents of Australia who have achieved the highest distinction in scholarship in the humanities

Six University of Sydney academics have been elected Fellows or Honorary Fellows at the Annual General Meeting of the Australian Academy of the Humanities which took place on 19 November.

Fellows elected to the Academy are residents of Australia who have achieved the highest distinction in scholarship in the humanities.

Honorary Fellows include distinguished public figures who advocate for the humanities, practitioners of the arts, overseas scholars in the humanities who have a close association with Australia, and Australian-based scholars who have made substantial contributions to the humanities throughout their careers.

The new University of Sydney Fellows are:

Professor Penelope Gay from the Department of English has an international reputation for her publications on William Shakespeare and Jane Austen. Her book As She Likes It: Shakespeare’s Unruly Women has led to many monographs and essays on Shakespeare and Shakespearean performance. Her work on Austen was shot listed for the NSW Premier’s Award.

Dr John Alaistair Laird Lee was Senior Lecturer in Greek at the University of Sydney for nearly thirty years. A leading Greek linguist, he is an authority on the language of the Septuagint (Greek Old Testament) and on New Testament lexicography. His History of New Testament Lexicography attracted especially high acclaim. He is currently running a large collaborative project on New Testament lexicography out of Sydney.

Professor Richard Waterhouse of the Department of History began his career as an American social historian, publishing A New World Gentry to critical praise in 1989. He then switched to Australian cultural history, publishing influential work on the nineteenth-century stage and on two hundred years of Australian popular culture.

University of Sydney Honorary Fellows are:

Professor Richard Lawrence Hunter, after graduating from the University of Sydney, completed his PhD at the University of Cambridge. He is currently the Regius Professor of Greek at Cambridge. He has authored eleven books, most influentially on Hellenistic poetry. He was awarded an Honorary Degree from the Aristotelian University of Thessaloniki. 

Professor Patrick Joseph O’Keefe holds a degree from four universities including a PhD from the University of Sydney. He is an expert on legal protection and the management of cultural heritage, advising UNESCO, the Council of Europe, and several national government on various aspects of heritage, including the return of human remains to their country of origin.

Professor Lyndel Vivienne Prott AO is one of the world’s most distinguished authorities on cultural rights and heritage. She was awarded a personal Chair in Cultural Heritage at the University of Sydney before taking up successive leadership positions in UNESCO. She has advised several international bodies and is the author of five fundamental reference books in her field. She was awarded the Austrian Cross of Honour in 2001. 


 


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