All future 2010 events

View All Summary Expand all
January
SCIL and ILA Public Lecture with Sir Ivor Roberts   View Summary
14 January 2010

Sir Ivor Roberts: The Development of Modern Diplomacy

Please click here to register online

This lecture will examine highlights from Satow's Diplomatic Practice - a classic guide to diplomacy, first published 90 years ago and revised four times since. This is the first revised edition for thirty years and provides an enlarged and updated section on the history of diplomacy and comprehensively revises the practice of diplomacy and the corpus of diplomatic and international law since the end of the Cold War. It traces the substantial expansion in numbers both of sovereign states and international and regional organisations and features detailed chapters on diplomatic privileges and immunities, diplomatic missions, and consular matters. It also examines new forms of diplomacy from the work of NGOs to the use of secret envoys and commercial security firms, and the book highlights the impact of international terrorism on the life and work of a diplomat.

This event is presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law, Sydney Law School and the International Law Association.

About the speaker

Sir Ivor Roberts entered the Diplomatic Service in 1968. From 1978 to 1982 he was First Secretary at the British High Commission in Canberra. From 1989 to 1993 he was Minister in the British Embassy in Madrid. He was appointed Charge d'Affaires and Consul-General in Belgrade in March 1994, and after recognition of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia by the United Kingdom, he became Ambassador. During his time in Belgrade he conducted negotiations on behalf of the international mediators (Lord Owen and Carl Bildt) with both the Yugoslav authorities and the Bosnian Serbs.

From 1998 to 1999 he was on a sabbatical as a Senior Associate Member of St Antony's College, Oxford, writing and lecturing on his experiences in Yugoslavia. From 1999 to 2003 he served as British Ambassador to the Republic of Ireland and from 2003 to 2006 as Ambassador to Italy and to San Marino. He retired from the Diplomatic Service in September 2006 on his election as the President of Trinity College.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Alex Mills, University of Cambridge   View Summary
28 January 2010

Title: The Confluence of Public and Private International Law

Speaker: Dr Alex Mills, University of Cambridge

A sharp distinction is usually drawn between public international law,
concerned with the rights and obligations of states with respect to other
states and individuals, and private international law, concerned with
issues of jurisdiction, applicable law and the recognition and enforcement
of foreign judgments in international private law disputes before national
courts. This talk will challenge this distinction by exploring the ways in
which norms of public international law shape and are given effect through
private international law, based on an analysis of the history of private
international law, its role in US, EU, Australian and Canadian federal
constitutional law, and its relationship with international constitutional
law.

About the Speaker:

Dr. Alex Mills is the Slaughter and May Lecturer in Law at Selwyn
College, University of Cambridge, where he teaches Conflict of Laws, Public
International Law and Constitutional Law. He has a BA (Hons) and LLB (Hons)
from the University of Sydney, and an LLM and PhD from the University of
Cambridge. He is the author of "The Confluence of Public and Private
International Law - Justice, Pluralism and Subsidiarity in the
International Constitutional Ordering of Private Law" (Cambridge University
Press, 2009). His present research interests include international
investment law and international constitutionalism.

February
Labour Law Seminar: Bargaining processes in the US    View Summary
4 February 2010

Bargaining processes in the US

Including the requirement to bargain in good faith

Following the new good faith bargaining requirements recently introduced into Australian law, (Fair Work Act 2009, Pt 2-4, Div 8), this lecture will provide an opportunity for academics and practitioners in workplace relations and labour law to gain an insight into the United States experience of good faith bargaining. It will focus on related issues concerning representation, voting and the composition of bargaining units.

Speaking at the event are the heads of two leading United States labour relations institutions: George Cohen, Director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service; and Ronald Meisburg, General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board.

The different roles of Mr Cohen and Mr Meisburg,will provide both a legal and practical perspective of good faith bargaining under the U.S. National Labor Relations Act.

This event is presented by the University of Sydney Law School and Fair Work Australia.

About the speakers

George Cohen was nominated as the Director of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service by President Obama on 29 June, 2009 and confirmed by the United States Senate on 5 October, 2009. Mr Cohen has had an extensive and distinguished career as a labor lawyer, negotiator, and mediator. During the period 1966-2005 he was a senior partner at Bredhoff & Kaiser, a Washington, D.C. law firm with a national practice, specialising in representing private and public sector labour organisations in collective bargaining. He is a graduate of Cornell University and its Law School and earned a LLM degree from Georgetown Law. In the past three years he has been engaged in a solo practice as a mediator. He is a member of the prestigious Mediation Panel of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and has successfully mediated numerous complex, high profile disputes.

Ronald Meisburg was nominated as General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board by President Bush in July 2005 and confirmed by the United States Senate on August 3, 2006. From 1980-2003, Mr. Meisburg practiced labour law in Washington, D.C., most recently in the firm of Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart. Earlier in his career, he served at the Department of Labor in the Office of the Solicitor of Labor, and in the divisions of Employee Benefits and Mine Safety and Health. He received his B.A. degree from Carson-Newman College and his J.D. degree from the University of Louisville.

**This event is now full. To be placed on a waiting list please email:law.events@sydney.edu.au**

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Laura E. Little, Temple University   View Summary
4 February 2010

Speaker: Professor Laura E. Little,Temple University

Seminar Topic: Adjudication and Emotion

This seminar will take a brief journey through the emotional life of an adjudicator, exploring some of the emotions at play in judging and investigating ways to harness emotions that enhance the quality of decision making. Although emotions are an inextricable part of life and law, unchecked sentiments risk damage to values that are core to quality adjudication: 1) impartiality; 2) independence; and 3) competence. Yet emotions can also reinforce these values. Professor Little will explore the three adjudication values in relationship to four representative sets of emotions:

1) loyalty and gratitude;
2) jealousy and envy;
3) sympathy and empathy, and
4) disgust and hate.

Professor Little will highlight the benefits and potential detriments of each of these emotions in decision making. As an illustration, she will focus on the interplay between emotions and two aspects of the United States legal system: judicial selection and separation of powers. In particular, the judicial selection process fosters loyalty and gratitude, while the separation of powers system creates opportunities for judges to develop and deploy jealousy and envy.

About the Speaker:

Professor Little is the James E. Beasley Professor of Law at Temple University's Beasley School of Law and specialises in Federal Courts, Constitutional Law, Conflict of Laws, and International Criminal Law.

ABA ILEX Conference: Cross-Border Collaboration, Convergence and Conflict   View Summary
9 February 2010

The Sydney Law School is pleased to partner with the American Bar Association Section of International Law in the presentation of thisconference to be held in Sydney on 9-10 February 2010.

Day 1 - The Internationalisation of Domestic Law and its Consequences

8.00am- 5.30pm, Tue 9 February 2010

Banco Court, Supreme Court of NSW, 184 Phillip Street, Sydney

The conference provides an opportunity to hear from some of the most respected legal minds from Australia and the US. Headlining the impressive list of guest speakers will be US Supreme Court Associate Justice, the Honourable Antonin Scalia, who will discuss, amongst other things, whether the United States' judicial experience with the Bill of Rights provides any guidance in the current debate about a possible Charter of Human Rights for Australia. Other key speakers include former High Court Chief Justices, the Honourable Murray Gleeson and the Honourable Sir Anthony Mason, and former High Court Justice Michael Kirby.

Day 2 - Moot Court Demonstration: The Art of Persuading Judges

2.30 - 5.00pm, Wed 10 February 2010

Sydney Law School, New Law School Building, Eastern Avenue, University of Sydney (Camperdown Campus)

For directions, please click here

This event, held in conjunction with the New South Wales Young Lawyers and hosted by the University of Sydney Law School, will offer a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to witness top advocates from Australia and the United States display their skills before some of the most distinguished jurists of these two countries, including US Supreme Court Associate Justice, the Honourable Antonin Scalia. Participants will act out a hypothetical cross-border dispute with parallel proceedings in the US and Australia in what promises to be a highly entertaining lesson on the art of persuading judges. A reception will follow from 5.00-6.30 pm.

While attendance at the full conference attracts a fee, those wishing to attend just the 10 February session at Sydney Law School are invited to attend free of charge. Registration is essential, however - please fill in the details on the first page of the registration form (without electing conference registration), and email to intilex@staff.abanet.org indicating your intention to attend only the 10 February session.

For a copy of the full program, registration fees and registration forms, please click here.

For further information and registration, please direct enquiries to the American Bar Association on intilex@staff.abanet.org

ABA ILEX Conference Day 2 - Moot Court Demonstration: The Art of Persuading Judges   View Summary
10 February 2010

PLEASE NOTE: THIS EVENT IS FULL,AND DUE TO THE RESPONSE RECEIVED FOR THE WAITING LIST, PLACES ONTHE WAITING LIST WILL NO LONGER BE ACCEPTED. We apologise for any inconvenience experienced as a result of the popularity of the event.

As part of American Bar Association Section of International Lawconference onThe Internationalisation of Domestic Law and its Consequences, Sydney Law School is pleased to hostthe following special event, held on day two of the conference.

Moot Court Demonstration: The Art of Persuading Judges

This event, held in conjunction with the New South Wales Young Lawyers and hosted by the University of Sydney Law School, will offer a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to witness top advocates from Australia and the United States display their skills before some of the most distinguished jurists of these two countries, including US Supreme Court Associate Justice, the Honourable Antonin Scalia. Participants will act out a hypothetical cross-border dispute with parallel proceedings in the US and Australia in what promises to be a highly entertaining lesson on the art of persuading judges. A reception will follow from 5.00-6.30 pm.

For thelist of 'players' and the program for the event, please click here.

For further information, please direct enquiries to the American Bar Association on intilex@staff.abanet.org

2nd ANJeL Australia-Japan Business Law Update   View Summary
13 February 2010

Register Online

To register please click here.


This second ANJeL CLE Seminar aimed especially at Australian practitioners in Japan, as well as Japanese practitioners interested in Australian law and the economy, focuses on developments in Australian and Japanese financial markets after the GFC as well as various implications of the recently amended Australia-Japan Double Tax Treaty.


Speakers

Professor Sheelagh McCracken recently joined the University of Sydney Law School as Professor of Finance Law. She has lectured extensively on finance law in Australia and in various centres in Asia, and has a strong research interest in the area. The seventh edition of Everett and McCracken's Banking and Financial Institutions Law, which she has co-authored since its inception, was published in Sydney in 2009. The third edition of her book on The Banker's Remedy of Set-Off is scheduled for publication in London in 2010.

Professor Souichirou Kozuka is Professor of Commercial Law at Sophia University Law School in Tokyo. He lectures and writes extensively particularly on the regulation of financial institutions, the secured transactions, distribution agreements, and transport law. He is Program Convenor (ANJeL-in-Japan: Kanto) and a frequent visitor to Australia.

Dean Page is a tax partner with Ernst & Young (EY) in Tokyo. Prior to joining EY, Dean co-founded and was CEO of JAX, a leading independent professional services firm. His other experience includes nearly six years with PricewaterhouseCoopers and three years with a Japanese international law firm. Dean is admitted as both an Attorney (England/Wales & Australia) and CPA (U.S. & Australia). He co-heads the International Tax Education Program (ITEP) at Temple University Japan where he has acted as an Adjunct Professor since 2001.

Paul Previtera is a Senior Tax Manager EY in Tokyo. He has more than seven years experience assisting multinational enterprises in the structuring of their international operations. Prior to joining EY, Paul worked in Grant Thornton Japan's international tax practice where he headed the firm's real estate advisory group. He is admitted as a lawyer (Qld) and holds a Masters of Tax from the University of New South Wales. Paul co-heads the ITEP as an Adjunct Professor.

Associate Professor Luke Nottage (Chair) is a founding Co-Director of the Australian Network for Japanese Law. He specialises in comparative and transnational commercial and consumer law.


Venue Details

Ernst & Young Shinnihon Tax, Tokyo.

Click here for a location map and further contact details.


Online Brochure

Please click here for further program details.
Lunchtime Seminar Series with Mark Van Hoecke    View Summary
17 February 2010

Seminar Topic: Legal Cultures and Globalisation

This seminar will consider the development of legal doctrine in the context of the current globalisation of legal cultures. New societal and legal developments, which are taking place more or less at the same time in different countries, the globalisation of the economy as well as attempts to harmonise law at a supra-national level all create novel challenges for the doctrinal study of law.

Since different legal cultures exhibit considerable variations in law and legal doctrine, harmonisation or globalisation will not be easy and requires, first of all, shared comprehension of 'legal doctrine', 'legal science' or both.

Priority should be given to enhancing the quality of legal doctrine and the establishment of a common legal doctrine at, for instance, the European level would certainly contribute to this goal, as would increased use of non-legal disciplines, such as legal sociology and 'law and economics'.

About the Speaker

Professor Van Hoecke is the 2010 Julius Stone Institute for Jurisprudence Distinguished Visiting Professor. Since February 2008 he has held the position of full time research professor for 'Legal Theory & Comparative Law' at the University of Ghent. He is also a part-time research professor for 'Methodology of Comparative Law' at the University of Tilburg (The Netherlands).

For a copy of the paper Legal Cultures, Legal Science & Globalisation please click here

Inaugural George Winterton Lecture 2010: Executive Power   View Summary
18 February 2010

This event is now full.

We apologise for this inconvenience

____________________________________

It is with great sadness that the Sydney Law School and the community mourn the death of Professor George Winterton, who died in November 2008. This event is to celebrate the achievements of this man - one of Australia's foremost experts on the Constitution and constitutional law.

The address will be delivered by Chief Justice Robert French, who was appointed to the High Court of Australia in September 2008.

Following the lecture, Chief Justice French will launch the book Constitutional Advancement in a Frozen Continent, Essays in Honour of George Winterton.

Continuing the Work of George Winterton

Friends and colleagues of the late George Winterton are invited to make a gift to the George Winterton Memorial Fund also being launched at the event.

To view the brochure

Please click here
Lunchtime Seminar Series with Luke Peterson and Nick Gallus    View Summary
18 February 2010

Seminar Topic: International Investment Law Protections for Not-Profit-Organisations

The International Center for Not-for-Profit Lawhas identified a "growing regulatory backlash against civil society organizations in many parts of the world."The Centernotes that, particularly in the Middle East, the former Soviet Union, Asia and Africa, not-for-profit organizations have encountered a range of obstacles including the outright seizure of assets and facilities, dissolution, de-licensing, restrictions or bans on the use of foreign funding and intimidation. While affected organizations may have recourse to remedies under local law or international human rights agreements, such remedies can be of limited utility. For example, local courts are sometimes reluctant to rule against the state and not all human rights treaties are enforceable. A less explored avenue for not-for-profit organizations is the vast and still-growing network of international treaties for the protection of foreign investments, commonly referred to as bilateral investment treaties ("BITs").

About the Speakers

Luke Peterson is a journalist who writes on international law and policy issues. His reporting has appeared in The Economist, The Financial Times, and a range of specialized news publications. Luke also publishes the www.InvestmentArbitrationReporter.com news service.

Nick Gallus is Counsel at the Trade Law Bureau of the Canadian Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Assistant Professor at Queens University School of Law. He is currently counsel forthe Government of Canada in two NAFTA Chapter 11 disputes and has previously acted as counsel in several bilateral investment treaty ("BIT") cases. He has helped negotiate BITs and has consultedto NGOs on the protections available under BITs.

International Investment Treaty Law and Arbitration Conference   View Summary
19 February 2010 to 20 February 2010

Click here to register and make your secure online payment now.

The International Investment Treaty Law and Arbitration Conference: Evolution and Revolution in Substance and Procedure will be held on the 19 & 20 February 2010.

This major conference explores some of the more controversial issues in contemporary investment treaty law and practice, including emerging issues in the nature of investment treaties, evolving jurisprudential trends, and potential changes in direction for investment law and arbitration. The program includes four plenary sessions and 14 concurrent panels with over 60 presentations from an exciting mix of senior and up-and-coming experts drawn from universities, government and private practice.

Keynote Speaker: Professor Philippe Sands QC, Matrix Chambers and University College London

Distinguished Speakers: Sir Franklin Berman QC KCMG, Essex Court Chambers, London; and Professor M Sornarajah, National University of Singapore.

Conference Brochure
To view a copy of the program, please click here

Speaker Biographies

To view a copy of the speaker biographies, pleaseclick here

Registration

Full fee: $440 inc GST

Concession: $275 inc GST (FT Student / FT Academic / NGO)

Speakers:$200 inc GST

A cocktail dinner for delegates will also be held at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Circular Quay, from 6-10pm on Friday 19 February, at a cost of $99 inc GST per person.

Accommodation

To book local accomodation, pleaseclick here.For special accommodation rates for Government and University employees only, click here.

ACCEL presents - The New International Carbon Offset?   View Summary
24 February 2010

Register Online

To register, please click here.

The New International Carbon Offset? Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD)

Deforestation, especially in the tropics, contributes around 20% of annual global greenhouse gas emissions. The Copenhagen Accord recognises the crucial role of reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) and the need to enhance removals of greenhouse gas emissions by forests. Under the Accord, financial resources from developed countries to developing countries will be mobilised through the immediate establishment of a mechanism including REDD-plus. Meanwhile, Australia's proposed Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme envisages that REDD offset credits might be recognised as eligible international emissions units following Copenhagen. Our panel of speakers will discuss the implications of the recent Copenhagen Accord and the future of REDD in Australia and globally.

Event Program


3.30pm:Registration and Refreshments


4pm: Welcome

Chair, Adjunct Professor Robert Hill, US Studies Centre, The University of Sydney


4.10pm: 'The Copenhagen Accord: Is it Legally Binding?'

Professor Gillian Triggs, Dean, Sydney Law School


4.40pm: 'Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation under the Copenhagen Accord'

Professor Rosemary Lyster, Professor of Climate and Environmental Law and Director of the Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law, Sydney Law School


5.10pm: 'Australian Government Perspectives on REDD'

Kushla Munro, Director, Australian Government International Forests Partnership

5.40pm:'Financing for REDD under the Copenhagen Accord'

Kate Miles, Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law, Sydney Law School


6.10pm: 'Enforcing the REDD Provisionsin the Copenhagen Accord'

Dr Tim Stephens, Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law

6.40pm: Questions and Close

Adjunct Professor Robert Hill, US Studies Centre, The University of Sydney

March
Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Andrew Lang, London School of Economics   View Summary
4 March 2010

The Neoliberal Moment in International Law

Around the late 1990s, a 'trade and human rights' debate emerged: on the one hand, claims were made that certain formal conflicts may exist between trade law and human rights law, and that human rights law may require particular forms of state intervention in markets which trade law forbids; on the other, the global project of trade liberalisation was presented as fundamentally compatible with, and reinforcing of, the global promotion of human rights. This seminar will offer an intervention in that debate along two axes.

First, it historicises the trade and human rights debate as a projection or internationalisation of domestic political struggles over neoliberal transformations of the state in the developed and developing world.It shows how these political struggles, when projected into the international field, are recast as problems of a fragmented legal order, requiring 'inter-regime co-ordination' as a solution.It asks what the consequences of such a reframing might be, and draws attention to a number of the more disturbing paths down which it might lead.

Second, it uses the trade and human rights debate as a launching point for an explorationof the relationship between international legal regimes and regimes of expert knowledge. How is international economic law informed by evolutions in orthodox economic knowledges, and how conversely do international legal regimes contribute to the evolution, projection and mobilisation of expert economic knowledges? One purpose of this line of enquiry is to question too simple models which posit WTO law as unproblematically an embodiment and global projection of neoliberal economic prescriptions.

About the Speaker

Dr Andrew Lang, London School of Economics

Dr Lang is a Senior Lecturer in the Law Department of the London School of Economics and specialises in International Economic Law and Public International Law. His current research is focussed on a number of themes around global economic governance, including the relationship between law and expert knowledge, and sociological approaches to the study of the trade regime.

SCIL Presents: Judge Aindrias O Caoimh, Judge of the Court of Justice of the European Union   View Summary
11 March 2010

European Justice: Judging in the Court of Justice of the European Union

This event is now full

Due to an overwhelming number of registrations, we have now closed off this event. We apologise for this inconvenience.

_______________________________

Judge Aindrias Ó Caoimh is the Irish Judge on the Court of Justice of the European Union. He will speak about his experiences as a Judge of the Court and offer insights into the operation of the Court, some interesting cases, and changes to the Court under the new Treaty of Lisbon.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Jessie Hohmann University of Cambridge    View Summary
11 March 2010

Seminar Topic: Conceptual Issues in the International Human Right to Housing

The right to housing has gained a significant place in the international human rights corpus, yet the right remains contested and controversial. Drawing on doctoral and more recent research, Dr Hohmann will argue that the way in which the right to housing has been interpreted, particularly in legal fora, serves to obscure and marginalise the actual issues that complicate a realisation of the right to housing.

In this presentation, Dr Hohmann will seek to illustrate this argument through specific conceptual issues in the right to housing: space, privacy and identity. These concepts provide an opportunity to explore the meaning of housing and to reveal the interests that motivate inclusion of housing within the corpus of human rights. Yet they remain largely absent from legal inquiries into the meaning, scope and violation of the right to housing.

The presentation will consider whether this conceptual/legal divide has implications beyond the interpretation and realisation of the right to housing, In the process, Dr Hohmann will investigate how human rights may be interpreted in ways that lose touch with social conditions, and evaluate whether this affects the prospects for actual social change through human rights.

About the Speaker

Dr. Jessie M Hohmann

Dr Jessie Hohmann is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Cambridge and the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law and holds a Junior Research Fellowship at Darwin College, Cambridge.

Dr Hohmann's research focuses on human rights and the normative limits of international law, investigating how human rights push at the limits of the international legal system and the implications of these pressures for international law. She lectures on the LLM human rights courses at both Cambridge and King's College London.

Previously,Dr Hohmanncompleted a PhD at the University of Cambridge on 'The Right to Housing: Theoretical and Practical Possibilities.' She also holds a LLM from the University of Sydney, a LLB from Osgoode Hall (York University) and a BA from the University of Guelph. She is a barrister and solicitor of the Law Society of Upper Canada and was previously Associate Lecturer at Macquarie University.

Dr Hohman's publications include the forthcoming 'Visions of Social Transformation and the Invocation of Human Rights in Mumbai: The Struggle for the Right to Housing' 13 Yale Human Rights & Development Law Journal (2010) and the recently published 'Igloo as Icon: A Human Rights Approach to Climate Change for the Inuit?' (2009) 18(2) Transnational Law & Contemporary Problems 297.

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week One   View Summary
17 March 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Juliane Werther    View Summary
18 March 2010

Seminar Topic: Moral Rights in Germany and Australia

Ms Werther will present on her research for her doctoral thesis with the same title. It concerns theproblems artists face when they want to dispose of their moral rights according to German law. The thesis tries to provide a solution to this problem by looking at the way Australian moral rights legislation handles this issue. Juliane will start by explaining what moral rights are and how the problems of the German legislation emerged to enablelisteners with no IP background to follow the topic.

About the Speaker:

Ms Werther currently works at the Law firm Lang & Rahmann in Duesseldorf, Germany and is undertaking her PhD with the topic of her thesis being "Moral Rights in Australia and Germany".

Developing Countries in WTO Dispute Settlement   View Summary
23 March 2010

To register, please click here.

In this lecture, Frieder Roessler, Executive Director of the Geneva-based Advisory Centre on WTO Law, will discuss the dispute settlement system of the WTO and the participation of developing countries in WTO dispute settlement.

As the Executive Director of the Advisory Centre on WTO Law - a Geneva-based international organization providing legal advice on WTO law, support in WTO dispute settlement proceedings and training in WTO law to developing countries - and a former Director of legal Affairs of the GATT and the WTO, Mr Roessler is in a unique position to understand how developing countries use the WTO dispute settlement system and the obstacles they face. He will present some insights into the operation of that system and how developing countries can benefit from it.

Frieder Roessler has been the Executive Director of the ACWL since it began its operations in 2001. He was Director of Legal Affairs of the GATT from 1989 and then the WTO until 1995. His main task at the GATT and the WTO was to advise dispute settlement panels and to prepare drafts of their reports or supervise their preparation by his staff. He was also closely involved in the legal aspects of the Uruguay Round negotiations and participated in the legal drafting process at the end of the Round.

After leaving the WTO, Mr Roessler joined the Faculty of Law of Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He has also been an adjunct professor at the Jean Moulin University of Lyon and at Paris and taught at the universities of St Gallen in Switzerland and of Minnesota in the United States.

Mr Roessler is visiting under the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Special Visits Program.

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Two   View Summary
24 March 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Daniel Gregory   View Summary
25 March 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'Legal Theory at Sydney'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'Legal Theory at Sydney' series.

Of Justice, Whales, Emus and Twin-Earth: A Better Theory of Concepts for Ronald Dworkin

The theory of natural-kind concepts which Hilary Putnam develops in ,, The Meaning of "Meaning"‟ and the theory of legal reasoning which Ronald Dworkin develops in Law's Empire are not obviously related. Dworkin‟s suggestion in his famous „Hart‟s Postscript‟, then, that there are „instructive similarities‟ between natural-kind concepts and the concepts which feature in legal reasoning (e.g. justice, fairness etc.) could only be described as unexpected. Whilst unexpected, however, it is also well-deserving of our attention - for if legal reasoning really is a matter of interpretation, then we shall surely want to know something about the structure and content of the legal and political concepts which lawyers and judges interpret. Moreover, Dworkin has precious little to say in Law's Empire about interpretation as a mental process so his brief remark in „Hart‟s Postscript‟ could provide the key to understanding his philosophy - whether for better or for worse.

The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate that the legal and political concepts which are involved in legal reasoning (if Dworkin is right that legal reasoning is essentially a matter of interpretation) cannot be natural-kind concepts; that Dworkin is wrong, moreover, to suggest that there are „instructive similarities‟ between the two; but that there is at least one other theory of concepts - the exemplar view - on which his legal philosophy perhaps could build a foundation.

Biography

Daniel Gregory studied philosophy and law at the University of Sydney. He is currently a member of the Taxation practice at Baker & McKenzie.

For further details of theJSI Legal Theory at Sydney Seminar Seriespleaseclick hereto view the brochure

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Beth Thornburg   View Summary
25 March 2010

Seminar Title: Manipulation of Public Perception of Law and Courts

Politicians have long sought to shape their messages to appeal to voters. But today in the United States corporate interest groups carry on well-financed, sophisticated campaigns to create voter pressure on legislators and judges to limit plaintiffs' recoveries, and to do so they villainize claimants, their lawyers, and the courts themselves. Their primary tools are images and anecdotes, with some deceptive numbers thrown in for good measure. Is this happening in Australia as well (perhaps in the name of 'tort reform')? What impact will these campaigns have on public confidence in and support for the courts and legal system more generally?

About the Speaker:ProfessorBeth Thornburg

Beth Thornburg is a Professor at SMU Dedman School of Law in Dallas, Texas. She teaches and writes in the area of civil procedure and alternative dispute resolution. Drawing on her experience with civil rights and commercial litigation, her scholarship focuses on the procedural fairness of the litigation process, especially at the pleadings, discovery, and jury charge stages. She also writes and speaks in the areas of comparative procedure, online dispute resolution, and the intersection of law and culture. This semester she is a Visiting Scholar at the Melbourne Law School, where she is doing research on Australian civil procedure.

Crime Free Housing Seminar   View Summary
29 March 2010

To register, please click here.

Is it possible to design neighbourhoods to prevent and reduce crime? This seminar will explore this question with reference to contemporary developments in New South Wales and other jurisdictions. The seminar will be of interest to planners, police, local government personnel, crime prevention practitioners and architects.

There has been much debate and commentary regarding crime in housing estates in recent years. Reports of problematic estates have regularly received media coverage. This coverage often fails to acknowledge the work that is happening in these areas to reduce and prevent crime. This seminar will bring together an exciting group of academics, policy makers and people planning and managing large housing estates and will explore contemporary practices and policies aimed at achieving crime free housing.

Speakers include:

  • Eileen Baldry, Associate Professor, School of Social Sciences and International Studies, UNSW.
  • Claudia Stephens, General Manager, Newleaf Communities.
  • Shane O'Brien, National Environmental health and Safety Manager, Delfin Lend Lease
  • Galina Laurie, Director, Community Regeneration Unit, Housing NSW

  • Chris Martin, PhD Candidate, University of Sydney

This seminar has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of Delfin Lend Lease.

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Three   View Summary
31 March 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

April
JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Pat O'Malley   View Summary
1 April 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'Legal Theory at Sydney'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'Legal Theory at Sydney' series.

Simulated Justice

The disciplinary societies of the 20th century are being transformed by governance through telematic networks - informatics networks that operate remotely through binary coded identifiers. Credit cards, access keys, DNA traces, vehicle bar codes, GPS chips, geospatial 'bracelets' for offenders and so on are familiar examples. In this context, new forms of 'simulated' justice and policing are emerging at the convergence of telematic regulation with two linked trends: the monetization of justice and the development of risk as a technology of governance. A classic example is the traffic fine, where increasingly the offence is electronically monitored, calibrated, monetized into a fine, the fine issued and expiated in simulated space - the point where the real and the virtual converge. While all of this is very 'real' (money after all is primarily digitized nowadays) binary codes rather than liberal individuals are active. The paper examines this governmental development and some of the implications for policing that illustrate ways in which simulated governance is moving beyond the reach of 'individual rights' as liberal individuals are fragmented into simulated 'dividuals', and commodified licenses rather than rights become critical to everyday life.

About the Speaker :Professor Pat O'Malley

Most of Professor Pat O'Malley's work over the past fifteen years has related to the development of risk as a technique for governing social and legal problems, and the key political, ethical and theoretical issues that this has given rise to.

Professor O'Malley was appointed Lurcy Distinguished Lecturer at Amherst College in 1992; John Edwards Lecturer at the University of Toronto in 1996; and Centenary Lecturer at the Victoria University of Wellington in 1999. In 2000, he was awarded the American Society of Criminology's Sheldon and Eleanor Glueck Award for contributions to international criminology, and in 2002 was appointed as Canada Research Chair in Criminology and Criminal Justice. Most recently he has been appointed as Adjunct Research Professor at Carleton University in Ottawa.

For a copy of the paper for this seminar pleaseclick here
Lunchtime Seminar Series with Jean D'Aspremont   View Summary
1 April 2010

Formalism in International Law After Postmodernism

Formalism has been the central paradigm in ascertaining the rules of international law and distinguishing between law and non-law at the international level since systematic studies of international law began. Accordingly, international lawyers have always been trained to delineate international legal rules by virtue of the formal source from which they emanate, a blueprint that, until recently, has been persistently perpetuated.Yet, deformalisation has long been infiltrating the ascertainment of international law. Although conceptualisations of law-identification in international legal scholarship has been subject to some cyclical oscillations between formal and non-formal antipodes, some restricted types of deformalised law-identification have invariably been recognized in the mainstream conceptualisations of international law. The most common of these deformalised law-ascertainment techniques is embodied in the possibility that an international legal rule can arise, not out of a formal identification, but from the concurring behaviour of States captured in terms of practice and opinio juris.

Most international legal scholars will no doubt have noticed that such deformalisation has recently grown beyond these few circumscribed exceptions to such an extent as to put into question the monopoly of formalism in the ascertainment of international legal rules. Indeed, deformalised techniques of law-identification nowadays pervade international law to a degree never witnessed before, materialising either in the growing acceptance of effect-based or process-based law-identification criteria or in radical skepticism towards law-ascertainment.

It is in the context of the contemporary retreat away from formalism that this book purports to provide some avenues for the containment of deformalisation and the rehabilitation of formalism as a central paradigm for the delineation of international law. In doing so, the book seeks to gather new support for more formal conceptualisations of international law ascertainment and to participate in the emergence of a new counterpoint to the anti-formalistic trends of contemporary legal scholarship. Restoring the centrality of formalism in law-ascertainment in the theory of international law, however, calls for more than mere repetition of the old formal templates. What is required is a significant modernisation of formalism, for only a revamp of formal law-identification that takes into account some tenets of post-modern critique can rein in the contemporary move away from formal law-ascertainment criteria in the theory of international law.

About the Speaker

Jean D'Aspremont has been Associate Professor of International Law at the University of Amsterdam since 2009. After obtaining his doctorate in law from the University of Louvain in Belgium in 2005, he was a Global Research Fellow in the Hauser Global Law School Program at New York University in 2005-2006 and then an Assistant Professor of Public International Law at the University of Leiden in 2006-2008. In 2009, he was counsel in proceedings before the International Court of Justice (Kosovo Advisory Opinion). He has published one monograph (L'Etat non démocratique en droit international. Etude critique du droit positif et de la pratique contemporaine (Paris, Pedone, 2008)) as well as numerous articles in peer reviewed journals and has several books forthcoming. He has been on the editorial board of the Leiden Journal of International Law since 2006 and was an editor of the New York University Journal of International Law & Politics in 2005-2006.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Max du Plessis    View Summary
7 April 2010

The Promises and Problems of International Criminal Justice: Lessons from (South) Africa

Professor du Plessis will be discussing the vital importance of civil society action in giving effect to international criminal justice. In particular, he will discuss efforts in South Africa (ultimately successful) to procure a domestic arrest warrant for President al-Bashir, and the use of South Africa's ICC implementation legislation to bring complementarity cases in our courts against Zimbabwean torturers and individuals accused of war crimes in Operation Cast Lead in Gaza. He will also discuss more broadly the push-back by the African Union against the International Criminal Court within the context of the uneven international criminal justice landscape (the likelihood that the Security Council will push for a referral of the Darfur crisis; but won't do so in respect of Gaza).

About the Speaker

Max du Plessis is an associate professor of law at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban and a senior research associate at the International Crimes in Africa Programme at the Institute for Security Studies, Pretoria. In addition to his academic and research work, Max is an associate member of the KwaZulu-Natal Bar with a practice in international and constitutional law.He has appeared in numerous cases in the South African Constitutional Court, is representing Professor Kenneth Good (who was expelled from Botswana for criticizing the President) before the African Commission on Human and Peoples Rights, and has represented NGOs in Southern Africa in utilizing South Africa''s Implementation of the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court Act in pursuing cases against individuals accused of international crimes in Zimbabwe and Gaza. He has written widely in the field of international and international criminal law and spent a month in the International Criminal Court in 2007 as a visiting expert.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Davina Cooper    View Summary
12 April 2010

Stripping the Public Bare: Theorising the Politics of In/Equality from Nudist Encounters

We are used to the listing of inequalities (gender, class, race, sexuality), with new entrants and inevitable etceteras, but is there any logic for progressives in the constitution of the list? What makes certain forms of discrimination count as illegitimate relations of inequality, when groups, such as smokers, describe themselves today in these terms? And what does undoing such inequality mean?

This paper explores these questions, as they animate current discussion on inequality and difference, through a case-study of social nudism. An unusual supplement to listed inequalities, the paper explores how we might go about asking the question: does the nudist/ textile divide constitutes a relation of illegitimate inequality. It then asks what undoing such inequality might mean: parity between dressed and undressed groups, equal but different spaces for nudism and clothing, nudity/ dress as an insignificant distinction or something else.

Centring the discussion of my talk on the eruption of naked bodies within mainstream public spaces and public encounters, the paper uses nudism to explore, conceptually, the compositional character of inequality, the power of norms to structure what undoing (textile) domination might mean, and the fantasmatic quality of equality, when it attaches to anti-subordination practices, as a non-governmental, elusive, virtual virtue.

About the Speaker

Davina Cooper is the author of Challenging Diversity (2004), Governing out of Order (1998), Power in Struggle (1995) and Sexing the City (1994), and works broadly across the fields of socio-legal studies, political theory, gender and sexuality,and cultural geography. Her current project addresses the conceptual promise and social power of "everyday utopias". She is a Professor at University of Kent, UK, and from 2004-2009 directed the AHRC Research Centre for Law, Gender & Sexuality.

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Four   View Summary
14 April 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

ACCEL Seminar Series 2010 - Week 1   View Summary
14 April 2010

Click here to register and make your secure online payment now.

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, heritage, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

Participants will be given a copy of Rosemary Lyster, Zada Lipman, Nicola Franklin, Graeme Wiffen and Linda Pearson Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales 2nd edition (Federation Press: 2009).

ACCEL's annual seminar series will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Registration

15 March: $880 (inc GST)

Program

For a full copy of the program, click here.


Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 14 April 2010
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 21 April 2010
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 28 April 2010
Pollution with Adjunct Professor Gerry Bates

Week 4 - 5 May 2010
Heritage and Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 12 May 2010
Environmental Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 6 - 19 May 2010
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 26 May 2010
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Mark Van Hoecke   View Summary
15 April 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'JSI Guest Speakers'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'JSI Guest Speakers' series.

Judicial Review and Deliberative Democracy: A Circular Model of Law Creation and Legitimation

During this seminar Professor Mark Van Hoeckewill discuss the legitimation of judicial review of legislation. Professor Van Hoecke argues that such a legitimation is not just a moral matter but is to be considered more generally in terms of societal acceptability, since it is based on a wide range of reasons including moral, social and pragmatic concerns. Moreover, Professor Van Hoecke's paper stresses that the legitimation of judicial decisions should be properly viewed in a circular perspective, so that the relationship between legislators and judges cannot be reduced to an absolute supremacy of those who are democratically elected over those who apply the law. On the contrary, the law is constantly made, adapted and developed in legal practice and legal decisions are basically legitimated through several processes of deliberative communication.

For a copy of Mark Van Hoecke'spaper please click here

About the Speaker -Professor Mark Van Hoecke, University of Ghent

Professor Van Hoecke is the 2010 Julius Stone Institute for Jurisprudence Distinguished Visiting Professor. Since February 2008 he has held the position of full time research professor for 'Legal Theory & Comparative Law' at the University of Ghent. He is also a part-time research professor for 'Methodology of Comparative Law' at the University of Tilburg (The Netherlands).

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Five   View Summary
21 April 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

ACCEL Seminar Series 2010 - Week 2   View Summary
21 April 2010

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, heritage, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

Participants will be given a copy of Rosemary Lyster, Zada Lipman, Nicola Franklin, Graeme Wiffen and Linda Pearson Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales 2nd edition (Federation Press: 2009).

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.



Program

For a full copy of the program, click here.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 14 April 2010
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 21 April 2010
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 28 April 2010
Pollution with Adjunct Professor Gerry Bates

Week 4 - 5 May 2010
Heritage and Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 12 May 2010
Environmental Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 6 - 19 May 2010
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 26 May 2010
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Samuel Issacharoff    View Summary
23 April 2010

President Obama versus the Supreme Court: The Curious Case of American Party Funding Law

The Supreme Court's decision in the Citizen United case is the most dramatic opinion on the law of the political process since Bush v. Gore, the 2000 case deciding the presidential election. The Court not only overturned critical portions of the recently minted Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, but it did so in the name of a sweeping right of expression by corporations. Professor Samuel Issacharoff, the Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law at New York University School of Law will discuss the impact of Citizens United and set out the unresolved constitutional dilemmas in the American law of campaign finance. Professor Issacharoff is a leading figure in the study of the Law of Democracy and the editor of the leading cross-national study of party funding laws.

About the Speaker: Professor Samuel Issacharoff is the Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law at the New York University School of Law. He is an eminent scholar and commentator on the subject of voting rights and electoral systems, as well as civil procedure and constitutional law.

Matt Laffan Memorial Address in Social Justice   View Summary
27 April 2010

In Search of Origins: Blindness in History and Law

To register, please click here

In March 2009, Sydney Law School alumnus Matt Laffan passed away after he fought and lost the biggest battle of his colourful and active life, and an annual memorial address was established to celebrate the significant impact Matt made in his short life. On 27 April, Professor Ron McCallum AO will deliver the second annual Matt Laffan Memorial Address in Social Justice on the topic In search of Origins: Blindness in History and Law.

In order to bring to people's attention the contributions of persons with the disability of blindness, the lecture will unpack the lives of some extraordinary blind people in history from the time of the Gospels to the present day. The theme of this history is one of acceptance of persons with disabilities, however, much of this history is unknown to the general public. Of all the professions, law has attracted disabled persons like Matt Laffan and Professor McCallum because it is housed in the mind as a way of thinking and of problem solving. The lecture will conclude by examining the contributions of blind persons to the law, whether as lawyers, as academics, as judges or as litigants.

"Matt Laffan's tenacity and courage is an example to me, to my sisters and brothers with disabilities, and to all persons who strive for acceptance and for social justice." Ron McCallum AO

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Six   View Summary
28 April 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

ACCEL Seminar Series 2010 - Week 3   View Summary
28 April 2010

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, heritage, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.


Participants will be given a copy of Rosemary Lyster, Zada Lipman, Nicola Franklin, Graeme Wiffen and Linda Pearson Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales 2nd edition (Federation Press: 2009).

ACCEL's annual seminar willappeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

For a full copy of the program, click here.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 14 April 2010
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 21 April 2010
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 28 April 2010
Pollution with Adjunct Professor Gerry Bates

Week 4 - 5 May 2010
Heritage and Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 12 May 2010
Environmental Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 6 - 19 May 2010
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 26 May 2010
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Arlie Loughnan & Dr Rita Shackel   View Summary
29 April 2010

The PG Research Experience in Law: Starting a Conversation

In this seminar, Dr Arlie Loughnan and Dr Rita Shackel would like to advance the 'conversation' about the law student PG research experience. After short presentations regarding the available data on the PG research experience in law, Dr Loughnan and Dr Shackel will then open up the session to comments and contributions from any of those present. Professor Terry Carney, Professor Julie Stubbs and Dr Belinda Smith (Associate Dean, International students) will be present. A special invitation has also been issued to all current PG Research students in the Faculty.

In this presentation, Dr Loughnan and Dr Shackel seek to focus on the specific institutional aspects of a positive PG research experience, and to canvass some of the ways in which individuals and particular clusters/centres are working to enhance PG student experience in the Faculty. If you would like to join in this conversation, Dr Loughnan and Dr Shackel would very much welcome your attendance at the seminar.

About the Speakers:

Dr Arlie Loughnan, Sydney Law School

Dr Arlie Loughnan joined the Faculty in 2007. Arlie's research concerns criminal law and the criminal justice system, with a focus on the relationship between legal doctrines, practices, institutions and knowledge. Her particular interests are constructions of criminal responsibility, the interaction of legal and expert medical knowledges and the historical development of the criminal law.

Dr Rita Shackel, Sydney Law School


Dr Rita Shackel's research is broadly focused on evaluation and reform of legal processes, particularly, vis-à-vis victims of crime and children's interaction with the law. Her research combines doctrinal work in evidence and procedure with interdisciplinary analysis, drawing particularly on psychological theories and empirical findings and methodologies. Rita also has a strong interest in legal pedagogy.

May
China - Intellectual Property and Innovation: Law and Policy   View Summary
3 May 2010

Registration

Click here to register online.

_____________________________________________________________

This seminar will focus on current issues in Intellectual Property Law in China and China's obligations in relation to intellectual property under the WTO.

Ms Li Li, Senior Legal Counsel (IPR) for the Hewlett-Packard Company in Shanghai, and former Deputy Chief Judge of the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Tribunal of the Pudong New Area Court in Shanghai, will speak on current issues in Intellectual Property Law in China, with a focus on the Chinese Indigenous Innovation Policy, and its implications for law, practice and policy in China.

Professor Natalie Stoianoff of the Faculty of Law at the University of Technology, Sydney will speak on China's obligations under the Protocol for China's accession to the WTO, and analyse the subsequent actions taken by those WTO member nations who have expressed concern or raised disputes in relation to China's compliance. In particular, this presentation will analyse the TRIPS Article 63.3 request made by the US, Japan and Switzerland in October 2005 and the January 2009 result of the WTO dispute resolution action taken by the US and various other member nations (including Australia) in relation to Measures Affecting the Protection and Enforcement ofIntellectual Property Rights in China (WT/DS362).

This event is presented by the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law in association with the China Focus Group of the International Law Section of the Law Council of Australia.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Mike Redmayne   View Summary
3 May 2010

Confronting Confrontation

Criminal defendants are often said to have a right to examine (or 'confront') the witnesses against them. This right is guaranteed under the European Convention on Human Rights, under the ICCPR, and under the US Constitution. But what does confrontation mean, and in what circumstances might there be exceptions to the right? For example, if a prosecution witness has died, is the right breached by the introduction of her statement at trial? These questions have recently brought the English courts into conflict with the European Court of Human Rights. They are also topical in the United States, where the confrontation right has been reinvigorated by the Supreme Court. This paper explores these issues, focussing on the problem of the use of statements by absent witnesses and probing the underlying justifications for the confrontation right.

About the Speaker - Professor Mike Redmayne, London School of Economics


Mike Redmayne is a Professor of Law at the London School of Economics. His research interests are in criminal procedure and evidence. He is the author of Expert Evidence and Criminal Justice (OUP 2001) and, with Andrew Ashworth, The Criminal Process (OUP, 4th edn forthcoming 2010). He is currently joint articles editor of the Modern Law Review.

Private International Law Jurisdiction in Cyberspace - The Collision Between Territorial Sovereignty   View Summary
4 May 2010

Register Online

Click here to register and make your payment online

_________________________________________

About the Presentation

Rules on the jurisdiction of national courts over civil and commercial matters were embedded into national laws in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Those rules were fashioned in the light of industrial age technology and commerce, and the emergence of the territorially sovereign nation state as the only relevant political actor in international relations. Since that time, globalisation, the lowering of trade and investment barriers, and especially the use of technology have made place less relevant to the incidence of civil and commercial causes and the connection of those causes to national laws and the courts which enforce them. Jurisdiction rules when applied in this context can give rise to capricious, arbitrary and accidental effects that do not serve the interests of the parties or the ends of justice. The talk will consider these problems and the way that national jurisdiction rules have, or may, attempt to resolve them under Anglo-Australian common law and United States law.

About the Speaker

Justin Hogan-Doran is a Barrister at the NSW Bar, where he practices in commercial litigation including maritime law, cross-border claims and international arbitration. In 2009, he was listed by the Australian Financial Review as one of Australia's Best Lawyers, specialising in alternative dispute resolution. He was a Menzies Scholar to Oxford University, where he completed the BCL and M Phil, writing a thesis on private international law jurisdiction of laws in cyberspace. He teaches Transnational Commercial Litigation in the LLM in Europe Program and is a PhD candidate, supervised by Professor GillianTriggs.

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Seven   View Summary
5 May 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

ACCEL Seminar Series 2010 - Week 4   View Summary
5 May 2010

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, heritage, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

Participants will be given a copy of Rosemary Lyster, Zada Lipman, Nicola Franklin, Graeme Wiffen and Linda Pearson Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales 2nd edition (Federation Press: 2009).

ACCEL's annual seminar series will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

For a full copy of the program, click here.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 14 April 2010
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 21 April 2010
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 28 April 2010
Pollution with Adjunct Professor Gerry Bates

Week 4 - 5 May 2010
Heritage and Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 12 May 2010
Environmental Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 6 - 19 May 2010
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 26 May 2010
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Kyla Reid   View Summary
6 May 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'Legal Theory at Sydney'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'Legal Theory at Sydney' series.

Seminar Title:Consent, Human Rights and the State: The Possibilities for Indigenous Governance in Terms of a (Revised) Right to Self-Determination

When indigenous peoples seek greater governmental control over their communities often they and their advocates articulate this claim, especially in international forums, in terms of a 'right to self-determination.' This paper will consider the appropriateness of this discourse for articulating indigenous governance claims.Kyla Reid will begin by briefly defending the legal orthodoxy of self-determination through an intellectual history of the discourse's emergence in international law. Then, Ms Reid will summarise and reject the attempts by Allan Buchanan, Benedict Kingsbury and Iris Marion Young to rethink self-determination in a manner more appropriate for articulating indigenous governance claims.Ms Reid will conclude that attempts to re-think self-determination remain too tied to the institutional structures of the state to be appropriate for articulating indigenous claims.

About the Speaker:

Kyla Reid is Ph.D. student in the Department of Philosophy at University of Sydney. She graduated with Masters of Arts in political science from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver in 2007. Her interests lie in political and legal philosophy generally. More specifically, she is interested in the legitimacy issues raised by the governance claims of indigenous peoples against the settler state. Her dissertation criticises the bias towards the institutional framework of the state within Western political philosophy as detrimental towards understanding what indigenous peoples are asking for when they are making governance claims.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Ms Li Li, Hewlett-Packard Company   View Summary
6 May 2010

Law and Policy in China: Intellectual Property and Innovation

This presentation will consider current issues in Intellectual Property Law in China, with a focus on the Chinese Indigenous Innovation Policy, and its implications for law, practice and policy in China.

About the Speaker:

Ms Li Li, Senior Legal Counsel (IPR), Hewlett-Packard Company, Shanghai, and former Deputy Chief Judge of the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Tribunal of the Pudong New Area Court, Shanghai.

Ms Li Li was formerly the Deputy Chief Judge of the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Tribunal of the Pudong New Area Court in Shanghai, China. She currently works as Senior Legal Counsel (IPR) for the Hewlett-Packard Company in its Shanghai office, where she specialises in Chinese intellectual property law. The Basic Courts in China are the courts of first instance, where 90% of all Chinese cases are resolved. Ms Li served on the Pudong Court, the Basic Court for the thriving business district of the Shanghai Pudong New Area from 2000 to 2008, and acquired extensive experience in commercial and intellectual property litigation, before moving to practice in the corporate sector. Ms Li has a Bachelor of Laws and Master of Laws from the East China University of Political Science and Law, and has published extensively in the areas of trademark law, unfair competition and business secrets litigation.

Crime Prevention Seminar   View Summary
10 May 2010

Keeping up with the latest developments in crime prevention can be challenging. This seminar will highlight recent developments, including successful local crime prevention initiatives, and will include a small number of keynote presentations and interactive panel sessions.

The two keynote speakers secured for this event are:

  • Jackie Fitzgerald (Deputy Director, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research). Jackie will discuss recent NSW crime trends. With 2009 NSW crime data to be released in late April 2010, Jackie will be discussing the latest crime trends across NSW.
  • Peter Homel (Research Manager, Crime Reduction and Review Program, Australian Institute of Criminology). Peter will discuss contemporary crime prevention trends across Australia. Having worked across many Australian jurisdictions in recent years, Peter is in a good position to describe the latest crime prevention approaches being adopted in other States and Territories.

Following the keynote speakers, interactive panel sessions will be conducted. These panel sessions will seek to explore current NSW crime prevention policies and local crime prevention strategies. Particular attention will be paid to the steps involved in developing a successful crime prevention intervention, drawing on practical experiences of crime prevention practitioners. These panel sessions will promote dialogue between audience members and the panellists, rather than relying on lengthy presentations.

This seminar will be of particular interest to:

  • Crime prevention practitioners
  • Police
  • Local government agencies
  • Non-government organisations
  • Youth and community workers
  • Security personnel
  • University students

This seminar has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of the NSW Department of Justice and the Attorney General.

This event is now full and registrationsareclosed. For any enquiries, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Eight   View Summary
12 May 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

ACCEL Seminar Series 2010 - Week 5   View Summary
12 May 2010

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, heritage, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

Participants will be given a copy of Rosemary Lyster, Zada Lipman, Nicola Franklin, Graeme Wiffen and Linda Pearson Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales 2nd edition (Federation Press: 2009).

ACCEL's annual seminar series willappeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

For a full copy of the program, click here.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 14 April 2010
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 21 April 2010
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 28 April 2010
Pollution with Adjunct Professor Gerry Bates

Week 4 - 5 May 2010
Heritage and Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 12 May 2010
Environmental Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 6 - 19 May 2010
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 26 May 2010
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Dr Patrick Emerton    View Summary
13 May 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'JSI Guest Speakers'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'JSI Guest Speakers' series.

Human Rights: A Non-Universalist Conception

Contemporary human rights discourse typically characterises human rights standards as making universal claims on all forms of human social organisation. Indeed, the claim to universalism might appear to be ineliminable from contemporary understandings of human rights, given that the centrepiece of that understanding is the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The contention of this paper is that an alternative, non-universalist conception of human rights claims is available to us, and is a superior one. Rather than being understood as statements of fundamental moral truth, the promulgation of human rights standards can be understood as a particular sorts of means to a particular sort of end - roughly, as a means of making modern political communities viable sites of human flourishing.

This alternative conception of human rights enables the resolution of certain puzzles endemic to contemporary human rights discourse, such as the relationship between institutions and human rights satisfaction, and the relationship between, on the one hand, civil and political rights, and on the other, economic and social rights. It also suggests that, if there occurred a significant change either in forms of political organisation, or in our understanding of human flourishing, contemporary human rights discourse might become redundant, in much the same way as have various moral frameworks that were dominant at earlier periods in history.

About the Speaker -

Dr Patrick Emerton, Monash University

Areas of Expertise: Legal philosophy, Legal theory, Political and social philosophy, Moral philosophy, Philosophy of language, International justice, Anti-terrorism law

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Mr Jo Ford   View Summary
13 May 2010

Regulating Peace-Sensitive Business Activity During Post-Conflict Transitions

'How does international law feature in efforts to rebuild societies after conflict? Lawyers' attentionto post-conflict situations has generally focussed onpolitical issues, actors and institutions: democratic elections, constitution-making,transitional justice, or on humanitarian issues. Despite growing awareness of the significance of economic activity to sustainable post-conflict peacebuilding, lawyersfeel less comfortable with the political economies of conflict and post-conflict areas, and the roles of private economic actors. Although 'blood diamonds', private military contractors and other experienceshave highlighted the significance of the private sector, there is comparatively little attention to how, particularly during 'transitional' periods after conflict, the international community might better regulate private economic activity in order to mitigate its possible harmful impact, and maximise the peacebuilding potential of the private sector.

This seminar is an overview of cross-disciplinary PhD researchfocussing on the role of UN peacekeeping missions as regulators of business activity post-conflict. It may be of interest to international lawyers, as it is partly in the context of ongoing UN Human Rights Council efforts to discern the human rights obligations attaching to corporations and businesses, efforts to 'harden' corporate social responsibility through law, and wider debates and initiatives on regulating business conduct in weak governance zones

About the Speaker: Mr Jo Ford, ANU

Mr Jo Ford is a graduate of Natal and Cambridge and a doctoral student with the Centre for International Governance and Justice, Regnet, ANU.

Mr Ford is pursuing his PhD studies at the Centre for International Justice and Governance, ANU.MrJoFordresearch looks at the international law, regulation and the role of the private sector in post-conflict reconstruction.Mr Fordwas a member of the Sydney Law School teaching staff in 2002 and 2003. He was a founding member of, and remains affiliated to, the Sydney Centre for International Law.

Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Patrick Parkinson AM   View Summary
18 May 2010

Family Law and the Indissolubility of Parenthood

Few areas of public policy involve as much conflict as the law of parenting after separation. The argument of this lecture is that many of these conflicts derive from the breakdown of the model on which divorce reform was predicated in the late 1960s and early 1970s. That model presupposed that divorce could end the relationship between parents in such a way that people could get on with their lives with only residual ties to their former partners. That has proved to be illusory. International trends suggest that there has been an irreversible shift towards a model of post-separation parenting which assumes that the family endures despite the separation of the parents. Once marriage was indissoluble. Now it is parenthood which, in practice, is so difficult to dissolve, with profound implications for parents, children and the family law system.

Professor Patrick Parkinson AM is a specialist in family law, child protection and the law of equity and trusts. His books include Australian Family Law in Context (4th ed, 2009), The Voice of a Child in Family Law Disputes (with Judy Cashmore, 2008), Tradition and Change in Australian Law (3rd ed, 2005), Child Sexual Abuse and the Churches (2nd ed, 2003) and Principles of Equity (editor, 2nd ed, 2003). Patrick is a member of the Executive Council of the International Society of Family Law and the editor of the Australian Journal of Family Law, and is well-known for his community work concerning child protection.

Lectures presented as part of the Sydney Law School DistinguishedScholarsLectureSeries 2010 are free, and pre-registration is not required.Click here for a copy of the series program.

Judicial Supremacy or Inter-institutional Dialogue? Political Responses to Judicial Review   View Summary
18 May 2010 to 19 May 2010

This two-day workshop is presented by Sydney Law School, the US Studies Centre, and the Clark Centre for Australian & New Zealand Studies at the University of Texas, Austin.

Authors' Workshop:

Judicial Supremacy or Inter-institutional Dialogue?

Political Responses to Judicial Review

9am-5.15pm, Tuesday 18 May & 9am-4pm, Wednesday 19 May

Faculty Common Room

Prominent legal scholars from Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and the US will convene to discuss a set of commissioned papers that examine the divergent forms of judicial review and the political consequences of judicial review decisions.

The development of new models of judicial review in new places demands empirical analyses that specify and elaborate the role of history, culture, and politics in the actual practice of judicial review. This workshop addresses various questions, including: How is judicial review institutionalised in different settings? What are the political effects of judicial review decisions?

Mark Tushnet, Harvard Law School, will deliver an opening address, followed by a series of country-specific panels. Participants include: Mark Graber (University of Maryland); Sanford Levinson (University of Texas - Austin); Brian Galligan & Adrienne Stone (University of Melbourne); Helen Irving, (Sydney Law School); Janet Hiebert (Queen's University); Rainer Knopff & Dave Snow (University of Calgary); Petra Butler (Victoria University of Wellington); Paul Rishworth (University of Auckland). Rhonda Evans Case (East Carolina University), will serve as moderator.

All panels are open at no cost, however catered coffee-breaks and lunches will be limited to the presenters. No RSVP is required, and those wishing to sit in on individual sessions should just come along. Please note, however, that numbers will be limited.

Papers will be posted this week at http://ussc.edu.au/. Please click here for a copy of the program.

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Nine   View Summary
19 May 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

ACCEL Seminar Series 2010 - Week 6   View Summary
19 May 2010

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, heritage, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

.

Participants will be given a copy of Rosemary Lyster, Zada Lipman, Nicola Franklin, Graeme Wiffen and Linda Pearson Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales 2nd edition (Federation Press: 2009).

ACCEL's annual seminar serieswill appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

For a full copy of the program, click here.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 14 April 2010
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 21 April 2010
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 28 April 2010
Pollution with Adjunct Professor Gerry Bates

Week 4 - 5 May 2010
Heritage and Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 12 May 2010
Environmental Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 6 - 19 May 2010
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 26 May 2010
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Sydney Law School Graduation Party   View Summary
20 May 2010

Professor Gillian Triggs, Dean of the Sydney Law School, invites you to a cocktail reception to celebrate your graduation the evening before your special day.

Program

6.30pm - Drinks and canapés

6.50pm - Welcome address: Professor Barbara McDonald, Alumni Council

7.00pm - Special guest: Tom Glasson (LLB '04), Business Affairs Lawyer, Granada Media

Lawyer Tom Glasson will talk about life after Sydney Law School and what it means to be an alumnus.

As a lawyer for television production company Granada Media (Australia's Next Top Model, Dancing with the Stars), Tom Glasson was the winner of the 2008 National Golden Gavel public speaking competition, and has worked as a writer for shows including Comedy Inc, David Tench Tonight and The Ronnie Johns Half Hour.

RSVP for this event has now closed.

Restorative Justice: Moving Forward   View Summary
24 May 2010

Online Registration

To register, please click here.

________________________________________________

The Sydney Institute of Criminology presents the first in a proposed series of events relating to restorative justice within the criminal justice system. These events will provide opportunities for restorative justice practitioners, policy-makers, researchers and other interested parties to share knowledge, information and experience.

In NSW, legal practices built on restorative justice principles are well established across the criminal justice system: Youth Justice Conferences with young offenders, Forum Sentencing with adult offenders, Restorative Justice processes with post-sentence adult offenders and Circle Sentencing with Indigenous offenders. However, restorative justice is a dynamic, evolving discipline. Over the coming months, the Sydney Institute of Criminology events will highlight developments in theory and research, explore critical issues and concerns, promote examples of practice, stimulate thinking, reflection and discussion and, potentially, inform the future development of restorative justice policy and practice in NSW.

Restorative Justice: Moving Forward, includes short presentations from a small panel of speakers offering different perspectives to a critical discussion of restorative justice. Seminar participants will have opportunities to explore these issues with the speakers after each presentation.

Guest Speakers

Dr Ivo Aertsen, Criminology professor at the Leuven Catholic University (K.U.L. Belgium), is internationally recognised as one of the pre-eminent criminologists currently working in Restorative Justice and has written extensively on the subject. He is a past Chair of the European Forum for Restorative Justice. Dr Aertsen will present, via AVL, on recent theoretical developments in restorative justice and the place of restorative justice in an international context.

Julie Stubbs, Professor of Criminology, Sydney Law School, is internationally respected for her work on gendered violence and widely published in the field. She has a long-standing interest in the relationship dynamics within restorative justice practice. Her presentation will explore these issues and their implications for evolving restorative justice policy and practice.

Natalia Blecher, BA/LLB (Hons); Researcher, Supreme Court of NSW, has recently completed what is fast becoming a seminal study examining the theoretical role and the actuality in practice of apology in the restorative justice conference. Her findings raise a number of considerations of particular interest to restorative justice practitioners and policy-makers.

Employment Relations & the Law Seminar Series 2010 - Week Ten   View Summary
26 May 2010

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introduction to the series

Week 2: The Fair Work Framework: The NES, Modern Awards and Workplace Rights

Week 3: Classifying Work: Employment, Contracting and Consulting

Week 4: The Employment Contract

Week 5: Termination of Employment

Week 6: Collective Bargaining and Industrial Action

Week 7: Occupational Health and Safety

Week 8: Discrimination in Employment

Week 9: Workplace Dispute Resolution

Week 10: Future Issues

Course fee: $990 inc GST

Series Brochure

To view the online brochure please click here

ACCEL Seminar Series 2010 - Week 7   View Summary
26 May 2010

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, heritage, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to get up-to-date early in the year. Participants will be given a copy of Rosemary Lyster, Zada Lipman, Nicola Franklin, Graeme Wiffen and Linda Pearson Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales 2nd edition (Federation Press: 2009).

ACCEL's annual seminar serieswill appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Registration

Seminar fee: $880 inc GST

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 14 April 2010
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 21 April 2010
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne and Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 3 - 28 April 2010
Pollution with Adjunct Professor Gerry Bates

Week 4 - 5 May 2010
Heritage and Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 12 May 2010
Environmental Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 6 - 19 May 2010
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 26 May 2010
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Registrations for this event will open shortly. If you are interested in being placed on a waiting list, please email your contact details to law.events@sydney.edu.au.

ACCEL Seminar Series 2010 - Week 7   View Summary
26 May 2010

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, heritage, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.



Participants will be given a copy of Rosemary Lyster, Zada Lipman, Nicola Franklin, Graeme Wiffen and Linda Pearson Environmental and Planning Law in New South Wales 2nd edition (Federation Press: 2009).

ACCEL's annual seminar serieswill appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

For a full copy of the program, click here.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 14 April 2010
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 21 April 2010
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne and Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 3 - 28 April 2010
Pollution with Adjunct Professor Gerry Bates

Week 4 - 5 May 2010
Heritage and Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 12 May 2010
Environmental Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 6 - 19 May 2010
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 26 May 2010
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Social Justice Careers Fair   View Summary
26 May 2010

Presented by Sydney Law School and Sydney University Law Society (SULS)

The Fair will provide direct access to law students seeking to pursue a career in social justice. A range of organisations will be on hand to discuss your options, including government, non-government, community and not-for-profit organisations whose work falls within the broad ambit of social justice.


Attendance at the Fair is FREE, and registration is not required.

Click herefor a copy of the event flyer.
JSI Guest Speakers Series: Stanley L. Paulson   View Summary
27 May 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'JSI Guest Speakers'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'JSI Guest Speakers' series.

Title: The Great Puzzle: Kelsen's Basic Norm

The puzzle stemming from Hans Kelsen's basic norm might be conceptualised in the form of a dilemma: If the idea of 'grounding' the law or providing a foundation for the law is taken seriously as the task Kelsen accords to the basic norm, then the dilemma might look like this: Either the characterisation chosen from among more than a dozen arguably distinct characterisations of the basic norm provides nothing remotely like a 'grounding' of the law but generates instead a petitio principii, a begging of the question, or - the other horn of the dilemma - this or that Kantian or Neo-Kantian characterisation does appear to imply the 'grounding' function of the basic norm, but no sound Kantian or Neo-Kantian argument in support of the 'grounding' function is forthcoming. Paulson will take up a number of matters adumbrated in this statement of the dilemma, to wit: Kelsen's various characterisations of the basic norm, the petitio principii arising from many characterisations, the failure of the Kantian or Neo-Kantian transcendental argument as applied in legal science, and, finally, an explication of the basic norm on the model of Kant's regulative principle, which, Paulson argues, lends a grounding function to the basic norm.

About the Speaker:Stanley L. Paulson,Washington University, St Louis and University of Kiel

Stanley L. Paulson attended the University of Minnesota as an undergraduate, majoring in philosophy (B.A.). He took graduate degrees in philosophy at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (M.A., Ph.D.) and a law degree at Harvard University (J.D.).

Paulson began his teaching career in the Department of Philosophy at Washington University in St. Louis in the fall of 1972. He was granted tenure at the University in 1978 and was appointed at the School of Law in 1983. He was appointed William Gardiner Hammond Professor of Law in 2000.

He has held a number of post-doctoral fellowships, including awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities (Washington, D.C.), the Fulbright Commission (Washington, D.C. and Vienna), the Max Planck Society (Munich), the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (Bonn - Bad Godesberg), and the Rockefeller Foundation (New York).

Paulson's specialty is European legal philosophy and legal theory, and he has written a great deal on the work of the legal philosopher and constitutional theorist Hans Kelsen. Paulson writes in English and in German, and his work has been translated into seven foreign languages.

People with Complex Needs Who Pass Through Criminal Justice: Professor Margaret Hamilton    View Summary
31 May 2010

Registrations are now closed

Due to an overwhelming response from registrants this event is now oversubscribed. We apologise for the inconvenience.

_________________________________________________

About the Speaker

Professor Hamilton is Professorial Fellow in the School of Population Health, University of Melbourne. She is the immediate past Chair and now Vice-President of the Cancer Council Victoria, and is also an executive member of the Australian National Council on Drugs. She is also a member of the Prime Minister's Council on Homelessness. Professor Hamilton has long standing policy, research and programme development experience in the arena of alcohol and drug dependence, including as a delegate to the UN Commission on Narcotic Drugs. Professor Hamilton's background is in social work and public health, and she has conducted research in epidemiology, policy, evaluation (prevention and treatment), young people and drugs, women and alcohol, alcohol problems in remote Australia, evaluation of therapeutic communities and self-help. She was the founding Director of the Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre in Victoria, and recently chaired the Multiple and Complex Needs Panel in Victoria.

About the Presentation

Efforts to enhance efficiency in service provision have produced increasingly sophisticated targeting in the various human service domains.

In the context of changing demographics, the aftermath of de-institutionalisation of the 1970's to 1990's and governments contracting out services with tight specifications this has often had an unintended outcome of excluding those with multiple needs; leaving some people in our community especially vulnerable. Some appear to be at increasingly high risk of being 'serviced' in our state run justice systems. This paper shares the experience of one endeavour of a state to provide an over-sighting service (under legislation) to those at the extreme end of the spectrum of people with multiple and complex needs.

Victoria's Multiple and Complex Needs Panel (2004-2009): observations of the Chair.

People with Complex Needs Who Pass Through Criminal Justice' is part of the 'Beyond Punishment' seminar series, sponsored by Corrective Services NSW.

June
Takeovers Panel Conference   View Summary
4 June 2010

Corporate Law In Focus

Takeovers Panel Conference

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Ross Parsons Centre at Sydney Law School will host a one day conference on 4 June 2010 commemorating the 10th Anniversary of the reconstituted and reinvigorated Takeovers Panel. The focus of the conference will be a review of the Panel's achievements and prospects.

Guest speakers include representatives of the judiciary, barristers, solicitors and ASIC. We expect the conference to be an informative and interactive forum and closing remarks will be made by Justice Reg Barrett of the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

Speaker papers will be published by the Ross Parsons Centre after the conference.

Registration

Full Fee: $350 (including GST)

Full Time Student (identification required): $245 (including GST)

Sydney Law School Alumni (identification required): $280 (including GST)

Program

Click here to view a copy of the conference brochure.

The Unfinished Business of Decolonisation: West Papua and Western Sahara as Occupied Territories   View Summary
9 June 2010

This seminar explores the unfinished business of decolonisation, by considering the legal, political and historical aspects of two territories which raise questions about the international right to self-determination and the enduring legacies of colonialism and occupation.

Western Sahara has been occupied by Morocco since the mid-1970s, despite a recognition by the International Court of Justice that the Saharawi people have an unrealised right to self-determination. West Papua was incorporated into Indonesia in the 1960s, ostensibly pursuant to a UN-sponsored act of free choice by its inhabitants, but questions have also remained about the legitimacy of that process and the extent to which that "choice" was truly free or representative. Both territories have involved armed violence by the local people against external rule. Both remain unsatisfactorily resolved in various respects. This seminar provides perspectives on the situation in both territories and enables comparisons and contrasts to be drawn.

Confirmed speakers are:

Kamal Fadel, Polisario (Western Saharan) Ambassador to Australia

Clinton Fernandes,Senior Lecturer, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, UNSW

Gennaro Gervasio, Senior Lecturer, Macquarie University

The Chair, Irene Baghoomiansa member of theSydney Centre for International Law, will comment on international law aspects of both cases.

Abstracts:

Kamal Fadel

Western Sahara is Africa's last colony. There are striking similarities between East Timor and Western Sahara. Both were abandoned by their former colonial occupiers and invaded by neighbouring countries in 1975, but while East Timor has gained its independence, Western Sahara is still on the UN's list of non‐self‐governing territories waiting for the right to self‐determination. During the past 35 years Saharawis have endured war, exile and horrendous human rights abuses. The continued occupation of Western Sahara is a violation of the fundamental norms of international law. The lack of political will and competing national interests of some members of the Security Council have contributed to UN's failure in Western Sahara so far.

Dr Clinton Fernandes

Dr Fernandes willspeak about the current situation in West Papua. He will discuss the long-running but low-level insurgency, the role of the Indonesian military, the economics of the conflict, the political situation and the prospects for the future. He will also explain the background to the conflict from the colonial era to its incorporation and full-scale transformation under Indonesian rule. He will analyse the challenges posed by the rise of the West Papuan independence movement for Australia's relations with Indonesia.

Gennaro Gervasio

The Democratic Forces in the Moroccan Opposition and Civil Society, from the Islamists to the Left, rarely address the question of Western Sahara in their political discourse, and everyday politics towards change in the Alawite kingdom. Likewise, the vibrant independent press in Morocco, which has dared to attack the monarchy several times already, is often silent if not part of the mainstrem discourse when it comes to the conflict. On the other hand, there's a declining -if any- interest from Sahrawis in engaging with the democratic elements in Moroccan civil society. Based on recent fieldwork on Civil society in Morocco, I will try to offer some explanation for this 'missing link', which constitutes a further obstacle on the way of any possible political settlement of the conflict.

Biographies:

Ambassador Kamal Fadel is the representative to Australia of Polisario - the Western Sahara independence movement. He has served in the Saharawi missions in Algeria, UK India, Iran and until recently as Ambassador to East Timor.Ambassador Fadel has represented Western Sahara at several international conferences. He has also contributed several articles on Western Sahara to national and international publications. Heholds an MA in International Relations from the University of Kent, UK.

Dr Clinton Fernandes is the author of Reluctant Indonesians:Australia, Indonesia and the Future of West Papua (Scribe, 2006). He is a Senior Lecturer in Strategic Studies at the Australian Defence Force Academy campus of the University of New South Wales. His principal area of research is in International Relations and Strategy, where he studies the National Interest in Australia's external relations. His focus on the Indonesian military has informed his work as a historian of the 24-year occupation of East Timor by Indonesia in its multiple dimensions: the clandestine resistance, the armed resistance, the Indonesian military, the diplomatic front and the solidarity movement.He teaches courses on The Role of Modern Intelligence, Modern Political Ideologies, Strategic Studies and the Comparative Politics of Southeast Asia. He has served as Consulting Historian on the Balibo film.

Gennaro Gervasio, Senior Lecturer, Macquarie University

This event is now full. For futher enquiries, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.

Keynote Oration: Preventing Cancer, Promoting Global Health and Development    View Summary
10 June 2010

Online Registration

To register, please click here

Please note: This event is linked to the conference taking place on 11 June. For more information regarding this conference, please click on the link below.

Legislate, Regulate, Litigate? Legal Perspectives on Cancer Prevention and Control

_______________________________________

This event is jointly hosted by the University of Sydney International Union against Cancer (UICC)

Speakers

Opening remarks: Mark Dreyfus QC, MP (Chair, House of Representatitves, Legal and Constitutional Committee)

Keynote: Robert Beaglehole, Emeritus Professor, University of Auckland; Co-director, International Public Health Consultants, Auckland.

Response: David Hill, Cancer Council Victoria

About the Presentation

Emeritus Professor Beaglehole will be delivering the keynote oration of the Legislate, Regulate, Litigate? Legal Perspectives on Cancer Prevention and Treatment conference, taking place on 11 June.

This free event is open to all guests of the Sydney Law School. Seating will be limited to the first 150 registrations.

18th Annual Labour Law Conference   View Summary
10 June 2010

This conference brings together some of Australia's leading labour law, IR researchers and practitioners to debate the key issues confronting labour law today.

The 18th Annual Labour Law Conference will take place on 10 June at the Hilton Hotel, Sydney.

The program will focus on a range of issues, including immigration, redundancy, aging workers, insolvency, pay equity, NES and modern awards.

Professor Ron McCallum AO will close the conference with a presentation titledTowards a National OHS Law.

Registration

Early bird rate: Until7 May, registrants will pay only $800 inc GST
After 7 May, the cost of registration is $1000 inc GST.

Please click here to view a copy of the program and to register online.

This conference is presented by the University of Sydney's Workplace Research Centre in conjunction with Sydney Law School.

Conference: Legislate, Regulate, Litigate? Legal Perspectives on Cancer Prevention and Treatment    View Summary
11 June 2010

Online Registration

Please click here

_____________________________

About the Conference

This conference draws attention to the role for law and regulation in a comprehensive response to the prevention and treatment of cancer, both in the Australian community, and globally.

Cancer is the leading cause of disease burden in Australia (19.4% in 2003), and few families have not been touched by it.

The conference will open at 6pm on Thursday 10 June with the freekeynote oration Preventing Cancer, Promoting Global Health and Development, delivered by Robert Beaglehole ONZM, Emeritus Professor, University of Auckland; Co-director, International Public Health Consultants, Auckland.


The conference will continue on 11 June with a full day of sessions and panel discussions featuring leading experts from around the world.

Online Brochure

Click here to view the conference brochure

17 th Annual AAPAE Conference: Ethics in the Professional Life: Past, Present and Future   View Summary
15 June 2010 to 17 June 2010

Early Bird Registrations Close 1 April

To register or for further information please click here

_____________________________________________

The Australian Association for Professional and Applied Ethics (AAPAE) and the organising committee invite you to contribute to the 17th Annual AAPAE Conference.

Conference papers will be considered, subject to peer review, forpublication in the Australian Journal of Professional and AppliedEthics, which is currently ranked B under the ERA.

Speakers include

Professor Ron McCallum, Labour Law, University of Sydney

Professor Peter Singer, Bioethics, Princeton University

Professor Ian Kerridge, Bioethics, University of Sydney

Professor Simon Chapman, Public Health, University of Sydney

Dr Simon Longstaff, St James Ethics Centre

Professor Gael McDonald, Business and Law, Deakin University

Professor Geoff Moore, Business Ethics, Durham University

Dr Alan Saunders, presenter, "The Philosopher's Zone", ABC

The conference features plenary sessions and workshops, includingauthor sessions, encouraging discussion of a broad scope ofcontemporary ethical issues relating to the professional life.

Don't miss out on the Special Offer in registration fees for academics!

Book Launch: Celebrity and the Law   View Summary
15 June 2010

Guests are invited to attend the launch of a new book, Celebrity and the Law, written by Patricia Loughlan, Barbara McDonald and Robert Van Kreiken.

The book willbe launched by Richard Ackland, journalist, commentator on the
law and media and editor of the Gazette of Law and Journalism and
Justinian
.

The launch will be held on Tuesday 15 June from 5.30pm on the Level 4 bridge area (adjacent to Faculty Common Room 432) of the New Law Building. Drinks and light refreshments will be served.


RSVP by 11 June:

Adam Bratt, Centre Administrator
Email: adam.bratt@sydney.edu.au
Phone: 02 9351 0385

For further information on how to purchase this book and other titles from
Federation Press please click here.


This launch is sponsored by the Parsons Centre, Sydney Law School.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Robert van Krieken    View Summary
17 June 2010

Can Legal Culture Help Explain Institutional Child Abuse in Ireland?

This paper will examine the extent to which the concept of legal culture can be used to generate a more developed account of the systemic mechanisms internal to the Church institutions which both produced abusive behaviour and encouraged institutional tolerance of it as well as a reluctance to engage with its consequences and effects. It will begin by outlining the ways in which the specific character of Irish societal and state formation might be said to have generated a distinctive legal culture concerning the relationship between the church, law and society, and then go on to whether this can be said to have underpinned the particular form taken by the institutional treatment of children in Ireland, drawing on a comparison with related questions in the Australian setting.

About the Speaker

Robert van Krieken was until recently at the University of Sydney in the Department of Sociology. He is a graduate in law from this law school. He now has a Chair in Sociology at University College Dublin.

Lunchtime Seminar Series Professor Alison Conner    View Summary
22 June 2010

Movie Justice: The Law in Early Chinese Movies

Speaker: Professor Alison Conner, William S. Richardson School of Law, University of Hawaii

ProfessorConner has conducted a detailed study of the way in which the legal system is portrayed in Chinese movies in the first half of the 20th century, a time in Chinese history when China had only just adopted a more modern westernized legal system and begun to train the legal profession against a background of the Japanese invasion and internal unrest. Her presentation will look at the way in which the dynamic Chinese movie industry saw the law and lawyers in China during this period.

About the Speaker:Professor Alison Conner is Professor of Law and Director of International Programs at the University of Hawaii Law School. She is a specialist in Chinese law and legal history and has published widely in that area. She is also Secretary of the American Society of Comparative Law. Prior to becoming a legal academic, Professor Conner practised on Wall Street for 5 years. She has a JD from Harvard Law School and a PhD from Cornell University in Asian Studies, and is fluent in spoken and written Chinese.

Parsons Tax Seminar and Book Launch: Resources Super Profits Tax   View Summary
24 June 2010

Registration

Click here to register now.

The Government's proposed resource super profits tax (RSPT) has generated considerable public debate concerning the appropriate taxation of the mining sector. While the RSPT has received extensive media coverage, much of this has been at a political level with the technical design of the tax receiving less public analysis. The tax is complex and differs from the existing petroleum rent resources tax. The purpose of this seminar is to examine the technical design of the RSPT in both a local and global context.

Speakers:

Jason McDonald, Treasury, will explain the policy and design of the RSPT.

Philip Daniel, International Monetary Fund, will look at the RSPT proposal in the context of global reforms of mining taxation.

Associate Professor Russell Ross, University of Sydney, and Amrit MacIntrye, Baker & McKenzie, will act as commentators.

Chair: Professor Lee Burns, University of Sydney

At the conclusion of the seminar, there will be a book launch of Daniel, Keen & McPherson (eds), The Taxation of Petroleum and Minerals, Principles, Problems and Practice (Routledge).

For a copy of the seminar brochure, please click here.

TASA Crime & Governance Workshop   View Summary
30 June 2010

Register Online

Click here to register and make your payment online.

_________________________________________

TASA Crime & Governance Workshop on Ethnographic Methodologies

The Crime and Governance Thematic Group of the Australian Sociological Association (TASA) in conjunction with the Sydney Institute of Criminology at The University of Sydney, will host a workshop on ethnography, crime and governance on 30 June 2010, the day before the Critical Criminology Conference.

This workshop will present qualitative research about different aspects of the criminal justice process, regulatory agencies and how crime is understood and experienced within communities.

Registration is open in the first instance to members of TASA and delegates attending the Australian Critical Criminology Conference. Subject to space the workshop will be open to other interested researchers.

July
ANZCCC2010: The Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference   View Summary
1 July 2010 to 2 July 2010

The Sydney Institute of Criminology at the University of Sydney and the School of Social Sciences at the University of Western Sydney are proud to invite academics, researchers, activists, students and criminal justice professionals to the 2010 Australian and New Zealand Critical Criminology Conference. The conference venue is the New Law Building at the University of Sydney Camperdown Campus.

Since 2007, the Critical Criminology Conference has been hosted by a range of universities throughout Australia with the intention of promoting critical and analytic perspectives on crime and justice. The conference in 2010 will continue to foster dialogue beyond the traditional boundaries of the discipline of criminology and promote the ground-breaking research of critical criminologists from Australia and New Zealand.

Conference program and abstracts

Please click here for a copy of the conference program. Click here for a copy of the conference abstracts.

*This event is now full*. For futher enquiries, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.

Restorative Justice Practitioners' Forum: The Role of the RJ Facilitator   View Summary
19 July 2010

Register Online

Click here to register

____________________________________________________

The Sydney Institute of Criminology is pleased to present the first in a program of Restorative Justice Practitioners' Forums, offering professional development opportunities for people working directly in service delivery of restorative justice in the criminal justice system.

The Restorative Justice Practitioners' Forums will comprise a short theoretical introduction to a specific practice issue, followed by interactive small group discussions where practitioners are encouraged to share their experience, knowledge and ideas relevant to the topic.

The RJ Practitioners' Forum on 19 July explores The Role of the RJ Facilitator.

Two short articles will be disseminated on the day, together with a short presentation by Dr Jasmine Bruce on some findings from her thesis research, Facilitating Restorative Justice - A Study of Conference Convenors. The interactive session will be semi-structured, with groups asked to present key discussion points at the conclusion of the session.

Critical Perspectives of CPTED   View Summary
20 July 2010

Registration

Click here to register.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Crime Prevention through environmental design (CPTED) involves the manipulation of the built environment to prevent crime and to reduce the fear of crime. CPTED has gained greater prominence in recent years, with the introduction of guidelines to encourage the designing out of crime. However, to date, there has been limited debate or analysis of CPTED practice in NSW. This seminar will seek to partially address this gap and will critically explore CPTED theory and practice.

The seminar will consist of presentations from the following academics and practitioners:

· Professor Paul Ekblom (Academic Director, Design Against Crime Research Centre, Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, England) - Paul Ekblom read psychology at University College London, where he also gained his PhD. He spent much of his career as a researcher in the UK Home Office, centring on crime prevention. He was involved throughout crime prevention's rise from obscurity to widespread recognition by practitioners and policymakers in central and local government and beyond. Paul joined the Design Against Crime Research Centre in June 2005. Paul is an established figure in the worlds of police and crime prevention training, research, knowledge management and advanced practice.

· Dr Kurt Iveson (Senior Lecturer in Urban Geography, University of Sydney) - Kurt is primarily interested in the question of how social justice can be achieved in cities. Within this broad interest, his previous research has focused on two main areas. First, he has examined the significance of the urban public realm for citizenship and democracy. This has included looking at contests over different uses of urban public space, including the politics of protest, graffiti writing, cruising, hanging out, and outdoor advertising. Second, he has explored how urban planning might work better to achieve social justice in cities. In particular, he has considered the ways in which planners should conceptualise, and respond to, different forms of diversity in the city.

· Garner Clancey (Sydney Institute of Criminology) - Garner has degrees in psychology (undergraduate) and criminology (postgraduate) and over 18 years experience in criminal justice and crime prevention work. He has worked on crime prevention consultancies across Australia, including the development of crime prevention plans for local government, coordinating community safety audits for local government authorities (including on town centres, housing developments and retail precincts) and evaluating various crime prevention initiatives / programs. Garner has worked as part of multi-disciplinary teams to conduct crime risk assessments on proposed developments. Garner recently developed the 'Considerations for establishing a public space CCTV network' report for the Australian Institute of Criminology and is an Executive Member of the Australian Crime Prevention Council and a member of the NSW Young Offenders Advisory Committee.

· A representative of the Crime Prevention Division of the Department of Justice & Attorney General, will present on a recent project that aimed to explore graffiti prevention techniques. Graffiti vandalism is a crime that has significant financial and social impacts on the NSW community, affecting Government utilities, public transport operators, local government, business owners and residents.The cost of graffiti management diverts taxpayers' money from important Government services for the community. In recent years, a broad range of programs and initiatives aimed at reducing graffiti vandalism have been introduced across Australia and internationally. However, there is little evidence available on the effectiveness of the strategies in reducing graffiti vandalism. The Crime Prevention Division of the Department of Justice & Attorney General implemented their Graffiti Reduction Demonstration Project aiming to identify and build an evidence-base for the most effective graffiti vandalism prevention strategies. This presentation will explore the approaches tested and the Division's findings on what techniques are effective at preventing graffiti.

This seminar will be of particular interest to:

  • Crime prevention practitioners
  • Police
  • Local government agencies
  • Architects
  • Planners
  • Urban designers
  • Non-government organisations
  • Youth and community workers
  • Security personnel
  • University students

This seminar has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of the NSW Department of Justice and Attorney General.

Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Michael Dirkis   View Summary
27 July 2010

The Demise of International Tax Avoidance?The Internationalisation of Tax Law Policy and Administration in the 21st Century

Traditionally the powers of all revenue authorities to obtain offshore information has been limited as has the ability of revenue authorities to enforce foreign tax debts. Australia's recent signing of tax information exchange agreements with a number of tax havens and the renegotiated tax treaties are seen as a major step in overcoming theses limitations. The paper seeks to explore the processes of co-operation between revenue authorities which have lead to the effective internationalisation of the Australian Taxation Office's (ATO) information gathering and debit powers and whether this process will lead to the demise of international tax avoidance.

Professor Michael Dirkis is a noted researcher, having authored and co-authored over 550 publications and papers. From 1999 - 2009 he was, as Senior Tax Counsel for the Taxation Institute of Australia, in the forefront of the all major tax reform and taxation administration reforms through participation in key Australian governmental consultative forums conducted by the Treasury, Australian Taxation Office, the Board of Taxation, the Inspector General of Taxation and the Australian National Audit Office and appearing before numerous Parliamentary committees. Michael is also engaged with international tax organisations such as the Irish Taxation Institute, Japan Federation of Certified Public Tax Accountant's Association, the Japan Tax Research Institute, and the Asia-Oceania Tax Consultants' Association, and with foreign revenue authorities through the Study Group on Asian Tax Administration and Research (SGATAR), the United States' Government Accountability Office (GAO), New Zealand Inland Revenue Department, and HM Revenue & Customs.

Lectures presented as part of the Sydney Law School DistinguishedScholarsLectureSeries 2010 are free, and pre-registration is not required. Click here for a copy of the series program.

Public Lecture: The Hon John G Roberts, Jr, Chief Justice of the United States   View Summary
28 July 2010

THIS LECTURE IS NOW FULL, with the allocation of tickets released on 29 June quickly exhausted. The waiting list is also now closed, and as such no further places will be offered. Thank you for your interest in this event.

Sydney Law School, together with The Australian American Leadership Dialogue and Corrs Chambers Westgarth Lawyers, are pleased to host a public lecture by the Honourable John G Roberts, Jr, Chief Justice of the United States.

Chief Justice Roberts will share his experiences of this prestigious office, and this lecture provides a rare opportunity to hear from one of the outstandingjurists of our time.

The Honorable John GRoberts, Jr, graduated from Harvard Law School in 1979. He served as a law clerk for Judge Henry J Friendly of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit (1979-1980) and for then-Associate Justice William H Rehnquist of the Supreme Court of the United States (1980 Term) before moving on to hold the roles of Special Assistant to the Attorney General, US Department of Justice (1981-1982), Associate Counsel to President Ronald Reagan (1982-1986) and Principal Deputy Solicitor General, US Department of Justice (1989-1993). He practiced law in Washington DC (1986-1989) (1993-2003), before his appointment to the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 2003. He was nominated as Chief Justice of the United States by President George W Bush and took his seat on September 29, 2005.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Helen Irving   View Summary
29 July 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'Legal Theory at Sydney'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'Legal Theory at Sydney' series.

Gender and Theories of Constitutional Citizenship

The literature on constitutionalcitizenship (and related concepts ofconstitutional identity, legitimacy, and 'patriotism')is substantial, but gender as a referent is almost entirely absent. This neglect cannot be taken as confirmation ofgender's non-relevance. Since we know that gender is relevant in other comparable fields, there is at least an a priori case for it here. Furthermore, a significant proportion of theliterature concerns principles foraccommodating other power asymmetries or social cleavages. As we challenge constitutional universalism, and take notice of, orfactor cultural pluralism into accounts of constitutional citizenship, similar considerations can and should apply with respect to gender. What, then, are the ways of understanding and transforming a constitutional citizenship that rests on, and is emerging from, an exclusionary (masculine) history and epistemology? This paper (part of a work in progress) explores some answers.

About the Speaker

Professor Helen Irving, Sydney Law School

Professor Helen Irving was appointed to the Faculty of Law in 2001. She teaches Federal Constitutional Law, Comparative Constitutionalism and Gender and Constitution-Making. In 2005-2006 she held the Harvard Chair of Australian Studies as a Visiting Professor at Harvard Law School.

Professor Irving has been the historical consultant for a number of television and radio documentaries, including as New South Wales Historical Consultant for the National Archives of Australia website 'Documenting a Democracy': http://www.foundingdocs.gov.au/, and Historical Consultant for Film Australia's documentary 'Federation' 1999. She has served as historical and constitutional advisor to many public and governmental bodies, as well as Justices of the High Court of Australia. She is a frequent newspaper opinion writer and media commentator.

In 2003 Professor Irving received the Centenary Medal for services to the Centenary of Federation.

Journal of Contract Law - Contractual Indemnities Conference   View Summary
30 July 2010

Presenters:

Sir Anthony Mason AC KBE

Stephen Estcourt QC

Wayne Courtney, University of Sydney Law School

Donald Robertson, Partner, Freehills

Professor Andrew Stewart, University of Adelaide

Nuncio D'Angelo, Partner, Mallesons Stephen Jaques

Justice Stephen Rothman, Supreme Court of NSW

Professor John Carter, University of Sydney Law School; Consultant, Freehills

Professor Barbara McDonald, University of Sydney Law School

The Hon Dr Kevin Lindgren QC

Associate Professor Gregory Tolhurst, University of Sydney Law School

Professor Michael Furmston, Singapore Management University

Professor Howard (Woody) Hunter, President, Singapore Management University

Registration fee:
Commercial Law Association members: $795
Standard rate: $990

Venue:
Dixson Room, Mitchell Wing, NSW State Library.

For further details and to register for the conference please click here.

This event is presented by members of the Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law in conjunction with the Commercial Law Association.

August
Past Lives and Future Hopes: A Vision to End Animal Suffering   View Summary
3 August 2010

Sydney Law School is proud to support Voiceless, the animal protection institute, in presenting their annual Animal Law Lecture Series, now in its fourth year. This year's keynote lecture will be delivered by 'the mother of the animal law movement', Joyce Tischler.

Joyce Tischler is co-founder and General Counsel for the US Animal Legal Defense Fund, and is a pioneer in the field of animal law. Combining her life-long affinity for animals with her legal skills, she has been instrumental in developing, nurturing and growing the animal law movement in the US and around the world.

Ms Tischler will talk about the birth of the animal law movement thirty years ago in San Francisco and how a handful of attorneys set in motion a revolution that has touched the lives of billions of animals worldwide.

NSW Governor Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO will launch Animal Law in Australia and New Zealand and Dr Melissa Perry QC will deliver a presentation on the status of animal law in Australia.

For more information and to register your attendance please click here.

2010 Ross Parsons Corporate Law Address: Fraud on the Market in the US - Can it be Fixed?   View Summary
3 August 2010

Register Online

This event is free, however registration is required. Click here to register.

_________________________________________________________________________

Professor Reinier Kraakman, Harvard Law School, will deliver the 2010 Ross Parsons Corporate Law Address, followed by a panel discussion featuring: Belinda Gibson, Deputy Chair, ASIC; John Kluver, Executive Director Corporations and Markets Advisory Commission; and Greg Golding, Mallesons Stephen Jaques. Professor Jennifer Hill of Sydney Law School will chair the address.

Fraud on the market doctrine in combination with American class action rules represents the odd spectacle of a thriving area of litigation that employs sophisticated consulting firms and financial economists, but that, in its current form, finds very little support amongst American legal academics.

In crude terms this doctrine permits a class of shareholders who buy or sell shares to sue for out-of-pocket damages if a material misrepresentation made 'knowingly' distorts market prices. This address will discuss parties to these actions, the effects of such actions and possible reforms.

The panel will discuss a range of issues relating to the doctrine of fraud on the market in the Australian context.

Reinier Kraakman is the Ezra Ripley Thayer Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, where he teaches corporate law, corporate finance, and seminars on comparative corporate law and theoretical aspects of corporate and securities law. He was previously a clerk for Judge Henry J Friendly of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and a Professor of Law at Yale Law School. He has also been a visiting professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center, New York University Law School and at the University of Tilburg in the Netherlands. He is a Fellow of the European Corporate Governance Institute. He has also advised on company law reform in Russia and Vietnam, and has consulted with the Bank of International Settlements on reform of its corporate governance practices. Professor Kraakman has written numerous articles on corporate law and corporate governance and is principal author of several books.

Venue: Federal Court of Australia

For a copy of the event brochure, click here.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Kent Roach    View Summary
4 August 2010

The 9/11Effect: A Comparative and Critical Examination of Counter-Terrorism Law and Policy

This paper will examine the unprecedented role played by the United Nations in responding to 9/11. Acting under the mandatory provisions of Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Security Council in Resolution 1373 called on all nations to ensure that terrorist acts and the financing of terrorism were established as serious criminal offences in domestic law . The Security Council, like many states, acted with minimal time for deliberation and without full information about the nature of the attacks including the way they were financed. It was influenced by what was at hand, namely its previous efforts with respect to listing and imposing sanctions against those affiliated with the Taliban and Al Qaeda and the most recent counter-terrorism convention which at the time related to the financing of terrorism even those these regimes failed to stop 9/11 let alone many less expensive acts of terrorism. If, as some have claimed, the UN acted as a world legislator in the aftermath of 9/11, it experienced many of the shortcomings of other legislatures that have felt compelled quickly to respond to acts of terrorism.

The Security Council and its Counter-Terrorism Committee created by Resolution 1373 has emerged as an important new transnational actor in the field of counter-terrorism law. Through Resolution 1373, the Security Council demanded that all countries ensure that terrorism and various forms of support for terrorism were treated as serious crimes. Resolution 1373 called on all countries to ensure that terrorism was treated as a serious crime, but it offered no guidance on the proper definition of terrorism or the role of human rights in countering terrorism. The result was that countries were free to define terrorism usually in expansive and arguably overbroad ways. The Security Council also has endorsed some forms of anti-terrorism measures- laws against the financing and incitement of terrorism- that are of questionable efficacy in actually helping prevent terrorism. It has also maintained lists of terrorists without providing due process or transparency about the secret intelligence that may have prompted decisions by states to add individuals or groups to domestic or international lists that have the effect of making the listed effective outlaws. The Security Council's post 9/11 dominance in the counter-terrorism field mirrors the dominance of the domestic executive. The General Assembly's Counter-Terrorism Plan of 2006 significantly places greater emphasis on respecting rights and the rule of law and responding to conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism than the work of the Security Council. The role of the various rights protections bodies of the United Nations will also be examined with a focus on the absence of judicial review within the UN system for individuals affected by individual measures such as the 1267 terrorist listing regime and the role of domestic and supra national judiciaries in providing indirect judicial review.

About the Speaker

Professor Kent Roach is Prichard-Wilson Chair of Law and Public Policy at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, with cross-appointments in criminology and political science, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is a graduate of the University of Toronto and of Yale, and a former law clerk to Justice Bertha Wilson of the Supreme Court of Canada.

In recent years, Professor Roach has specialized in anti-terrorism law and policy and is the co-editor of The Security of Freedom: Essays on Canada's Anti-Terrorism Bill (2001) and Global Anti-Terrorism Law and Policy (2005). Professor Roach also served on the research advisory committee for the Commission of Inquiry into the Actions of Canadian Officials in Relation to Maher Arar and is Director of Research (Legal Studies) for the Commission of Inquiry into the Investigation of the Bombing of Air India Flight 182. Professor Roach also served on the research advisory committee of the Ipperwash Inquiry into the killing of Dudley George. Hewas research director for the Ontario Law Reform Commission's Report on Public Inquiries (1992) and for the Commission of Inquiry into Forensic Pediatric Pathology. He has represented Aboriginal and civil liberties groups in many interventions before the courts, including in the landmark Supreme Court of Canada cases of Stillman, Latimer, Gladue and Sauve.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Dr Honni van Rijswijk    View Summary
5 August 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'JSI Guest Speakers'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'JSI Guest Speakers' series.

Responsibility for Historical Suffering in Tort Law: Power, Ethics and the Politics of Vulnerability

The adjudication of responsibility for historical injuries has become a key and troubling question in contemporary jurisprudence. In the Australian context, responsibility for the continuing effects of traumas experienced by Aboriginal Australians has been attempted through a number of legal and government strategies, but these gestures, such as the national apology in 2008, have not led to substantial, material benefits. There seems to be a sticking point in the full development of meaningful responsibility in the domains of law and State, regarding the injustices of the past. The recent Trevorrow case was the first to award compensation to a member of the Stolen Generation at common law but despite this important step, it is arguable that the benefits of this precedent will not extend to a great number of the Stolen Generation, and that the common law is an inadequate forum to redress this suffering. This paper examines the capacity of tort law to provide an adequate framework of responsibility concerning historical suffering, and is in part a response to the claims of two leading theorists that tort law is uniquely suited to providing justice for the vulnerable in general, and Aboriginal Australians in particular.

Writing before the Trevorrow case, Stapleton argued for the ethical and logical development of tort in "righting the most grievous wrongs in Australia's history." Similarly, Desmond Manderson has argued that "if law has a soul, then … it is to be found in the law of tort." Tort's potential for achieving social justice is seen to arise through its underlying moral framework and language—the way in which, as Stapleton elegantly puts it, protection of the vulnerable is the "golden thread" that runs through tort. Dr Honni van Rijswijk will evaluate this potential through a careful analysis of the nature of tort's moral responsibility—its narratives, logics, key figures, and relationship to suffering. Dr Honni van Rijswijk argues that the basis of morality in tort law lies in a particular reading of Christian ethics—Lord Atkin's instantiation of the Golden Rule in Donoghue v Stephenson. This neighborly mindset of tort law is pre-emptive and relational: tort potentially produces a strange new intimacy between people, one based on suffering and responsibility. However, it can be problematic to take this morality at face value. Accordingly, Dr Honni van Rijswijk will evaluate the moral thread of tort using Fredrich Nietzsche's re-reading of the major narratives and tropes of Christianity in the First Essay of Genealogy of Morals. Second, Dr Honni van Rijswijk will show the ways in which Nietzsche's repositioning of ethics in relation to power—his argument that the moral domain is not separate from politics, but an effect of politics—might explain the inadequacy of tort law in redressing historical injuries.

About the speaker

Dr Honni van Rijswijk is a graduate of the University of Sydney and received her PhD from the University of Washington, where she was a Fellow in the Society of Scholars at the Simpson Center for the Humanities. Her research focuses on intersections between law and culture, tort law, and the development of interdisciplinary and critical methods. Her doctoral dissertation provides a theoretical and cultural history of tort law, and considers the justice claims of those whose suffering is rendered invisible through dominant legal and cultural frameworks. She also has a wider background in the law of obligations, both through her LL.M. work at Trinity College Dublin, and through her work in private practice. She is a lecturer in the Law School at the University of Technology Sydney.

Recent Developments in Investment Banking   View Summary
9 August 2010

Register Online

Click hereto register.

_______________________________________________________________

Speaker: Andrew Tuch, Sydney Law School and Harvard Law School

Commentators:
Chris Van Homrigh, Senior Executive Leader -Investment Banks, ASIC; Professor Ron Masulis, UNSW School of Banking and Finance; Frank K Houston, Professor of Finance, Vanderbilt University

In this seminar, Andrew Tuch of Harvard Law School will consider recently adopted financial regulatory reforms and other significant developments in investment banking in the United States.

These regulatory reforms are expected to have far reaching structural implications for financial services firms. The so-called Volcker Rule prohibits banks from engaging in proprietary trading or investing in or sponsoring hedge funds or private equity funds. Further rules may impose fiduciary duties in new contexts.

The seminar will also examine wider regulatory developments, including the SEC action against Goldman Sachs, alleging securities fraud in the marketing of collateralised debt obligations. The possible implications of these developments for Australia will be considered.

Andrew Tuch is an Olin Fellow in Law and Economics and a Fellow of the Program on Corporate Governance at Harvard Law School. He is on leave from Sydney Law School, where he is a senior lecturer. Prior to entering academia in 2004, he practised corporate law with Davis Polk & Wardwell in New York and London, focusing on capital markets transactions and mergers and acquisitions. His publications are concentrated on financial services regulation, deterrence theory and fiduciary doctrine. In 2010, he is teaching a workshop at Harvard on Professional Ethics in Business Transactions. Andrew began his career at Minter Ellison in Sydney.

Venue: Minter Ellison, Aurora Place, 88 Phillip Street, Sydney

Registration:
Full Fee: $77 inc GST
Sydney Law School Alumni: $61.60 inc GST
Student Concession: $66 inc GST
*Group Discount: $55 inc GST
*Available when 5 or more people from one organisation register for the seminar and is payable by cheque only or as individual registrations.

For a copy of the event brochure, click here.

Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Peter Cashman   View Summary
10 August 2010

Who Owns Your Genes? Is the Patenting of Genetic Discoveries in the Public Interest?

To date, a substantial number of genetic 'discoveries' have been the subject of successful patent applications in Australia and in numerous other countries. This has given rise to a number of complex and controversial legal and policy questions. These issues are presently under consideration by a Senate Inquiry in Australia and the subject of a test case in the United States brought by the American Civil Liberties Union and the Public Patent Foundation affiliated with the Benjamin N Cardozo School of Law [Association for Molecular Pathology, et al. v United States Patent and Trademark Office, et al., SDNY].

This lecture will review the legal, policy and public interest questions arising out of the patenting of human genetic discoveries.

Dr Peter Cashman is a barrister and Kim Santow Chair in Law and Social Justice at the University of Sydney. He was formerly: Commissioner in charge of the civil justice review with the Victorian Law Reform Commission; Commissioner jointly in charge of the reference on class actions with the Australian Law Reform Commission; founding Director of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre; founder and senior partner of the firm Cashman & Partners which merged with the Melbourne firm Maurice Blackburn & Co to form the national firm Maurice Blackburn Cashman (now Maurice Blackburn Pty Ltd); Governor of the American Trial Lawyers' Association (now the American Association for Justice) and National President of the Australian Plaintiff Lawyers' Association (now the Australian Lawyers Alliance). He holds a degree in law and a diploma in criminology from the University of Melbourne and a Master of Laws degree and a PhD from the University of London. He has practised law in the United Kingdom, the United States and Australia.

Lectures presented as part of the Sydney Law School DistinguishedScholarsLectureSeries 2010 are free, and pre-registration is not required. Click here for a copy of the series program.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Kevin Walton   View Summary
12 August 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'Legal Theory at Sydney'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'Legal Theory at Sydney' series.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Kevin Walton

An Obligation to Vote?

Further details to follow.

About the Speaker: Kevin Walton, Sydney Law School

Dr Kevin Walton, Director of the Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence, Sydney Law School

Brief Biographical Detail:

Dr Kevin Walton joined theSydney Law Schoolin 2003. He previously lectured in law at the University of Aberdeen. His current research focuses on questions of methodology in legal and political philosophy by examining dominant interpretations of certain responses to legal obligations.

Areas of Interest:

  • Legal philosophy
  • Political philosophy
  • Social theory

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Qi George Zhou   View Summary
12 August 2010

Damages for Repudiation: An Ex Ante Perspective on the Golden Victory Case

The remedy of damages for repudiation modifies not only the parties' behaviour after the contract is repudiated (ex post behaviour), but also their behaviour in making and performing the contract (ex ante behaviour). In this paper, a law-and-economics approach is adopted to analyse the House of Lords' majority decision in Golden Victory, arguing that this decision is economically justified because: (1) it encourages the parties to solve the uncertainty of measuring damages; (2) it enforces the parties' contractual allocation of risks; and (3) it encourages the early disclosure of the intention to breach.

This paper differs from the existing literature in two ways. First, rather than examining the impact of Golden Victory on ex post behaviour, it focuses on ex ante behaviour. Secondly, unlike most existing literature, which criticises the Lords' decision, this paper supports it from a law-and-economics perspective.

About the Speaker

Dr Qi George Zhou is a lecuturer in law at Sheffield Law School in England. He teaches and researches contract law, law-and-economics and regulation. Dr Qi George Zhou studied law at the Chinese University of Political Science and Law in China, the University of Bournemuth, and the University of manchester in England. He is a qualifed Chinese lawyer. Before coming to the UK in 2002, he practised commercial law in mainland China for five years.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Paul Mitchell   View Summary
16 August 2010

Artificiality in Failure of Consideration

The principle that a payment can be recovered where there has been a total failure of consideration is one of the foundations of the law of unjust enrichment. Yet its precise content remains controversial. Traditionally the emphasis has been on performance: if the claimant received any part of what was promised in return for the payment, there can be no recovery. However, this analysis fails to account for a variety of cases in which some element of performance was given, but the claim succeeded. For instance, in Rowland v Divall the purchaser of a car received no title from the seller, but did have use of the car for several days; his claim for the return of the price succeeded. Such cases are usually dismissed as artificial. However, as this paper demonstrates, failure of consideration was never exclusively conceived in terms of a failure of performance, nor have later courts - dealing with a variety of situations - felt obliged to restrict it to performance. On the contrary, courts have consistently recognised that a total failure of consideration may consist in a failure to confer particularly important legal rights on the party making the payment.

About the Speaker:

Dr Paul Mitchell, King's College London

Dr Paul Mitchell is currently a Reader in Law at King's College London, and has been appointed to a Chair in Laws at University College London from September 2010. His research interests span the areas of tort, contract and unjust enrichment, which he often investigates from a historical perspective, as in his monograph on defamation: The Making of the Modern Law of Defamation (2005).

The Fifth John Lehane Memorial Lecture 2010   View Summary
18 August 2010

Renowned retired Law Lord, Lord Hoffmann, will deliver the fifth John Lehane Memorial Lecture on the topic: The Influence of European Law on the Common Law in English Courts.

John Lehane made a significant contribution to the study and practice of law in Australia. A University of Sydney Medallist, he began his legal career as an articled clerk at Allen Allen & Hemsley in 1966. He became that firm's leading banking law partner, managing partner and, ultimately, its chairman. In 1995 he was appointed to the Federal Court of Australia, where he served with distinction until 2001.

John Lehane lectured in law at the University of Sydney for many years, published numerous papers and co-authored Australia's leading text on equity. One of his eminent contemporaries, Roddy Meagher, said of him: 'He was one of the greatest lawyers and one of the nicest men any of us will ever meet.'

Venue
Supreme Court of NSW, Banco Court
Level 13 Law Courts Building, Queens Square
184 Phillip Street, Sydney

Registration/Information
Sarah Rudd
tel: 02 9230 4137
email: RSVPSydney@aar.com.au

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor George P. Smith   View Summary
19 August 2010

The Centre for Health Governance, Law & Ethics and The Centre for Values, Ethics & Law in Medicine (VELIM) are pleased to present:

Bioethics and Human Rights: Toward a New Constitutionalism

Professor George P. Smith II

Columbus School of Law

The Catholic University of America, Washington DC

Professor Smith's lecture honours the memory of the late Professor George Winterton of Sydney Law School and examines the ongoing battle for universal recognition and enforcement of human rights, the right to health, health care, or health protection. After considering, principally, the work of the United Nations through the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the conclusion is reached that a global framework, or spirit of constitutionalism, is being developed for actuating a right to health protection.

The views of Julius Stone on social responsibility in science, together with the ideas of former High Court Justices Michael Kirby and Sir Anthony Mason on the limits of judicial discretion in interpreting and applying normative international standards in domestic and municipal courts will be highlighted.

After Professor Smith's talk an expert panel will be invited to comment. The Panel consists of:

Prof Belinda Bennett, Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics, Sydney Law School

Prof Rosalind Croucher, President of the Australian Law Reform Commission

Assoc Prof Peter Gerangelos, Sydney Law School

Emeritus Prof Miles Little, Centre for Values Ethics and the Law in Medicine, University of Sydney

Professor George P. Smith joined the Columbus School of Law of the Catholic University of America in Washington DC in l977. He had previous law teaching affiliations at the University of Michigan, Indiana University, Georgetown, George Washington and Notre Dame. His core teaching areas are property law, land use and environmental law. His areas of specialization are law, science and medicine - specifically bioethics and health law. He is the Founding Faculty Editor of The Journal of Contemporary Health Law and Policy. He has held over 85 research appointments with institutions including: the medical schools at the universities of Chicago, Columbia, Indiana, Minnesota, Northwestern, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia and Washington, as well as the universities of Arizona State; Auckland; New Zealand; British Columbia; Cambridge; McGill; Oxford; Sydney; Melbourne; UNSW; Macquarie; The Hoover Institution, The Max Planck Institute, Germany; The Rockefeller Foundation; Bellagio, Italy, Trinity College at Dublin University; Dartmouth College; The Free University of Berlin; Princeton Seminary and the divinity schools at Cambridge, Yale and Vanderbilt.


About the Speaker

Professor Smith is an internationally recognised and respected author of over 13 books and more than 157 law review articles, monographs, book chapters, and essays. His contributions to the legal profession were recognized by Indiana University in 1998 when he was awarded an LLD degree, Honoris Causa. He is listed in Who's Who in the World and Outstanding Writers of the 20th Century as well as WHO's WHO IN AMERICAN EDUCATION and WHO's WHO in AMERICAN LAW. He is a life member of the American Law Institute.

Please note this seminar will start at 12.00pm.

Light refreshments will be provided from12.00pm

Supreme Court Corporate Law Conference   View Summary
24 August 2010

Supreme Court Corporate Law Conference
Restructuring Companies in Trouble - Director and Creditor Perspectives

Speakers:Professor John Armour,Oxford University; Corinne Ball, Jones Day, New York; David Cowling, Clayton Utz; Stephen Parbery, Prentice Parbery Barilla; Professor Robert B Thompson, Georgetown University Law School.

The program will also feature a hypothetical to be moderated by Alan Cameron AM.

For further information please click here

ACCEL Conference 2010 - Resilience and Climate Change: Law's Response?   View Summary
26 August 2010 to 27 August 2010

Registration

Click here to register now.

_____________________________

In 2010, the Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law and the Institute for Sustainable Solutions at the University of Sydney join forces to present a ground breaking conference entitled Resilience and Climate Change: Law's Response?

Scientific and economic perspectives of Australia's resilience to climate change will be offered, while the capacity of Australia's current environmental legislation to respond to the resilience challenge will be questioned. Government representatives will explain recent policy and legislative responses to build resilience to the impacts of climate change.

The specific focus of this conference is Australia's biodiversity, water, coasts and cities. This conference should be attended by lawyers, academics, policy-makers, consultants, non-government organisations and anyone else who is interested in Australia's resilience to climate change. Presenters at the conference are drawn from universities, government departments, and the CSIRO and include some of Australia's key thinkers on the question of resilience and climate change.

Online Brochure

To view the online brochure, complete with program, please click here.

Registration Fees

Full fee: $350 inc GST

Sydney Law School alumni: $280 inc GST

EPF Member: $280 inc GST

Environmental law academic: $175 inc GST

Student/NGO: $175 inc GST

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Jonathan Verschuuren    View Summary
26 August 2010

The Dutch Crisis and Recovery Act: Economic Recovery and Legal Crisis?

In the Netherlands, the 2010 Crisis and Recovery Act aims at speeding up decision-making on a wide variety of activities, in the hope that following the financial and economic crisis, projects can immediately be carried out without any delay caused by legal procedures in court or elsewhere. The Act has been greeted with extensive criticism on the basis that it allegedly curtails citizen's procedural rights, focuses almost exclusively on environmental standards as 'obstructing' standards that need to be removed, and infringes international and EU law. The presentation will provide a legal critique of the Act and consider the legal issues likely to be raised through its operation.

About the Speaker

Professor Jonathan Verschuuren,Tilburg University

Professor Jonathan Verschuuren is Professor of International and European Environmental Law at Tilburg University where he also holds the position of Vice Dean for Research. He holds a PhD from Tilburg University and has taught, researched and published extensively both nationally and internationally across almost all areas of environmental law and policy. His current research focuses predominantly on the question of how environmental laws operating at different levels integrate to deal with complex environmental issues, particularly in the area of natural resources law.

Crime, Morality, and Bioethics in America: The Religious Right and the 'Culture Wars'   View Summary
31 August 2010

Guest Speaker

John Dombrink, PhD

Professor of Criminology, Law & Society and Sociology,

School of Social Ecology,

University of California, Irvine

This presentation will discuss certain key enduring, shifting and contradictory elements of the American culture war as it moves forward:

  1. the broadening and moderating of the role of religion;
  2. a drop in salience of certain wedge issues, such as same sex marriage and stem cell research;
  3. continued ambivalence surrounding abortion and reproductive rights; and
  4. the rise of a new/old culture war resistance ('birthers', 'deathers', 'Tenthers', 'truthers' and 'tea party' activists) that makes the predictions of realignment and hopes for post-partisanship weaker. Together, the elements suggest a reconfiguring of the 'culture wars' in the United States.

This presentation will draw from a larger project: 'After the Culture War? America in the Obama Era', which examines the competing themes of normalisation of the 'core' culture war issues (abortion, same-sex marriage, aid-in-dying, stem cell research) against the contemporary backlash and resistance,including, but not limited to, the 'tea party' phenomenon. The resulting book will provide an assessment of the status of social and religious conservatism in America, and a measure of the vitality of the culture wars.

About the speaker

John Dombrink is a sociologist, and professor in the Department of Criminology, Law & Society at the University of California, Irvine. He is the co-author of The Last Resort: Success and Failure in Campaigns for Casinos, University of Nevada Press, 1990 (with William N Thompson); Dying Right: The Death With Dignity Movement, Routledge, 2001 (with Dan Hillyard); and Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells -- Understanding Crime, Law and Morality in America, New York University Press, 2007 (with Dan Hillyard). John Dombrink's ongoing research examines 'morality contests' in American culture, and assesses the status of American laws and attitudes toward the sphere of personal morality.

No RSVP is required, and light refreshments will be served.

September
The International Arbitration Amendment Act 2010: Addressing Australia's Arbitration Ambivalence   View Summary
2 September 2010

Register Online

To register for this event, please click here

_________________________________

About the Seminar

This seminar offers the first in-depth analysis of the IAA as amended in July 2010. The IAA has become the regime exclusively governing international arbitrations in Australia, arguably with no longer any possibility of opting in to the uniform Commercial Arbitration Acts (CAAs) or even a foreign arbitration law. But the CAAs are also being amended to align more closely with the Model Law, and for domestic arbitrations parties can instead opt in to the IAA regime. The CAA amendments are also interesting for provisions (eg on Arb-Med) that were not included in the amended IAA, but which may (or may not) be useful for parties to international arbitrations to adopt by agreement anyway.

This seminar explores these and many other issues affecting especially international arbitration law and practice, based primarily on the detailed Introduction to the path-breaking 11-chapter work, Nottage/Garnett (eds) "International Arbitration in Australia" (Federation Press, October 2010: prelims reproduced at www.law.usyd.edu.au/scil).

Registration Fees

Full fee: $109 (inc gst)

SLS alumni: $87.20 (inc gst)

F/T academic: $87.20 (inc gst)

F/T student: $55 (inc gst)

ILA early career member: $55 (inc gst)

To view the conference brochure, please click here.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Breen Creighton    View Summary
2 September 2010

Government Procurement as a Vehicle for Industrial Relations Reform:

The Case of the Australian Building and Construction Industry

There is a long history in Australia and overseas of using government procurement policies as a vehicle for the protection of the terms and conditions of employment of employees working on government contracts and (to a lesser extent) promoting collective bargaining for such employees. With little fanfare, in the late 1990s the Howard Government decided to use government procurement for rather different purposes: namely, to implement its industrial relations reform agenda in an important sector of the economy. It did this through the National Code of Practice for the Construction Industry and (more importantly) the associated Implementation Guidelines. On the evidence available, this strategy has enjoyed a significant measure of success, and appears to have effected significant cultural and behavioural change in the industry. It has done so, however, in a manner which has been largely free of parliamentary or judicial scrutiny. As such, the Government's approach raises some disturbing issues relating to respect for the rule of law. Interestingly, the Rudd Government has indicated that it will retain the Code and Implementation Guidelines in only slightly modified form.

About the Speaker

Professor Breen Creighton, The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology

Breen Creighton has been a Professor of Law at RMIT University since January 2009. His principal research interests are in the fields of employment law, industrial law, occupational health and safety, equal opportunity law and international labour law. He has published extensively in all of these areas.

Immediately before joining RMIT Breen was a partner in the Workplace Relations Group at Corrs Chambers Westgarth from 1999-2008. He has also held academic posts at Edinburgh University, the University of Melbourne and La Trobe University. He was Legal Officer at the ACTU from 1986-88, Principal Legal Officer at the ILO 1988-91 and in 1991-92 headed a Taskforce on Ratification of ILO conventions for the Commonwealth Government. He has been a member of various public bodies, and has acted as consultant to governments, businesses and unions in Australia and overseas.

Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series: Professor David Kinley   View Summary
7 September 2010

Too Big to Fail:Making Global Finance Pay for Human Rights

This talk develops arguments as to how global finance can be made part of the solution to greater human rights protection, not just part of the problem. It investigates the relationship between human rights and such matters as remittances, foreign direct investment, debt forgiveness, innovative development financing, philanthrocapitalism, and the critical differences and connections between the real and paper economies. The relative capacities of global finance to do great harm to human rights as well as its potential to do great good will be canvassed, and the role that human rights law and policy does and might play analysed and assessed.

Professor David Kinley holds the Chair in Human Rights Law at Sydney University. His research focus over the past decade has been in the area of human rights and the global economy. He is author of the critically acclaimed Civilising Globalisation: Human Rights and the Global Economy (2009); and editor of Corporations and Human Rights, and Human Rights and the World Trade Organisation (both 2009); another edited book (Principled Engagement: Promoting Human Rights in Pariah States) is due out later this year. He lectures and speaks all over the world and has worked with various governments, corporations and NGOs, the UN, the World Bank, and other aid agencies. He is an Academic Panel Member of Doughty Street Chambers, London.

Lectures presented as part of the Sydney Law School DistinguishedScholarsLectureSeries 2010 are free, and pre-registration is not required. Click here for a copy of the series program.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Patricia Lane   View Summary
9 September 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'Legal Theory at Sydney'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'Legal Theory at Sydney' series.

In Africa with Professor Gray: The Practice of Property Theory in Peacemaking

Professor Kevin Gray's analysis of property law describes modern common law property jurisprudence as "fluctuating inconsistently" between three conceptual models. The models of "property as right", "property as fact" and "property as responsibility" might need a fourth model: "property as sovereignty" to complete the picture. These conceptual models provide an analytical tool for unpicking the complex forces at work in armed conflicts such as those taking place in the states of the Sudan, which have experienced civil disturbance to a greater or lesser degree since 1956. The talk will examine the way in which the identification of the modes of conflict by reference to the conceptual models of Professor Gray helped to suggest possible solutions to the "land problem" in the mediation of this difficult and longstanding dispute.

About the Speaker: Patricia Lane, Sydney Law School

Patricia Lane practices primarily in property, equity and environmental law, and teaches property and currently, Interpretation, at the Law School. She has been involved as a resource person to the mediation in relation to the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (2005), the Darfur Peace Agreement (2006), the Eastern Sudan Peace Agreement (2006) and more recent peace talks on Darfur under the mediation of the joint UN/AU mediation, in Libya (2007) and Doha (2010).

Ms Lane has worked in a variety of legal and administrative roles, including as a practitioner at the NSW Bar, and as a former Registrar and Member of the National Native Title Tribunal. She has also participated in various peace negotiations concerning the Sudan as a resource person to mediators and parties in respect of land, environment, and natural resources.

Areas of Interest

  • Property Law
  • Native Title
  • Environmental law
  • Equity
  • Property regimes and Peace-making

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Peter Turner   View Summary
13 September 2010

Degrees of Property

One may look for property's essence; and one may search for property's justifications. Once those substantial tasks are done, the picture of property as a legal concept nevertheless remains incomplete. Looking for property's essence involves excluding from consideration features which property sometimes or often displays, and looking only at property's universal features. Searching for property's justifications assumes an understanding of the entirety of property as a legal concept, not only its universal features. The second task thus assumes that the inessential in property is a matter of concern. However, it also assumes something not yet established: knowledge of what property's inessential features are, and how they feature in lawyers' reasoning and thought. This paper seeks to establish a part of that knowledge by using the notion of degrees of property as it applies to private property in common law systems.

About the Speaker:

Dr Peter Turner, Faculty of Law, University of Cambridge

Dr Peter Turner was elected a Fellow of St Catharine's College, Cambridge, in 2010, and is a Member of the Faculty of Law at the University of Cambridge. He was educated at The University ofSydney (BSc 1999, LLB(Hons) 2002) and Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge (PhD 2010). In 2002 he was Tipstaff to the Hon Justice JD Heydon, following which he practiced as a solicitor in Sydney (2003-2005), worked as a Legal Officer at the Australian Law Reform Commission (2005-2006), and was a Lecturer (part-time) in Litigation (2002) and Equity (2003-2005) at the University of Sydney Law School. His research interests lie in equity and trusts, property, contract, commercial law, statute, and legal formality. The title of his doctoral thesis was 'Equitable Rights Arising from Specifically Enforceable Contracts'. From 2010 he is also a Director of Studies in Law at St Catharine's College, Cambridge, as well as Secretary and Treasurer of the Cambridge Law Journal.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Grant Lamond   View Summary
14 September 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'JSI Guest Speakers'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'JSI Guest Speakers' series.

Seminar Title: The Doctrine of Precedent and the Rule of Recognition

About the Speaker

Dr Grant Lamond, Oxford

Dr Grant Lamond is University Lecturer in Legal Philosophy and Felix Frankfurter Fellow in Law, Balliol College. He studied Philosophy and Law at the University of Sydney and clerked for the Chief Justice of the Federal Court of Australia. He took the BCL at Magdalen College, and was a Junior Research Fellow at St Edmund Hall, where he completed his DPhil on practical reasoning. He has taught at the University of Melbourne and King's College London.

Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series: Professor John Stumbles   View Summary
21 September 2010

Banks Acting as Prudent and Responsible Lenders

The GFC has revealed that banks and other financiers in Australian and elsewhere have provided financial accommodation to customers in amounts in excess of their capacity to repay and in circumstances where the customersfailed to understand the documents signed by them and the risks which they were being asked to assume. Earlier financial crises have revealed similar circumstances in which borrowers have been unfairly disadvantaged and often resulted in new legislation and case law which exposed new risks for banks if they did act imprudently or irresponsibly. Professor Stumbles will explore these legislative and judicial responses to this type of conduct and consider their effectiveness in ensuring banks act properly in dealings with their customers

Professor John Stumbles teaches in the area of finance law and insolvency at the Sydney Law School. He has written on matters relating to banking and finance and insolvency law. Prior to his academic career, he was a banking and finance partner for over 20 years at Mallesons Stephen Jaques, a leading law firm in Australia and in Asia, acting as counsel for Australian and offshore banks. In that capacity, he assisted foreign banks setting up business in Australia, drafted standard banking documentation and assisted banks in settling banking procedures and practices.

Lectures presented as part of the Sydney Law School DistinguishedScholarsLectureSeries 2010 are free, and pre-registration is not required. Click herefor a copy of the series program.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Celeste Black   View Summary
23 September 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'Legal Theory at Sydney'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'Legal Theory at Sydney' series.

A Link Between Theories of Justice and the Legal Concepts of Charity? The Case of Animals

Classification of objects as charitable can lead to important legal privileges under trust law and revenue law and yet a clear definition of charitable purposes remains elusive. It has often been said that charity law is constantly evolving and must reflect contemporary community attitudes, not those of times past. The early extensions of the legal concept of charity to include animal protection from the mid-19th Century indeed reflected a growing societal recognition of animal interests, with judicial decisions reflecting this interest as derivative. That is, protection of animals from cruelty is charitable not because of the benefit derived by the animals but due to the elevating effect this can have on the morals of humankind. This talk will draw out the parallels between views espoused by Kant and others regarding our (indirect) duties to animals and the basis of the judicial decisions which have addressed the extension of the concept of charity to animals. It will also highlight further limits that have been placed on charitable status based on the instrumental value of the animals concerned and will argue that, unlike other aspects of charity law, the protection of animals has failed to evolve beyond the 'attitudes of times past'.

About the Speaker: Celeste Black, Sydney Law School

Ms Black is a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney and Attorney at Law, Supreme Court of California, United States of America. She is a member of the Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law and the Faculty's Climate Law and Policy Group. At Sydney Law School, Ms Black teaches a variety of undergraduate and postgraduate units in income tax law. In the tax area, her research interests include the interaction between taxation law and policy and environmental policy, with particular emphasis on the taxation implications of emissions trading schemes, and the taxation treatment of employee remuneration.

In 2009, Ms Black will be offering the Faculty's first Animal Law unit as an undergraduate elective. Her research interests in relation to animal law include the place of animals in relation to the concept of charities, live export and the interaction between WTO law and animal welfare standards

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Associate Professor Ben Saul   View Summary
23 September 2010

The Kafka-esque Trial of Sheikh Mansour Leghaei: Innocent Imam or Iranian Spy?

Taking Australia to the United Nations Human Rights Committee in Geneva

In mid-2010 Australia expelled an Iranian national, Sheikh Mansour Leghaei, after a 15-year legal battle in Australia against an adverse security assessment issued by the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO). Sheikh Leghaei has never been informed of the allegations against him and brought numerous challenges in the Australian federal courts seeking the disclosure of the evidence against him. Dr Leghaei is a moderate Muslim sheikh at the Imam Hussein Islamic Centre in Earlwood, Sydney and his wife and four children are Australian residents or citizens. His expulsion, after a long and difficult public campaign to prevent his removal, caused considerable distress to his family and to 1,200 followers. After exhausting domestic remedies, in 2010, Sheikh Leghaei lodged a communication with the UN Human Rights Committee under the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, alleging that Australia violated his human rights to a fair hearing, freedom from discrimination, and family unity. He also requested interim measures to prevent Australia from expelling him while the UN Committee considered his case.

This seminar considers the range of legal issues in the case, including Australian constitutional and public law, security and immigration laws, and international human rights law. It also considers the pros and cons, and highs and lows, of utilizing UN human rights procedures alongside public campaign strategies. The seminar draws conclusions about the quality of justice in Australia for a non-citizen suspected of being a security risk, and what that tells us about Australian values and the rule of law in Australia.

Associate ProfessorBen Saul was one of the barristers acting for Sheikh Leghaei in his UN communication.

About the Speaker:

Associate Professor Ben Saul, Sydney Law School

Associate Professor Ben Saul is Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law (SCIL) and a barrister. He has published widely in international law journals and his recent book, Defining Terrorism in International Law (Oxford University Press, 2006), is the leading scholarly work on the subject. He has taught law at UNSW, Oxford, and in Nepal, Hong Kong and Cambodia and is Editor in Chief of the Australian International Law Journal. Ben has delivered numerous lectures in Australia and overseas, appeared frequently before parliamentary and law reform inquiries, been active in public debates about terrorism, sedition, torture, refugees and human rights, and regularly appears in the international and national media on international law issues.

Seminar and Book Launch: Power, Politics and Justice in Post-Genocide Rwanda   View Summary
27 September 2010

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Registration

Please click here to register.

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Speaker:Dr. Phil Clark, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford

Chair: Dr Wendy Lambourne, Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Sydney

Rwanda has experienced immense social and political upheaval since 1990, especially after the 1994 genocide, which claimed the lives of three-quarters of the Tutsi minority in just 100 days. During the genocide, hundreds of thousands of ordinary Rwandans committed crimes including murder and nearly two million refugees fled the country, mostly into the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since 1994, Rwanda has pursued a comprehensive policy of genocide prosecutions, most notably through the gacaca courts, which comprise 11,000 community-based jurisdictions across the country. Meanwhile, Rwanda has achieved a seemingly high degree of social stability and become an international development 'success story', with the World Bank and donors praising its sustained levels of economic growth that are almost unparalleled across Africa.

But beneath Rwanda's peaceful veneer lie political and social tensions that warrant further scrutiny. This seminar explores the political, social, legal and cultural landscape in Rwanda, the impact of the genocide on the present-day society and the wider region, and what the future holds for Rwanda. The backdrop to these discussions is the recent, heavily criticised presidential election in Rwanda, the leaking of a UN report into Rwanda's alleged atrocities in eastern Congo after 1994, and the completion of the eight-year gacaca justice process.

The seminar will also serve as a launch of Dr. Clark's book, The Gacaca Courts, Post-Genocide Justice and Reconciliation in Rwanda: Justice without Lawyers (Cambridge University Press). Drawing on more than seven years of fieldwork in Rwanda and nearly 500 interviews with participants in trials, this in-depth ethnographic analysis of a complex transitional justice institution explores the ways in which Rwandans interpret the gacaca courts. Its conclusions provide insights into post-genocide justice and reconciliation, as well as the population's views on the future of Rwanda itself. Click here for more information on the book.

Phil Clark is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Socio-Legal Studies, University of Oxford, and convenor of Oxford Transitional Justice Research. From October 2010, he will be Lecturer in Comparative and International Politics at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London. He has written extensively on conflict questions in Africa, principally transitional justice in the Great Lakes region and the work of the International Criminal Court, and advised a wide range of national and international policy actors on these issues.

Doing Business in Indonesia: A Legal Perspective   View Summary
28 September 2010

Register Online
To register, pleaseclick here.

___________________________________
Doing Business in Indonesia: A Legal Perspective

Indonesia is Australia's nearest northern neighbour. It is an archipelagic state with more than 17,000 islands and 230 million people. It offers abundant natural resources for commercial exploitation.

By virtue of Law No. 25/2007 on Investment (the "Investment Law") all sectors in Indonesia are open to foreign investment, except for those included in the Negative Investment List. In 2010, the Indonesian government expanded the sectors open to foreign investment, including the fields of healthcare and agriculture.

The Investment Law was specially drafted to entice more foreign investment to Indonesia. The Law offers some investment facilities including tax, immigration service and import permission facilities. The Law does not distinguish between foreign and domestic investors: they both receive equal treatment. The Law requires that a joint venture company ("PT PMA") be established between a foreign company and local partner. Unlike in the past, the Law is silent on the divestment. In some sectors, a 100% foreign investment is allowed.

The new 2009 Mining Law makes eligible foreign mining companies which have established a PT PMA for a mining license, granted by the central or local government. Under this new law, there is no more contract of work between the state and foreign investors for mining of coal and other minerals.

As for oil and gas, foreign contractors are invited to do business either in upstream or downstream areas. For upstream activity, a foreign oil company is not required to establish a PT-PMA. It must only sign a production-sharing contract with BP MIGAS, a body especially instituted for that purpose.

As a member of WTO Agreement, Indonesia has developed its laws on IPRs in compliance to TRIPs Agreement. These IPR laws complement the Investment Law.

Guest Speaker: Mr A Zen Umar Purba

Mr A Zen Umar Purbar is a practicing lawyer in Ali Budiardjo, Nugroho, Reksodiputro ('ABNR'), one of Indonesia most highly-regarded law firms. He is also Professor of Law at the University of Indonesia.

Chair: Dr Simon Butt, Sydney Law School

Inaugural Kevin McCann Lecture on Energy and Resources Law: Dr Ziggy Switkowski   View Summary
29 September 2010

This event is now full

You may register your details below for inclusion on the waitlist.As we will be recording this event, a podcast will be made available in the days following the event.

To register your interest, please click here

__________________________

Nuclear Power, Climate Change and Energy

With climate change continuing as a critical global issue, and energy security becoming a global priority, there has been renewed interest in the use of nuclear reactors for the production of electricity with near zero greenhouse gas emissions.

The civilian nuclear power industry is now more than 50 years old and 440 reactors now provide some electricity to two thirds of the global population in 31 countries. Several other countries are considering introducing nuclear power and outside of hydroelectricity and the burning of fossil fuels, no other technology can deliver baseload electricity reliably and cost effectively.

For the time being, Australia has rejected deployment of nuclear energy. Community attitudes remain polarised with concerns about reactor location, spent fuel management and the creation of longlived radioactive waste.

The government's long term energy strategy requires success with carbon capture and storage, supercharged growth in renewables, and moderating demand through conservation - a risky set of expectations.

This lecture will trace the growing importance of nuclear technology around the world, examine the concerns with its use, and conclude that nuclear power cannot be excluded if Australia is to meet its energy and climate change targets.

About the Speaker
Dr Ziggy Switkowski is the Chair of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation. He is a non-executive director of Suncorp, Tabcorp and Healthscope, and Chair of Opera Australia and a former chief executive of Telstra, Optus and Kodak (Australia).

In 2006 he chaired the Prime Minister's Review of Uranium Mining, Processing and Nuclear Energy which returned nuclear power to the country's strategic debate.

He has a PhD in nuclear physics from the University of Melbourne and is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering.

October
Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Justine Bell    View Summary
7 October 2010

Integrated management of environmental information - an ecologically sustainable solution?

Speaker

Dr Justine Bell, University of Queensland

Sustainability has been the catalyst for major legislative and policy reform at the international, national and local levels. Climate change, drought, erosion, loss of biodiversity and reductions in air quality have prompted governments to enact legislation regulating the use of privately-owned land. However this increase in environmental regulation has led to a corresponding decrease in security of landholding in Australia, as restrictions and obligations created by these Acts are often imposed with little or no consideration given as to how they can interact with the land title register.

Furthermore, because many environmental restrictions and obligations do not operate in conjunction with the land title register, often landholders are not aware of their existence. As a result, there have been numerous cases in Australia where unauthorised activity such as land clearing has occurred due to a lack of knowledge. Such activity is usually punished with a fine, but this is imposed after the damage has already occurred, and often at an enormous financial cost to landholders.

Some Australian jurisdictions have attempted to remedy this problem through the provision of better information. This includes registering or recording information on land title, or establishing a separate spatial database on which information is represented. Such developments have occurred on a largely ad-hoc basis, and there are inconsistencies in whether information is registered or recorded, and if so where it is registered or recorded, and what legal consequences attach to such entries.

This seminar will explore some current Australian approaches to registering and recording these interests. It will highlight the strengths and weaknesses of the main approaches used, and conclude with recommendations for an integrated system for the management of environmental interests affecting land use.

About the Speaker

Dr Bell is a Lecturer at the TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland.Dr Bellholds a PhD from the Queensland University of Technology. She also completed her undergraduate studies in law at QUT, being awarded an LLB with First Class Honours in 2006. Dr Bell's doctoral research examined how property registers might be used to record information of environmental restrictions pertaining to land, and how this could contribute to the achievement of a policy of sustainable ecological development.

Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Rosemary Lyster   View Summary
12 October 2010

Confronting the Greenhouse Conundrum in a Climate of Uncertainty

Regulating greenhouse gases has emerged as one of the most crucial issues of the 21st Century. Yet it occurs in the context of considerable uncertainty. What is the future of international climate change negotiations? How do controversies around climate science and the economic implications of climate change interface with the law-making process? Which economic instruments should governments adopt to signal a price on carbon - a carbon tax or an emissions trading scheme, and do we need complementary measures such renewable energy and energy efficiency schemes? In this lecture, Professor Lyster analyses whether the regulation of greenhouse gases poses any unique challenges to the notion of law.

Professor Rosemary Lyster is Director of the Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL), and specialises in energy and climate law, water law and GMOs, and environmental law. She has written and co-authored a number of books in the area of energy and climate law and environmental and planning law, and is a regular presenter at international and domestic conferences. Rosemary is an editor of the Environmental Planning and Law Journal and is a member of the World Conservation Union Commission on Environmental Law, including the Special Working Groups on Water and Wetlands, Energy and Climate Change, and Forests.

Lectures presented as part of the Sydney Law School DistinguishedScholarsLectureSeries 2010 are free, and pre-registration is not required. Click herefor a copy of the series program.

Security, Freedom and Human Rights: The Fearful Power of Fabric   View Summary
12 October 2010

Register Online
To register, please click here.

Please note: Seats are limited to 70 places for all seminars in this series.

______________________________

This series of short seminars explores some acute current controversies about the relationship between security, freedom, and human rights. Each seminar involves a 30 minute presentation followed by questions.


The Fearful Power of Fabric: Is Banning the Islamic Headscarf Necessary to Save Democracy - Or Has Secularism Turned Fanatical?
In recent years, the Islamic headscarf or veil has been elevated to an iconic symbol of civilisational struggle, cultural collision, and religious difference in public debate in many countries, including most recently in the French republic. Various liberal democracies have restricted the wearing of the full Islamic veil, on grounds that it offends secularism, oppresses women, threatens security, signifies fundamentalism, or is incompatible with local cultures, societies or public values. This seminar asks when, and under what conditions, it might be lawful under international human rights law to restrict freedom of religious, political and cultural expression by banning the Islamic headscarf. It considers relevant human rights cases in courts around the world, from Turkey to Britain to Canada, and interrogates the quality of judicial reasoning and public debates about the necessity of such restrictions.

Ben Saul asks whether laws banning Islamic veils are permissible restrictions on freedom of religious expression - or a symptom of a strange and virulent public psychological disorder in some democracies.

Comment: Marie Le Moël, foreign correspondent for Le Monde and Radio France Internationale, will discuss the heated controversies in France over new laws banning the full burqa in public places.


About the speaker
Associate Professor Ben Saul is Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law and a barrister. Ben is internationally recognised for his work on terrorism, human rights, the law of armed conflict and international criminal law. He has published five books, 50 scholarly book chapters or journal articles, 150 other publications, and delivered over 150 public seminars. Ben has taught law at Oxford, Sydney, UNSW, and in China, India, and Cambodia, and conducted training for the governments of Iraq, Kuwait, Algeria, Laos, Nepal and Bhutan. He has been involved in human rights cases concerning South Africa, Peru, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Israel, Macedonia, Fiji and the United States (including Guantanamo Bay), including before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the UN Human Rights Committee and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Ben is a member of the International Law Association's International Committee for the Compensation of Victims of War and President of the Refugee Advice and Casework Service, and was previously a legal expert for a UN General Assembly's committee on Palestine. He has a doctorate in law from Oxford, and honours degrees in Arts and Law from Sydney.


Online Brochure
Click here to view the series brochure.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Fleur Johns   View Summary
14 October 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'Legal Theory at Sydney'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'Legal Theory at Sydney' series.

Marginal Notes: Death, Disaster and Infra-legality in International Law

International law - international humanitarian law in particular - is intensely concerned with dead bodies encountered amid violence: their sanctity, their incendiary properties, and their significance for families, communities, and nations. In circumstances of natural disaster, international law retains some of these concerns. In the latter context, however, international law's governing dispositions tend to take a rather different turn. When cast as waste-products of natural disaster, dead bodies induce norms and institutions concerned overwhelmingly with the accumulation, verification and flow of data. International law as disaster management emphasises the separation of the living from the dead and the leaching from bodies of inexpert, unmanageable meanings. Through prompt and professional management, the dead body is to be made doubly dead in international law; neither public nor private.

This paper presents a close reading of literature surrounding international organisations' 'management' of dead bodies in disaster situations, in contrast to manuals concerned with the handling of the dead in conflict settings. Through this, the paper explores how and what the dead body is made to mean in and for international law. It studies the particular combination of governmental techniques cultivated within the international legal field at sites of mass death. By focusing on international legal texts concerned with death en masse, this paper demonstrates the importance of the infra-legal for international law: that is, that which international law casts as beneath legal notice and, at the same time, always within international law's estimation.

This paper presents new, ongoing research which is to be forthcoming in a book: Non-legality in International Law: Limits of the Legal Imagination.

About the Speaker:

Dr Fleur Johns, Sydney Law School

Dr Fleur Johns is Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law (with Dr. Ben Saul) and a Senior Lecturer in the Faculty of Law. Fleur teaches and conducts research mainly in public and private international law and legal theory. Fleur is a graduate of the University of Melbourne (BA (Fine Arts & English Literature major)), LLB (Hons 1)) and Harvard Law School (LLM, SJD, Menzies Scholar, Laylin Prize). She is a member of the Editorial Boards of the Leiden Journal of International Law (co-editor, Articles), the Australian Journal of Human Rights and the journal Global Peace, Change & Security, a member of the Advisory Board of the Australian Feminist Law Journal, a former Primary Editor of the Harvard Human Rights Journal and former Book Review Editor of the Sydney Law Review. Fleur also serves (by election) on the Coordinating Committee of the International Legal Theory Interest Group within the European Society of International Law.

Current projects on which Fleur is working include a co-edited volume entitled Events: The Force of International Law, exploring unacknowledged legacies of, and paths not taken in, international law by reference to a selection of historical 'events'. Fleur is also continuing work on a series of studies of domains perceived as lawless, pre-law or insufficiently regulated by international law, examining these by reference to the literature on governmentality and ethnographies of expertise (from aspects of the global market to the detention camp and the torture chamber). Fleur has an ongoing interest in geographic dimensions of international legal authority and spatial effects of international law, dating back to her doctoral work at Harvard.

Research grants of which Fleur has been recipient include: an Arts and Humanities Research Council Grant (UK, 2006-2007, with Prof. Peter Fitzpatrick et al.) and a Leverhulme Trust Visiting Fellowship (UK, 2005-2006).

Non-governmental and international organizations with which Fleur has worked include: the Refugee Advice and Casework Service (Sydney, Management Committee Member, 2003-2005, 2009-); the International Law Association (Australian Branch, National Management Committee Member, 2005); the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs & Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies (Rapporteur, 1999); the American Civil Liberties Union (pro bono legal work, 1997); the Lawyers Alliance for New York (pro bono legal work, 1996-1998); the Environment Defenders Office (Victoria) (Non-Executive Director, 1993-1995); and the Esprit Cares Trust Fund (Advisory Board Member 1992-1994).

2010 Sydney Law School Postgraduate Information Evening   View Summary
14 October 2010

Register Online
To register, please click here.

_______________________________________

The Sydney Law School will hold its annual Postgraduate Information evening on Thursday 14 October from 5.30-7pm. The event is an opportunity for prospective candidates to meet face to face with our staff to discuss matters in relation to postgraduate study in law at the Sydney Law School.

The Dean will deliver a brief presentation on the law school's postgraduate program at 5.45pm.

Light refreshments will be available.


For further information
For more information regarding this event email: law.pginfoevening@sydney.edu.au

For an information pack, tel: +61 2 9351 0351/+61 2 9351 0267/+61 2 9351 0361 or email: law.postgrad@sydney.edu.au.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Mark Drumbl   View Summary
14 October 2010

Not so Simple: Child Soldiers, Justice, and the International Legal Imagination

Speaker

Professor Mark Drumbl

Professor of Law and Director, Transnational Law Institute, Washingtonand Lee University, School of Law

Drawing from ethnographic research, thisseminar examines questions of responsibility, rights,and reintegrationin the case ofchild soldiersimplicated inmass atrocity.It turns to assumptions of agency, action, and personhood -- instead of thedominant leitmotiv of helplessness, incapacity,and vulnerability -- to revisit the place of child ex-combatants within the architecture of post-conflict reconstructive initiatives.Theproject alsointimatesa broader cautionary taleregarding transnational humanitarianism and its attendant imagery,the role of criminal law in transformative politics, and superficially protective approaches to actualizing the best interests of the child.

The First Review Conference on the International Criminal Court, Kampala 31 May to 11 June 2010   View Summary
19 October 2010

Register Online

To register, please click here.

_________________________________

The Review Conference on the ICC, mandated by the Rome Statute of the Court in 1998, had on its agenda three proposals for amendments to the Statute. One dealt with activating the Court's jurisdiction over the crime of aggression; one with the use of forbidden weapons in non-international armed conflict; and one with Article 124 of the Statute, which permits states with sufficient gall to opt out of the war crimes provisions of the Statute. Professor Clark's talk is a follow up to his article in the Australian Journal of International Law discussing the planned agenda for Kampala. Come and find out what happened!

About the Speaker

Roger Clark,a graduate of Victoria University in New Zealand and of Columbia Law School in New York, has written widely on international law, human rights and criminal law. He was a member of the United Nations Committee on Crime Prevention and Control between 1986 and 1990. In 1995 and 1996 he represented the Government of Samoa in arguing the illegality of nuclear weapons before the International Court of Justice in The Hague. Since 1995, he has represented Samoa in the negotiations to create a permanent International Criminal Court, including the Rome Conference in 1998 when the treaty setting up the Court was finalised, in subsequent meetings of the Preparatory Commission for the Court, the Court's Special Working Group on the Crime of Aggression, and at the 2010 Review Conference on the Court in Kampala, Uganda.

Professor Clark is Board of Governors Professor at Rutgers Law School inCamden, New Jersey, where he teaches Criminal Law, International Law, Human Rights, Foreign Relations and National Security Law, and International Criminal Law.

Chair

Irene Baghoomians, Sydney Law School

Sydney Institute of Criminology presents: Introduction to Crime Prevention   View Summary
20 October 2010

Register Online

To register online please click here.

_______________________________

This one-day Introduction to Crime Prevention training course provides practical, scenario based training covering an array of topics including:
• Reasons not to solely rely on the criminal justice system to prevent crime
• Local crime statistics and crime data analysis techniques
• A crime problem-solving model
• Models of crime prevention
• Ingredients of successful partnerships
• Simple methods of implementing and evaluating crime prevention initiatives

This training will be especially relevant to local government Community Safety Officers, police, staff from non-government organisations involved in preventing crime, criminology students and others interested in crime prevention. Upon completion of the training, participants will have a working knowledge of key crime prevention concepts and be familiar with strategies to effectively prevent crime. The practical nature of the training means that the skills and knowledge gained through this training will be directly transferable to the workplace.

Participants will also receive a CD containing crime prevention information and exercises to supplement the face-to-face training experience.

The training will be facilitated by Garner Clancey. Garner is an Adjunct Lecturer of the Sydney Institute of Criminology and has extensive experience in crime prevention. He has studied psychology, criminology and urban planning; taught crime prevention units across four universities; worked for juvenile justice and police agencies; and completed numerous crime prevention projects, including the development of crime prevention plans for local government authorities. Garner recently authored a resource manual on public space CCTV systems for the Australian Institute of Criminology and has created numerous crime prevention resources. Garner has also served on various Boards and Committees, including the National Children and Youth Law Centre Board, the Australian Crime Prevention Council Executive Committee and the NSW Young Offenders Advisory Council.

Registration fees

Full fee: $220 (inc GST)

F/T student: $150 (inc GST)

University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)

Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Security, Freedom and Human Rights: A Just Peace after Gaza - or Peace at Any Price?    View Summary
21 October 2010

Register Online
To register, please click here.

Please note: Seats are limited to 70 places for all seminars in this series.

______________________________

This series of short seminars explores some acute current controversies about the relationship between security, freedom, and human rights. Each seminar involves a 30 minute presentation followed by questions.


A Just Peace after Gaza - or Peace at Any Price? International Law Limits on a Political Settlement in the Middle East
What role does or can international law play in a peaceful resolution of the Israel / Palestine dispute? Depending on the speaker, public discussion about peace in the Middle East is either thick with mentions of international law - or remarkable for the absence of reference to law. Those realists who insist on the primacy of a 'negotiated' political settlement appear to believe that any political deal which brings peace is acceptable, and that law is largely irrelevant. Those who approach the dispute through the lens of international law argue that peace cannot come at any price, and that the only acceptable deal is one that brings peace with justice. The public debate is frequently confused by claims and counter-claims about what international law does or does not say about key issues in the dispute, particularly when partisan governments or polemical lobbyists dominate the debate and frequently mislead the public about the legal realities - and in the process, do no favours to the cause of peace. This seminar examines the legal debates on key controversies: Israeli settlements, the status of Jerusalem, self-determination, security needs, the Gaza blockade, and the 'right of return' of Palestinian refugees. While acknowledging uncertainties in some areas of law, the seminar sets out reasoned legal 'answers' on many of the issues, from the perspective of an international law scholar who is neither 'for' nor 'against' the Israeli or Palestinian causes.

Ben Saul considers whether international law can make a difference to any peace settlement in the Middle East, including on the critical issues of Israeli settlements, Jerusalem, self-determination, security, the Gaza blockade, and the 'right of return' of Palestinian refugees.

Comment: Lisa Main, ABC24 TV and formerly of Al Jazeera TV New York, reflects on the place of international law in media coverage of the Middle East dispute.


About the speaker
Associate Professor Ben Saul is Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law and a barrister. Ben is internationally recognised for his work on terrorism, human rights, the law of armed conflict and international criminal law. He has published five books, 50 scholarly book chapters or journal articles, 150 other publications, and delivered over 150 public seminars. Ben has taught law at Oxford, Sydney, UNSW, and in China, India, and Cambodia, and conducted training for the governments of Iraq, Kuwait, Algeria, Laos, Nepal and Bhutan. He has been involved in human rights cases concerning South Africa, Peru, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Israel, Macedonia, Fiji and the United States (including Guantanamo Bay), including before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the UN Human Rights Committee and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Ben is a member of the International Law Association's International Committee for the Compensation of Victims of War and President of the Refugee Advice and Casework Service, and was previously a legal expert for a UN General Assembly's committee on Palestine. He has a doctorate in law from Oxford, and honours degrees in Arts and Law from Sydney.


Online Brochure
Click here to view the series brochure.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Associate Professor Anne Twomey   View Summary
21 October 2010

The Pitfalls and Perils of Minority Government

Speaker

Associate Professor Anne Twomey- Sydney Law School

The formation of a minority Commonwealth Government has shone a light into some of the darker corners of the Constitution and its conventions. This seminar will address the latest controversies and constitutional questions, including:

  • Can the independents join with the Opposition to pass Bills on matters such as paid parental leave without government agreement?
  • What sort of motions could be regarded as a vote of no confidence and potentially bring down the government?
  • What should the Governor-General do if the Prime Minister loses a vote of confidence and seeks an election?
  • Does an outgoing Prime Minister have the right to advise the Governor-General on the appointment of her successor?

About the Speaker

Associate Professor Anne Twomey- Sydney Law School

Associate Professor Anne Twomey has practised as a solicitor and is admitted to practice in New South Wales, Victoria, the ACT, and the High Court. She has worked for the High Court of Australia as a Senior Research Officer, the Commonwealth Parliamentary Research Service as a researcher in the Law and Government Group, the Commonwealth Senate as Secretary to the Senate Legal and Constitutional Committee, and The Cabinet Office of NSW as Policy Manager of the Legal Branch. She has acted as a consultant to various government bodies.

Rethinking International Criminal Justice: A Collaborative, Interdisciplinary Research and Policy Pr   View Summary
22 October 2010 to 23 October 2010

Rethinking International Criminal Justice is the next phase of the ICCJNet Reimagining International Criminal Justice research strategy. From critically analysing the shape, nature, impacts, and direction ofinternational criminal justice as an evolving processthe project seeks toinfluence and reshape itstrajectorythroughwork-shoppingsubstantive andprocedural challenges in practice. In order to achieve this stage in anongoing research enterprise, the project utilises a unique interdisciplinary research methodology to bring the worlds of policy and academia into active and meaningful discussion based around responses to a rich and complex scenario of the sort that confronts the various stakeholders daily.

There are now four broad Focus Areas represented as broad Working Groups: Interests, Regulatory Functions and Modes, Potentialities, and Limitations. Each of these groupsare charged togenerate research ideasnecessitated by the intervention modalities they will consider in theirdelineated areas. Rethinking International Criminal Justice is the product of structured working group engagement, through to a meeting where research questions will be married with policy options, and the resultant challenges will be moulded into a strategic research agenda for the development and funding of action-oriented research initiatives.

Registration

Please include the following details in your RSVP by 13 October 2010: Name, title,email, affiliation, and dietary requirements. Please send to Karen McLaren at: karen.mclaren@sydney.edu.au

Expressions of Interest

For expressions of interest and to participate in pre workshop online discussion contact: Janice jansimk@gmail.com or Louise louise.boon-kuo@sydney.edu.au.

Click here for more information: http://blogs.wun.ac.uk/iccjnet/.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Professor Edward Stein   View Summary
25 October 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'JSI Guest Speakers'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'JSI Guest Speakers' series.

Born that Way? Not a Choice: Problems with Origin-Based Arguments for LGBT Rights

Research on how sexual orientations develop has captured the attention of many Americans. Some researchers, citing evidence from neuroscience, genetics, and psychology, claim that sexual orientation is inborn, fixed at an early age, or not the result of any choices. Many advocates of lesbian and gay rights have welcomed this claim and have tried to use it and the research supporting it in arguments for same-sex marriage, anti-discrimination laws that refer to sexual orientations, the inclusion of lesbians and gay men in the military, and other such issues affecting sexual orientation minorities. Such "origin-based" arguments take the following form: if sexual orientations are innate, genetic, firmly rooted in biology, fixed early in life, and/or not chosen, then it is wrong to criminalize the sexual behavior of lesbians, gay men, and bisexuals, to discriminate against them, and/or to withhold from them rights and benefits that are available to heterosexuals. This talk will examine such arguments—specifically, the "born that way" argument and the "not a choice" argument—and find that they are deeply problematic. Such arguments are, to varying degrees, based on dubious empirical premises, provide little political traction, are ethically impotent and may have serious bioethical implications. Further, in most US legal contexts, these arguments mistakenly prioritize immutability as a factor in equal protection analysis.

About the Speaker

Professor Edward Stein

Edward Stein is Vice Dean, Professor of Law, and Director of the Program in Family, Law, Policy, and Bioethics at Cardozo School of Law in New York City. He holds a B.A. from Williams College, a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a J.D. from the Yale Law School. He is the author of two books (The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory and Ethics of Sexual Orientation and Without Good Reason: The Rationality Debate in Philosophy and Cognitive Science, both published by Oxford University Press), the editor of a widely cited anthology (Forms of Desire: Sexual Orientation and the Social Constructionist Controversy, published by Routledge) and he has written dozens of law and philosophy articles and chapters relating to sexual orientation, gender, family law, science, and ethics. Stein was a law clerk for Judge Dolores Sloviter of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and he has taught at Yale University, Williams College, Mount Holyoke College, and New York University, where he continues to teach as an Adjunct Professor of Law.

Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series: Professor Sheelagh McCracken   View Summary
26 October 2010

Exercising a Self-Help Remedy in Finance: Is it Necessarily Helping Yourself?

The legal concept of 'set-off' expresses a simple idea: where two persons are indebted to each other, only the balance should be payable. Its application becomes controversial, however, when a bank claims to set off a customer's credit balance against that customer's debt to it. Professor McCracken analyses the scope and operation of the concept in this lecture entitled: Exercising a Self-Help Remedy in Finance: Is it Necessarily Helping Yourself?


Available to individuals, businesses and financial institutions alike, set-off potentially offers a powerful self-help remedy. Yet its exercise has attracted criticism. So, for example, during the global financial crisis, several banks in the UK reportedly found themselves accused of having used an 'obscure' legal device to 'raid' their customers' accounts. Examining interpretations and applications of the concept, Professor McCracken reflects on the extent to which the law can - and should - accommodate such a remedy.

Dr Sheelagh McCracken is Professor of Finance Law at Sydney Law School. Over the last 20 years she has lectured on finance law within Australia and around Asia in Singapore, Hong Kong, Beijing and, more recently, in Tokyo. She has a strong research interest in commercial law, particularly finance law. The third edition of her book on The Banker's Remedy of Set-Off was published in London this year.

Lectures presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Scholars Lecture Series 2010 are free, and pre-registration is not required. Click here for a copy of the series program.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Edward Stein    View Summary
28 October 2010

Relationship Recognition for Same-Sex Couples in the United States

Presently there is a complicated patchwork of recognition and non-recognition for same-sex relationships in the United States. While several states recognise such relationships to some degree or other (whether through legalised marriages, recognition of marriages from other jurisdictions, civil unions, domestic partnerships, or other such status), many other states to some degree or other explicitly deny recognition to some or all of these relationships. This talk analyses the present situation, the ongoing legal and legislative battles, and explores two additional proposal related to relationship recognition, namely, (1) the abolition of the legal institution of marriage and (2) the adoption of a functionalist approach to relationship recognition.

About the Speaker

Professor Edward Stein, Cardozo School of Law, New York City

Edward Stein is Vice Dean, Professor of Law, and Director of the Program in Family, Law, Policy, and Bioethics at Cardozo School of Law in New York City. He holds a B.A. from Williams College, a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a J.D. from the Yale Law School. He is the author of two books (The Mismeasure of Desire: The Science, Theory and Ethics of Sexual Orientation and Without Good Reason: The Rationality Debate in Philosophy and Cognitive Science, both published by Oxford University Press), the editor of a widely cited anthology (Forms of Desire: Sexual Orientation and the Social Constructionist Controversy, published by Routledge) and he has written dozens of law and philosophy articles and chapters relating to sexual orientation, gender, family law, science, and ethics. Stein was a law clerk for Judge Dolores Sloviter of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit and he has taught at Yale University, Williams College, Mount Holyoke College, and New York University, where he continues to teach as an Adjunct Professor of Law.

Oration: Law's Role in the Global Response to HIV/AIDS   View Summary
28 October 2010

------------------------------------


Registration

Click here to register.

------------------------------------

More than any other disease, HIV illustrates that law can be both a tool for, and an obstacle to, improved public health. In many developing countries, where the rule of law is often weak, UN agencies argue that the 'enabling legal environment' for the response to HIV is critically important. In June 2010, the UN Development Program announced the formation of the Global Commission on HIV and the Law, which will report at the end of 2011.

In this oration, David Patterson, Manager of HIV and Health Law at the International Development Law Organization in Rome, Italy, will critically review the role of law in international responses to HIV. His presentation will identify some immediate challenges, propose ways to address them, and note the implications for other public health challenges in the development context.

------------------------------------

Keynote: Mr David Patterson, Manager, HIV & Health Law Program, International Development Law Organization (IDLO)

Responder: Mr John Rock

Chair: Ms Julie Hamblin

------------------------------------

About the Speakers:

David Patterson

David Patterson is a graduate of Sydney University (BSc) and UNSW (LLB). Postgraduate studies include LLM (McGill) and MSc (London).After graduating he joined the Australian Federation of AIDS Organizations (AFAO) and edited two editions of the Australian HIV/AIDS Legal Guide. David co-founded the Canadian HIV/AIDS Legal Network. In 1993 he interned with the (then) UN Centre for Human Rights in New York City, and later obtained UN ECOSOC consultative status for both the Legal Network and the International Council of AIDS Organizations (ICASO). Since 1994, working with UNDP, UNAIDS, and national and international NGOs,he has supported law and policy reform and implementation in the response to HIV in the Caribbean, East Africa, and South East Asia. Since 2009 he has managed the HIV and Health Law Program at the International Development Law Organization (IDLO) in Rome, Italy. In 2009 he edited the Toolkit: Scaling up HIV-related Legal Services. David is a member of the Programming Sub-Committee of the UNAIDS Reference Group on HIV and Human Rights.

John Rock

John has lived with HIV for nearly 30 years. An industrial chemist, after a career in international marketing based in London, New York and Sydney, he ran his own consultancy business in marketing for 11 years. In 2000 on the advice of his doctors he closed the business and wanting to give something back for his good fortune in still being alive, commenced voluntary work in HIV - mainly in Asia and the Pacific. He is an Advisor to APN+ (Asia Pacific Network of PLHIV) and is on the Transitional Steering Group (Interim Board) of ITPC (International Treatment Preparedness Coalition). His main focus is assisting positive groups in Asia and the Pacific to advocate for their rights, in particular their right for treatment, care and support. He is also Chair of the Board of AFAP (Australian Foundation for Peoples of Asia and the Pacific) a development NGO based in Sydney.

Julie Hamblin

Julie Hamblinhas worked for more than 20 years in the fields of health law, bioethics and public health. Asa partner in the Health Group of HWL Ebsworth, she advises hospitals, health professionals and other health providers onabroad range of legal and policy issues, including clinical risk, medical negligence, privacy, medical research, health ethics and public health policy.She has also worked extensively on HIV policy internationally, having undertaken consultancy work with the United Nations Development Programme and other UN and non-governmental bodies in more than 20 countries in Asia, the Pacific, Africa and Eastern Europe. She has served on many Government bodies and advisory boards, including the Australian National Council on HIV/AIDS and Related Diseases, the National Pituitary Hormones Advisory Council, Central Sydney Area Health Service and the National Institute of Complementary Medicine.

Brochure

Click here for a copy of the brochure.

Crime or Care? The Problem of Cause of Death and 'Intention to Kill' in End-of-Life Care   View Summary
28 October 2010

A symposium presented by the Centre for Values, Ethics & the Law in Medicine, and the Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics at Sydney Law School.

Just as the Greens Senator Bob Brown has reignited the public discussion on euthanasia, leading researchers and practitioners Dr Andrew McGee, Associate Professor Cameron Stewart, and Dr Charles Douglas will each discuss the complex problems that arise when the law of homicide is applied to end-of-life-care.

This seminar is essential for health care professionals and lawyers working in the end-of-life context, and will be an afternoon of stimulating discussion between our speakers and guests on this challenging area of law and practice.

RSVP

Lindy Gaze
E: lindy.gaze@sydney.edu.au

Please click here for a copy of the brochure.

Postgraduate Student Conference 2010   View Summary
29 October 2010

Online Registration

Click here to register.

For more event details please refer to the Postgraduate Conference website.

_____________________________

Law and Social Reality

Emerging social, environment and economic issues create complex issues for legal scholars to investigate. How do we undertake successful law reform? How are legal developments translated into social change? What are the consequences of law's application to problems such as climate change, human rights abuses and economic reform?

Post-graduate research students in law and associated disciplines in the social sciences and humanitieswill present on these and related issues, particularly:

- Law reform in response to new social, environment and economic issues

- The differences between 'law-in-books' and 'law-in-action'

- The consequences of law's application to social problems

- Law and the social sciences, empirical research or social theory

- Social justice and the law

This is an opportunity to experience Sydney Law School in its new state-of-the-art facilities, to hear presentations on the thesis research process and participate in discussions on critical research questions.

Students are also welcome to attend the conference without presenting.

For further enquiries

Contact Belinda Reeve: law.pgconference@sydney.edu.au

November
Security, Freedom and Human Rights: Speaking Fire and Fairy Tales   View Summary
1 November 2010

Register Online
To register, please click here.

Please note: Seats are limited to 70 places for all seminars in this series.

______________________________

This series of short seminars explores some acute current controversies about the relationship between security, freedom, and human rights. Each seminar involves a 30 minute presentation followed by questions.


Speaking Fire and Fairy Tales: Has Iran Incited Genocide against the Jewish People, and Should Australia Take Legal Action?

Ben Saul examines inflammatory public statements made by senior Iranian leaders against Israel and asks whether they amount to the crime of incitement to genocide, or hate speech, or nasty, distasteful remarks by some very ignorant men.


About the speaker
Associate Professor Ben Saul is Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law and a barrister. Ben is internationally recognised for his work on terrorism, human rights, the law of armed conflict and international criminal law. He has published five books, 50 scholarly book chapters or journal articles, 150 other publications, and delivered over 150 public seminars. Ben has taught law at Oxford, Sydney, UNSW, and in China, India, and Cambodia, and conducted training for the governments of Iraq, Kuwait, Algeria, Laos, Nepal and Bhutan. He has been involved in human rights cases concerning South Africa, Peru, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Israel, Macedonia, Fiji and the United States (including Guantanamo Bay), including before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the UN Human Rights Committee and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Ben is a member of the International Law Association's International Committee for the Compensation of Victims of War and President of the Refugee Advice and Casework Service, and was previously a legal expert for a UN General Assembly's committee on Palestine. He has a doctorate in law from Oxford, and honours degrees in Arts and Law from Sydney.


Online Brochure
Click here to view the series brochure.

Investing in Alternatives to Prison    View Summary
3 November 2010

Please Note

Due to an overwhelming response, we have filled all 130 places for this event. If you wish to be placed on the waitlist for this event, please register at the link below. If we are unable to offer you a seat before the event, we will ensure that you are notified once the podcast of the event is made available.

To be placed on the waitlist for this event pleaseclick here.

_____________________________________

The Australian Institute of Criminology suggests that the overall imprisonment rate per 100,000 of the adult prison population increased from 88 to 168 between 1984 and 2008, an average growth rate of five percent per year. This has profound implications for the people being sentenced to prison and has consequences for resettlement of prisoners coming out of prison. There are also significant financial costs associated with this increased use of incarceration, not least of which is associated with the substantial resources that have to be invested in prison building programs.

This seminar will look at the costs of imprisonment and consider how limited public funds could be invested in alternatives to imprisonment. Speakers at this event include:
•The Honourable Harold Sperling QC (Convenor, Crime and Justice Reform Committee)
•Mr Peter Achterstraat (Auditor-General, Audit Office of NSW)
•Emeritus Professor David Brown (University of New South Wales)

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Professor Denise Meyerson   View Summary
4 November 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'JSI Guest Speakers'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'JSI Guest Speakers' series.

The foundations of liberalism: Neutrality or a view about the good life?

John Stuart Mill' s harm principle prevents interferences with liberty for certainkinds of reasons. Millargued, in particular,that the criminal law should not be used to prevent either harmless immorality or conduct that harms only those who voluntarily engage in it. Conduct should therefore not be prohibited for 'moralistic'or paternalistic reasons. In carving out a robust sphere of personal freedom, the harm principle is central to liberal politics. This paperseeks toshowwhy the harm principle is attractive.There are different possible explanations of why we should accept the harm principle, which rest on deeper beliefs about the legitimate purposes of the state and even deeper views about how such beliefs should be defended. This paper is concerned with these underlying issues, with a view to providing a solid theoretical foundation for the traditional liberal principle of tolerance of free choice in matters of personal conduct.

About the Speaker

Professor Denise Meyerson, Macquarie University

Professor Meyerson researches and teaches in the areas of jurisprudence, constitutional law, administrative law and comparative human rights law.

Professor Meyerson is a member of the editorial board of Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics and the South African Journal of Philosophy. She is also a consulting editor for Philosophical Studies Series.

Professor Meyerson was appointed as a Visiting Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford in 1996 and a Scholar-in-Residence at Valparaiso Law School, Indiana in 2010. She is an Honorary Professor in the Law Faculty at the University of Cape Town.

Security, Freedom and Human Rights: The Kafka-esque Trial of Sheikh Mansour Leghaei   View Summary
10 November 2010

Register Online
To register, please click here.

Please note:Seats are limited to 70 places for all seminars in this series.

______________________________

This series of short seminars explores some acute current controversies about the relationship between security, freedom, and human rights. Each seminar involves a 30 minute presentation followed by questions.


The Kafka-esque Trial of Sheikh Mansour Leghaei: Innocent Imam or Iranian Spy? Taking Australia to the UN Human Rights Committee in Geneva
In mid-2010 Australia expelled an Iranian national, Sheikh Mansour Leghaei, after a 15-year legal battle in Australia against an adverse security assessment issued by the Australian Security Intelligence Organisation (ASIO). Sheikh Leghaei has never been informed of the allegations against him and brought numerous challenges in the Australian federal courts seeking the disclosure of the evidence against him. Dr Leghaei is a moderate Muslim sheikh at the Imam Hussein Islamic Centre in Earlwood, Sydney and his wife and four children are Australian residents or citizens. His expulsion, after a long and difficult public campaign to prevent his removal, caused considerable distress to his family and to 1,200 followers. After exhausting domestic remedies, in 2010, Sheikh Leghaei lodged a communication with the UN Human Rights Committee under the Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, alleging that Australia violated his human rights to a fair hearing, freedom from discrimination, and family unity. He also requested interim measures to prevent Australia from expelling him while the UN Committee considered his case.
This seminar considers the range of legal issues in the case, including Australian constitutional and public law, security and immigration laws, and international human rights law. It also considers the pros and cons, and highs and lows, of utilizing UN human rights procedures alongside public campaign strategies. The seminar draws conclusions about the quality of justice in Australia for a non-citizen suspected of being a security risk, and what that tells us about Australian values and the rule of law in Australia.

Ben Saul was one of the barristers acting for Sheikh Leghaei in his UN communication.


Ben Saul asks what ASIO's Kafka-esque security expulsion of an Iranian imam from Australia - without a fair hearing, or any real hearing at all - tells us about the quality of justice, the rule of law, and public values in our democracy.


About the speaker
Associate Professor Ben Saul is Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law and a barrister. Ben is internationally recognised for his work on terrorism, human rights, the law of armed conflict and international criminal law. He has published five books, 50 scholarly book chapters or journal articles, 150 other publications, and delivered over 150 public seminars. Ben has taught law at Oxford, Sydney, UNSW, and in China, India, and Cambodia, and conducted training for the governments of Iraq, Kuwait, Algeria, Laos, Nepal and Bhutan. He has been involved in human rights cases concerning South Africa, Peru, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Israel, Macedonia, Fiji and the United States (including Guantanamo Bay), including before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the UN Human Rights Committee and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Ben is a member of the International Law Association's International Committee for the Compensation of Victims of War and President of the Refugee Advice and Casework Service, and was previously a legal expert for a UN General Assembly's committee on Palestine. He has a doctorate in law from Oxford, and honours degrees in Arts and Law from Sydney.


Online Brochure
Click here to view the series brochure.

Juvenile Offending - What Are the Facts?   View Summary
11 November 2010

---------------------------------------------------------

Registration

**Limited places are still available. Click here to register.**

---------------------------------------------------------

We often hear reports and stories about juvenile offending. At times, these reports present alarming scenarios and troubling images. But what are the facts of juvenile offending?

This seminar will bring together a number of experts to review the existing scientific evidence and to sketch out what is known about juvenile offending. The expert panel of speakers will review available evidence on juvenile crime trends, consider factors associated with involvement in crime and discuss what appears to work most effectively in preventing juvenile offending.

Speakers include:

  • Peter Muir, Chair of Australasian Juvenile Justice Administrators (AJJA) will open the seminar.
  • Dr Eric Heller, Manager of Research, NSW Juvenile Justice
  • Jessie Holmes, Information Officer, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research
  • Rachel Aalders, Senior Project Manager, Child and Youth Welfare Unit, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare

This seminar has been made possible through the sponsorship of Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Sally Harpole   View Summary
15 November 2010

Speaking your language? What is the language of resolution in the Asia-Pacific region?

Speaker: Sally Harpole

The level at which China has embraced arbitration is remarkable. Statistically, arbitration caseloads in China are among the highest in the world.
This poses the question: What is the impact of this on international arbitration in the Asia-Pacific region?
The lecture will focus on the preference for institutional over ad hoc arbitration in China and the frequent adoption of Chinese as the language of the arbitration, as well as the consequences of this for arbitral procedure and the development of an emerging arbitration culture in the Asia Pacific.

About the speaker

Sally Harpole is a Visiting Professor and Senior Fellow of Straus Institute for Dispute Resolution, Pepperdine University Law School (Asian Study Tour 2003-2010), where she designed a comparative law program introducing the legal systems of Hong Kong and Mainland China.

She has lectured at several universities on the subjects of dispute resolution, international and comparative law.

Sallyis a frequent chairman and speaker at conferences on dispute resolution and the legal aspects of doing business in China and greater Asia. In 2008, she co-chaired with the United Nations Legal Counsel the 50th anniversary conference on the New York Convention on the Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards.

CANCELLED: JSI Legal Theory at Sydney: Dr Euan MacDonald   View Summary
18 November 2010

Please note this seminar has been postponed until next year. Registered guests will be sent an email notifying them of the new date and registration information early 2011.

Constitutionalising the Globe? The Rhetorical Construction of Community in International Legal Scholarship

Dr Euan MacDonald, Sydney Law School

Derivative Actions in Asia: Culturally Irrational, Politically Motivated or Economically Efficient?   View Summary
19 November 2010

The Centre for Asian and Pacific Law, Australian Network for Japanese Law and Ross Parsons Centre at Sydney Law School are proud to present this seminar with Dr Dan W Puchniak, National University of Singapore.



To RSVP for this seminar, please email law.caplus@sydney.edu.au by Monday 15 October 2010.

About the seminar
The last decade has seen an explosion in comparative corporate law scholarship. However, the vast majority of this scholarship has viewed comparative corporate law through a distinctly Anglo-American lens. This has left a significant gap in the literature, which has grown increasingly apparent with the (re)emergence of Asia as a juggernaut in the global economy.

In late July 2010, to begin to address this dearth in the scholarship, NUS (with Dan Puchniak as the principal investigator) organised a symposium - which included several of Asia's leading corporate law scholars - on the derivative action in Asia's leading economies. The derivative action was chosen as a logical entry point for beginning to develop the scholarship on comparative corporate law in Asia because all of Asia's leading economies have transplanted the derivative action from various foreign jurisdictions and invested considerable resources into reforming their transplants. However, in spite of the fact that all of Asia's leading economies have taken such efforts, there is no detailed analysis of how the derivative action functions in Asia's leading economies and to what extent significant similarities and differences exist across the region. The broad goal of the symposium was to fill this gap in the literature by producing a thought provoking book in the field of comparative corporate law focusing on derivative actions in Asia.

This seminar will provide a summary of the key findings of the symposium and highlight some of the significant points in the symposium book (entitled Derivative Actions in Major Asian Economies: Legislative Design and Legal Practice) - which will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2012. The seminar will also provide a summary explanation of the factors which have resulted in Japan becoming a strange bedfellow with Delaware as the world's clear leader in derivative litigation. The finding that the enormous increase in shareholder litigation in Japan is driven by derivative actions that produce more direct financial costs than benefits for shareholders, companies and lawyers may surprise. The explanation of what actually drives such seemingly 'economically irrational' actions is evidence that derivative litigation (and corporate law more generally) in Asia's leading economies can no longer be ignored outside of Asia.

About the speaker
Dan Puchniak is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Law at the National University of Singapore where he teaches Comparative Corporate Law, Japanese Corporate Law and Governance and Singapore Company Law. Dan is the past recipient of numerous academic awards including the Jean and Joseph McCombe Memorial Prize for placing first in his Bachelor of Arts Degree and the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (Monbukagakusho) Scholarship to complete an LLM in International Economic and Business Law and an LLD at Kyushu University. Dan has published widely on comparative and Japanese corporate law and governance and is regularly invited to present his scholarship and lecture at leading law schools in Japan, South Korea, Mongolia, Australia, the US and Canada. His most recent research paper on shareholder litigation in Japan was selected for presentation at the Harvard-Stanford International Junior Faculty Forum. Dan is currently the ASEAN Convener for the Australian Network for Japanese Law and a member of the Editorial Board for the Max Planck Institute's Journal of Japanese Law. Prior to entering academia, Dan worked as a corporate commercial litigator at Torys LLP in Toronto, Canada.

Security, Freedom and Human Rights: Killing Terrorists and Privatising War   View Summary
23 November 2010

Please note this event is now full. To be placed on a waiting list please email - law.events@sydney.edu.au

______________________________

This series of short seminars explores some acute current controversies about the relationship between security, freedom, and human rights. Each seminar involves a 30 minute presentation followed by questions, and will finish within an hour.


Killing Terrorists and Privatising War: Non-State Actors in Armed Conflict

Ben Saul examines 'drone wars' and when it may be lawful to kill terrorists under the law of armed conflict and human rights law.
David Kinley, Professor of Human Rights at Sydney Law School, questions the regulation of 'private security contractors' in armed conflict.


About the speaker
Associate Professor Ben Saul is Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law and a barrister. Ben is internationally recognised for his work on terrorism, human rights, the law of armed conflict and international criminal law. He has published five books, 50 scholarly book chapters or journal articles, 150 other publications, and delivered over 150 public seminars. Ben has taught law at Oxford, Sydney, UNSW, and in China, India, and Cambodia, and conducted training for the governments of Iraq, Kuwait, Algeria, Laos, Nepal and Bhutan. He has been involved in human rights cases concerning South Africa, Peru, Bangladesh, Indonesia, Israel, Macedonia, Fiji and the United States (including Guantanamo Bay), including before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, the UN Human Rights Committee and the Inter-American Court of Human Rights. Ben is a member of the International Law Association's International Committee for the Compensation of Victims of War and President of the Refugee Advice and Casework Service, and was previously a legal expert for a UN General Assembly's committee on Palestine. He has a doctorate in law from Oxford, and honours degrees in Arts and Law from Sydney.


Online Brochure
Click here to view the series brochure.

Sydney Institute of Criminology presents: Crime Prevention Master Class 2010   View Summary
24 November 2010

Register Online

To register and pay by credit card online, please click here. A tax invoice will be emailed to you at the completion of the transaction.

Cheque or EFT payments are not accepted through online registration. Please click here for a registration form so that we can issue you with a tax invoice for cheque or EFT payments.

_______________________________

This training will provide experienced Crime Prevention Officers / Community Safety Officers with opportunities to learn about the latest developments in crime prevention practice and theory. Drawing on contemporary international developments, this training will be a must for experienced crime prevention practitioners.

To ensure that individual learning outcomes are achieved through this training, each participant will complete an individual training assessment. Aspects of the training will be tailored to address specific requirements and further resources will be recommended to enhance learning beyond the training day. This will ensure that experienced practitioners benefit from this training.

The training will cover:

  • International developments for evidence-based crime prevention
  • Advanced methods of program evaluation
  • Contemporary developments in crime prevention techniques
  • Sharing of local examples of effective crime prevention

Participants will also receive a CD containing crime prevention information and exercises to supplement the face-to-face training experience.

The training will be facilitated by Garner Clancey. Garner is an Adjunct Lecturer of the Sydney Institute of Criminology and has extensive experience in crime prevention. He has studied psychology, criminology and urban planning; taught crime prevention units across four universities; worked for juvenile justice and police agencies; and completed numerous crime prevention projects, including the development of crime prevention plans for local government authorities. Garner recently authored a resource manual on public space CCTV systems for the Australian Institute of Criminology and has created numerous crime prevention resources. Garner has also served on various Boards and Committees, including the National Children and Youth Law Centre Board, the Australian Crime Prevention Council Executive Committee and the NSW Young Offenders Advisory Council.

Registration fees

Full fee: $220 (inc GST)

F/T student: $150 (inc GST)

University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)

Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Refining an understanding of Restorative Justice   View Summary
29 November 2010

Registration

Click here to register your attendance.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The term 'restorative justice' is fast becoming part of the common vernacular of the criminal justice system. International organisations such as the United Nations and Council of Europe advocate that restorative justice processes form part of a country's mainstream response to criminal offending by both juvenile and adult offenders. Academics theorise the concepts and evaluate pioneering programs. Proponents argue the social benefits and governments monitor community perceptions and attitudes. Increasingly, jurisdictions are incorporating 'Restorative Justice' into their criminal justice system. But this raises a conundrum: Can a justice process that is still evolving, and that is based on principles and concepts rather than codified law or procedure, be consistently implemented and practiced, let alone researched and evaluated?

The challenge for those working in the field is to remain informed and responsive to developments in theory, and articulate these in a clear practice model of service delivery. Building an interpretive community around restorative justice in NSW is about developing shared understandings of the core goals, principles and values.

How consistently do we understand and apply the term 'restorative justice'? Definitions are tweaked in response to practice, theory or research. Debates flourish: What is or isn't restorative justice? Where does restorative justice fit in relation to other alternative dispute resolution practices in the criminal justice system or indeed with similarly-principled practices applied outside the criminal justice system? What are the core features unique to restorative justice? How best can restorative justice achieve its stated aims relating to victims, offenders or the community?

This RJ Seminar, presented by the Sydney Institute of Criminology and sponsored by NSW Department of Justice and Attorney-General, will explore these questions and issues. A panel of experts will each address a short set of prepared questions and then participate in a question-and-answer session responding to issues raised by the audience.

So that issues can be explored thematically, registered participants are requested to submit their questions prior to the seminar, by email to rj.seminar@yahoo.com.au (including full name and contact details, please). Supplementary questions from the floor may be invited on the evening, time permitting.

Panel members are:

  • Rob Mackay, who set up the first victim-offender mediation scheme in Scotland in the 1980s. He has since taught social work, written about restorative justice theory and served on the boards of a number of UK and European bodies concerned with development and practice of restorative justice. Since moving to Australia in 2008, Rob has been actively involved with restorative justice in NSW.

  • Dr Meredith Rossner, a research fellow at the Justice Research Group at the University of Western Sydney. She received her PhD in Sociology and Criminology from the University of Pennsylvania (USA). Dr. Rossner has worked as a part of an international research team evaluating restorative justice; her particular interest is in exploring the emotional dynamics and crime reduction potential of face-to-face restorative justice conference in the UK and Australia.

  • Lise Barry, whose experience in restorative justice goes back to 1998 when shewas recruited as part of the first intake of Convenors of Youth Justice Conferences in NSW. She continues to work as a Convenor and is also an accredited mediator with the NSW Community Justice Centre. Lise is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie University Law School, where she teaches dispute resolution and legal ethics. She has an interest in the role of culture in restorative justice processes and also in how these processes are transformed and co-opted by legislative frameworks.

  • Dean Hart who is the NSW state manager of the Forum Sentencing Program, a pre-sentence conference process for eligible adult offenders. Forum Sentencing is operated by NSW Department of Justice and Attorney-General and is currently being expanded from four sites to all local courts in NSW. Dean has managed the development and implementation of Forum Sentencing and the Community Conferencing for Young Adults pilot program which commenced in 2005 and preceeded Forum Sentencing. He is very interested in maintaining consistent good practice and expanding the options for use of restorative justice.

This event is sponsored by the NSW Department of Justice and Attorney General.

Julius Stone Address 2010: Nicola Lacey, University of Oxford   View Summary
30 November 2010

Register Online
To register, please click here.

___________________________________

Could He Forgive Her? Gender, Agency and Women's Criminality in 19th-Century English Law and Literature

In this lecture, Nicola Lacey shall contend that there is a great deal to be learnt from realist novels about how women's agency and criminality was understood in the latter part of the 19th Century. Focusing on the work of Anthony Trollope in particular, she shall try to show that, notwithstanding his lifelong literary preoccupation with independent-minded women, from poisonous Mrs Proudie in the early Barsetshire novels to the more palatable, but equally alarming, Lady Glencora of the Palliser series, his novels are marked by two attitudes to female self-assertion - whether criminal or otherwise - which are key to late Victorian understandings of female deviance. The first is a deep ambivalence about - not infrequently shading into fear of or even disgust for - women who assert their (increasingly acknowledged) intellectual and practical capabilities through acts of independence from men. The second is a tendency to associate female criminal and moral transgressions with a deep-rooted capacity for deception associated with either women as such or, at least, the female social role. Indeed, this image of female falseness provides an important counterpoint to the other, and more widely studied, Victorian tendency to associate female criminality with madness or other pathology. In making this argument, Nicola Lacey shall draw out links between the literary images of appropriate and inappropriate femininity under consideration, and both the social and political world which produced them, and the evolving position of women in both the criminal and the civil courts. As a coda to this last dimension of her lecture, she will also sketch the specific attitudes to law and lawyers which we find in Trollope's work.

Nicola Lacey is Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College. She previously held appointments as Professor of Criminal Law and Legal Theory at the London School of Economics (1998-2010); as Professor of Law at Birkbeck College (1995-8); as Fellow and Tutor at New College (1984-95); and as lecturer at University College London (1981-1984). She has held visiting appointments at New York University, Yale University, Harvard University, the Australian National University, the Humboldt University and the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin, and held a Leverhulme Major Research Fellowship from 2006-9. She has been a Fellow of the British Academy since 2001, and is an Honorary Fellow of New College.

Nicola works in the fields of criminal law, criminal justice and legal and social theory. She is working on a cross-disciplinary study of the development of ideas of responsibility for crime since the Eighteenth Century; and on the comparative political economy of criminalisation and punishment.

Chair Dr Kevin Walton, Sydney Law School

Supporting information

To view the brochure, please click here.

Click here for synopses of five novels by Anthony Trollope.

December
Seminar: Post-Release Employment   View Summary
2 December 2010

Registration

Click here to register your attendance.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gaining employment is frequently advocated as a key form of post-release support. However, with the rise of employment screening, the tightening of regulations around the security industry and a competitive job market (amongst other things), the prospects for recently released prisoners gaining employment has been eroded in recent times. Notwithstanding these issues, there are also many challenges faced by ex-prisoners in staying in poorly paid employment when the lure of easy money beckons.

This seminar will investigate these issues and will explore post-release employment opportunities available to ex-prisoners.

Speakers include:

  • Michael Self (Mens Transition Worker - Hunter, Community Restorative Centre)

  • Dr Bronwyn Naylor (Monash University)

  • Brad Parker (CFMEU)

This seminar has been made possible through the sponsorship of Corrective Services NSW.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Professor Scott Veitch   View Summary
6 December 2010

To register please click here

Please note this seminar is part of the series 'JSI Guest Speakers'. By clicking on the link above you are able to register for this seminar and others in the'JSI Guest Speakers' series.

The Public in Law

This presentation will analyse and evaluate different aspects of the meaning of the public in law.

Two broad understandings are introduced: first, as a noun, "the public" in law may refer to a range of different constituencies. Sometimes these are clearly defined, sometimes they overlap or are contested. A key question here is: How would we know if "the public" was anything other than a projection of an institution? Could it be known otherwise than as a figure or place or grouping conjured up by the needs or desires of a political, legal or media project?

Secondly, the public in law may refer to law's "public quality". Here we can profitably ask whether there is something distinctive and uniquely signficant about law's publicness; and if there is, what is at stake in maintaining and reproducing such a quality?

In light of this dual understanding, the presentation will then explore the possibility that the worth and potential of the public in law is bound up with contestations over what an 'unconstituted' public might promise or threaten, an issue that lies at the heart of the relationship between law and politics.

About the Speaker:

ProfessorScott Veitch, The University of Hong Kong

Professor Veitch writes and teaches in the areas of legal, political and social theory. Educated in Scotland he has worked at universities in the United Kingdom and Australia, and has held visiting academic positions in South Africa, New Zealand, Belgium and France.

Professor Veitch's area of research is jurisprudence broadly defined, and his work draws on historical, philosophical and sociological insights into law and legal institutions. More specifically it has dealt with the politics of domestic and international law; critical aspects of legal reasoning; the role of law in processes of transition and its bearing on reconciliation and memory; and the relations between legal concepts and political economy.

Current research projects include comparing legal traditions in their philosophical and socio-economic contexts; a critical evaluation of citizenship and the common good in the European Union; and representations of pain in legal and aesthetic contexts.

Lecture and Reception for Alumni and Friends in Hong Kong   View Summary
6 December 2010

The University of Sydney, Faculty of Law invites you to a lecture and reception for Sydney Law School alumni and friends.

International Investment Policy: Uniformity and the Sovereign State

Associate Professor Vivienne Bath will lecture on her research in international investment policy with particular reference to China and Australia. Vivienne Bath is Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at Sydney Law School. She has honours degrees in Arts (Asian Studies) (Chinese) and Law from the Australian National University and a Master of Laws from Harvard University. Her research areas are Chinese law (particularly investment and commercial law) and international business law. Vivienne is admitted to practice in Australia, Hong Kong, New York and England. Prior to joining the University of Sydney, she was a partner of Coudert Brothers and spent 12 years in Hong Kong, specialising in commercial law, with a focus on foreign investment and commercial transactions in the People's Republic of China.

*This lecture applies towards CLE and CPDrequirements of both The Law Society of NSW and the NSW Bar Association.


RSVP by 22 November to:

Alumni Officer

Email:law.alumni@sydney.edu.au

Tel: +61 2 9351 0294

Master Class: Due Process and Rule of Law as Human Rights    View Summary
8 December 2010

---------------------------------------------------------------

Registration

Click here to register.

---------------------------------------------------------------

The University of Sydney & The Australian Centre for Migration Education & Research will co-host a Master Class on the subject of "Due Process and Rule of Law as Human Rights: The High Court and the 'Offshore' Processing of Asylum Seekers", which will discuss the recent decision of Plaintiff M61/2010E v Commonwealth and Plaintiff M69 of 2010 v Commonwealth.

Mary Crock, Professor of Public Law, Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney will discuss the case and the implications of the judgement on administrative decision making and the pacific strategies in East Timor and Nauru.

This forum will be especially beneficial for experienced Agents and judicial officers.

Please join us for this high level informative discussion of a major decision in immigration law.

  • Member Price: $75.00
  • Non-Members Price: $85.00
  • Student Subscriber Price: $75.00

Venue:

St James Campus
Minster Ellison Room, Level 13

173 - 175 Phillip Street
Sydney

The Real Wealth of Nations: Pathways to Human Development   View Summary
15 December 2010

Registration

Click here to register your attendance.

______________________________________________________________

The Real Wealth of Nations: Pathways to Human Development

A Discussion of the UNDP Human Development Report on its 20th Anniversary

Most developing countries have made dramatic progress in health, education, and basic living standards in recent decades, with many of the poorest countries posting the greatest gains, according to the 2010 Human Development Report. But patterns vary greatly, with some countries losing ground since 1970. Introducing three new indices, the 20th anniversary edition of the Report documents wide inequalities within and among countries, deep disparities between women and men, and extreme multidimensional poverty in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.

Join us for a discussion of the report with an expert panel including:

  • Jeni Klugman, Director, UNDP Human Development Report Office and lead author of the report
  • Annmaree O'Keeffe, Research Fellow, Lowy Institute for International Policy
  • Mark McPeak, International Program Director, ChildFund Australia

The session will be chaired by Professor David Kinley, Chair in Human Rights Law, and will include a Q & A session.

This event is co-presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law and the UNDP.

A review of the Human Development Report is now available. To access a copy of this, please click here.