All future 2013 events

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January
The CSC Research Student Seminar series   View Summary
11 January 2013

In order to create a research community for our students and thus better support their research and scholarship, the China Studies Centre has initiated a monthly event, the CSC Research Student Seminar series. This will provide an opportunity for CSC research students to meet each other and CSC academic members, create a shared identity, as well as discuss intellectual and practical issues.

The seminar is scheduled at 12-1 pm on every second Friday of each month at Room 310 Old Teachers College (see schedule below), in which a student will present his/her research, followed by a discussion. CSC Academic members, especially research student supervisors, are invited to come.

Please note that this is a brown bag seminar, so feel free to bring your lunch.

DatePresenterTitle
11/01/2013Feifei HanThe Interaction between Lower- and Higher-Level Processing in Foreign Language (FL) Reading with Chinese University-Level EFL Readers
08/02/2013Irene Shidong ANStudents' Perception of Effective Online Language Learning in Blended Learning Environments
08/03/2013Zoe WANGThe influences of Environmental NGOs on Rural Landscape Change in China
12/04/2013Ben SUNThe Political Participation of Chinese Diaspora in Australia Local Government from 1990s till 2012
10/05/2013Cerrina Lu ZhangLanguage Policy and School Linguistic Practice of Ethnic Minorities in China: with particular focus on the Yi communities in Liangshan
14/06/2013Professor Kerry BrownTBA
12/07/2013Nicole TalmacsTBA

University Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Effective Online Language Learning in Blended Learning Environments

This research aims to examine university teachers' and students' experiences of online learning in blended learning environments. It focuses on the teachers' and students' attitudes and perceptions of the integration of Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL), Web-based language learning and Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL) into the language programs at Australian universities. It specifically aims to investigate the effectiveness of the applications of technology in the language curriculum in assisting language learning as perceived by the teachers and students. The blended environments examined in this research are those where campus-based face-to-face teaching is enhanced by the implementation of certain types of technology use. This study investigates whether teaching and the student learning behavior i.e. the ways they approach different learning tasks are changed in a certain way, and how the teachers and the students perceive the connection between online learning and face-to-face teaching and learning and whether they think online learning assist their teaching and learning for the course. It is argued that in tertiary education where student-centered learning is highly valued, the curriculum planning should derive from a better understanding of students' experiences, not merely from the demonstrated effectiveness of the new and fancy technologies or the proven effective teaching methodologies. Contextualized research on the specific blended environment is needed to inform practitioners so as to help them make immediate decisions about curriculum improvement which is positioned at the center of their teaching agenda. By investigating and analyzing the teachers and the students' experiences and collecting their interpretations of the blended learning environment, this research intends to provide the teachers with a holistic perspective in planning and enhancing learning, especially with regard to catering for various needs of a more and more diverse group of university students.

Irene Shidong An

Irene S. An is a PhD Candidate in the Department of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney. She had taught English in Tianjin Foreign Studies University in China for nine years before migrating to Australia in 2002. She commenced employment as an Associate Lecturer at the University of Sydney in 2005. She has been responsible for building eLearning programs in the Department of Chinese Studies since 2007 and has been involved in Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) research. Her research interests include CALL, online and blended language teaching and learning, and teaching methodology. Her PhD project is on University Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Effective Online Language Learning in Blended Learning Environments.

 
February
The CSC Research Student Seminar series   View Summary
8 February 2013

In order to create a research community for our students and thus better support their research and scholarship, the China Studies Centre has initiated a monthly event, the CSC Research Student Seminar series. This will provide an opportunity for CSC research students to meet each other and CSC academic members, create a shared identity, as well as discuss intellectual and practical issues.

The seminar is scheduled at 12-1 pm on every second Friday of each month at Room 310 Old Teachers College (see schedule below), in which a student will present his/her research, followed by a discussion. CSC Academic members, especially research student supervisors, are invited to come.

Please note that this is a brown bag seminar, so feel free to bring your lunch.

DatePresenterTitle
08/02/2013Irene Shidong ANStudents' Perception of Effective Online Language Learning in Blended Learning Environments
08/03/2013Zoe WANGThe influences of Environmental NGOs on Rural Landscape Change in China
12/04/2013Ben SUNThe Political Participation of Chinese Diaspora in Australia Local Government from 1990s till 2012
10/05/2013Cerrina Lu ZhangLanguage Policy and School Linguistic Practice of Ethnic Minorities in China: with particular focus on the Yi communities in Liangshan
14/06/2013Professor Kerry BrownTBA
12/07/2013Nicole TalmacsTBA

 
China for the world: The globalisation of Chinese porcelain   View Summary
12 February 2013

Co-presented with Sydney Ideasas part of the official event of Sydney Chinese New Year Festival 2013.

In this richly illustrated presentation, Dr Baoping Li will rely on over twenty years of research to explain the significance of Chinese porcelain to our understanding of history, archaeology, cultural studies, and the collecting of antiques in China and the world. Dr Li has first-hand experience working with porcelains found at the site of a lost city in North China that was part of the Mongol Empire, ancient Angkor in Cambodia, and an Arab merchant shipwreck of c. 826 CE found in the Java Sea that provides the earliest physical evidence for direct trade between China and the Middle East.

Dr Li Baoping: Dr Li received his BA and MA degrees from the Archaeology Department of Beijing University, and then worked in Beijing for the English-language journal China Archaeology and Art Digest. He undertook his PhD at the University of Queensland, and then worked there as an Australia Postdoctoral Fellow funded by the Australia Research Council (ARC). He is currently an ARC Australia Future Fellow in the School of Languages and Cultures at the University of Sydney and is a member of the University's China Studies Centre. As an archaeologist and historian, Dr Li specializes in Chinese ceramics and their global distribution. He investigates these topics through an integrated approach that includes the disciplines of history, archaeology, art history, and the chemical sourcing of trade ceramics in order to understand the patterns of China's long-term, international trade network.

Registration: clickhere to register.

 
Modernising health care provider education in China   View Summary
18 February 2013

China is facing an epoch-making revolution of health care service and health care system, symbolised by the paradigm shift from existing disease-management system to a better integrative health care system with the following five transitions:

  • Transition from disease-driven medicine to health driven medicine;
  • Transition from targeting on illness to targeting on people;
  • Transition from hospital-based disease management to community-based integrative health care service;
  • Transition from high-tech predominant medical intervention to high-touch, people-centered and community-engaged health care;
  • Transition from disease intervention to comprehensive health care package including disease diagnosis & treatment, disease prediction, disease prevention and health promotion

To meet the needs and demands of this revolution, modernising health care provider education is of strategic importance, including reforming training of clinic doctors, as well as nurses, paramedical workers, community care providers and social workers.

In line with the essential requirements of health care providers adapting to this new health care system, medical education reform is extremely urgent and imperative, it represents a switch in emphasis from teaching to student-centered participatory learning, from didactic mode of knowledge to a problem-solving capability and critical thinking, from the traditional discipline-based teaching path to an integrated, comprehensive interdisciplinary highway of learning all through the whole medical curriculum, which should be refined and adjusted time and time to tailor-fit the changing world and its evolving culture and social value, as well as rapid development of life and biomedical sciences.

The strategic framework and preliminary trial of medical education reform program of the School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University will be briefly introduced.

Professor Yifei Wang
currently serves as the Senior Advisor, Medical School of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Vice Chairman of Shanghai Senior Professor Association, Past-President of Chinese Society of Reproductive Medicine, Chairman of Shanghai Society of Family Planning and Reproductive Health, Editor-in-Chief of International Journal of Reproductive Health and Family Planning and Editor-in-Chief of Asian Journal of Andrology.

From 1995-2001 he was appointed as Medical Officer, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland, serving as the Area Manager for Asia and the Pacific, as well as the coordinator of 60 Global WHO Research and Training Collaborating Centers for Reproductive Health.

He has published more than 100 research papers and review articles in peer-reviewed journals and be the Editor-in-chief of several important monographs, including Chinese Medical Encyclopedia: Human Histology and Embryology, Human Reproductive Biology, Reproductive Medicine: Fertility, Infertility and Anti-fertility and Andrology. He has been the Principal Investigator or Advisor of many National Priority Research Programs, such as National Guideline of ART and Stem Cell Research and Application, Cellular and Molecular Mechanism of Human Reproduction and Environmental and Genetic Factors and Birth Defects and Male Infertility. In 1995 he received the Award of La Medaille de Chevalier de la Legion D'Honneur by the Government of the Republic of France.

To register, pleaseclick here.

 
Obama and the pivot to Asia: What it means for Australia and the region   View Summary
26 February 2013

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas and the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre.

Speaker: Lord Michael Williams of Baglan

 

In this lecture, Lord Michael Williams will draw on his extensive experience and knowledge in international affairs at the UN and in the British Foreign Office as well as a number of NGOs to discuss the implications of President Obama's rebalancing towards Asia and what this might meant for Australia and the Pacific.

Lord Williams was the Under Secretary-General and Special Coordinator for Lebanon, United Nations. From 1999 to 2005, he was the Special Adviser to two UK Foreign Secretaries, Robin Cook (1999-2001) and Jack Straw (2001-2005). He held a number of senior positions in the United Nations in the 1990s, including Deputy Director for Human Rights, UN Mission for Cambodia; Advisor to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Geneva; Director, Office for Children and Armed Conflict, New York.

Lord Michael Williams is also a researcher in Middle East and Southeast Asia affairs. He received his PhD in politics from the University of London. He has been extensively writing about international affairs, peacekeeping and social welfare. His recent publications include Civil-Military Relations and Peacekeeping (1999), Vietnam at the Crossroads (1992), Communism, Religion and Revolt in Banten (1990).

 

To register for this event, please click here.

 

 
Roundtable with Lord Michael Williams of Baglan on Southeast Asia   View Summary
26 February 2013

Co-presented with the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre.

Lord Williams has an intimate knowledge of the Southeast Asia region from his academic and diplomatic work over the last four decades, and has met some of the key leaders from Aung Sang Su Chi of Myanmar to President Yudhoyona of Indonesia. This roundtable will be a discussion of recent developments in the area, including the dramatic changes in Myanmar, and the impact of China across the region.

Lord Michael Williams was the Under Secretary-General and Special Coordinator for Lebanon, United Nations. From 1999 to 2005, he was the Special Adviser to two UK Foreign Secretaries,Robin Cook (1999-2001) and Jack Straw (2001-2005). He held a number of senior positions in the United Nations in the 1990s, including Deputy Director for Human Rights, UN Mission for Cambodia; Advisor to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Geneva; Director, Office for Children and Armed Conflict, New York.

Lord Williams is also a researcher in Middle East and Southeast Asia affairs. He received his PhD in politics from the University of London. He has been extensively writing about international affairs, peacekeeping and social welfare. His recent publications include Civil-Military Relations and Peacekeeping (1999), Vietnam at the Crossroads (1992), Communism, Religion and Revolt in Banten (1990).

 

Please note this is an invite only event. Light lunch is provided.RSVP essential.

 
March
The CSC Research Student seminar series   View Summary
8 March 2013

In order to create a research community for our students and thus better support their research and scholarship, the China Studies Centre has initiated a monthly event, the CSC Research Student Seminar series. This will provide an opportunity for CSC research students to meet each other and CSC academic members, create a shared identity, as well as discuss intellectual and practical issues.

The seminar is scheduled at 12-1 pm on every second Friday of each month at Room 310 Old Teachers College (see schedule below), in which a student will present his/her research, followed by a discussion. CSC Academic members, especially research student supervisors, are invited to come.

Please note that this is a brown bag seminar, so feel free to bring your lunch.

Date

PresenterTitle
08/03/2013Zoe WANGThe influences of Environmental NGOs on Rural Landscape Change in China
12/04/2013Ben SUNThe Political Participation of Chinese Diaspora in Australia Local Government from 1990s till 2012
10/05/2013Cerrina Lu ZhangLanguage Policy and School Linguistic Practice of Ethnic Minorities in China: with particular focus on the Yi communities in Liangshan
14/06/2013Professor Kerry BrownTBA
12/07/2013Nicole TalmacsTBA

The influences of environmental NGOs on rural landscape change in China

China is experience tremendous environmental challenges in recent decades: highest greenhouse gas emission, severe air and water pollutions, rising energy demand and many others. Meanwhile, due to the social-political change in China, environmental NGOs (eNGOs) have been thriving in response to the various issues. By employing political ecology as the theoretical framework and by situating eNGOs in the multi-scalar inter-relationship between different institutional actors (including governments, international partners, donors and local communities) , my research is to examine the influence of Chinese eNGOs on the rural landscape which is shaped by changing social relations and environmental practices. In this talk, I will offer some examples from my ethnographic data to illustrate how the complex power dynamics around eNGOs and their practice result in influence on landscape.

Student bio:

Ju-Han Zoe Wang holds a Bachelor of Science in Zoology from National Taiwan University, and a Master in Environmental Management from Yale University. After completing her master studies, she joined the Industrial Technology Research Institute in Taiwan as an associate researcher until 2009, working on energy and climate policy. During 2006, she was a visiting researcher to UC Berkeley. Zoe commenced her PhD in Geography in March 2010. Her research experience involves areas such as China, Taiwan and Sri Lanka. Her research interests include political ecology, NGO study and the general social aspects of conservation, development and energy issues.

 
Working in no-man's land:between sociology and Chinese studies   View Summary
12 March 2013

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

The relationships between disciplines and area studies have been much discussed and disputed since the establishment of area studies centres from the 1940s. Many contributions to these debates have concentrated either on (meta-) theoretical issues or on political considerations, notably the geo-political impetus behind the support given to area studies in post-war USA. Some participants in these discussions also mention institutional factors, especially those of higher education, that have had effects on discipline-area studies relationships.

In this lecture, Dr Norman Stockman will draw partly on his own experience, as a sociologist who became active in Chinese studies, to explore a range of such institutional factors. He is particularly concerned to understand why the study of Chinese society has not been more fruitfully incorporated into the 'mainstream' of sociology more generally, an issue which has also been remarked upon in relation to other disciplines, such as anthropology, political science, and the history of science.

Dr Norman Stockman

Norman Stockman is a British sociologist with a particular interest in China. He has worked with Chinese sociologists on several collaborative research projects. These include a comparative study of women's work and family life in China, Japan, Britain and the USA (resulting in the book Women's Work in East and West, with Norman Bonney and Sheng Xuewen, UCL Press 1995), and a project on rural-urban migration in Shanghai. He has also written on social inequality in China, and is the author of Understanding Chinese Society, a general survey of the sociology of Chinese society (Polity Press 2000). From 1989 to 2005, his teaching included an advanced undergraduate option course on Chinese Society, and he also supervised PhD research on aspects of Chinese society. From 2000 to 2005 he contributed to the postgraduate course leading to the Master of Chinese Studies at the Universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow. He is a founder member and Honorary President of the University of Aberdeen Chinese Studies Group, and served as Honorary Secretary of the British Association for Chinese Studies (BACS) from September 2005 to September 2011. He now has an emeritus position in the Department of Sociology, University of Aberdeen.

To register, please click here.

 
Master class by Professor Philip Salzman   View Summary
13 March 2013

Master class by Professor Philip Salzman, China Studies Centre Visiting Profrofessor

Title: Comparative analysis in anthropology

Philip Carl Salzman, Ph.D. (Chicago)is Professor of Anthropology at McGill University in Canada. He is a long time student of nomadic and pastoral peoples, and founded the Commission on Nomadic Peoples of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences, and the international journal Nomadic Peoples. Extensive ethnographic field research in Baluchistan (Iran), Gujarat and Rajasthan (India), and Sardinia (Italy) provided the foundation for such publications as The Anthropology of Real Life: Events in Human Experience (1999), BlackTents of Baluchistan (2000), Pastoralists: Equality, Hierarchy, and the State (2004), and Culture and Conflict in the Middle East (2008). His latest publication is Classic Comparative Anthropology: Studies from the Tradition (2012). Recent explorations in Kyrgyzstan have led to his current interests in the nomadic and pastoral peoples of Central and East Asia, with particular attention to Tibet, Inner Mongolia, Outer Mongolia, and Turkistan.

Please note this is aninvitation only event, light lunch will be provided, RSVP before midday 11 March for catering purposes.

 
China under Xi Jinping: after who, what?   View Summary
19 March 2013

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

With the conclusion of the 18th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party in November 2012, China has officially entered the era of Xi Jinping. A princeling who took over as general secretary of the Party and chairman of the Central Military Commission, Xi also succeeded Hu Jintao as president of the People's Republic of China in March 2013.

In this lecture, Professor Bo Zhiyue, a leading scholar on China's elite politics, will provide a brief introduction to the new leadership under Xi Jinping and speculate what policies this new leadership is likely to adopt for China's political, economic, and social development in the next five to ten years.

Professor Bo Zhiyue

Professor Bo Zhiyue is a Visiting Professor at the China Studies Centre, University of Sydney and Senior Research Fellow at the East Asian Institute of the National University of Singapore. He obtained his Bachelor of Law and Master of Law from Peking University and PhD from the University of Chicago. He has taught at Peking University, Roosevelt University, the University of Chicago, American University, St John Fisher College, Tarleton State University, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is a recipient of the Trustees' Distinguished Scholar Award at St. John Fisher College and the inaugural holder of the Joe and Theresa Long Endowed Chair in Social Sciences at Tarleton State University.

His research interests include China's elite politics, Chinese provincial leaders, central-local relations, cross-strait relations, and Sino-American relations. He is the author of a trilogy on Chinese political elites and elite politics: Chinese Provincial Leaders: Economic Performance and Political Mobility since 1949 (M. E. Sharpe, 2002); China's Elite Politics: Political Transition and Power Balancing (World Scientific, 2007); and China's Elite Politics: Governance and Democratization (World Scientific, 2010).

To register, pleaseclick here.

 
Boardroom Seminar: The party, the state and the military in China   View Summary
21 March 2013

Since 1927 when Mao Zedong introduced the principle of the Party commanding the gun, the Red Army (later the People's Liberation Army) has evolved from the army of an opposition party to the army of a new state in various forms in the past eight decades. After two chairmen of the Central Military Commission chose to stay on after their retirement from other party positions, Hu Jintao decided to retire from all of his party positions at the 18th National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party.

In this lecture, the speaker will introduce the historical evolution of the relationship among the Party, the state, and the military in the past eight decades (in particular, the past six decades) and evaluate the relationship in terms of China's future political development.

Professor Bo Zhiyue

Professor Bo Zhiyue is a Visiting Professor at the China Studies Centre, University of Sydney and Senior Research Fellow at the East Asian Institute of the National University of Singapore. He obtained his Bachelor of Law and Master of Law from Peking University and PhD from the University of Chicago. He has taught at Peking University, Roosevelt University, the University of Chicago, American University, St John Fisher College, Tarleton State University, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is a recipient of the Trustees' Distinguished Scholar Award at St John Fisher College and the inaugural holder of the Joe and Theresa Long Endowed Chair in Social Sciences at Tarleton State University.

His research interests include China's elite politics, Chinese provincial leaders, central-local relations, cross-strait relations, and Sino-American relations. He is the author of a trilogy on Chinese political elites and elite politics: Chinese Provincial Leaders: Economic Performance and Political Mobility since 1949 (M. E. Sharpe, 2002); China's Elite Politics: Political Transition and Power Balancing (World Scientific, 2007); and China's Elite Politics: Governance and Democratization (World Scientific, 2010).

RSVP: Please click here to register.

 
Master class:Chinese provincial leaders in the reform era:six cohorts   View Summary
25 March 2013

In the literature on Chinese provincial leaders in the reform era, a critical link is missing. It is not clear the extent in which reform and opening policies have impacted on the recruitment patterns of provincial leaders. This lecture attempts to fill this void by classifying Chinese provincial leaders of the reform era into six distinctive groups. From 1979 to 2008, there are six cohorts of provincial leaders in China. They are old revolutionary guards, post-Cultural Revolution generation, Deng Xiaoping's lieutenants, Jiang Zemin's technocrats, Princeling provincial leaders, and Youth League cadres. Each cohort was recruited because of its historical circumstances and policy imperatives of the time.

Professor Bo Zhiyue

Professor Bo Zhiyue is a Visiting Professor at the China Studies Centre, University of Sydney and Senior Research Fellow at the East Asian Institute of the National University of Singapore. He obtained his Bachelor of Law and Master of Law from Peking University and PhD from the University of Chicago. He has taught at Peking University, Roosevelt University, the University of Chicago, American University, St John Fisher College, Tarleton State University, and the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is a recipient of the Trustees' Distinguished Scholar Award at St. John Fisher College and the inaugural holder of the Joe and Theresa Long Endowed Chair in Social Sciences at Tarleton State University.

His research interests include China's elite politics, Chinese provincial leaders, central-local relations, cross-strait relations, and Sino-American relations. He is the author of a trilogy on Chinese political elites and elite politics: Chinese Provincial Leaders: Economic Performance and Political Mobility since 1949 (M. E. Sharpe, 2002); China's Elite Politics: Political Transition and Power Balancing (World Scientific, 2007); and China's Elite Politics: Governance and Democratization (World Scientific, 2010).

 
Event postponed: China, geographical thought and the not quite poststructural revolution   View Summary
26 March 2013

Please note due to unforseen circumstances, this lecture by Professor Carolyn Cartier has had to be postponed. Further information about the new date and time will be posted here on the CSC website. Apologies for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Co-presented with Sydney Ideas.

The theme of the Third Guangzhou Triennial, "Farewell to Post-Colonialism," continues to reverberate in intellectual thought: where but contemporary China would such a valediction form and take shape? Since the 1970s, the broad paradigm shift from structural to poststructural theory has moved through the international academy with far-reaching implications for university curricula and research priorities, yet the geographical diffusion of this poststructural revolution has been uneven—within universities, among universities within national academies and globally in the international academy. It has linked scholarship in the industrialized world with postcolonial worlds, yielding unprecedented arcs of knowledge formation, whilst its encounters with the Chinese academy, given the predicaments of China's twentieth century history, have been alternatively tentative, reactive and far-reaching. Now China's national project to vault universities into world rankings is leading to questions about the commensurabilities of knowledge formation, questions with implications for research design and international scholarly practice. From perspectives in geographical thought, this talk assesses how ideas moving through the global public sphere take shape and re-form in dialectical encounters with the continuing production of Marxian-inspired thought in the Chinese academy and its aesthetics of paradoxicality. From contemporary art to neoliberal urbanization, and from PM 2.5 to the family fortunes of Wen Jiabao, debates over understanding China arguably evolve in terms of contradiction and paradox—the aesthetic form of dialectical materialism that brings the totality of political debate into view.

Professor Carolyn Cartier

Carolyn Cartier is an urban geographer and research designer working in social theory and China Studies. Her research program concerns understanding the process of urban development in China and Hong Kong from perspectives on spatial transformation behind the spectacle of rapid growth. Her work gives particular attention to the uses of theoretical geography for research on cities and regions in China and the complexities of research practise with neoliberalisation of the international academy.

Professor of Human Geography and China Studies in the China Research Centre at the University of Technology, Sydney, Carolyn Cartier was a member of the faculty at the University of Southern California before joining the Australian academy in 2009. She has been a Fulbright Fellow and is the author of Globalizing South China and co-editor of The Chinese Diaspora: Place, Space, Mobility and Identity and Seductions of Place: Geographical Perspectives on Globalization and Touristed Landscapes. She is also an Adjunct Research Director for the China Urban theme at the Australian Centre on China in the World at the Australian National University.

 
Event Cancelled: Boardroom Seminar: Crafting Zhuang nationality medicine    View Summary
27 March 2013

Please note due to unforseen circumstances, this lecture by Professor JudithFarquhar has been cancelled. However, you are welcome to come to a lecture "Afterlives of the Field Survey: Several modern moments in Chinese state knowledge production"by Professor Farquhar on 28 March. For more information, pleaseclick here.

This talk reports research at the interface between official medical knowledge and "ethnic" styles of wild or folk healing in today's China. Working with researchers in ethnically-marked sites in southwestern China, we consider the epistemological implications and health services developments that are emerging as "ethnic traditional medicines" appear in public. The case in question is that of Zhuang nationality medicine in Guangxi. Researchers of Zhuang medicine both produce new medical information and the contexts in which their newly systematic knowledge can be put to use, in institutions ranging from village clinics to medical schools. We also suggest that another context is being brought into view: a certain wild outside to rationalized systems -- an embodied expertise and a radically local knowledge - are emerging as a fresh source of value and a new kind of public health challenge in "ethnic" China.

Professor Judith Farquhar

Judith Farquhar is Max Palevsky Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. She is the author of numerous works on contemporary Chinese medical cultures, including Knowing Practice: The Clinical Encounter of Chinese Medicine(1994);Appetites: Food and Sex in Post-Socialist China (2002); and Ten Thousand Things: Nurturing Life in Contemporary Beijing (2012). Her current research with Dr. Lili Lai investigates the Chinese process of salvaging and sorting out the traditional medical systems of minority nationalities in southern and southwestern China.

 
Event Cancelled: Master class by Professor James L. Hevia   View Summary
27 March 2013

Please note due to unforseen circumstances, this master class by Professor James L. Hevia has been cancelled. Apologies for any inconvenience this may have caused.

Title: The uses of intelligence

Professor James L. Hevia

James L. Hevia is Professor of International History and Director of the Undergraduate Program in International Studies at the University of Chicago. His first book, Cherishing Men from Afar: Qing Guest Ritual and the Macartney Embassy of 1793 was awarded the Joseph Levenson Prize of the Association for Asian Studies. He is also the author of English Lessons: The Pedagogy of Imperialism in Nineteenth Century China and most recently The Imperial Security State: British Colonial Knowledge and Empire-building in Asia. His current research is on animal-human relations with a focus on transport animals in the British and Indian armies.

 
Afterlives of the Field Survey: Several modern moments in Chinese state knowledge production   View Summary
28 March 2013

Co-presented with Department of Anthropology.

This talk, a report of field research in southwestern China on "ethnic traditional medicine," revisits the conventional perception that social research in Maoist China, especially with regard to ethnic minorities, has been "Stalinist."  The image of a rigid state's-eye view of popular life, and of a form of knowledge that constructs ethnicity in the state's or market's interest only, has not proven to be accurate. The question with which we replace assumptions about Stalinist social research is, rather: how have good communists and civil servants tried, over the years, to "seek truth from facts." We focus on several moments: the model developed by Mao Zedong in his work with the Hunan peasant movement; the field surveys of medicinal plants and experts in the early 1970s; and the new state-led effort to "salvage and sort" the traditional medicine of the nation's minority peoples.

Professor Judith Farquhar

Judith Farquhar is Max Palevsky Professor of Anthropology at the University of Chicago. She is the author of numerous works on contemporary Chinese medical cultures, including Knowing Practice: The Clinical Encounter of Chinese Medicine(1994);Appetites: Food and Sex in Post-Socialist China (2002); and Ten Thousand Things: Nurturing Life in Contemporary Beijing (2012). Her current research with Dr. Lili Lai investigates the Chinese process of salvaging and sorting out the traditional medical systems of minority nationalities in southern and southwestern China.

 

 
April
How China's wartime past is shaping its present - and future by Professor Rana Mitter   View Summary
9 April 2013

Beijing's policies continue to dominate the news in the Asia-Pacific region.  Will China and Japan clash in the seas of East Asia?  Will China be able to implement social welfare policies that will calm dissent and social unrest?  Why did it take so long for China to become such a major power?  One unexpected but crucial story that helps illuminate these different questions is the wrenching history of China's experience during World War II, in the epic war against Japan from 1937 to 1945.  Over 14 million Chinese died and some 80 million became refugees during those years.  This lecture will explore how the battered China of wartime became today's superpower in the making - and why.

Professor Rana Mitter

Rana Mitter is Professor of the History and Politics of Modern China at the University of Oxford, and a Fellow of St Cross College. His research has focused on the historical development of Chinese nationalism, with a particular interest in the Sino-Japanese War of the 1930s and 1940s, and its effects on shaping contemporary China. He is the author of several books including A Bitter Revolution: China's Struggle with the Modern World (Oxford, 2004), for which he was named Young Academic Author of the Year by the UK Times Higher Education Supplement in 2005, and Modern China: A Very Short Introduction (Oxford, 2008).  His new book China's War with Japan, 1937-1945: The Struggle for Survival, will be published in June 2013.

Rana presents and contributes regularly to programmes on television and radio, including BBC World News, the History Channel, and Night Waves on BBC Radio 3 in the UK. His essays and reviews have appeared in publications including the Financial Times, Outlook, The Telegraph (Kolkata), The Times of India, The Guardian, The Economist, and History Today.

To register for this event, please click here.