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Top 5 reasons to study Arts and Social Sciences


13 December 2016

Activate your desire for knowledge and passion for learning
Activate your desire for knowledge and passion for learning

Ranked 14th in the world for Arts and Humanities by the QS World Faculty Rankings, the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences offers you the opportunity to pursue your passions.

Here are the top five reasons why you should join Australia's largest and most diverse undergraduate program in Arts and Social Sciences.

The business world will covet you
The business world will covet you

Number 1:

The business world will covet you

If you choose to study a Bachelor of Arts (BA) or another Humanities-based degree, you will acquire analytical, critical thinking, problem-solving and communication skills, aptitudes craved by the corporate and private sector. Owing to the fast-moving nature of technological innovation, the ability to process large quantities of diffuse data into a clear, economical and effective argument, a central characteristic of a BA, is in more demand than ever. It is for this very reason that such high-level companies as KPMG, Telstra, NBC Universal and Allianz are part of our exclusive employer placement program, ArtSS Career-Ready.

A love of learning is for life
A love of learning is for life

Number 2:

A love of learning is for life

Studying Arts and Social Sciences stirs a desire for knowledge and a passion for learning. It cultivates this love of scholarship by fostering a sense of curiosity about difference and the ability to visualise yourself in someone else’s shoes. This notion reflects itself in many ways. From the study of Asian languages and how it prepares you to lead the new engagement with Asia over the next decade and beyond through to understanding the relationship between human rights and democratisation. Your quest for understanding will never diminish.

Economics concerns humanity, not statistics and figures
Economics concerns humanity, not statistics and figures

Number 3:

Economics concerns humanity, not statistics and figures

Numbers do not lie but they do not tell the whole story. In the aftermath of the global economic crisis, a deeper and more intricate perspective is now required to design and develop enhanced economic policy. The transformation of economics means that it now interacts more actively with psychology, sociology, political science, philosophy and history. A degree in Economics now gives you not just an excellent grounding in theory but a practical toolkit to apply to real-life problem solving.

Number 4:

Comprehend the past to shape the future

Future change starts with recognising the lessons that the past can teach you. History unites many disciplines but it also teaches you how to examine human kind from a variety of diverse standpoints. You can focus on specific cultures or civilisations or craft a thematic approach by comparing different societies. For example, our Nation Empire Globe initiative considers how nationalism, imperialism, internationalism and globalisation are linked. What are the medieval origins of human rights? How could the fragmentary British empire have had such a profound impact upon a large continental nation such as the United States? History expands your knowledge of how the modern world emerged and imparts an understanding of how and why things change.

Tessa Boyd Caine BA (HONS) (2000) MCrim (2003) is the the CEO of the National Centre for Health Justice Partnerships
Tessa Boyd Caine BA (HONS) (2000) MCrim (2003) is the the CEO of the National Centre for Health Justice Partnerships

Number 5:

Passion inspires leadership

The world needs corporate leaders who can cope with complexity, have a capacity for imagination and refine the ideas of many. The principal qualities of an Arts degree - communication and empathy - make good leaders great. For example, at Westpac a History graduate replaced a Classics graduate when Brian Hartzer stepped in for the outgoing Gail Kelly as CEO. The greatest and most important transformations take place when our leaders are willing to develop new ideas and test new approaches. It underscores the importance of contributing to a dynamic and innovative society.

You can discover more about Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Sydney during Information Day on 5 January 2017 by attending one of our fascinating talks:

Bachelor of Arts

Learn how you can tailor this degree to explore your passions, interests and ambitions across more than 47 disciplines.

Arts and Social Sciences at Sydney: career preparation and employability

Find out how studying arts and social sciences will equip you with the skills employers value most and provide you with the ability to thrive in an ever changing work environment.

Bachelor of Economics

Understand how this degree will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the overall context of business and government.