All future 2012 events

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January
Humour in Chinese life and letters: classical and traditional approaches    View Summary
29 January 2012

Co-presented with Art Gallery of NSW

Humour in Chinese life and letters: classical and traditional approaches draws together essays on humour and laughter in their multitudinous forms of expression in Chinese culture past and present. Verbal, visual and behavioural modes of humour are explored by specialists in fields ranging from cultural and political history to linguistics, literature, drama and the history and philosophy of science.

Dr Stephen Fitzgerald, Australia's first ambassador to China following the establishment of diplomatic relations with the PRC in 1972, will offer remarks based on his long engagement with China.

Following his talk meet the book's editorsJocelyn CheyandJessica Milner Davisfor a book signing.

This event is part of the 2012 City of Sydney Chinese New Year Festival, celebrating the Year of the Dragon.

 
February
Seminar:International Law in the early relationships in the Asia-Pacific: the influence of Alonso's    View Summary
27 February 2012

 

The analysis of Alonso's legal thought in the treaty De Dominio infidelium et iusto bello contra indos and the personal documention of Martin de Rada's participation in the conquest of the Philippines and the running of the first embassy in China, allows us to assert the idea that those from the New Spain who wanted to repeat the feats of Hernan Cortes and Pizarro in China and were influenced by the internal law of the time. Lopez argues this was oriented towards fostering peaceful relations, trade and the fight against crime.

In this lecture, Claudia Lopez will elucidate some of the aspects of the content included in the letters sent by Rada to Alonso. She will argue that through examination of Rada's letters, Rada could be recognized as the first western sinologist.

Claudia López Lomelí is a legal historian of early Asia Pacific interactions. Her expertise is in Spanish Colonial legal ideas and treatises in the Americas and how these influenced Colonial practices in Asia, particularly in the Philippines and in parts of China. Claudia completed her PhD in Law at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain and is currently a lecturer in the Institute for International Studies at the University of the Sea in Mexico.

  • The seminar will be in Spanish with English translation.
 
March
Conference : Socio-legal norms in preventing and managing disasters in Japan and the Asia-Pacific   View Summary
1 March 2012 to 2 March 2012

Co-presented by the China Studies Centre. This conference compares the preparedness for large-scale disasters and subsequent responses in Japan, focusing on the '3-11' events: the earthquake and tsunami that devastated north-east Japan on 11 March 2011 and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant radiation leaks. We will explore whether and how socio-legal norms may have differed significantly within Japan regarding the former, primarily a natural disaster; compared to the latter, a 'man-made' or artificial disaster.

 

The conference will focus on the legal or regulatory environment, but in broad social, economic and political context. It will bring together experts in relevant fields of domestic and international law as well as specialists in social history and literature, media studies and political economy. One working hypothesis is that cultural and social norms were more effective in helping both to prevent and manage responses to Japan's natural disaster, compared to the artificial disaster where political and economic factors played more significant roles. The project considers whether this phenomenon can be found in earlier periods and especially in other Asia-Pacific countries, particularly in China, Indonesia and New Zealand (susceptible to earthquakes and tsunamis), and the USA (the only other Asia-Pacific country to have experienced a serious nuclear emergency).

 

Registration

Click Here to register and for secure online payment 

Early bird: $110 inc GST (until February 10, 2012) Full fee: $220 inc GST (after February 10, 2012) Sydney Law School Alumni: $176 inc GST Full time Academic, Government/NGO, ANJeL member, Australia-Japan Society of NSW member: $110 inc GST Full time student, University of Sydney Staff, Member of the China Studies Centre, University of Tohoku Law Faculty Staff: Free (ID required) The final session of the conference on March 2 (4.30pm) will be free to the public.

 
Talk:Chinese Exceptionalism in International Relations   View Summary
14 March 2012

Co-presented with SydneyIdeas.

Although exceptionalism is an important dimension of China's foreign policy,Dr Feng Zhang argues, it has not been a subject of serious scholarly research. In this lecture, Dr Zhang attempts to examine the manifestations and sources of contemporary Chinese exceptionalism and explain its implications for foreign policy.

Chinese exceptionalism is defined by great power reformism, benevolent pacifism, and harmonious inclusionism. While resting on an important factual basis, it is constructed by mixing facts with myths through selective use of China's vast historical and cultural experiences. Exceptionalism does not determine policy, but by being anessential part of the worldview of the Chinese government and many intellectuals, it can become an important source for policy ideas. It can be further seen as a normative theory for China's foreign policy, as one among six major schools competing for ideational influence in China's foreign policy formation.

Feng Zhang is a Lecturer in the Politics and International Studies Programme of the School of Social Sciences and Humanities at Murdoch University. Feng works on China's foreign relations and the international politics of East Asia, focusing on three related questions: historical East Asian politics and China's central role in it, contemporary Chinese foreign policy especially with regard to policy ideas and grand strategy, and international relations theory from a Chinese perspective.

 
Seminar:Organisational Ecology and Economic Transition in China   View Summary
22 March 2012

Co-presented with Business School, the University of Sydney.

A/Prof. Jane Luexamines the economic transition from planned economy to market economy in China from an organisational ecology perspective. She depicts the Chinese domestic economy as mainly comprising three organisational populations: state-owned enterprises (SOEs), collectively owned enterprises (COEs), and privately owned enterprises (POEs). She conceptualizes economic transition as a population level change from an old organisation form (SOE), through a transitional or hybrid form (COE), to a new form (POE).

Her main theoretical argument is that when a new organisational form runs counter to the prevailing institutional codes and norms represented by the old, dominant form, a transitional or hybrid form that share identities with the old form and the new form respectively can transfer legitimacy to the new form. Thus the transitional form plays a pivotal role in the transition from the old form to the new form, providing legitimation and support for the latter. Using annual census data covering all Chinese manufacturing sectors firms that were founded during 1998-2007, she found a competitive relationship between SOEs and POEs and a commensalistic relationship between SOEs and COEs; the relationship between POEs and COEs is one of predator-prey.

Jane Lu is an associate professor in NUS Business School, National University of Singapore. She received her Ph.D. from the Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario in 2001. Her research centers on international strategy such as FDI location choice, entry mode choice and alliance partner selection.

Jane Lu has published in leading academic journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management and Journal of Business Venturing, among other journals. She has co-authored a textbook: International Business: An Asia Pacific Perspective (Pearson).

 
May
Telling Chinese Stories    View Summary
1 May 2012

 

Professor Geremie Barmé, Director,

Australia Centre on China in the World,

ANU

 

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

 

We tell ourselves stories in order to live.' This is the famous opening line of Joan Didion's 1979 The White Album, a series of autobiographical essays about the 1960s. Individuals create narratives related to their own lives, as do groups, societies, political parties and nations. From the dying days of the Qing dynasty, the thinker and reformist Liang Qichao wrote about the need for China to have a new history, one that would both reflect its changed realities and help make it a modern nation.

Many of those who engage with the Chinese world encounter the stories that are told about China-there is the monolithic narrative of the party-state, the multiple stories of individuals, companies, communities, and then there are the array of accounts and told about China, some that try to deepen understand others that evoke. 

History and national narratives express aspirations as well as political agendas. Australia too is a country that tells itself stories. At around the time that the Chinese Communist Party's General Secretary Hu Jintao announced the 'Eight Glories Eight Shames' (ba rong ba chi) as part of the new socialist values strategy in 2006, the then Liberal Coalition Australian Prime Minister John Howard and his Education Minister Brendan Nelson championed a list of nine 'Values for Australian Schooling'. They were part of a response to our local 'history wars'. 

Since 2008, the People's Republic of China has increasingly focused on 'telling the China story', as the former PRC ambassador to Australia Fu Ying has put it. Understanding the official 'China Story' as well as some crucial variations of it- 'telling Chinese stories'- is crucial to a broad-based engagement with the contemporary Chinese world.

This lecture will consider how some of these stories have come to be told, by whom and for whom, and what this may mean for those who pay attention. It will also introduce The China Story, a publishing and Internet project being launched by the Australian Centre on China in the World.

 

Geremie R Barmé is an historian, cultural critic, filmmaker, translator and web-journal editor who works on Chinese cultural and intellectual history from the early modern period (1600s) to the present. He is a research professor and Australian Research Council Federation Fellow in the ANU College of Asia & the Pacific, The Australian National University (ANU), Canberra, where he also edits the online e-journal China Heritage Quarterly. 

He is presently working with the oral historian Sang Ye on a book entitledInside the Rings of Beijing: China's Global Aura, a monograph related to The Dream of the Red Chamber and Qing history in modern China, and a study of the Garden of Perfect Brightness(Yuánm'ng Yuán). His latest book is The Forbidden City (2008). He is the Director of the Australian Centre on China in the World (CIW), ANU.

 
Reflections on Cultural Identity   View Summary
9 May 2012

Presented with Sydney Ideas and the department of Anthropology and theDepartment of Ancient History and Classics, the University of Sydney.

The visit of Professors Jean and John Comaroff is jointly sponsored by the China Studies Centre, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, the School of Philosophical and Historical Inquiry(SOPHI), the School of Social and Political Sciences(SPSS) and CCANESA; at the University of Sydney.

The politics of cultural identity, far from receding with the modernity, appears to have taken on new force in the wake of the cold war - especially with the triumphal rise of neoliberal capitalism on a global scale. This has yielded many efforts to explain the continued salience of ethnicity in a "new" world order that, in the late 1980s and early 1990s, was widely predicted to dissolve difference in the face of global flows of people, objects, currencies, signs, styles, desires. Less attention, however, has been paid to a subtle shift in the nature of ethnicity: its commodification.

This lecture is devoted to showing that, increasingly, ethnic groups across the planet are beginning to act like corporations that own a "natural" copyright to their "culture" and "cultural products" - framed in terms, also, of heritage and indigenous knowledge - which they protect, often by recourse to the law, and on which they capitalize in much the same way as do incorporated businesses in the private sector. Why is this occurring? What are its political, economic, social, and ethical consequences? How is it transforming the nature of ethnicity and citizenship in the nation-state? And what are its theoretical implications for understanding such foundational social science concepts as culture and identity? These are the questions that will be addressed by distinguished anthropologists Professors Jean and John Comaroff in their presentation for Sydney Ideas.

Jean Comaroff is Bernard E. & Ellen C. Sunny Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology and of Social Sciences in the College, and in the Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Chicago. She has conducted fieldwork in southern Africa and Great Britain and is interested in colonialism, modernity, ritual, power, and consciousness. Her specific foci of study have included the religion of the Southern Tswana peoples (past and present); colonialism and Christian evangelism and liberation struggles in southern Africa; healing and bodily practice, and the making of local worlds in the wake of global "modernity" and commodification.

John Comaroff is the Harold H. Swift Distinguished Service Professor of Anthropology and of Social Sciences in the College at the University of Chicago. He does research in southern Africa, concentrating on the Tswana peoples and is is interested in colonialism, postcoloniality, modernity, neoliberalism, social theory, and

 
EAST AND WEST: PAST AND FUTURE   View Summary
16 May 2012 to 18 May 2012

2012 CSC Annual Workshop

The China Studies Centre warmly invites you to partake in the 2012 CSC Annual Workshop from the 16-18 May 2012.

The academic organizers are Associate Professor Alison Betts and Dr Peter Jia. The workshop participants will bring together a group of top academics from Australia, China and Europe, specializing in Chinese Central Asia. The schedule for the 3 day workshop can be found here.

Presented papers will focus on two themes: the first two days will consider the topic of Connections between China and the West: Bronze and Iron Ages and the last day's feature will be Connections between China and the West: Later Periods.

The final chaired discussion will look to the future establishment of new research collaborations and questions of heritage management.

The keynote speech, Challenges in Afghan Heritage Management: War and Post-war Development will be given by Dr Abdul Wasey Feroozi, former Director General of the National Institute of Archaeology of Afghanistan.

These sessions are all open to CSC members, students and the public. For lectures given in Chinese language (see schedule), a limited supply of headsets for simultaneous translation services will be provided to the audience, subject to availability.

 
The Recent Development of China's Civil Society   View Summary
21 May 2012

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas and Sydney Democracy Initiative, University of Sydney.

After the 30-plus years of reform and opening up, Chinese society has been gaining more independent space and growth momentum which have rarely been seen in Chinese history. In this presentation, Professor Yu argues, a relatively independent civil society is emerging in China thanks to the introduction of market economy and progress of democratic governance in China. Professor Yu details the categorisation, characteristics, progress and limitations as well as implications of civil society in China. In his view, the growth of China's civil society is irreversible from the long run since a market economy and democratic system will call for a civil society in place. China's aspiration for market economy and pledge to democracy make the development of civil society a necessity for China although it could possibly face some setbacks from time to time.

Professor Yu will give a short presentation, followed by a conversation with John Keane, Professor of Politics at the University of Sydney.

Professor Yu Keping is Professor and Director of the China Center for Comparative Politics and Economics (CCCPE), and also Professor and Director, Center for Chinese Government Innovations, Peking University and Institute of Political Development, Tsinghua University. Professor Yu received his PhD in political science from Peking University in 1988 and was awarded the Honorary Doctor Degree by the University of Duisburg-Essen University, Germany, in 2008. He currently serves as Deputy Director of Bureau of Translation of the CCP Central Committee. He is also the Director of the Chinese Government Innovations Awards Program. His major fields of expertise include political philosophy, comparative politics, globalization, civil society, governance and politics in China. His English work includes Democracy is a good thing (2009) and Globalization and Changes in China's Governance (2008). Professor Yu has spent time as a visiting scholar at Harvard University, Duke University and the Free University of Berlin.

 
The Transitional City in China   View Summary
25 May 2012

The nature, role, structure and growth of a city is a reflection of the underlying dynamics of the economy, geography, society and history of a country. The change and evolution of the city and the urbanisation process of the Peoples' Republic of China since it adopted the new opening and reform policies in 1978 not only changed the horizon of the former socialist urban scene and urban process, it also represented a unique subset in urbanisation and urban development among the transitional economies. Professor Sit will review the development of the PRC's cities and the country's urbanisation process from 1980 to 2008. He will discuss the main features and lessons from the PRC which will enrich our understanding of the spatial process in urban and economic development in transitional economies generally.

Professor Vicitor Fung Shuen Sit was raised and educated in Hong Kong since 1950, and obtained his B.A. (Hon.) and M.A. degrees from the University of Hong Kong. During 1974-77 he studied at the London School of Economics in the UK and obtained a Ph.D. degree there. From 1977 to 2007 he was a professor in the Department of Geography, University of Hong Kong. He is currently the Founding Director of the Advanced Institute for Contemporary China Studies, Hong Kong Baptist University.

Professor Sit has authored and edited more than 40 books and published over 100 papers in international academic journals specialising in city, regional development, infrastructure and economic strategy.

His publications demonstrate the fusion of perspectives and methodologies of the East and West. Many are published bilingually in Chinese and English, with one of the distinct features being the unique angle he takes in analysing and interpreting the traditions and history of China.

Besides being a dedicated teacher and researcher, Professor Sit has also participated actively in politics. He has been a member of the Preparatory Committee for the HKSAR, Selection Committee for the Chief Executive of the HKSAR and served as Deputy of the National People's Congress of China from 1993-2008.

 
June
ESSAY COMPETITION to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations   View Summary
7 June 2012 to 15 August 2012
中文

The China Studies Centre of the University of Sydney is organising a young person's essay competition to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations.

The competition is designed to encourage Australian and Chinese young people up to the age of 25 to engage with each other and thereby strengthen mutual understanding and ensure future collaboration between the two countries.

The Competition is solely sponsored by Mr William Chiu, Chairman of Australian Council for the Promotion of Peaceful Reunification of China (ACPPRC).

The Competition

• The theme of your essay needs to be 'The Australia-China relationship and its future'.
• You can submit one essay only, written in either Chinese or English.
• The maximum character count for the Chinese essay is 2000 characters. For the English essay, the maximum is 2500 words.
• For both for the Chinese and English essays, one First Prize will be awarded, along with two Second Prizes, and two Third Prizes.

Application Method

• Applicant can download the application form here.
• Completed application form together with the essay should reach the China Studies Centre email csc.events@sydney.edu.au on or before 15 August 2012.

Essay Assessment Panels


• A separate panel of experts will judge the Chinese essays and the English essays. Each panel will consist offive members drawn from universities, chaired by a leading member of the China Studies Centre.
• The decision of assessment panels will be final.

Awards

• For both the Chinese and English essays, First Prize is a cash award of A$3000; Second Prize is A$2000; Third Prize is A$1000.All winners who attend the competition award ceremony will receive a travel allowance of A$1000, as well as a visit to the University of Sydney, and their essay will be included in the brochure of the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations essay competition.

The China Studies Centre will inform the competition winners individually around mid-September. Winners will also be invited to participate in the competition's award ceremony and cocktail reception in Sydney on 13 November 2012, where they can share their essays and thoughts with guests and media on this very happy occasion.

Confirmed guests of honour include the Governor of New South Wales, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO , also Chancellor of the University of Sydney; and the University's Vice-Chancellor, Dr Michael Spence.

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of
Australia-China Diplomatic Relations

Sole sponsor:

Mr William Chiu, Chairman of Australian Council for the Promotion of Peaceful Reunification of China (ACPPRC)

Major media partner:

 
Event postponed:China, Geographical Thought and the Not Quite Poststructural Revolution   View Summary
19 June 2012

Please note due to unforseen circumstances, this lecture has had to be postponed. Further information about the new date and time will be posted here on the CSC website. Apologies for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

Beginning in the late 1970s the broad paradigm shift from structural to poststructural theory moved through the international academy with far-reaching implications for research in the humanities and social sciences. Rooted in the social movements of the 1960s and new realities wrought by globalising change, the analytical promise of the poststructural shift challenged prevailing norms - the foundations of scientific practice, the nation-state institution, racial categories, and modernisation theory - to address power relations that limited social change.

Its acceptance has widely transformed university curricula and research priorities, yet the geographical diffusion of this poststructural revolution has been uneven, uneven within universities, among universities within national academies, and globally in the international academy. While it has linked scholarship in the industrialised world with postcolonial worlds, yielding unprecedented arcs of knowledge formation, its encounter with China, given the predicaments of China's twentieth century history, has been tentative and incomplete.

Now, China's national project to vault universities into world rankings is leading to questions about the commensurabilities of knowledge formation in the international academy, questions with implications for research design and publication and the future of scholarly practice. This talk introduces these issues from perspectives in geographical thought to consider how contemporary ideas in human geography travel in the scholarship on cities, regions and processes of territorialisation in contemporary China.

Carolyn Cartier is an urban geographer and research designer working in social theory and China Studies. Her research program concerns understanding the process of urban development in China and Hong Kong from perspectives on spatial transformation behind the spectacle of rapid growth. Her work gives particular attention to the uses of theoretical geography for research on cities and regions in China and the complexities of research practise with neoliberalisation of the international academy.

Professor of Human Geography and China Studies in the China Research Centre at the University of Technology, Sydney, Carolyn Cartier was a member of the faculty at the University of Southern California before joining the Australian academy in 2009. She has been a Fulbright Fellow and is the author of Globalizing South China and co-editor of The Chinese Diaspora: Place, Space, Mobility and Identity and Seductions of Place: Geographical Perspectives on Globalization and Touristed Landscapes. She is also an Adjunct Research Director for the China Urban theme at the Australian Centre on China in the World at the Australian National University.

 
Essay competition information in Chinese   View Summary
25 June 2012 to 15 August 2012
ENGLISH

澳大利亚和中国在很多不同的领域都有着良好的合作关系。为了加强两国年轻人彼此的了解,悉尼大学中国研究中心在中澳建交40周年之际,现举办一个以"中澳关系未来发展"为主题的大型中英文征文比赛,欢迎所有25岁或以下澳大利亚及中国的青少年参加,一起见证这历史性的一刻。

本征文比赛是由澳洲中国和平统一促进会邱维廉会长独家赞助。

征文比赛详情
-参赛文章需以"中澳关系未来发展"为主题,文章题目则不限。
-每名参赛者只可提交一篇中文或英文文章。
-中文文章字数上限为2,000字,英文文章字数上限为2,500字。
-设中英文两个组别,每组设冠军1名、亚军2名、季军2名。

报名方法
-参赛者可以从这里下截报名表格。
-填妥之报名表格连同参赛文章必须于2012年8月15日前电邮至csc.events@sydney.edu.au


评判团
-设中英文两个组别评判团,各由五位资深大学教授学者组成。悉尼大学中国研究中心将邀请其他大学教授担任评判,而评判团主席则由悉尼大学中国研究中心教授担任。
-征文比赛赛果将由评判团作最终决定。


征文比赛奖品
-包括现金奖(冠军澳币三千元/亚军澳币二千元/季军澳币一千元) 、所有出席颁奖典礼的获奖者将另外获得澳币一千元的旅游津贴、获奖文章被编入庆祝中澳建交40周年征文比赛特刋内、及参观悉尼大学校园。

悉尼大学中国研究中心将于九月中旬各别通知征文比赛获奖者,并将邀请其亲临悉尼参加将于2012年11月13日举行的颁奖典礼及酒会,与嘉宾、媒体分享获奖文章及感受。( 颁奖典礼主礼嘉宾包括新南威尔斯州总督,悉尼大学荣誉校长玛丽·巴什尔教授阁下及尼大学校长迈克尔·斯宾塞博士)

庆祝中国—澳大利亚建交40周年

独家赞助:

澳洲中国和平统一促进会邱维廉会长

主要合作媒体:

 
July
ESSAY COMPETITION to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations   View Summary
7 June 2012 to 15 August 2012
中文

The China Studies Centre of the University of Sydney is organising a young person's essay competition to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations.

The competition is designed to encourage Australian and Chinese young people up to the age of 25 to engage with each other and thereby strengthen mutual understanding and ensure future collaboration between the two countries.

The Competition is solely sponsored by Mr William Chiu, Chairman of Australian Council for the Promotion of Peaceful Reunification of China (ACPPRC).

The Competition

• The theme of your essay needs to be 'The Australia-China relationship and its future'.
• You can submit one essay only, written in either Chinese or English.
• The maximum character count for the Chinese essay is 2000 characters. For the English essay, the maximum is 2500 words.
• For both for the Chinese and English essays, one First Prize will be awarded, along with two Second Prizes, and two Third Prizes.

Application Method

• Applicant can download the application form here.
• Completed application form together with the essay should reach the China Studies Centre email csc.events@sydney.edu.au on or before 15 August 2012.

Essay Assessment Panels


• A separate panel of experts will judge the Chinese essays and the English essays. Each panel will consist offive members drawn from universities, chaired by a leading member of the China Studies Centre.
• The decision of assessment panels will be final.

Awards

• For both the Chinese and English essays, First Prize is a cash award of A$3000; Second Prize is A$2000; Third Prize is A$1000.All winners who attend the competition award ceremony will receive a travel allowance of A$1000, as well as a visit to the University of Sydney, and their essay will be included in the brochure of the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations essay competition.

The China Studies Centre will inform the competition winners individually around mid-September. Winners will also be invited to participate in the competition's award ceremony and cocktail reception in Sydney on 13 November 2012, where they can share their essays and thoughts with guests and media on this very happy occasion.

Confirmed guests of honour include the Governor of New South Wales, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO , also Chancellor of the University of Sydney; and the University's Vice-Chancellor, Dr Michael Spence.

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of
Australia-China Diplomatic Relations

Sole sponsor:

Mr William Chiu, Chairman of Australian Council for the Promotion of Peaceful Reunification of China (ACPPRC)

Major media partner:

 
Essay competition information in Chinese   View Summary
25 June 2012 to 15 August 2012
ENGLISH

澳大利亚和中国在很多不同的领域都有着良好的合作关系。为了加强两国年轻人彼此的了解,悉尼大学中国研究中心在中澳建交40周年之际,现举办一个以"中澳关系未来发展"为主题的大型中英文征文比赛,欢迎所有25岁或以下澳大利亚及中国的青少年参加,一起见证这历史性的一刻。

本征文比赛是由澳洲中国和平统一促进会邱维廉会长独家赞助。

征文比赛详情
-参赛文章需以"中澳关系未来发展"为主题,文章题目则不限。
-每名参赛者只可提交一篇中文或英文文章。
-中文文章字数上限为2,000字,英文文章字数上限为2,500字。
-设中英文两个组别,每组设冠军1名、亚军2名、季军2名。

报名方法
-参赛者可以从这里下截报名表格。
-填妥之报名表格连同参赛文章必须于2012年8月15日前电邮至csc.events@sydney.edu.au


评判团
-设中英文两个组别评判团,各由五位资深大学教授学者组成。悉尼大学中国研究中心将邀请其他大学教授担任评判,而评判团主席则由悉尼大学中国研究中心教授担任。
-征文比赛赛果将由评判团作最终决定。


征文比赛奖品
-包括现金奖(冠军澳币三千元/亚军澳币二千元/季军澳币一千元) 、所有出席颁奖典礼的获奖者将另外获得澳币一千元的旅游津贴、获奖文章被编入庆祝中澳建交40周年征文比赛特刋内、及参观悉尼大学校园。

悉尼大学中国研究中心将于九月中旬各别通知征文比赛获奖者,并将邀请其亲临悉尼参加将于2012年11月13日举行的颁奖典礼及酒会,与嘉宾、媒体分享获奖文章及感受。( 颁奖典礼主礼嘉宾包括新南威尔斯州总督,悉尼大学荣誉校长玛丽·巴什尔教授阁下及尼大学校长迈克尔·斯宾塞博士)

庆祝中国—澳大利亚建交40周年

独家赞助:

澳洲中国和平统一促进会邱维廉会长

主要合作媒体:

 
South America with China: A comparative approach to Argentina, Brazil and Chile   View Summary
25 July 2012

Over the past decade China has strongly affected the commercial structures of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and other South American nations. The process has prompted South American states to adopt new political and economic strategies that affect not only their foreign relations, but also their domestic legislation. Scholarly debate has not yet addressed the links between China's impact and processes of national rulemaking in South America. This presentation applies an empirical multilevel analysis to two phenomena: (1) changes to South American legislation on mining and land property rights in light of Chinese demand, and (2) the strategies pursued by Argentina, Brazil and Chile as strategic partners of China in the emerging international system.

Ana Soliz Landivar is a Research Fellow at the GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Hamburg, and a DAAD Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst Scholar. She holds a Masters in International Studies (Chile), postgraduate diplomas in Regional Integration (Spain and Chile), and graduate degrees in Political Science (Chile) and Law (Bolivia).

 
Urban and Rural Planning in Xinjiang: Urbanization and Cultural Identity   View Summary
27 July 2012

 

Urbanization has been the principal impetus of China's economic development in the past three decades. Urban planning has been an extremely complicated process of redistributing spatial resources in a transitional society. The issue of cultural identity adds an additional layer of complexity, especially in China's autonomous regions for ethnic minorities. Professor Li Huijun has directed more than ten urban and rural planning and architectural design projects in Turpan, Xinjiang since 2006. In this talk, he will discuss the tensions between national and regional culture, the Islam and secular society, and religion and modernization arising in these projects.

 

Professor Li Huijun is Director of the Center of Spatial Culture in the School of Media and Design, Shanghai Jiaotong University. He has published widely on urbanization and planning in China and has extensive experience in urban and rural planning and architectural design.

 

RSVP here.

 
August
ESSAY COMPETITION to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations   View Summary
7 June 2012 to 15 August 2012
中文

The China Studies Centre of the University of Sydney is organising a young person's essay competition to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations.

The competition is designed to encourage Australian and Chinese young people up to the age of 25 to engage with each other and thereby strengthen mutual understanding and ensure future collaboration between the two countries.

The Competition is solely sponsored by Mr William Chiu, Chairman of Australian Council for the Promotion of Peaceful Reunification of China (ACPPRC).

The Competition

• The theme of your essay needs to be 'The Australia-China relationship and its future'.
• You can submit one essay only, written in either Chinese or English.
• The maximum character count for the Chinese essay is 2000 characters. For the English essay, the maximum is 2500 words.
• For both for the Chinese and English essays, one First Prize will be awarded, along with two Second Prizes, and two Third Prizes.

Application Method

• Applicant can download the application form here.
• Completed application form together with the essay should reach the China Studies Centre email csc.events@sydney.edu.au on or before 15 August 2012.

Essay Assessment Panels


• A separate panel of experts will judge the Chinese essays and the English essays. Each panel will consist offive members drawn from universities, chaired by a leading member of the China Studies Centre.
• The decision of assessment panels will be final.

Awards

• For both the Chinese and English essays, First Prize is a cash award of A$3000; Second Prize is A$2000; Third Prize is A$1000.All winners who attend the competition award ceremony will receive a travel allowance of A$1000, as well as a visit to the University of Sydney, and their essay will be included in the brochure of the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations essay competition.

The China Studies Centre will inform the competition winners individually around mid-September. Winners will also be invited to participate in the competition's award ceremony and cocktail reception in Sydney on 13 November 2012, where they can share their essays and thoughts with guests and media on this very happy occasion.

Confirmed guests of honour include the Governor of New South Wales, Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO , also Chancellor of the University of Sydney; and the University's Vice-Chancellor, Dr Michael Spence.

Celebrating the 40th Anniversary of
Australia-China Diplomatic Relations

Sole sponsor:

Mr William Chiu, Chairman of Australian Council for the Promotion of Peaceful Reunification of China (ACPPRC)

Major media partner:

 
Essay competition information in Chinese   View Summary
25 June 2012 to 15 August 2012
ENGLISH

澳大利亚和中国在很多不同的领域都有着良好的合作关系。为了加强两国年轻人彼此的了解,悉尼大学中国研究中心在中澳建交40周年之际,现举办一个以"中澳关系未来发展"为主题的大型中英文征文比赛,欢迎所有25岁或以下澳大利亚及中国的青少年参加,一起见证这历史性的一刻。

本征文比赛是由澳洲中国和平统一促进会邱维廉会长独家赞助。

征文比赛详情
-参赛文章需以"中澳关系未来发展"为主题,文章题目则不限。
-每名参赛者只可提交一篇中文或英文文章。
-中文文章字数上限为2,000字,英文文章字数上限为2,500字。
-设中英文两个组别,每组设冠军1名、亚军2名、季军2名。

报名方法
-参赛者可以从这里下截报名表格。
-填妥之报名表格连同参赛文章必须于2012年8月15日前电邮至csc.events@sydney.edu.au


评判团
-设中英文两个组别评判团,各由五位资深大学教授学者组成。悉尼大学中国研究中心将邀请其他大学教授担任评判,而评判团主席则由悉尼大学中国研究中心教授担任。
-征文比赛赛果将由评判团作最终决定。


征文比赛奖品
-包括现金奖(冠军澳币三千元/亚军澳币二千元/季军澳币一千元) 、所有出席颁奖典礼的获奖者将另外获得澳币一千元的旅游津贴、获奖文章被编入庆祝中澳建交40周年征文比赛特刋内、及参观悉尼大学校园。

悉尼大学中国研究中心将于九月中旬各别通知征文比赛获奖者,并将邀请其亲临悉尼参加将于2012年11月13日举行的颁奖典礼及酒会,与嘉宾、媒体分享获奖文章及感受。( 颁奖典礼主礼嘉宾包括新南威尔斯州总督,悉尼大学荣誉校长玛丽·巴什尔教授阁下及尼大学校长迈克尔·斯宾塞博士)

庆祝中国—澳大利亚建交40周年

独家赞助:

澳洲中国和平统一促进会邱维廉会长

主要合作媒体:

 
China, Climate Change and Sustainability: Spins, Facts and Realpolitik   View Summary
2 August 2012

Dr Wen's presentation will start with an overview of China's existing actions on climate change, and place current commitments in relation to other countries. She will argue that contrary to popular misconception in the West, China has already engaged and implemented quite substantial efforts to address climate change. China's investments in clean energy are e.g. Almost double that of the United States', and around three times in terms of percentage of GDP. Yet, these efforts are still not enough to counter climate change or to ensure sustainable development. Dr Wen will highlight some of the challenges for China, how the current growth centred development model must be changed, and some of the implications of this.

Dr. Wen will furthermore analyse the political situation regarding China's position in the climate negotiations. How did the China blame game after the Copenhagen climate summit fuel climate skepticism within the country and prove counterproductive? What are the different and often competing schools of thought among China's ruling elite and academics regarding the future climate regime?

Finally she will share ideas why it is important for the west and China to collaborate on sustainability issues and possible ways forward to rebuild trust.

Dr. Dale Jiajun Wen has focused on sustainable development issues for more than a decade. She received her PhD at California Institute of Technology (Caltech). Her current research focus includes sustainable agriculture, climate change, energy security, and other globalization related issues. She was a coordinate lead author for the International Assessment of Agricultural Science and Technology for Development (IAASTD), called by some the IPCC of agriculture. Over the last few years Dr Wen has followed the international climate negotiations closely, and has substantial insights to the Chinese government's reasoning and policy making as well as to what is happening on the ground in China - both in terms of climate action as well as the effects of the current development trajectory on sustainability

 
China and Southeast Asia: Ceramics and interactions in the past millennium   View Summary
7 August 2012

7 August 2012 and 9 August 2012

The Angkor Research Program and the China Studies Centre warmly invites you to partake in the Chinese Ceramics Workshop.

China has been a major player in trade and diplomacy in Southeast Asia for a millennium. Chinese ceramics were ubiquitous to that engagement from the 9th to the 19th C. They are its single most consistent, physical index. The tradewares were exported in vast quantities through the official tributary trade system, legitimate private trade and smuggling, and together with the dispersal of goods were the distribution of peoples, material and spiritual cultures and technologies. Archaeological porcelain fragments will be available for handling and discussion during the workshop, and there will also be a tour to the Chinese ceramic exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales guided by Baoping on Thursday, August 9th.

RSVP required as space is limited by 31 July 2012.


Program:


Tuesday August 7th


9:30-9:45
Introduction: Prof. Roland Fletcher, Director of the Angkor Research Program (University of Sydney)
Welcome Speech: Professor David Goodman, Academic Director, China Studies Centre (University of Sydney)


9:45-10:30
Chinese Ceramics in Sumatra: Recent Discoveries
Dr John N. Miksic (National University of Singapore and Singapore Institute of Southeast Asian Studies)

The two major kingdoms of Malayu and Srivijaya were important links in the east-west trading network. Both formed in the 7th century CE. The study of Chinese ceramics in Indonesia has been the province of collectors and art historians rather than archaeologists. As a result, we have little data on the precise provenance of many important examples, including those in the National Museum in Jakarta.

During the past few years archaeologists have been conducting important excavations in the highlands of West Sumatra. It now seems that the capital of the kingdom of Malayu moved far into the hinterlands of Sumatra in the 13th century. Previously the port of Muara Jambi in the lowlands had been the kingdom's centre. Chinese ceramics of the 13th through 16th centuries there illuminate important aspects of Malayu's economy and society during this critical period of history.

Unfortunately local rivermen have recently begun to use suction devices to search for artefacts on riverbeds in both Jambi and South Sumatra. In Palembang, Srivijaya's capital, a large quantity of items has come onto the backstreet antique market. These antiquities include ceramics of many varieties, including some which may have extraordinary value both commercially and academically. This talk will show examples of these recent finds.


10:30-11:15
Chinese export wares in Art Gallery of New South Wales
Mrs. Yin CAO, Curator of Chinese Art (Art Gallery of New South Wales)

The collection of the export wares in the Art Gallery of New South Wales is quite diverse both chronologically and geographically. The earliest examples include the Xing ware and Changsha ware of the Tang dynasty (618-907), and later pieces throughout the Song, Yuan, Ming and Qing dynasties. Geographically, the objects indicate the Chinese potters produced ceramics all over China to meet the wide demands from different continents, from Southeast and South Asia, the Middle East to Europe. This presentation selects a group of the fine examples to map out the long history of Chinese export wares that enhance the cultural exchange between China and the outside world.


11:15-12:00
Technology, Tradition, or Taste? Similarities between Vietnamese and Chinese Ceramics
Dr. Ann Proctor (formerly National Art School, Sydney)

Compared to the well documented history of Chinese ceramics, the study of Vietnamese ceramics is relatively new and under-researched. Many factors have contributed to the similarities in wares produced for export by these two entities: colonization of Vietnam by the Chinese, migration of Chinese potters to Vietnam, similar belief systems that have produced a common vocabulary of motifs and the geographical location of Vietnam and China on the same trade routes supplying markets within Southeast Asia and beyond. This presentation will review some of the recent research into Vietnamese ceramics, in order to shed light on the multifaceted reasons for both similarities and differences between Chinese and Vietnamese wares. I will also point out some of the gaps in our knowledge to date.


12:00-13:00
Lunch - Angkor Research Program, Old Teachers' College (A22) Room305

13:00-13:45
Kiln technology transfer from China to Cambodia in the 12th century
Dr. Don Hein, independent scholar and formerly site director for a few archaeological projects in Southeast Asia

Excavation in December 2011 to January 2012 at Torp Chey near Siem Reap in Cambodia revealed several kilns in stratigraphic sequence within one mound of seven found at the site. The kilns were similar to others previously recorded at other sites in Cambodia, being of a single chambered crossdraft type built at an incline of clay with a firebox at the lower end and having three horizontal exhaust vents at the upper part. What made this find exceptional was that it was the first time that intact vents were found, and that the kilns were side stoked.

Side stoking has not previously been reported in any Southeast Asian country and the existence of the technology at Torp Chey must represent influence from outside the region, most probably from China where the firing method has been practiced for centuries prior to the twelfth century when the Torp Chey was established. However the technical detail of the side stoke component of the Cambodian kilns is distinctly different from its Chinese origins and suggests the introduction was carried by persons only casually informed of the technology and the Cambodian potters were obliged to invent certain aspects of the method.

This event of technology transmission from China to Southeast Asia concerning the means of production is extremely rare and its understanding is vital to defining the history of kilns in the region, and to those of Cambodia in particular.


13:45-14:30
Chinese ceramics at Angkor: a preliminary analysis of the distribution of covered boxes from several surface collections and excavations

Ms. Linda McLaren, MA research student (University of Sydney)

Despite indigenous production of Khmer glazed pottery, imported Chinese ceramics have been found in large numbers at Angkor. Studying their distribution and frequency can potentially inform us on aspects of economic and social organisation in relation to this foreign trade. The ware type, covered box is consistently found in ceramic assemblages at Angkor at exceptionally high proportions compared to other ware types, and was also among the first types of wares to be regularly exported to Southeast Asia by the Chinese. Inscriptions at monuments in Angkor also demonstrate that hundreds of boxes from China were offered to local monasteries on single occasions, probably as high status items for both ritual and utilitarian use. This research provides preliminary results of quantitative analyses of qingbai (bluish-white glazed) and white ware covered boxes from excavations and surface collections at Angkor and compares them with shipwreck artefacts found across Southeast Asia and other dated wares from excavated kiln sites and tombs in China. New technologies for dating, such as chemical characterisation of sherds are also referenced.


14:30-15:15
Praying to Compassion: ceramic figures of Bodhisattva Guanyin found in Angkor, Java and the Philippines and the life of earliest Chinese traders in Southeast Asia
Dr. Baoping Li (University of Sydney)

This talk introduces a few ceramic figures of Guanyin or the Bodhisattva of Compassion found in Angkor the capital of the Khmer empire, the Philippines, as well as Trowulan in Java, the capital of Majapahit (c. 1293-1500) one of the greatest empires in the history of Indonesia. Based on comparisons with similar figures found from kiln and residence sites across China, the Japan-bound Shin'an wreck discovered in South Korea, and collections of Europe and America museums, the Guanyin figures found in these countries are dated to the Yuan to early Ming dynasty, and sourced to the porcelain kilns in Jingdezhen, Jiangxi, and celadon (greenware) kilns in Longquan, Zhejiang. According to Zhou Daguan, a Yuan dynasty envoy who visited Angkor in 1296, among the "sought after Chinese goods" are celadons from Longquan and Quanzhou (Marco Polo's Zayton). He also observed that Chinese traders lived in Angkor since there "women are easy to get, housing is easy to deal with, and it is easy to do trade", and they were highly respected by the local people and were even addressed as a Buddha. Most of the Guanyin figures found in Southeast Asia were probably brought there and placed in a small shrine of the Chinese family as object of worship, as they did back in China. These figures link the China ceramic trade and interaction with different countries, and provide valuable insights into the life of earliest Chinese emigrants in SE Asia.


15:15-16:00
Closing Comments: Prof. Jeffrey Riegel, Head of School of Languages and Cultures, University of Sydney. Followed by afternoon tea and discussion.


Thursday August 9th


10:00-11:30am
A tour to the Chinese ceramic exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales guided by Dr. Baoping Li, all welcome, no RSVP required.

Speaker Biographies

John N. Miksic is Associate Professor in the Southeast Asian Studies Department, National University of Singapore and head of the Archaeological Unit in the Nalanda-Sriwijaya Centre at the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. He completed one MA in International Affairs at Ohio University, and another MA and PhD in the Department of Anthropology at Cornell University. His dissertation, Archaeology, Trade, and Society in Northeast Sumatra, was based on fieldwork in Sumatra at the site of Kota Cina ("Chinese Fort"). He worked as a Rural Development Planning and Management Advisor in Bengkulu, Sumatra and taught archaeology at Gadjah Mada University, Yogyakarta, before he moved to Singapore in 1987. He has served on committees of the National University Museum and the Asian Civilisations Museum. He has received awards from Singapore and Indonesia for his contributions to the study of Southeast Asian culture. He serves on the board of non-profit organization devoted to the preservation of the culture and art of Cambodia (the Center for Khmer Studies). Current research includes a translation of a 17th-century Malay manuscript, the archaeology of ancient ports on the shores of the Straits of Melaka, and early cities in Indonesia, Cambodia, and Myanmar.

Yin Cao, Curator of Chinese Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales. Yin's academic career started with a Bachelor of Arts degree in archaeology from Peking University; then museological training at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., and a Master's degree in Chinese archaeology from Harvard University. She subsequently obtained museum experience as a key member of the Preparatory Committee for the establishment of the Arthur M. Sackler Museum of Art and Archaeology at Peking University, before becoming Assistant Director at that museum in the 1990s. She continues to be a consultant for the Arthur M. Sackler Foundation for the Arts, Science and Humanities in New York. Amongst her other achievements, she was responsible for co-curating the inaugural exhibition at the Lee Kong Chian Art Museum of the National University of Singapore in 2000.

Ann Proctor has an BA in Art History from ANU, an MA in Asian Art History and a PhD in Art History and Theory, both from the University of Sydney. She has worked in education in Australia, the Philippines and the West Indies, principally as a teacher of art and art history. She has also been an arts writer since the 1980's and for the past decade has been an active member of The Asian Arts Society of Australia, currently serving on the management and editorial committees of that organization. From 2003 to 2009 she taught Asian Art History and Theory at the National Art School, Sydney. She has also taught at the University of Sydney, the Australian National University and in Vietnam. Her publications include various articles in Ceramics Art and Perception, TAASA Review and her thesis, Out of the Mould: Contemporary Sculptural Ceramics in Vietnam, was published in 2009.

Don Hein has a background in ceramic studies, an MA in history from Monash University and a PhD in archaeology from Deakin University. He has spent many years in Southeast Asia studying ancient kiln sites in Thailand, Burma and Laos, and has visited China, Vietnam and Cambodia including taking part in the 2007 excavation of the Mount Kulen Sar Sie kiln site, and the 2011-2012 excavation of the Torp Chey kiln site, both near Angkor, Cambodia. In addition to working in Thailand during the 1970s where he was the site director for Thai Ceramics Archaeological Project 1980-87, he has fulfilled the same role for the Lao Australia Archaeological Project 1988-91 and Myanmar Australia Archaeological Project 1988-2003. He has been active in archaeological training programs including one in Cambodia in 2011, with another planned for later this year, both organised by Louise Cort, curator of Ceramics at the Freer-Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution, Washington.

Linda McLaren is currently doing a Master degree by research at the University of Sydney. She has been an independent researcher interested in the archaeological study of glazed Chinese ceramics found on shipwrecks and at terrestrial sites in Southeast Asia prior to the 18th century. She has firsthand experience of several archaeological sites in Southeast Asia and kiln sites in China.

Baoping Li is a Research Fellow at the Department of Archaeology, University of Sydney. He received his BA and MA degrees from the Archaeology Department of Beijing University, and then worked in Beijing for the English journal China Archaeology and Art Digest. He did his PhD at the University of Queensland, then worked there as an Australia Postdoctoral Fellow funded by Australia Research Council. He is currently studying Chinese ceramics found in Angkor and elsewhere in Southeast Asia, with financial support from ARC and the China Studies Centre of USYD. Baoping's speciality is Chinese ceramics and their global exporting and he investigates these through an approach integrating historiography, archaeology, art history, and chemical sourcing of trade ceramics to understand the patterns of China's long term, international trade network.

 
Seminar: Another science? The defense of divination during the republican era   View Summary
7 August 2012

In 1927, the KMT government started a fierce campaign against "superstitious persons and places". To a certain extent, the rhetoric of this campaign anticipated the language of later campaigns that were to take place in the PRC. Together with Chinese medicine and magic, divination and the mantic theories and practices of traditional China became one of the focal points of the attack. While the victorious cause of Chinese enlightenment has been studied extensively, the defenders of divination and their arguments have attracted little attention thus far. The talk shall provide an insight into the concepts of the supporters of traditional practices in the context of the keywords of "religion", "faith", "science", "superstition", and "modernity".

Michael Lackner has studied Sinology, Ethnology, Political Science and Philosophy in Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris. He has taught in Geneva, Göttingen and Erlangen, with stays as visiting professor at Fudan/Shanghai, Taida/Taipei, Kansai University/Osaka, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme and EHESS/Paris. Michael Lackner has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin and the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study. His fields of study encompass Song dynasty philosophical thought and learned practices, the Jesuit mission in China, the history of divination, and the formation of modern Chinese scientific terminology and disciplines. He has published monographs, databases and articles in these specialties.


 
China & Latin America, 1571-2012: From the Manila Galleon to the New Pacific Triangle   View Summary
8 August 2012

 

The current important relationship between China and Latin America is new, but not unprecedented.


Between 1571 and 2012, China and Latin America had a shifting relationship which reflected their changing positions in the world economy:  From Latin America's role as precious metal exporter to a China that was at the center of the world's pre-industrial economy during the 1571-1800 colonial era, through a 19th and early 20th century when China provided contract labor for Latin America's export sector and both were peripheral commodity exporters to a global industrial order centered on Europe and then the United States, to a 21st century in which Latin America is emerging as a key commodity exporter to a China that is once again at the center of the global economy, but now as the world's leading industrial power.  As China becomes the leading trading partner of important Latin American countries like Brazil and Chile and creates strategic relationships with them, it challenges US hegemony in the region, creating a new China-Latin America-U.S. Triangle whose shifting dynamic will shape the complex relations among  its nations during the decades to come.

 

Peter Winn was educated at  Columbia and Cambridge and has taught at Princeton and Yale. He is currently Professor of Latin American and Global History at Tufts University in Boston.Winn has also been a Visiting Professor at Fudan University in Shanghai, where he co-directed an international conference on "China, Latin America and the United States:  The New Pacific Triangle?"

 

Dr. Winn is the author of several acclaimed books on Latin America, including Americas:  The Changing Face of Latin America and the Caribbean (now in its 3rd edition), written as the companion volume to the PBS teleseries, Americas, for which he served as Academic Director.  He has published in major newspapers such as the New York Times and the Washington Post,  and been interviewed   for television and radio on five continents.

 

RSVP here.

 
Michael Lackner on how to turn philosophical ideas into diagrams: Chinese approaches and insights   View Summary
14 August 2012

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.


During a period of about 200 years, from the mid-12th to the mid-14th centuries, Confucian scholars produced - in large quantities - diagrams, which aimed to provide the reader with tools for textual analysis. In these diagrams, the arrangement of the sentences from the Classics is a non-linear one, the mapping of the text segments allows for a different kind of intuition, which eventually leads to a new understanding of the meaning of the text. The presentation will 1) try to shed some light on possible precedents of this new form of diagrams and 2) give an introduction into the multi-faceted functioning of diagrams on the basis of selected material.

Michael Lackner has studied Sinology, Ethnology, Political Science and Philosophy in Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris. He has taught in Geneva, Göttingen and Erlangen, with stays as visiting professor at Fudan/Shanghai, Taida/Taipei, Kansai University/Osaka, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme and EHESS/Paris. Michael Lackner has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin and the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study. His fields of study encompass Song dynasty philosophical thought and learned practices, the Jesuit mission in China, the history of divination, and the formation of modern Chinese scientific terminology and disciplines. He has published monographs, databases and articles in these specialties.

 
Transformation of hospital pharmacy in China - from count, mix, supply, to patient care on the ward   View Summary
16 August 2012

Health improvements have been falling behind the rapid pace of economic development in China which has led to discontent and criticism towards government, going against the nation's guiding principle to build a harmonious society.  Consequently an ambitious health-care reform is currently underway, aiming to provide affordable and equitable basic health care for all by 2020, however transformation to cost-effective services is difficult, and health expenditure and out-of-pocket payments are still requiring attention.  At the same time, irrational drug use is threatening the health and safety of the Chinese public.  Due to distorted pricing for medical services, physicians tend to overprescribe drugs for financial incentives. In fact, China is among the countries where antimicrobials and infusions are unnecessarily overused.

Internationally, the roles of pharmacists have expanded from compounding and supplying drugs to patient focused care, which has been shown to lower mortality, prevent adverse drug events, reduce costs, reduce medication errors and reduce patient's length of stay in hospitals.

In China, considering the fact that hospitals deliver more than 90% of outpatient and inpatient services, and dispense more than 70% of the nation's medications, we could expect hospital pharmacists, in their evolving roles, to improve the quality use of medicines and patient safety, and make a difference in the health-care reform.

Over the last 10 years, a series of policies have been issued to promote pharmacists' involvement in direct patient care to ensure quality use of medicines and patient safety.  The presentation by Chinese pharmacist Ryan Li will highlight measures that have been taken and some achievements that have been made.  He will also discuss the future development of hospital pharmacists in China and the future of this profession.

 

Yan Li is a Masters student of the six-year continuous program for pharmacy at Peking University, which is the first of its kind in China.  He is also a pharmacist based at Peking University Third Hospital who focuses on clinical practice in cardiology.  He serves as a part-time editor for medical website Unividas and is keen to write popular science articles to the public.

His pharmacy department maintains the highest standard of service, education and research and is widely acknowledged among the best in China.  More than 10 pharmacists from different hospitals visit his department to be trained each year, so he has first-hand observations of the changes taking place in China.  Earlier this year, he accompanied researchers from the University of Sydney to observe clinical pharmacy practices in 30 hospitals in China as a young liaison and translator.  He is currently visiting the University to assist researchers from the Faculty of Pharmacy with their research about development of hospital pharmacy in China.  His visit is generously sponsored by China Studies Centre.

 

RSVP here.

 
Master Class: What was new in Neo-Confucianism?    View Summary
21 August 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Neo-Confucianism (or daoxue道学) was an innovative movement both from the point view of its contents and its formal approaches. Although its novel messages have been studied at length, we will try to shed some light on the central issues of cosmology, moral behavior, and individual responsibility that characterized the Confucian Renaissance. 

In this Master Class, Dr Michael Lacker will argue that much less inquiry has been made into the formal aspects of daoxue: on the basis of selected texts and other documents, we will study Neo-Confucianism as a practice of an emerging social stratum of literati that encompassed novel ways to deal with cultural heritage.

Following Dr Lacker's talk, there will be an open disussion with research students.


Michael Lackner has studied Sinology, Ethnology, Political Science and Philosophy in Heidelberg, Munich, and Paris. He has taught in Geneva, Göttingen and Erlangen, with stays as visiting professor at Fudan/Shanghai, Taida/Taipei, Kansai University/Osaka, Maison des Sciences de l'Homme and EHESS/Paris. Michael Lackner has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin and the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study. His fields of study encompass Song dynasty philosophical thought and learned practices, the Jesuit mission in China, the history of divination, and the formation of modern Chinese scientific terminology and disciplines. He has published monographs, databases and articles in these specialties.

 

RSVP here.

 
'Australia and China at 40' book launch   View Summary
21 August 2012

Edited by China Studies Centre academic

members Dr James Reilly and Associate Professor Jingdong Yuan, this groundbreaking book commemorates the 40th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between the People's Republic of China and Australia.

GUEST SPEAKERS
Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Senator the Hon Bob Carr
Mr Xue Bing, Chargé d'Affaires ad interim, Embassy of the People's
Republic of China to Australia
Dr Michael Spence, Vice-Chancellor and Principal
Dr James Reilly, The University of Sydney

Please note this event is by invitation only.

 
September
Postgraduate Courses Information Session   View Summary
6 September 2012

Amid continued commentary on China's rise as a world superpower, the new Master of China Studies (MChinastud) and Master of China Public Administration (MCPA) aim to produce a new generation of leaders equipped with a more holistic comprehension of Australia's most important trade partner.

A deeper engagement with Chinese history, language and culture is the focus of these two-year masters degrees, which are both set to commence in Semester 1, 2013.

The Master of China Studies degree is intended for students looking to further their knowledge of China who may not have any previous background of study in the area. The broad introductory degree covers China's society, culture and history, while giving students the opportunity to specialise in elective topics including health, business, law, society and politics.

Alternatively, the MCPA aims to assist middle level public administrators and business people from both China and Australia to advance their knowledge of China as they contribute to these models. With a compulsory semester-long internship in China for domestic students, and a work placement in Australia for China-based candidates, students will enhance their core skills with real-world experience of public administration across the two nations.

Please note: this course will be available to international students subject to CRICOS registration.

 
Chinese Contemporary Art: Consolidating Powers - Thomas J. Berghuis in Conversation with Pi Li   View Summary
11 September 2012

The Power Institute, University of Sydney and the China Studies Centre are pleased to announce an evening conversation with the curator and art historian Pi Li. Pi Li is a leading art critic, who has an extraordinary track record as an independent voice in China with great insight into the development of contemporary Chinese art. Pi Li has also acted as an important bridge builder for contemporary art exchanges between China, Europe, and Asia; working with institutions in Europe including the Centre Pompidou in Paris, and the Tate Modern in London, as well as numerous institutions in Asia. During the past 15 years, Pi Li has made a significant contribution to the understanding of Chinese contemporary art. His work highlights the important role of the curator in consolidating the powers surrounding Chinese contemporary art within the context of a rapidly developing and expanding Chinese art and museum world.

In Sydney, Pi Li will be talking with Thomas J. Berghuis, Lecturer in Asian Art and a specialist on contemporary Chinese art, with the University of Sydney. The conversation will provide an opportunity to reflect on Pi Li's outstanding career as an art critic, curator and art historian, whilst also critically examining the many changes that have occurred during the past 10-15 years in the development of contemporary Chinese art.

RSVP's are required for this event. Please RSVP to powerinstitute.events@ sydney.edu.au with 'RSVP Consolidating Powers' in the subject line.

 
WHEN CHINA RULES THE WORLD   View Summary
14 September 2012

Copresented with Sydney Ideas.

The rise of China is reshaping the world. The Western financial crisis has accelerated this process. We are already witnessing the beginnings of a Chinese economic order. The consequences, however, will be as much political, cultural, intellectual, moral and military as economic. The international order will, over time, be profoundly restructured. But what will China be like as a global power? The abiding problem in the West has been the desire to understand China through a Western prism. It does not work. Unless we understand China in its own terms we will be unable to make sense of it. And unless we understand China, we will be unable to grasp the nature of the new global order.

Martin Jacques s is the author of the global best-seller When China Rules the World: the End of the Western World and the Birth of a New Global Order It was first published in 2009 and has since been translated into eleven languages. The book has been shortlisted for two major literary awards. A second edition of the book, greatly expanded and fully updated, was published on 29 March 2012. His TED talk on how to understand China has had almost one million views. He is a Senior Visiting Fellow at IDEAS, a centre for diplomacy and grand strategy at the London School of Economics, and a Visiting Professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing. He is also a Fellow at the Transatlantic Academy, Washington DC. He has previously been a Visiting Professor at Renmin University, the International Centre for Chinese Studies, Aichi University, Nagoya, and Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto. He was a Senior Visiting Research Fellow at the Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore. He was formerly the editor of the renowned London-based monthly Marxism Today until its closure in 1991 and was co-founder of the think-tank Demos. He has been a columnist for many newspapers, made many television programmes and is a former deputy editor of The Independent newspaper. He took his doctorate while at King's College, Cambridge.

Introduction by Professor John Keane, Director of the newly-founded Institute for Democracy and Human Rights (IDHR) and Professor of Politics at the University of Sydney.

 
October
CHANGING SOCIAL POLICY PARADIGM AND GOVERNANCE IN CHINA DURING THE HU-WEN ERA   View Summary
3 October 2012

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

Among the social and political consequences of the marketisation and commodification of social services in the post-Mao era is a society that has become increasingly unequal while regional disparity has intensified. Chinese citizens now openly criticize the government for denying its social welfare provision and social protection responsibilities.

Under the Hu-Wen leadership in the last decade, the central government has tried to re-focus its attention on social welfare provision by placing more emphasis on the quality and accessibility of health, education and other social protection measures, in order to address the tensions that are a product of the growing inequality. Pronouncements by the Chinese leadership on the need for building a harmonious society have been linked with improved services such as health and education for the poor. The state's commitments to regulating and assuring the conditions for collective welfare such as work safety, minimum wage for peasant workers, environmental regulation, the provision of affordable health care and unemployment relief, have all risen to new prominence on the policy agenda.

Professor Mok critically reviews the major policies and reform measures that the Chinese government under the Hu-Wen leadership has adopted in transforming the provision of social policy and delivery of social welfare services, with particular reference to examining whether there is any major shift in policy paradigm in social policy governance. More specifically, he will also assess how far the shift has really transformed social policy governance in mainland China.

Professor Ka Ho Mokis Acting Vice President (Research and development) and Associate Vice President (Research and International Exchange) of the Hong Kong Institute of Education (HKIEd). Before joining the HKIEd, he was Associate Dean and Professor of Social Policy, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Hong Kong (HKU). Being appointed as founding Chair Professor in East Asian Studies, Professor Mok developed the Centre for East Asian Studies at the University of Bristol, UK before taking the position at HKU. He also served as Associate Dean of Faculty of Humanities and Social Science at City University of Hong Kong before going to Bristol University. He is a founding editor ofJournal of Asian Public PolicyandComparative Development and Policy in Asia Book Series.

 
The structure of high-level politics during China's reforms in the 1980s   View Summary
9 October 2012

 

 

One of the major arguments concerning elite politics during the 1980s reforms posits "twin peaks politics"—that is political contention built around the two leading senior revolutionaries, Deng Xiaoping and Chen Yun. Professor Han will present an alternative analysis of political conflict, likening it to three legs of a tripod, a tripartite balance of forces, with Hu Yaobang (in 1981-1986) and Zhao Ziyang (in 1987-1989) constituting the third leg of the power tripod.

This talk will analyze how the interaction of these three forces determined the ups and downs of reform in this decade.

Professor Han Gang is one of the most distinguished Party historians in the PRC. His work has covered a wide range of post-1949 Chinese political history, but he is best known for his work on the 1970s and 1980s as the Maoist era gave way to the reform period. His eminence in this area is indicated by his selection to prepare the volume for the critical years 1977-78 in the acclaimed 10 volume History of the PRC series produced in Hong Kong. One of his major contributions in reassessing the elite politics of the emergence of reform is his reevaluation of Hua Guofeng's leadership in the early post-Mao period.

Professor Han holds appointments at East China Normal University in Shanghai, arguably the most dynamic and innovative institution in China dealing with PRC history, and the Central Party School in Beijing.

PLEASE RSVP HERE.

 
Distinguished lecturer: Professor Vivienne Bath   View Summary
11 October 2012

 

Foreign Investment, the National Interest and National Security - Foreign Direct Investment in Australia and China

 

To register, please click here.

 

China and Australia are both recipients of considerable amounts of inbound investment and maintain policies designed to encourage and attract it. Both countries are, however, considered by the OECD to maintain restrictive policies towards the admission of inbound investment. In addition, Chinese and Australian companies invest extensively overseas, including, in the case of Chinese companies, in Australia, where the extent and nature of foreign - particularly Chinese - investment in natural resources and rural land is increasingly controversial. The policies of the Australian and Chinese governments in relation to the admission of foreign direct investment ('FDI') both rely heavily on concepts of the national interest (in the case of Australia) and national security (in the case of China). Australia maintains a case by case screening regime based on a 'national interest' test; China has a detailed, highly regulated investment structure and review process which draws on concepts of 'national security' and 'national economic security', and has recently added an extra case by case review of certain foreign acquisitions on the basis of a "national security" test. In this lecture, Professor Bath will examine and compare the development and definition of concepts of national interest and national security - including the role of public opinion in both countries - and discuss the role they play in the admission of FDI in Australia and China.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Professor of Chinese and International Business Law , Faculty of Law, University of Sydney, and Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney. Prior to joining the Faculty of Law, Vivienne Bath was a partner of international firm Coudert Brothers, working in the Hong Kong and Sydney offices, and specialising in commercial law, with a focus on foreign investment and commercial transactions in the People's Republic of China. She previously practised as a commercial lawyer in New York and Sydney, and worked in the Federal Office of Parliamentary Counsel as a parliamentary draftsman.

Vivienne Bath has published widely in the area of Chinese law and is a frequent participant in conferences and seminars focussing on developments in the Chinese legal regime.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

This event is co-presented with the Sydney Law School.

 
China and the fifth generation leadership: China moves into the era of socio political change   View Summary
16 October 2012

 

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

The Communist Party of China is about to undergo a major leadership transition. The era of Hu Jintao and Wen Jiabao is drawing to a close. They have guided the People's Republic of China towards becoming the world's second largest economy - but they leave power in a country where over 120 million people are still living in poverty, and where there are immense challenges in terms of inequality, social stability and a sustainable economic future. This talk will look at how we can assess the Hu and Wen period, and how the future leaders will deal with a transition into an era in which the greatest challenges will be socio political. It will look at the likely scenarios the Communist Party will face as it moves towards middle income status by 2020, and it will try to answer the question of what China might look like at the end of the next decade. 

This talk will also introduce the work of the China Studies Centre, and be an invitation for all members of the university, across all faculties, to be involved in our work.

 

Following the talk refreshments will be served.

 

Professor Kerry Brown is Executive Director of the China Studies Centre, and Professor of Chinese Politics at the University of Sydney. He leads the Europe China Research and Advice Network (ECRAN), funded by the European Commission. Prior to this he was Head of the Asia Programme at Chatham House. Educated at Cambridge, London and Leeds Universities, he worked in Japan, and the Inner Mongolian region of China, before joining the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London. He worked in the China Section and then served as First Secretary, Beijing, from 2000 to 2003, and Head of the Indonesia East Timor Section at the FCO from 2003 to 2005. 

Kerry Brown is the author of The Cultural Revolution in Inner Mongolia (2006), Struggling Giant: China in the 21st Century (2007), The Rise of the Dragon - Chinese Investment Flows in the Reform Period (2008), Friends and Enemies: The Past, Present and Future of the Communist Party of China(2009), Ballot Box China (2011), along with an edited collection China 2020 Hu Jintao, China's Silent Leader has just been published, and he is working on the Palgrave Macmillan Introduction to China, to appear in early 2013. 

 

RSVP essential for catering purpose.

 
Round Table Discussion: Governance Logic in Village and Telecom Industry in China   View Summary
18 October 2012

The Mechanism and Governance Logic of the Hierarchical Operation of the Project System:  A Sociological Case Study of "Projects Entering the Village

 

Integrating opposing yet complementary "top-down" and "bottom-up" perspectives, this report  examines the social process whereby current financial transfer payment projects enter the villages. It attaches particular importance to the hierarchical model of "institutional mechanism"  in this process, which involve central government departments' contracting out the projects, local government' packaging of different projects and villages' competition for the packaged projects.

 

Professor Zhe will investigate the resultant different institutional logics and action strategies and the complex processes and consequences of their interaction. As an important mechanism for compensating vested interests during institutional transition, the project system provides an institutional platform for the convergence of logics of hierarchical governance. I stress that the system will genuinely promote public benefit and social integration only when it expands public space and realizes public governance in the villages through the provision of public goods.

 

Professor Zhe Xiaoye is a distinguished sociologist of the Institute of Sociology at Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. Her work focuses on social structure changes in China and communities at the village level. She has published extensively on village governance, communities and enterprises as well as family life in urban and rural China.


Manufacturer and Competition Factors: The Development of Telecom Industry in China (1949-2012)

 

Since 1949, China's telecommunication industry has experienced a transition from planned to market economy, gradually transforming itself from an undeveloped to rapidly expanding industry. It has also become one of the leading sectors in China. Examining the development of China's telecommunication industry can shed light on the importance of drawing on advanced experience from other countries, realizing the different roles of enterprises, competition and government regulations in the process of integration into the international market.

 

Associate Professor Rong Xinchun, Institute of Economics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences Main research fields: Tele-communications economics.

 

Please note part of the roundtable will be in Chinese with English translation.

 
Red Rock: the long, strange march of Chinese rock & roll   View Summary
19 October 2012

Rebellious, individualistic, and explosive, rock and roll seems incongruent with modern Chinese society. Beginning from 1986, the music has evolved from a Western import into something uniquely Chinese -- yaogun -- reshaped by the nation's unique system and its relationship with the outside world. Yaogun has much to say about China's own national journey through the post-Mao period and into the global community. After a decade-long immersion in the Chinese rock scene as a performer, writer, manager, promoter and more, Jonathan Campbell wrote Red Rock: The Long, Strange March of Chinese Rock & Roll as an attempt to give a comprehensive overview of the Chinese rock identity. What has yaogun taught him, and what can it teach the world - about China, and about rock and roll? Campbell will look back on his China time as well as shed light on yaogun's path and its future.

About the Author
After receiving his MA from the University of Washington (Seattle)'s Jackson School of International Studies, Jonathan Campbell lived in Beijing from 2000-2010, spending much of that time in the local rock scene as drummer, chronicler, booster, agent and more. His writing has appeared in a range of international publications, he's put together China tours for dozens of bands from around the world, arranged European tours for Chinese bands, attended international music conferences as part of China delegations and participated in literary festivals around the world. He has been called a "stalwart of the Chinese music scene"; "an instrumental behind-the-scene (figure)"; "the busiest man in Beijing showbiz" and "the Dr. [Norman] Bethune of China's rock scene." He lives in Toronto with his wife, and dog. Red Rock: The Long, Strange March of Chinese Rock & Roll is his first book.

Chaired by Andrea Myles, National Director of the Engaging China Project.
Talk followed by a performance with Chinese electro-experimental artist, Mr Wang. 

This event is also proundly supported by tenzenmen and Sydney Young Chinese Weekly.

 
The invisible hand of family:Diversification in business groups in emerging economies   View Summary
23 October 2012

Drawing on the literature of institutional embeddedness and diversification, we conceive diversification decisions in business groups in emerging economies as controlling owners' responses to conform to familial norms and pursue family interests. When controlling owners are highly embedded in the family, they will perceive the family welfare as their priority and tend to serve the familial norms such as inheritance, conflict avoidance and nepotism. These familial considerations will motivate controlling owners of business groups to diversify more, and to diversify via a new firm rather than a new division. We test these hypotheses with 92 business groups in Taiwan from 1980 to 2000. Our findings point to the importance of family in the diversification decisions of business groups in emerging economies.


Jane Luis an associate professor in NUS Business School, National University of Singapore. She received her PhD from the Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario in 2001. Her research centres on international strategy such as FDI location choice, entry mode choice and alliance partner selection.

Jane Lu has published in leading academic journals such as Academy of Management Journal, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of International Business Studies, Journal of Management and Journal of Business Venturing, among others. She has also co-authored a textbook: International Business: An Asia Pacific Perspective (Pearson).

 
Making sence of the Hu-Wen era   View Summary
31 October 2012

This event ispresented by Asia Society, Hong Kong.

Luncheon presentation by Kerry Brown,Executive Director, China Studies Centre and Professor of Chinese Politics, University of Sydney; David Goodman, Professorof Chinese Politics and Academic Director, China StudiesCentre, University of Sydney

With Beijing gearing up for its once-a-decade leadership succession, President Hu Jintao prepares to step down as head of the People's Republic of China's fourth generation of leaders and pass on the baton to heir apparent Xi Jinping. As influential figures continue to work behind the scenes to influence key personnel decisions to be endorsed by the 18th national party congress scheduled for November 8, where does China stand a decade after President Hu and Premier Wen Jiabao's rule? Where will its new leadership take it? What has been the legacy of President Hu's decade in power?

Kerry Brownis Executive Director of the China Studies Centre

and Professor of Chinese Politics at the University of Sydney. Prior to his current appointment, Professor Brown was Head of the Asia Program at Chatham House. Educated at Cambridge, London and Leeds Universities, he joined the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London in their China Section and then in Beijing as First Secretary.Professor Brown is the author of numerous books includingStruggling Giant: China in the 21st Century, Friends and Enemies: The Past, Present and Future of the Communist Party of China, and most recently,Hu Jintao, China's Silent Leader.

David Goodman is Professor of Chinese Politics and Academic Director of the China Studies Centre at the University of Sydney. His research is concerned primarily with social and political change in China, particularly at the provincial and local level. Professor Goodman has written on the history of the Chinese Communist Party and local social and political change in China. Recent publications include Twentieth Century Colonialism and China, Peasants and Workers in the Transformation of Urban China and Middle Class China. He was educated at the University of Manchester, Peking University and the London School of Oriental and African Studies.

For more information and booking, please click here.

 
November
New South Wales and China in the 40th Anniversary Year of the Australia-China Relationship   View Summary
6 November 2012

 

 

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas. 

 

Join Australia's Ambassador to China, Her Excellency Ms Frances Adamson, as she shares her insight into the evolving relationship between Australia and China from a NSW perspective since diplomatic relations began forty years ago.

Ms Adamson took up her posting as Ambassador in August 2011.  She served in the Australian Consulate-General in Hong Kong in the late 1980s, during the early years of China's reform and opening, and first visited mainland China in 1987.  She was seconded as Representative to the Australian Commerce and Industry Office in Taipei from 2001 to 2005. 

 

She has had two postings (1993 to 1997 and 2005 to 2008) to the Australian High Commission in London, did a brief stint at the Australian Permanent Mission to the United Nations in New York in 1992 and was Chief of Staff to the Minister for Foreign Affairs, and then the Minister for Defence in 2009 and 2010.

 

Ms Adamson is honorary patron of the China-Australia Chamber of Commerce in Beijing, patron of the Australia China Alumni Association, a member of the Advisory Board of the Australian National University's Australian Centre on China in the World and a member of the national Board of the Australia China Business Council.

 

Ms Adamson has worked on China-related matters for 21 out of her 27-year career with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. She speaks Mandarin.

 

To register, please click here.

 

 

 

 

 
The mystery of why the second largest economy in the world invites so little into the EU   View Summary
6 November 2012

Chinese Outward Investment has been one of the most exciting new developments in the global economy. In the last few years it has risen exponentially, increasing by over 50% each year since 2009. However, even as the world's second largest economy, China is still a relatively small player in terms of outward investment into Europe.

Are we expecting too much of this new flow of capital? So far, most of it is from state-owned companies rather than private, and from the Centre, rather than China's provinces. Currently, most of Europe may find Chinese outward investment complex and difficult to understand, but it is something that governments like the UK and Germany have given great attention to, with some large deals recently, involving companies like Huawei and Geely.

The British Chamber's Financial Services focus group invite Kerry Brown to brief members on the likely future trends of Chinese outward investment. Kerry is Executive Director of the China Studies Centre, Professor of Chinese Politics at the University of Sydney, as well as Team Leader of the Europe China Research and Advice Network (ECRAN) funded by the European Union. During this breakfast seminar, Kerry will advise what are the current barriers to Chinese outward investment, how can they be addressed, and how might things in this area look in the next five to ten years.

RSVP: ariel.tang@britishchambershanghai.org

No-show Policy
: Please note you must cancel your reservation in writing to the event contact staff 24 hours in advance. No-show member without notification will be charged a no-show fee of RMB 100.

Walk-in Policy: Please note that members who attend the event without prior reservation will be charged a walk-in fee of RMB 50 if spaces are still available.

Kerry Brown
Executive Director of the China Studies Centre, and Professor of Chinese Politics at the University of Sydney.


Kerry leads the Europe China Research and Advice Network (ECRAN), funded by the European Commission. Prior to this he was Head of the Asia Programme at Chatham House. Educated at Cambridge, London and Leeds Universities, he worked in Japan, and the Inner Mongolian region of China, before joining the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in London. He worked in the China Section and then served as First Secretary, Beijing, from 2000 to 2003, and Head of the Indonesia East Timor Section at the FCO from 2003 to 2005.

He is the author of a 'The Cultural Revolution in Inner Mongolia' (Global Oriental 2006), 'Struggling Giant: China in the 21st Century' (Anthem 2007), 'The Rise of the Dragon - Chinese Investment Flows in the Reform Period' (Chandos 2008) and 'Friends and Enemies: The Past, Present and Future of the Communist Party of China' (Anthem 2009), 'Ballot Box China' (Zed books 2011), along with an edited collection 'China 2020' (Chandos). 'Hu Jintao, China's Silent Leader' has just been published. His 'Contemporary China' will be published by Palgrave Macmillan in early 2013 , and he is currently working on a book on Shanghai, and on the Fifth Generation leadership in China, to appear next year.

 
the CSC Research Student Seminar series   View Summary
9 November 2012

In order to create a research community for our students and thus better support their research and scholarship, the China Studies Centre has initiated a monthly event, the CSC Research Student Seminar series. This will provide an opportunity for CSC research students to meet each other and CSC academic members, create a shared identity, as well as discuss intellectual and practical issues.

The seminar is scheduled at 12-1 pm on every second Friday of each month at Room 310 Old Teachers College (see schedule below), in which a student will present his/her research, followed by a discussion. CSC Academic members, especially research student supervisors, are invited to come.

Please note that this is a brown bag seminar, so feel free to bring your lunch.

DatePresenterTitle
09/11/2012DINH Thi Hien Luong (Julia)Chinese Ideational Leadership in Foreign Policy Making in the Early 21st Century: a focus on Hu Jintao's Harmonious society concept
14/12/2012Dong XingTBA
11/01/2013Feifei HanThe Interaction between Lower- and Higher-Level Processing in Foreign Language (FL) Reading with Chinese University-Level EFL Readers
08/02/2013Irene Shidong ANStudents' Perception of Effective Online Language Learning in Blended Learning Environments
08/03/2013Zoe WANGThe influences of Environmental NGOs on Rural Landscape Change in China
12/04/2013Ben SUNThe Political Participation of Chinese Diaspora in Australia Local Government from 1990s till 2012
10/05/2013Cerrina Lu ZhangLanguage Policy and School Linguistic Practice of Ethnic Minorities in China: with particular focus on the Yi communities in Liangshan
14/06/2013Kerry BrownTBA
12/07/13Nacole TalmacsTBA

 
Award ceremony: 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations essay competition   View Summary
13 November 2012

The China Studies Centre is hosting an essay competition award ceremony to celebrate the 40th anniversary of Australia-China diplomatic relations.


The Governor Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO, also Chancellor of the University of Sydney; and the Vice-Chancellor of the University Dr Michael Spence will both speak at this occasion.

As part of the celebrations of 40 years of diplomatic relations, the China Studies Centre at the University of Sydney held an essay competition for young people to engage with each other and thereby strengthen mutual understanding and ensure future collaboration between the two countries.

The competition was generously sponsored by William Chiu, Chairman of the Australian Council for the Promotion of Peaceful Reunification of China, and supported by Australia's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the Australian New Express Daily.

The China Studies Centre would like to thank the sponsor and supporters of the competition, the judges, all those involved in its organisation and, last but by no means least, the essayists whose participation highlights the continuing good relations between the people, governments and societies of China and Australia.

Following the ceremony, refreshments will be served.

Please note this is an invite-only event, to register, please click here.
Registration essential by 10 November

 
China in southeast asia: Can the region's small and medium powers manoeuvre the giant?    View Summary
15 November 2012

There can be little doubt about "China's rise" in Southeast Asia which has already been the focus of a myriad of publications. However, a shortcoming of the existing literature is its bias towards either one of the two positions at the extreme ends of the spectrum: while some argue that China's relations with Southeast Asia provide manifold opportunities for the region, the other group proposes the emergence of China as a threat to a stable regional order. I argue that both factions miss the point: China's role in Southeast Asia is of a multi-dimensional nature and, as in the case of all small and medium powers that are forced to deal with the presence of a great power in their midst, the Southeast Asian nations have to negotiate and mediate China's presence. I will discuss three case studies: 1) the ASEAN-China Free Trade Area, which was first enthusiastically embraced by ASEAN for political reasons only for some members to find out that it hugely disadvantages them in their trade relations with China. 2) The conflicts in the South China Sea where the Southeast Asian claimants are carefully trying to balance a multilateral approach towards China (via ASEAN) with their specific national interests. 3) China's emergence as (seemingly) largest provider of Official development assistance (ODA) to Southeast Asia - replacing Japan - and its implications for Southeast Asia.

Prof. Joern Dosch is currently a Professor of International Relations and Deputy Head of School (Research) at Monash University, Sunway Campus, Malaysia. He had previously held the Chair in Asia Pacific Studies at the University of Leeds, UK, where he also headed the Department of East Asian Studies. Before joining Leeds he was a Fulbright Scholar at Stanford University and Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Mainz, Germany, where he had also completed his PhD on the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in 1996. Dosch's research interests are centred on Southeast Asian politics and the region's international relations. He also frequently works as a consultant for the European Union, international organisations and transnatinal NGOs. He has published nearly 100 books and academic papers, including The Asia-Pacific, Regionalism and the Global System, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar 2012 (edited with C. Dent); The New Global Politics of the Asia-Pacific. 2nd revised edition, London and New York: Routledge 2011 (with M. Connors and R. Davison) and The Changing Dynamics of Southeast Asian Politics. Boulder and London: Lynne Rienner 2007.

Please note this event has reach its capacity.

 
December
2012 CSC Annual Conference   View Summary
5 December 2012 to 7 December 2012

The China Studies Centre holds an Annual China Studies Centre Conference to showcase recent research in the field each year. 6-7 December 2012 will see the inaugural CSC Annual Conference take place.

On the 6-7 December parallel sessions showcasing the CSC academic groups' current research activities, will take place in The Quadrangle of the Camperdown campus of the University of Sydney. It will also include a special panel on China-India Engagement. Each two hour panel will include time for discussion and questions from the audience and other academic members of the CSC.

The following special events will also be part of the 2012 CSC AnnualConference:

Art Exhibition:Shen Jiawei: Brothers and Sisters

Location: Seymour Centre, Foyer
Date: 5 December 2012
Time: 5pm - 7pm
To be opened by
Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO
Governor of New South Wales and Chancellor of the University of Sydney.

Following the opening Shen Jiawei will discuss his paintings with University of Sydney academics Professor David Goodman, Academic Director of the China Studies Centre, and Professor Jeffrey Riegel, Head of the School of Languages and Cultures.

Keynote Speakers

In collaboration with Sydney Ideas, the CSC is proud to present the following two keynote lectures:

Michael Bristow: Former BBC Beijing Correspondent

Title:The joys and difficulties of being a foreign correspondent in China

Location: Law School Foyer, Eastern Ave. the University of Sydney
Date: 6 December
Time: 12:30pm - 1:45pm

Professor Rosemary Foot: Oxford University

Title:The Disruption of China's Resurgence: Reflections from an IR Perspective

Location: The General Lecture Theatre, The Quadrangle, the University of Sydney
Date: 6 December
Time: 6pm - 7:15pm

For the current program, please click here.

 
Shen Jiawei: Brothers and Sisiters   View Summary
5 December 2012 to 17 December 2012

Exhibition time

5-17 December 2012

Shen Jiawei's epic painting series, Brothers and Sisters, depicts more than 300 historical figures active in Chinese public life from the summer of 1936 to the summer of 1937, that is, the twelve months leading up to the second Sino-Japanese War. Shen sees Brothers and Sisters as a pictorial representation of Solzhenitsyn's Red Wheel, but featuring mainly Chinese subjects. It consists of three 6-panel segments, with each segment measuring 198cm in height and 822cm in width. The first segment is titled Revolution and focuses on communist personalities, the second is titled National Salvation and focuses on nationalist personalities, and the third is titled Enlightenment and focuses on Chinese intellectuals.

Revolution was the first segment of this large-scale series to be completed. Of the 128 figures portrayed, 113 are identifiable and include notable personalities such as Leon Trotsky, Chen Duxiu, Song Qingling, Mao Zedong, Zhu De, Zhou Enlai, Chiang Kai-shek, Song Meiling, Zhang Xueliang, American journalist Edgar Snow, Aussie (William Henry) "Donald of China", and ANZAC digger Rewi Alley. The historical figures painted in Revolution are based on photographs contained in their archives.

Spain 1937 is Shen's most recent work, and presents a group portrait of world famous intellectuals who had participated in the Spanish Civil War: George Orwell, Ernest Hemingway, Pablo Neruda, André Malraux, Robert Capa, Gerda Taro, Joris Ivens, Julian Bell, and Dr Norman Bethune. Included in the painting are also Garcia Lorca's photograph and Pablo Picasso's Guernica.

SHEN Jiawei

Born in Shanghai in 1948,Shen Jiawei is largely self taught and became a well known artist in China in mid 1970s. His works at that time have become a part of Chinese art history during the "Cultural Revolution" period, and were shown in leading exhibitions about Chinese art at the Guggenheim Museum (1998) and Asia Society Museum (2008), and many museums and galleries in Australia and China. From 1982 to 1984 he studied advanced courses at the Central Academy of Fine Arts, and worked as a professional artist in Liaoning Art Studio from 1981 to 1988. He has won the Chinese National Art Prizes five times. Shen came to Australia in 1989 and has worked as a full-time artist in Sydney since then. He has been a finalist of the Archibald Prize 13 times and runner-up on one of these occasions. She won the Mary MacKillop Art Award in 1995 and Sir John Sulman Prize in 2006. By official commission, he has painted portraits of Princess Mary of Denmark and Former PM John Howard for the National Portrait Gallery and Parliament House, both in Canberra. His works in many public collections such as the National Museum, the National Art Museum, both in Beijing, and other museums and galleries in the US, Australia and China.

 
The joys and difficulties of being a foreign correspondent in China   View Summary
6 December 2012

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas. This lecture is part of the 2012 China Studies Centre Annual Conference.

There has never been a better time to be a foreign journalist in China. The country is undergoing a radical transformation that is changing the lives of everyone who lives there - and reporters have a ringside seat. What makes this an even better assignment is that there are relatively few foreign journalists reporting from a country that is still little understood by the outside world. But there are difficulties, not least from a sometimes hostile government that thinks foreign reporters are at best misguided, at worst anti-China. I will explain what it is like to be a journalist in China and look back on my five years as a correspondent for the BBC in Beijing.

Michael Bristow

Michael has been a journalist for nearly 20 years, starting out as a reporter on a weekly newspaper before moving to an evening publication and then on to the UK's Press Association. He then switched to broadcasting, initially working for the BBC World Service. For the last five years Michael was a correspondent for the BBC in China, a country he first studied at university. His reports - on everything from politics to the occasional outbreak of plague - appeared on TV, radio and online. He reported on the Sichuan earthquake, the Beijing Olympics and unrest in Tibet, as well as trying to work out exactly who's ruling the country. He has just left China and moved back to the UK, where he is attempting to write a book.

 
The disruption of China's resurgence: reflections from an IR perspective   View Summary
6 December 2012

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas. This lecture is part of the 2012 China Studies Centre Annual Conference.

Understanding the domestic and global implications of China's resurgence is a challenge for scholars as well as policy-makers. The focus of this paper is on what the understanding ofChina's resurgence exposes about the discipline of International Relations, and on what it has meant for IR approaches in terms of concepts, theories, and empirical foci.These questions will be explored through examination of arguments about the links between economics and security; the degree to which China challenges global order practices; and the issues raised by the new geo-politics. Finally, a case will be made for the value of establishing firmer links between those scholarly communities who work on domestic China and those who work on the IR of China.

Rosemary Foot

Rosemary Foot is Professor of International Relations, and the John Swire Senior Research Fellow at St Antony's College, Oxford University. Her principal research interests are in the International Relations of the Asia-Pacific, particularly security policies, human rights, regional institutional and normative developments, and US-China relations.

 
the CSC Research Student Seminar series   View Summary
14 December 2012

In order to create a research community for our students and thus better support their research and scholarship, the China Studies Centre has initiated a monthly event, the CSC Research Student Seminar series. This will provide an opportunity for CSC research students to meet each other and CSC academic members, create a shared identity, as well as discuss intellectual and practical issues.

The seminar is scheduled at 12-1 pm on every second Friday of each month at Room 310 Old Teachers College (see schedule below), in which a student will present his/her research, followed by a discussion. CSC Academic members, especially research student supervisors, are invited to come.

Please note that this is a brown bag seminar, so feel free to bring your lunch.

DatePresenterTitle
09/11/2012DINH Thi Hien Luong (Julia)Chinese Ideational Leadership in Foreign Policy Making in the Early 21st Century: a focus on Hu Jintao's Harmonious society concept
14/12/2012Dong Xing

Green Roof Policy arrangement of Beijing and its neoliberal interpretation

11/01/2013Feifei HanThe Interaction between Lower- and Higher-Level Processing in Foreign Language (FL) Reading with Chinese University-Level EFL Readers
08/02/2013Irene Shidong ANStudents' Perception of Effective Online Language Learning in Blended Learning Environments
08/03/2013Zoe WANGThe influences of Environmental NGOs on Rural Landscape Change in China
12/04/2013Ben SUNThe Political Participation of Chinese Diaspora in Australia Local Government from 1990s till 2012
10/05/2013Cerrina Lu ZhangLanguage Policy and School Linguistic Practice of Ethnic Minorities in China: with particular focus on the Yi communities in Liangshan
14/06/2013Kerry BrownTBA
12/07/13Nacole TalmacsTBA

RSVP here, please.