News

Doing Drugs: The ethics, economics and politics of national and international medicines policy



23 November 2011

Medicines play an important role in the prevention and treatment of many diseases.

At the same time, however, they can have serious adverse effects (>140,000 Australians are admitted to hospital every year for problems related to medicine) and are expensive (PBS expenditure in 2009 was $7679.3 million).

The principal challenge, therefore, is to design systems and policies that enable equitable access to the medicines that people need, that ensure their safety and quality, and that do so at a cost that individuals and the community can afford.

This is not a straightforward task, however, and around the globe governments struggle to respond to global economic constraints, increasing drug costs, rapid developments in biotechnology-based pharmaceuticals, aging populations, changes to intellectual property rights, changing consumer expectations, and the globalisation of clinical research and drug development.

This symposium, which is presented by the Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, The Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics and the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Sydneyand the Australian Institute of Health Innovation at the University of NSW, addresses some of the challenges confronting the development of medicines policy in Australian and internationally.

Speakers include eminent scholars from a range of disciplines, including public health, pharmacology, sociology, health economics, bioethics, politics and consumer advocacy.

Speakers:

Time/date:

9am -5pm, Tuesday 29th November

Location:

Eastern Avenue lecture Theatre, level 3 (lift access), University of Sydney

Cost:

Attendance is free but registration is essential.

Contact:

Ms Lindy Gaze

email: lindy.gaze@sydney.edu.au or

telephone 02 9036 3405

Download the program - Doing Drugs: The ethics, economics and politics of national and international medicines policy


Contact: Greg Sherington

Phone: +61 2 9351 0202

Email: 243d5c15566b5f11032d291e00572b14340e535d36185a02550c405230