News

Carbon and Water Management Research for Australia and Mexico


8 April 2010

The academics will collaborate to examine changes in carbon and water balances due to climate variability which threaten both Mexico's and Australia's food production and export. Carbon and water are key elements in agricultural production. The visit is part of a Council of Australia and Latin America Relationships (COALAR) grant.

During their time in Australia, Professor Jorge Etchevers, Professor Waldo Ojeda and Professor Israel Velasco will work with faculty researchers to explore possible joint research programs to manage water and carbon. They will also interact with researchers at Industry and Investment NSW in Orange, and have field visits to study water and carbon management in Australia.

"Our faculty has been building relationships with Mexican researchers because we recognise that we face many of the same problems due to similarities in climate," says Dr Willem Vervoort.

"This visit will allow us to discuss these problems in more detail, compare scientific notes and develop new joint research directions."

The particular focus on the joint management of carbon and water and the interaction between carbon and water is of specific relevance for agricultural food production and natural resource management.

Both IMTA and the Colegio are strong research-based organisations in Mexico which are natural counterparts to the work going on at the University of Sydney. The cooperation with Industry and Investment NSW broadens the scope to incorporate a significant part of the NSW agricultural research community.

Professor Jorge Etchevers (Colegio de Posgraduos) is an expert in the area of soil fertility and carbon management, Professor Waldo Ojeda (IMTA) is an expert in irrigation water management, while Professor Israel Velasco is an expert in hydrometeorology, or the interaction between climate and water supply.


Contact: Dr Willem Vervoort

Phone: 02 8627 1054

Email: 23311654160e620e08164f5d2e195f0f3a2e1d3613525c08233d6d1930