All future 2011 events

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January
SafeGrowth and City Crime - Co-Design, Eco-Parks, Funky Laneways and Fixing Deadzones   View Summary
24 January 2011

Registration closed.

** Please note,this workshop isnow full and registration has closed.**

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The Sydney Institute of Criminology is hosting a one-day workshop titled, SafeGrowth and City Crime - Co-Design, Eco-Parks, Funky Laneways and Fixing Deadzones on Monday 24 January 2011. This interactive workshop will explore crime in cities, will challenge participants to develop realistic and practical strategies from ideas of speakers and from each other and will seek to highlight some inclusive strategies to prevent crime in cities. We expect that the event will be of great interest to:

  • Local government staff (planners, crime prevention/community safety, place management, etc.)
  • Planners
  • Urban designers
  • Architects
  • Police
  • Criminologists
  • Crime prevention practitioners

This event will be facilitated by two high profile experts with significant international experience and reputations. Greg Saville and Wendy Sarkissian will facilitate workshops and deliver presentations through this one-day event. Information about these exciting facilitators is provided below:

Gregory Saville is co-owner of AlterNation, an international firm specialising in safer neighbourhoods and helping change agents transform their communities. He is a criminologist and urban planner who consults and trains SafeGrowth, community development and crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED).After ten years as a police officer in the Toronto area he founded Canada's first planning firm to specialise in CPTED and in 1996 co-founded of the International CPTED Association. He has taught and consulted in CPTED and safer environments around the world with Wendy Sarkissian, planners and architects of the Sydney 2000 Olypmics.In 2007 he developed a new urban planning process for sustaining safer neighborhoods called SafeGrowth. Later that year he launched the program at the United Nations Habitat program in Santiago, Chile and has since implemented it in cities in Canada and across the U.S. with the Local Initiatives Support Corporation from New York.He is Adjunct Professor at the University of Calgary's Faculty of Environmental Design and worked as research professor in the National Security Program at the University of New Haven, in partnership with the US Sandia National Laboratories regarding protecting critical infrastructure.

Wendy Sarkissian was initially trained as an educator, she holds a Masters of Arts in literature, a Master of Town Planning and a PhD in environmental ethics. Building a career as a social planning consultant, she has pioneered innovative planning and development approaches in an astonishing variety of contexts. This work has earned her forty professional awards. She has worked with senior managers and advisors to government departments and private enterprise, primarily in the urban, community, housing and development sectors. Widely regarded as a leader in her profession and acclaimed as a humorous and thought-provoking speaker, Dr Sarkissian is a Fellow of the Planning Institute of Australia and a Member of the International Board of Global Urban Development. She is an Adjunct Professor in the School of Sustainable Development, Bond University and a Member of the School of Sustainable Development Academic Advisory Panel. From 2006 to 2008 she was Adjunct Professor in the School of Community and Regional Planning, University of British Columbia, Vancouver. Wendy has served on Boards in South Australia and Queensland and is the award-winning author of six books on housing and community engagement. Three new books on sustainability and community engagement are forthcoming in 2008 and 2009 from Earthscan Publishers, London.

Interspersed throughout the day will be short, engaging presentations from experts covering various disciplines and focused on various issues relevant to the exploration of crime in cities. The final list of guest speakers will be finalised in the coming weeks. Speakers will cover the following topics:

  • The night-time economy
  • Graffiti
  • Public art
  • Homelessness
  • Integrated planning and policy development

Registration fee

Full fee: $220 (inc GST)
F/T student: $150 (inc GST)
University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Program

TimeTopic/Presenter
9:30amOpening Remarks - Garner Clancey (Sydney Institute of Criminology)
9:40Building a Stronger and Safer City (Ann Hoban, Director City Culture and Community, City of Sydney)
10:101st and 2nd Generation CPTED (Greg Saville)
11:00Morning Tea
11:20Case Study: Shall we Dense? (Adam Haddow, SJB Architects and Simon McPherson, SJB Urban)
11:50The Future of Neighbourhood Safety (Greg Saville and Wendy Sarkissian)
12:35Case Study: Graffiti (Kurt Iveson, University of Sydney and Cameron McAuliffe, Human Geographer) and Integrated Physical and Social Planning (David Lilley, Housing NSW)
1:30Lunch
2:15SafeGrowth in Action (Wendy Sarkissian and Greg Saville)
3:15Case Study: Night-time Economy (Stephen Tomsen, University of Western Sydney) and Illumination (Mary-Anne Kyriakou, Smart Light Sydney)
4:00Group Exercise (Greg Saville and Wendy Sarkissian)
4:45Melbourne's Policy for the 24 Hour City - a paradigm shift inthe City of Melbourne's approach to managing the city at night (Anne Malloch, Team Leader City Issues, Community Safety & Wellbeing, City of Melbourne)
5:10pmBringing it Together - (Greg Saville and Wendy Sarkissian)
5:30pmClosing Remarks - Garner Clancey (Sydney Institute of Criminology)

This workshop has been made possible through our sponsors the NSW Department of Justice and Attorney General and SJB Urban.

Parsons seminar: The Dodd-Frank Act    View Summary
25 January 2011

The Dodd-Frank Act - Whistleblowers and the Orderly Liquidation Authority

To register please click here

 

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (July 2010) promises to promote financial stability, end "too big to fail", and protect consumers from abusive financial services practices. Taking these aims seriously as criteria to judge the Act's success, the seminar will investigate whether the rules for whistleblowers' incentives and protection (sections 748 & 922) and the Orderly Liquidation Authority (Title ll) may be plausibly deemed successful against their own aims.

Speaker: Joseph Tanega, University of Westminster, United Kingdom

Joseph Tanega BA (Princeton University), M.PHil (Oxford University), Social Anthropology, JurisDoctor (University of San Diego) is a qualified US lawyer, former investment banker with Nomura Securities and Kleinwort Benson Securities, former Director of Business Risk Consulting for Ernst & Young, London, where he was in charge of thought leadership for financial institutions and capital markets, and former Deputy Attorney General to the Department of Social Services and Housing in Hawaii.

For a copy of the seminar brochure pleaseclick here

A light lunch will be served, and registration is required.

Attendance at the seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

This seminar is presented by theRoss Parsons Centre.

February
Aboriginal young people and crime    View Summary
7 February 2011

This event is now full

As we will be recording this event, a podcast will be made available in the days following the event.

To register your detailsfor a copy of the podcast please click here.

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On 11 November 2010, the Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice and the Sydney Institute of Criminology hosted a seminar that considered the facts of juvenile offending. One major theme emerging from this seminar was the continued over-representation of young Aboriginal people in the juvenile justice system. The next seminar in this series of events focusing on youth crime and juvenile justice will explore in detail the issues associated with Aboriginal young peopleand crime. Consideration will be given to the reasons for this continued over-representation, while also seeking to highlighting promising programs and community-based initiatives.

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Guest Speakers

Edwina Crawford Manager, Aboriginal Strategic Coordination Unit, Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice
Bob Debus, Former Minister for Home Affairs in the Australian Government and a former NSW Attorney General
Anthony Paulson, Centre Manager, Tirkandi Inaburra

Kate Sullivan, Research Scholar, Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, Australian National University

This seminar has been made possible through the sponsorship of Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice.

3rd ANJeL Australia-Japan business law update   View Summary
12 February 2011

Register Online

To register and make your secure online payment please click here.

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This third ANJeL CLE Seminar aimed especially at Australian practitioners in Japan, as well as Japanese practitioners interested in Australian law and the economy, introduces Australia's new regulatory regimes for personal property securities and for arbitration of commercial disputes, comparing also some developments in Japanese law and practice.

Speakers and Commentators
Dr Naoe Fujisawa, Tsukuba University

Shinsuke Kobayashi, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer (Tokyo)
Professor Souichirou Kozuka, Gakushuin University
Dr Luke Nottage, Sydney Law School
Professor John Stumbles, Sydney Law School
Professor Yasuhei Taniguchi, Matsuo & Kosugi (Tokyo)
Akiko Yamakawa, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer (Tokyo)

Chair
Edward Cole, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer (Tokyo)

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Conference Program
To view a copy of the program, please click here.

Please Note: This conference will be taking place in Japan at:

Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer
Akasaka Biz Tower 36F
5-3-1 Akasaka Minato-ku
Tokyo 107-6336 Japan

Map: http://www.freshfields.com/locations/japan/offices/map_tokyo.asp

Conference Costs

Full fee: $200 (GST exempt)

Sydney Law School Alumni: $160 (GST exempt)

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Lorenzo Zucca   View Summary
16 February 2011

To register pleaseclick here

Tolerance or Toleration?

How to Deal with Religious Conflicts in Europe

Speaker :Dr Lorenzo Zucca, King's College London

Commentator: Professor Wojciech Sadurski, Sydney Law School

In this paper, Lorenzo Zucca distinguishes between tolerance and toleration as competing attitudes towards religious diversity. He stipulates a definition of tolerance as a non-moralizing attitude, which should be kept apart from moralizing toleration (involving a great deal of moral judgement) and should be understood as the human disposition to put up with diversity. Tolerance thus defined is the basis for an alternative approach to cope with religious conflicts. Such an approach is less dependent on normative assumptions and more responsive to empirical data, including psychological insights as to the human ability to deal with difference.

For a copy of the seminar paper pleaseclick here

About the Speaker:

Dr Lorenzo Zucca, King's CollegeLondon

Dr Lorenzo Zuccajoined King's College in 2007 as a Lecturer in law. He holds the degrees of Maitrise (Paris 2 Assas), DEA (Paris 1 Sorbonne), Mjur (Oxford) and PhD (EUI, Florence). Previously, he was a full time law lecturer at the University of Aberdeen from 2005 to 2007.

George Winterton Memorial Lecture 2011: Pathway to a Republic   View Summary
17 February 2011

Register Online

Please note, this event is now full. Please click here to be placed on a wait list. You will be notified if a place becomes available.

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It is with great sadness that the Sydney Law School and the community mourn the death of Professor George Winterton, who died in November 2008. This event is to celebrate the achievements of this man - one of Australia's foremost experts on the Constitution and constitutional law.

The address will be delivered by The Hon Sir Gerard Brennan AC KBE, former justice and chief justice of the High Court.

Click here for a copy of the event brochure.

CANCELLATION NOTICE: Parsons CLE day   View Summary
17 February 2011

We have been advised by the Parsons Centre that this event is to be rescheduled. As a result, we have currently closed this site until further details come to hand.

For more details, please contact the Centre Administrator on 9351 0385.

We apologise for this inconvenience.

Fashioning the Right Disputes Settlement Clauses in Investment Treaties - Lessons from Asia?   View Summary
17 February 2011

Professor August Reinisch (University of Vienna) will discuss the interpretation of clauses in investment treaties, including several involving Asian parties, whereby host states consent to arbitration of claims brought directly by foreign investors alleging illegal interference in the investment on the part of the host state.

The scope of jurisdiction of investment tribunals is a crucial question which often leads to protracted arguments in the course of arbitration proceedings. In recent years an increasing number of cases have involved narrow disputes settlement clauses in Bilateral Investment Treaties which relate to the amount and mode of compensation in cases of expropriation. Tribunals have differed on the appropriate reading of such clauses, especially on whether they should be regarded as excluding the issue whether an expropriation has occurred in the first place. Some investment tribunals have relied on "Most Favoured Nations" clauses found in the treaties in order to extend their jurisdiction. This presentation will also assess the policy implicationsof broad versus narrow disputes settlement for host States.

About the speaker:

August Reinisch is professor of international and European law at the University of Vienna and professorial lecturer at the Bologna Center/SAIS of Johns Hopkins University. From 2004 to 2006 and as of 2010 he was/is Dean for International Relations of the Law School of the University of Vienna.

He was a Member of the ILA Committee on International Law on Foreign Investment, and he is a member of the ILA Study Groups on Accountability of International Organisations, State Insolvency, and the Role of Soft-Law Instruments in International Investment Law. He is president of the Austrian Branch of the ILA, Executive Board member of the European Society of International Law and of the German Society of International Law, as well as member of ASIL, ACUNS and other professional associations in the field of international law.

In addition to his appointments as arbitrator on investment tribunals, he has served as legal expert in numerous ICSID and non-ICSID proceedings. He is a member of the Panels of Conciliators and of Arbitrators maintained by ICSID.

Toregister please email law.caplus@sydney.edu.au by Wednesday 16February.

SCIL/ANZSIL symposium: current research in international economic law   View Summary
25 February 2011

Register online

To register please click here.

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This full day event on International Economic Law provides an opportunity to engage with new research in the field. Papers will cover a range of issues in international economic law. Topics to be covered will span international trade in goods, international intellectual property and international investment treaties.

The day commences with an address (by skype) by Professor Debra P. Steger, Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa, formerly Director of the Secretariat to the WTOP Appellate Body. The day will end with a discussion of the recent WTO Litigation between Australia and New Zealand over Australia's restrictions on imports of apples from New Zealand.

This symposium is jointly convened by the International Economic Law Interest Group of the Australia New Zealand Society for International Law (ANZSIL) and the Sydney Centre for International Law (SCIL) at the Sydney Law School, University of Sydney.

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Conference Programme

The full programme with details of speakers, and paper titles and abstractsis available from the webpage of the International Economic Law Interest Group of the Australian and New Zealand Society for International Law.

To access the programme, please click here.

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Conference Costs

ANZSIL member rates
Full fee: $110 inc GST
Fulltime student: $77 inc GST

Non ANZSIL member rates
Full fee: $165 inc GST
Fulltime student: $110 inc GST

University of Sydney rates

University of Sydney staff: $77 inc GST*
University of Sydney full time students: $77 inc GST

Sydney Law School Alumni: $132 inc GST
Sydney Law School staff: Free*

*Staff of the University of Sydney please note: to register, please contact the Event Coordinator at law.events@sydney.edu.au or phone 9351 0238.

Umbilical Cord Blood Banking Law Workshop   View Summary
25 February 2011

Associate Professors Cameron Stewart and Ian Kerridge welcome your attendance at the:

Umbilical Cord Blood Banking Law Workshop,

hosted by

The University of Sydney, the Centre for Values, Ethics and Law in Medicine,

the Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics and

Sydney Children's Hospital

9am-5pm

Friday, 25th of February 2011

at the Law Foyer, Level 2 of the New Law Building,

Sydney Law School,

Main campus of the University of Sydney, Camperdown NSW

Speakers include:

Professor David Weisbrot, CoRE of Legal Governance Macquarie University. Paper title: The Ethical, Legal & Social Implications of UCB Banking: Important Lessons from the Experience with DNA Biobanks

Professor Loane Skene, Faculty of Law, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne. Paper title:Development of stem cells and umbilical cord blood banking

Professor Paul Komesaroff, Faculty of Medicine, Monash University. Paper title: Wrong Direction: racial discrimination and cord blood donation

Professor Dianne Nicol, Faculty of Law, University of Tasmania Paper title: Tissue banking and the law

A/Prof CameronStewart, Centre for Health Governance Law and Ethics, University of Sydney Paper title:Property issues, contracts, trusts, torts and umbilical cord blood

A/Professor Ian Kerridge, Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, University of Sydney. Paper title:Data from NHMRC Research Project:Ethical and legal issues surrounding the decision-making process for donating and banking umbilical cord blood.

Lunch, morning and afternoon tea refreshments will be provided. For catering purposes please confirm your attendance by Monday 21 February 2011.

March
Lunchtime Seminar Series with Pamela Burton   View Summary
10 March 2011

From Moree to Mabo: The Mary Gaudron Story

From Moree to Mabo is the remarkable story of Mary

Gaudron QC, the first female justice of the High

Court of Australia.

From her formative years spent in a NSW country

town to being appointed the first female justice of

the High Court of Australia (1987) author Pamela

Burton conveys the extraordinary life of one of our

most colourful High Court judges. In a groundbreaking

career, Mary Gaudron passionately

championed gender equality and indigenous rights,

ruling on landmark decisions such as Mabo and

Wik. She also appeared in the Equal Pay case for

the Whitlam Government.

From Moree to Mabo'sauthor, Pamela Burton founded her own law firm in

Canberra in 1976, Pamela Coward and Associates. She later practiced as a

Barrister at the Canberra Bar. Her appointments have included Senior

Member, Commonwealth Administrative Appeals Tribunal, Legal

Counsel for the Australian Medical Association, Official Visitor, ACT

Mental Health.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Jonathan Crowe   View Summary
10 March 2011

Natural Law Beyond Finnis

To register please click here

The natural law tradition has undergone a revival in recent years, sparked by the work of John Finnis and the 'new natural law theorists' in the early 1980s. The ensuing decades have seen the emergence of a rich body of natural law scholarship. Despite this, however, contemporary natural law is still viewed by many as synonymous with the new natural law outlook. This paper seeks to distinguish the core claims of the natural law tradition from the more specific views of the new natural law theorists. It begins by discussing the place of the new natural law theory within contemporary natural law thought. It then offers an account of the core claims of the natural law tradition that emphasises their compatibility with a range of different viewpoints. Distinguishing the core claims of natural law from the various versions on offer not only facilitates clarity, but also promises to pave the way for increased diversity within natural law scholarship.

About the speaker

Dr Jonathan Crowe, University of Queensland

Dr Jonathan Croweteaches legal theory, constitutional law and international humanitarian law. He holds a PhD in law and philosophy from the University of Queensland, as well as honours degrees in both disciplines. His research examines the theoretical relationship between law and ethics, looking particularly at the nature and foundations of legal obligation and the role of ethics in legal reasoning. He has also published work on international humanitarian law, family law and alternative dispute resolution.

Dr Crowehas contributed articles to leading international and Australian journals, including the Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, Ratio Juris, the Melbourne University Law Review and the Australian Journal of Legal Philosophy. He is the author of Legal Theory (Law Book Company, 2009) and is currently working on a book on the natural law tradition in ethics and jurisprudence. He spent the first half of 2010 as a Visiting Scholar in the Philosophy Department at Georgetown University.

Employment relations and the law - week one   View Summary
16 March 2011

Register Online

Please click here to register.

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The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Todd Rakoff   View Summary
17 March 2011

Trends in American Legal Education

Further details to follow.

About the speaker:

Professor Todd Rakoff, Harvard Law School

Todd Rakoff is Byrne Professor of Administrative Law at Harvard University. Professor Rakoff has published extensively in the areas of administrative law and contract law and is co-author of a leading casebook on Administrative Law. Deeply involved in the development of legal education, he has chaired curricular reform committees at Harvard, and professional development activities for the Association of American Law Schools.

Research Interests

  • Administrative Law
  • Contracts
  • Structure of the Legal System

Education

  • Harvard University B.A. 1967, Social Studies
  • Oxford University B.Phil. 1969, Political Philosophy
  • University of Pennsylvania M.S.Ed. 1971, Urban Education
  • Harvard Law School J.D. 1975

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Stewart Motha   View Summary
17 March 2011

As If: The Unity of Law and Critique

To register please click here

This paper responds to the rise of social scientific approaches to law. It contends that the rise of social science has marginalized questions of justice in the name of the 'impact of research', 'enterprise value', or 'social relevance' of legal studies. At the heart of the problem, in Nietzschean terms, is the modern crisis of 'truth', and how it is disturbed and undone by competing accounts of the real or apparent world. Ranging from a discussion of Kant's account of reason as a tribunal to which all must submit, his disavowal of all 'illusory knowledge', and discussions of the 'sense' to be derived from literature - the paper takes up the motif of 'as if', or the fictive, which Kant also introduced to philosophy. The 'as if', it is argued, is central to addressing problems of myth, tradition, sense, and value, in transformative ethics and politics. The paper is particularly focused on transformative constitutionalism in South Africa, and draws on post-apartheid literature to examine how the post-colony deals with the tension between anti-colonial longing and post-colonial becoming.

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About the Speaker

Dr Stewart Motha, University of Kent

BA LLB (Hons.), Macquarie University, Sydney,1993; LLM, Osgoode Hall Law School, Toronto, 1996; Ph.D, Birkbeck, University of London, 2005.

Previously, Associate to Judge of the Federal Court of Australia, 1994-5, Lecturer in Law, University of Adelaide, South Australia, 1997; Legal Officer, Aboriginal Legal Rights Movement, South Australia, 1998; Lecturer in Public Law and Regulation, Lancaster University, 2003; joined Kent Law School in 2004.

Research Background

Dr Motha's research examines the relationship between sovereign power and law. His doctoral research was on postcolonial sovereignty in Australia. More recently he has examined sovereignty in the 'war on terror', constitutionalism and decolonisation in South Africa, and the intersection of imperialism and governance in the British Indian Ocean Territories (the Chagos Islands). More broadly Dr Motha's research interests extend to secularism and political theology, postcolonial theory, indigenous land rights and self-determination, regulation of culture and community, law and war, social movements, and theories of democracy.

Currentresearch projects

Dr Motha is currently working on a book entitled 'As if: The Unity of Law and Critique'. As a Fellow of the Stellenbosch Institute for Advanced Study, South Africa, Dr Motha is also working on a project with Prof Karin van Marle entitled Genres of Critique. Exploring critique as a problem of genre, we draw on post-apartheid literature and art to draw out critical strategies and liminal subjectivities.

The state of human rights for lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender people around the world   View Summary
21 March 2011

THIS EVENT IS NOW FULL.

This seminar is presented by the Social Justice Program and Sydney Centre for International Law at the University of Sydney Law School.

THIS EVENT IS NOW FULL.

Speaker:

Boris Dittrich, Advocacy Director for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Program at Human Rights Watch

Human Rights Watch is one of the world's leading independent non-governmental organisations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. Headquartered in New York and with over 20 offices worldwide, HRW conducts fact-finding investigations into human rights abuses in over 90 countries and publishes this research into more than 100 reports and briefings every year. HRW's workgenerates extensive coverage in local and international media, and its staff frequently meet with officials at all levels from governments, the United Nations, regional groups like the African Union and the European Union, financial institutions, and corporations to press for changes in policy and practice that better promote human rights. For further information about HRW, please visit www.hrw.org.

About the Speaker

BORIS DITTRICH

Boris is the Advocacy Director for the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Program at Human Rights Watch. The programdocuments and exposes abuses worldwide based on sexual orientation and gender identity.

Before joining Human Rights Watch in 2007, Boris wasa Member of Parliament in the Netherlandsfor over 12 years and initiated the same sex marriage and adoption bills through which the Netherlands became the first country in the world to legalize civil marriage for gays and lesbians. He also worked on the launch of the landmark Yogyakarta Principles at the United Nations Headquarters in 2007.

Prior to becoming a Member of Parliament,Boris served as a judge on the District Court of Alkmaar- north of Amsterdam.He is the author of two books in DutchonLGBT rights and is frequently quoted in the international press. Boris studied at Leiden University in the Netherlands.

Legal reform in Northeast Asia: the politics of competitive modernisation   View Summary
22 March 2011

Register Online

To register, please click here.

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Guest speaker

Professor Tom Ginsburg, University of Chicago Law School

About the seminar

One of the world's leading scholars in comparative and Asian law and constitutionalism examines paths towards 'judicialisation' and other institutional transformations particularly in Japan, Korea and Taiwan since the 1990s.


In recent years, major programs of legal reform have been undertaken in Japan, Korea and Taiwan. Before 1990, these systems shared a common set of institutional structures that Professor Ginsburg describes as the Northeast Asian Legal Complex with three elements: a professional, somewhat autonomous and competent court system organized hierarchically; a small, cartelised private legal profession without much independent political influence; and administrative law regimes that insulated bureaucratic discretion exercised by developmental regimes. As legal reform has been undertaken it has naturally caused some recalibration in these institutional structures. Yet notwithstanding differences in pace and timing, as well as in the style of reform, there is remarkable similarity in the reform outcomes. This lecture argues for the importance of region as a determinant of reform outcomes, even as national styles and processes differ.

This lecture is presented by theCentre for Asian and Pacific Law and theAustralian Network for Japanese Law.

Employment relations and the law - week two   View Summary
23 March 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

Lecture: Sir Michael Wood KCMG - 'The UN Charter as the Higher Law'   View Summary
24 March 2011

Registration

Click here to register for this event. ____________________________________________________________

The regulation of relations between sovereign States is an increasingly complex area as new treaties are concluded on a wide range of issues which were not previously the subject of international attention. These treaties, as well as other sources of international law, impose obligations on States which frequently overlap, as States find themselves subject to a number of regimes which deal with different aspects of the same area of State activity. As a result, questions of hierarchy in international law (such as jus cogens/peremptory norms; erga omnes obligations; Article 103 of the Charter) arise with increasing frequency in practice, in diplomatic discourse at the United Nations and elsewhere, and in cases before international and domestic courts and tribunals. Recent and pending cases which raise such questions include the Kadi case before the European Court of Justice; the Al-Jeddah case, which was before the United Kingdom House of Lords and is currently pending before the European Court of Human Rights; and the Behrami case, which also came before the European Court of Human Rights. There is a need for greater understanding and clarity on these matters among practitioners and judges, including those in domestic or regional courts. The speaker, Sir Michael Wood, will address in particular the higher status of obligations under the United Nations Charter.

About the speaker

Sir Michael Wood, KCMG, is a member of the International Law Commission, and a Senior Fellow of the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge. He is a barrister at 20 Essex Street, London, where he practices in the field of public international law (including in cases before the International Court of Justice).

He was Legal Adviser to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office between 1999 and 2006. After joining the FCO as an Assistant Legal Adviser in 1970, he was a member of the United Kingdom delegation to many international conferences, including most sessions of the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea, the Lancaster House Conference on Rhodesia, the "Two-plus-Four" negotiations on German Unification, the Cambodia Peace Conference, and the Dayton and Rambouillet Conferences on the former Yugoslavia.

His postings included three years (1991-1994) at the United Kingdom Mission to the United Nations in New York, dealing chiefly with Security Council matters. He was Agent for the United Kingdom for a number of years before the European Commission and Court of Human Rights, and UK Agent in cases before the ICJ, as well as in proceedings before the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea and thearbitral tribunals in the MOX cases.

This event is presented by the Sydney Law School and co-sponsored by the International Law Association.

Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Allan McCay   View Summary
24 March 2011

Behavioural genetics and mitigation in sentencing

To register click here

In this seminar 'Behavioural genetics and mitigation in sentencing'as part of theJSI Legal Theory at Sydney Seminar Series 2011, Allan McCay, Sydney Law School, will examine the significance of the free will debate for the retributive justification of sentencing. McCay will then consider Justice David Hodgson's view of free will.

Although sentencing in New South Wales involves both retributive and consequentialist elements, Allan McCay will start by arguing that the free will debate is significant for the retributive justification of sentencing. McCay will then turn to Justice David Hodgson's view of free will and consider how, under his theory, mitigation might be deserved in respect of predispositions to criminal behaviour uncovered by the science of behavioural genetics. McCay will finally consider whether sentencing in New South Wales could accommodate mitigation in respect of behavioural genetics in a way that is consistent with Hodgson's view as McCay extends it. Justice David Hodgson will comment on the paper.

About the speakers

  • Allan McCayteaches on the University of Sydney Foundation Program and is a PhD candidate in the Law Faculty at the University of Sydney.
  • Justice David Hodgsonis both Judge of Appeal in the Supreme Court of New South Wales and a philosopher with numerous journal articles, two books, and, of particular relevance to this talk, a forthcoming book entitledRationality + Consciousness= Free Willwhich is to be published byOxford University Press.
The International Law Commission and Its Recent Work   View Summary
25 March 2011

THIS EVENT IS NOW FULL.

The International Law Commission ("ILC") was created under Article 13(1)(a) of the Charter of the United Nations, which provides that the General Assembly shall initiate studies and make recommendations for the purpose of encouraging the "progressive development and codification of international law". Since its formal establishment in 1946, the ILC has considered and produced draft articles, draft conventions and other draft instruments on many core topics of international law, including the law of treaties, the law of the sea, diplomatic and consular relations, the creation of an international criminal court, and State responsibility. Despite its importance, the workings of the ILC are relatively little-known outside the circles of ministries of foreign affairs, attorney-general's departments, and international organisations. This seminar features a presentation by Sir Michael Wood KCMG, a current member of the ILC, and will shed light on the history, function, and composition of the ILC. It will also discuss two topics which have been on the ILC's programme of work, namely the international law rules relating to the "expulsion of aliens", and also the rules relating to "reservations to treaties". Associate Professor Ben Saul, of Sydney Law School, and Mark Jennings, of the Australian Attorney-General's Department, will comment on the ILC's work on these topics.

Speakers:

Sir Michael Wood KCMG is a member of the International Law Commission, and a Senior Fellow of the Lauterpacht Centre for International Law, University of Cambridge. He is a barrister at 20 Essex Street, London. He was Legal Adviser to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office between 1999 and 2006. He joined the FCO as an Assistant Legal Adviser in 1970, and was a member of the United Kingdom delegation to many international conferences, including most sessions of the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea. His postings included three years (1991-1994) at the United Kingdom Mission to the United Nations in New York, dealing chiefly with Security Council matters.

Ben Saul is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney, and a barrister. He has published widely in international law journals and his book, Defining Terrorism in International Law (OUP, 2006), is the leading scholarly work on the subject. He lectures in International Law, Refugee Law, International Humanitarian Law, and the International Law of War, Crime and Terror.

Mark Jennings is Senior Counsel in the Office of International Law in the Attorney-General's Department, Canberra.

Chair:

Chester Brown is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Law at the University of Sydney, a barrister, and door tenant at Essex Court Chambers, London. He is the author of A Common Law of International Adjudication (OUP, 2007), and lectures in Advanced Public International Law, International Dispute Settlement, International Arbitration, and International Investment Law.

Employment relations and the law - week three   View Summary
30 March 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

Distinguished Speakers Program: The Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP   View Summary
31 March 2011

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Registration is now closed as this event is full.

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The Hon Malcolm Turnbull MP will deliver the first lecture as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011, in which he will discuss aspects of the WikiLeaks case.

Malcolm Turnbull was first elected to the Federal Parliament as the Member for Wentworth in 2004 and was Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister. In 2007 he was appointed to Cabinet as the Minister for Environment and Water Resources. Malcolm is currently the Federal Shadow Minister for Broadband and Communications and was Leader of the Opposition from 16 September 2008 to 1 December 2009. In addition to his political career, he has made significant contributions in law, business and journalism.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011. Please click here for program details.

Expert panel discussion: Australia's response to child sexual abuse   View Summary
31 March 2011

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Speakers

Dr Judith Cashmore, Sydney Law School
Dale Tolliday, Clinical Advisor to the New Street Adolescent Services and Pre-Trial Diversion Program
Johanna Pheils, Deputy Solicitor for Public Prosecutions (Legal)
Hal Jackson, former justice of the District Court of Western Australia, Perth


About the event

This public panel discussion is presented by the Institute of Criminology as part of the AusAID funded Australian Leadership Awards Fellowship Program A multidisciplinary approach to reducing child sexual abuse in Sri Lanka, headed by Dr Patricia Weerakoon and Dr Rita Shackel of the University of Sydney. The primary goals of the program are to increase the capacity of Sri-Lankan professionals to deal with child sexual abuse (CSA) in inter-sectorial and multidisciplinary teams and to provide a forum for cross-cultural understanding of CSA.

At this event, experts will address a range of issues relevant to CSA focusing in particular on identification, prevention and multi-disciplinary responses to CSA. Expert presentations will be followed by public discussion between the program fellows, attendees and the expert panellists.

Conference Brochure

To download a copy of the online brochure, please click here.

Volunteers are being sought to assist the academic coordinators in organising workshops, compiling program materials and assisting with hosting program events and activities. If you are interested in volunteering please click here for details.

If you would like further information about the program please contact Dr Rita Shackel via email: rita.shackel@sydney.edu.au or by phone on 02 9351 0368.

EVENT POSTPONED - Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Daniel Wodak   View Summary
31 March 2011

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN POSTPONED

This seminar was originally scheduled for Thursday 31 March, but has unavoidably been postponed.

Once a new date is set, the seminar will be readvertised and an email will be sent to registered guests announcing the new date, with a request to re-confirm your attendance.

We apologise for any inconvenience.

Law, Language and Latitude

Statue books, constitutions and judicial precedents are awash with provisions and prohibitions that rely on phrases like "reasonable", "fair" or "cruel and unusual". Are such laws vague and indeterminate? Do they grant judges a degree of discretion in legal adjudication? These questions are of central importance to contemporary jurisprudence, particularly in relation to the Hart-Dworkin debate. Considering Hart and Dworkin's positions in turn, Wodak argues that Dworkin is wrong to rule out the possibility that judicial discretion exists, but right to claim that it raises serious ethical concerns. Understanding the nature, prevalence and implications of vague laws provides great insight into the intersection between adjudication, morality and legal theory.

About the speaker

Daniel Wodak completed a Bachelor of Arts with First Class Honours in Philosophy in 2008, winning a University Medal and the John Anderson Prize for Best Thesis, and a Bachelor of Laws with First Class Honours in 2010, winning several jurisprudence prizes, the George Dalley Prize and a University of Sydney Academic Merit Prize. He has lectured and tutored Philosophy at Sydney University, and will shortly be commencing a PhD in Philosophy on a Fulbright Scholarship.

April
Should NSW have a Mental Health Court?   View Summary
1 April 2011

The NSW Law Reform Commission, together with the Sydney Institute of Criminology invites to

Should NSW have a Mental Health Court?

To register please click here

A symposium to discuss the potential of a mental health 'court' or a specialist list to address issues of diversion in relation to people with cognitive and mental health impairments in the criminal justice system and how such a court or list might be implemented in NSW.

The symposium forms a part of the Commission's consultation process in relation to its review of People with cognitive and mental health impairments in the criminal justice system. Further information about the review is available at: http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lrc

The symposium will feature presentations by experts followed by a panel discussion.Audience participation will be encouraged as part of the panel discussion.

Speakers include

-Chief Magistrate Michael Hill: Chief Magistrate of the Magistrates Court of Tasmania, and Chair of the Steering Committee overseeing the development of the Court's Mental Health Diversion List Program.

-Magistrate John Lesser: Victorian Magistrate and supervising Magistrate for the Assessment and Referral Court List at Melbourne Magistrates' Court.

-Elizabeth Richardson: PhD Candidate at the Faculty of Law, Monash University, researching the operation of mental health courts and diversionary programs in Australia and overseas.

Working with offenders post-release   View Summary
4 April 2011

Registration has now closed for this event.

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The Community Restorative Centre (CRC) has extensive experience work with ex-prisoners, andis offering a one-day workshop on working with clients who are transitioning from prison back to the community. The workshop will provide an understanding of:

  • the NSW prison system;
  • the impact of incarceration;
  • the complex issues that affect offenders post release;
  • strategies to work more effectively with this client group; and

knowledge of available services and resources.

Registration fees

Full fee: $220 (inc GST)

F/T student: $150 (inc GST)

University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)

Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

The role of CSR in shaping labour's voice at the Malaysian workplace    View Summary
5 April 2011

The role of CSR in shaping labour's voice at the Malaysian workplace and the evolution of a constitutionalised contract of employment

In this seminar, Dr Vanitha Karean from Monash University's Sunway campus in Malaysia will analyse the path dependence phenomenon within Malaysian labour law and expose the underlying institutional defects within the Malaysian regulatory system for labour.

The potential for corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives in generating change at the Malaysian workplace will be examined in the light of emerging case law developments and theoretical models on the right to livelihood within the Malaysian Constitution. The focus of the discussion will be on the changing nature of labour norms in individual employment law, the advent of human rights reasoning and the interdependence of the organic forces in a particular jurisdiction that drive the labour agenda. The discussion concludes with an argument in praise of soft law within CSR codes as a viable agent for driving change in hard labour law, whilst maintaining its soft law character, thus contributing to the varieties of hybrid labour regulation.

To register, please email: law.caplus@sydney.edu.au.



This event is presented by the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law.

Employment relations and the law - week four   View Summary
6 April 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

Restorative justice: promoting previously unthinkable ways   View Summary
6 April 2011

Registration

Click here to register for this event.

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In 2003, Northern Ireland introduced restorative justice conferencing, based on the New Zealand model, to the juvenile justice system.Northern Ireland is now recognised as a European leader in restorative conferencing and two recent UK reports - by the Independent Commission on Youth Crime and Antisocial Behaviour (2010) and The Police Foundation and JUSTICE (2011) - have recommended that this model underpin the reform of the UK juvenile justice system. The University of Ulster developed and delivers the training for the Youth Conference Service facilitators and for police officers, and is also actively involved in the research and development of restorative practices more generally.

In this seminar, Dr Derick Wilson (University of Ulster) discusses the development and future directions of restorative justice in Northern Ireland including the Youth Conference Scheme, the Victims and Survivors Forum, policing reforms and restorative approaches in prisons. Dr Wilson will also discuss the potential for using a restorative approach in broader relational, institutional and public policy domains. His presentation will be followed by a short interactive session exploring the relevance of these ideas in the NSW context.

Dr Derick Wilson is a Reader in Education at the University of Ulster, specialising in Community Relations and Restorative Practice. He is currently a member of a programme team developing Restorative Practices across the Criminal Justice Sector, Schools, the Faith traditions and wider civil society in Northern Ireland.

Dr Wilson was awarded the MBE for services to Community Relations (1994), a Distinguished Community Fellowship by the University of Ulster (2002) and a Lifetime Achievement Award by the NI Community Relations Council (2007). He has been the Assistant Director, UNESCO Centre, (2006-09), an Equality Commissioner for Northern Ireland (2003-08) and an Associate Member of the pilot Victims and Survivors Forum (2009-10).

Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Belinda Reeve   View Summary
7 April 2011

To register please click here

Responsive regulation: considering the means but not the ends of regulation?

Ian Ayres and John Braithwaite's responsive regulatory approach is highly influential within regulatory studies and on the practices of regulatory agencies in a variety of fields, including tax systems, competition policy, occupational health and safety and environmental pollution. Informed by a range of theoretical perspectives, responsive regulation calls upon regulators to be flexible, and responsive, tailoring both regulatory strategies and enforcement measures to the social context of the regulatory problem, as well as varying industry and company motivations to comply. Recent government policy documents demonstrate a particular interest in the regulatory pyramid of responsive regulation, as distinct from the more popular enforcement pyramid. In other words, such documents are concerned with implementing regulatory regimes that respond to the relevant industry's willingness to self-regulate, as opposed to the range of enforcement measures used to induce compliance with such schemes.

Responsive regulation forms part of a broader trend towards responsive, reflexive or procedural forms of law, which attempt to secure compliance through the provision of procedures and processes for institutionalising regulatory norms, rather than directly commanding substantive ends. This paper presents a critique of responsive regulation, arguing that it focuses on regulatory techniques and processes at the expense of substantive concerns. This deficit is partly remedied by studies examining how "proceduralisation" can be used to secure regulatory goals, as found in the work of Julia Black. However, this paper argues that further theorising of the relationship between regulatory means and ends is required. This is particularly the case in relation to the regulatory pyramid, which is concerned with the implementation of new regulatory regimes, and thus raises critical questions about the goals of new regulatory strategies. Regulatory studies could be enhanced by more explicit consideration of the relationship between regulatory techniques and substantive goals, including which actors determine regulatory goals and where in regulatory processes these goals are set.

About the Speaker

Belinda Reeve is a PhD candidate at Sydney Law School, and the research assistant for an ARC discovery grant project on occupational health and safety prosecutions. She has degrees in Law and Arts from the University of Auckland and an honours degree in sociology from the Australian National University. Her thesis is examining the role of responsive regulation in chronic disease prevention through an analysis of marketing controls in the tobacco, food and alcohol industries.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Cameron Stewart   View Summary
7 April 2011

Legal and Ethical Challenges raised by Umbilical Cord Blood Banking

Umbilical cord blood (UCB) contains stem cells. Stem cells can be used in allogeneichaematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT is a curative therapy for many cancers (leukaemia, lymphoma), bone marrow failure syndromes, haemoglobinopathies, immunodeficiencies and inborn errors of metabolisms. In the last 10 years the establishment of UCB banks has become an integral part of the UCB transplant program in Australia. UCB banks fall into two categories: government funded public UCB banks, which store donated blood for public access; and private cord banks, which will, for a fee, bank an individual's blood for personal use. Both types of banks exist in Australia.

In this paper Associate Professor Cameron Stewart will discuss some of the legal and ethical challenges that are raised by the practice of UCB banking. These issues range from discussion of the origins of UCB (is it part of the mother or the foetus?), the ownership of UCB blood (tissue is normally forbidden from, being 'owned'), contract law (fair trading; contracts for the benefit of a third party); conditional gifts (can I conditionally donate UCB to a person of a particular race?) and trusts law (does a private UCB contract create a trust of UCB?). The paper will raise these issues and some possible ways forward for reform.

Speaker: Associate Professor Cameron Stewart, Sydney Law School

Cameron Stewart is an Associate Professor and Director of the Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics at Sydney Law School and Associate Professor at the Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, Sydney Medical School. He has degrees in economics, law and jurisprudence. He has worked in the Supreme Court of New South Wales and has practiced commercial law at Phillips Fox Lawyers. His previous appointment was at Macquarie Law School, where he spent 10 years, the last of which as Dean. He is Vice President of the Australasian Association of Bioethics and Health Law. Cameron is also the Associate Editor in law of the Journal of Bioethical Inquiry and the co-editor of the Ethics and health law news service. He also runs a website on Discovering Australian Guardianship Law.

Cameron has worked on a number of projects for NSW Health, the NSW Guardianship Tribunal, the Office of Public Guardian and Alzheimer's Australia. His current projects include studies on umbilical cord blood banking, direct to consumer advertising, guardianship law and consent to high risk medical procedures.

Ahmadiyah and religious tolerance in Indonesia   View Summary
8 April 2011

Online registration

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About the seminar

Professor Nasution will discuss religious tolerance and the law in Indonesia, focussing on the persecution of Indonesian Ahmadis.

About the speaker
Professor Dr Iur Adnan Buyung Nasution is widely regarded as Indonesia's leading advocate and trial lawyer. He is a pioneer of legal aid and law reform, as well as being a key figure in the development of human rights law and constitutionalism in Indonesia. Early in 2007, Dr Nasution was appointed to Indonesia's Presidential Advisory Council, a highly prestigious constitutional body. In 2010, he was appointed an Honorary Professorial Fellow in the Melbourne Law School.

Beyond punishment: actuarial risk assessment   View Summary
11 April 2011

Register online

To register, please click here.

*please note that seats are limited to the first 160 registrants.

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About the event

Actuarial risk assessment tools have become ubiquitous within the criminal justice system. Attempts to measure risks of offending and reoffending are commonly used in various stages in the criminal justice system. With such widespread use, it is important to consider the implications of these tools. This seminar will explore current uses of actuarial risk assessment methodologies and contemporary research findings.

This event is sponsored by the Department of Corrective Services.

Guest Speakers

James R P Ogloff, JD Ph.D FAPS is a psychologist and Fellow of the Canadian, American, and Australian psychological societies. He is the Foundation Professor of Clinical Forensic Psychology at Monash University and Director of the Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science. He is also Director of Psychological Services at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health (Forensicare). He has worked in clinical and forensic psychology in a variety of settings for more than 25 years. Professor Ogloff has specific expertise in the assessment of risk for violence. He is the Past-President of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Psychiatry, Psychology and Law and a former Chair of the College of Forensic Psychologists of the Australian Psychological Society. He is a Past-President of the Canadian Psychological Association and a Past-President of the American Psychology-Law Society. Professor Ogloff has published 16 books more than 200 scholarly articles and book chapters. He is the recipient of the 2009 Award for Distinguished Contributions in Forensic Psychology from the Australian Psychological Society.

Stuart Ross is a Senior Fellow in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne. His research interests include correctional and court-based program design and evaluation, sentencing decision making and criminal justice population modelling. His recent work includes evaluations of release transition programs, court programs and the development of an instrument for assessing risk and need in Victorian prisoners and offenders. He is currently Chief Investigator on an ARC Discovery Project on procedural justice for victims of crime, and an ARC Linkage Project on the integrated responses to family violence.

Intellectual property and the development aspects of the WTO's Doha round negotiations   View Summary
11 April 2011

Registration

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Sydney Law School and Mallesons Stephen Jaques are pleased to present the following seminar:

Intellectual property and the development aspects of the WTO's Doha Round negotiations

The World Trade Organization 2001 Doha Declaration for the Development Round of negotiations included a number of intellectual property issues. These negotiations are ongoing. Ms Watal will explain the negotiations and possible outcomes in these negotiations covering the general review of the TRIPS agreement and negotiations on specific issues including:

  • the possible establishment of a multilateral register for Geographical Indications on wine and spirits and possible strengthening of the TRIPS rules on GIs for products other than wines and spirits;
  • the question of patentability or non-patentability of plant and animal inventions and protection of plant breeders rights;
  • the relationship between the TRIPS Agreement and the UN Convention on Biodiversity; and
  • the protection of traditional knowledge and folk-lore.

About the speaker: Ms Jayashree Watal, Intellectual Property Division, World Trade Organization

Ms Watal has been Counsellor in the Intellectual Property Division of the World Trade Organization since February 2001. During the Uruguay Round, Ms Watal acted for the Indian government in negotiating the TRIPS Agreement. She was a Deputy Secretary of the Indian Ministry of Industry between 1986 and 1991 and was the Director of the Trade Policy Division of the Indian Ministry of Commerce between 1995 and 1998. She also holds the position of Adjunct Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center. She has published many articles on issues related to intellectual property rights in both Law and Economics journals, and has authored a book Intellectual Property Rights in the WTO and Developing Countries (Kluwer Law International, 2001).

A welcome will be given by Scott Bouvier, Partner, Mallesons Stephen Jaques, and the session will be chaired by Brett Williams, Senior Lecturer and Associate, Sydney Centre for International Law, University of Sydney Law School

Registration fees

Early bird registration: $44 inc GST (until 18 March)

Full fee: $77 inc GST

Sydney Law School alumni: $61.60 inc GST

University of Sydney staff/FT student: $61.60 inc GST

Note to members of the press: Chatham House Rule applies to this event.

International regulatory responses to the Global Financial Crisis: Part 1   View Summary
12 April 2011

Registration

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The first seminar in the two-part Corporate Governance Seminar Series looks at the focus of regulatory reforms in Europe and taxing of executive remuneration after the Global Financial Crisis, with international guest speakers Associate Professor Florian Moslein and Dr Glen Loutzenhiser.

In the first half of 2011 the Ross Parsons Centre will host a number of international visitors with expertise in corporate law and governance. This special program of corporate law seminars will examine reforms to corporate governance and surrounding issues which have arisen in response to the global financial crisis.

Part 1 includes two components:

  • From corporate to contract governance: the focus of regulatory reforms in Europe after the Global Financial Crisis - Associate Professor Florian Moslein, University of St Gallen, Switzerland; Humboldt University, Germany
  • Taxing executive remuneration: after the Global Financial Crisis - Dr Glen Loutzenhiser, St Hugh's College, University of Oxford

Click here to view a brochure with full details.

Employment relations and the law - week five   View Summary
13 April 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

ACCEL seminar series 2011   View Summary
13 April 2011

Registration

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

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The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 13 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 20 April
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 27 April
Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 4 - 4 May
Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 5 - 11 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 - 18 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 25 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Briefing session: uses and abuses of crime statistics    View Summary
14 April 2011

Registration

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The 2010 NSW crime statistics will be released soon (late April 2011).This background briefing session byDr Don Weatherburn (Director, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research) and Jessie Holmes (Project Officer, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research) will provide a detailed understanding of reporting of crime, the limitations of crime statistics, and ways of interpreting and reporting crime data.

This event will help equip journalists and commentators to understand crime data in all of its complexity.

Journalists, journalism students, criminology students and those generally interested in crime data are encouraged to attend this event.

This briefing session is a joint initiative of the Sydney Institute of Criminology (University of Sydney) and the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Sarah Sorial    View Summary
14 April 2011

Free speech and democracy: The problem of 'line-drawing'

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A current preoccupation in debates about free speech is how to draw 'lines' between political speech and non-political speech and between 'extreme' speech and intense disagreement. In this paper,Dr Sorial suggest that this reasoning is based on an erroneous assumption that extreme speech and disagreement are similar in kind but differ in their intensity. Sorial suggests an alternative account that conceives of extreme speech and intense disagreement as fundamentally different kinds of speech acts and apply this account to some so-called hard cases.

About the speaker:Dr Sarah Sorial, University of Wollongong

DrSarah Sorial is a lecturer and ARC Research Fellow in law and philosophy at the University of Wollongong. She has degrees in philosophy and law from Macquarie University and a PhD in philosophy from the University of New South Wales. Her research and teaching expertise includes the areas of philosophy of law, political philosophy, and philosophy of feminism. She has published in journals including Philosophy and Law, Ratio Juris: An International Journal in of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law, Journal of Value Inquiry, Monash Law Review, Current Issues in Criminal Justice, Philosophy Today, International Philosophical Quarterly, and International Political Theory. She has a forthcoming book entitled: Sedition and the Advocacy of Violence: Free speech and counter-terrorism (Routledge).

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Matthew Dyson   View Summary
14 April 2011

Why tort lawyers think about a claimant's illegality

Until the late twentieth century, not until the 1960s, did the common law attempt to develop a unified doctrine to deal with illegality by the claimant in the events leading to his or her claim. Prior to this date the types of illegality which were considered, like the trespasser injured on the premises or the participant in a brawl, were rarely dealt with by the courts. They certainly generated no generalised defence. Dr Dyson will analyse when, why and how illegality reasoning developed towards a single doctrine in England and Australia. In addition to tort lawyers, the seminar will be of interest to criminal lawyers, legal historians, comparativists and those working on common law legal reasoning.

About the speaker:

Dr Matthew Dyson, Fellow and Director of Studies, Jesus College, University of Cambridge

Theatres of violence: facts and fictions   View Summary
18 April 2011

Registration

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The high profile of crime and violence in our daily press, on our television screens and bestseller lists testifies to society's fascination with prohibited, illicit and unlawful acts. This exciting event draws together a diverse panel of writers who focus on violence in their writing to explore the relationship between real crime and fictional violence. The seminar will consider a varied set of topics on the theme of violence's facts and fictions, such as representations and images of crime; the place of law in reflecting particular pictures of violence; masculinity, femininity, groups and gangs; and crime's myths, figures and fantasies.

Join panel members: former detective now true crime author Clive Small, journalist and fiction writer Mark Dapin, and discussants: law academic and criminologist come fiction writer David Brown and criminologist Rebecca Scott Bray as they investigate theatres of violence in fact and fiction.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Ian Lee   View Summary
19 April 2011

Corporate criminal responsibility as team-member responsibility

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In this seminar, Associate Professor Lee willdevelop a theory of corporate criminal responsibility as the shared responsibility of the members of a team for wrongdoing committed by one of their number in the pursuit of their common goals. Lee argues, in addition, that this understanding of corporate responsibility for wrongdoing can help to illuminate the nature of and rationale for the practice of imposing criminal liability upon corporate entities for crimes committed by their directors, officers and employees in the pursuit of the corporation's goals.

The theory advanced in the paper is a theory of collective responsibility. However, it is to be distinguished from theories — such as those of Peter French and Phillip Pettit — under which corporate or group responsibility is viewed as the responsibility of the corporation or group as an autonomous moral person. Like French and Pettit, Lee suggests that the corporation is a collective entity and not, for instance, a mere collection of atomistic individuals. There is a difference between a collectivity and a crowd, and corporation is of the former type. However, Lee argues that it is not necessary (and not desirable) to ground corporate and collective responsibility in an anthropomorphic characterization of the nature of collective entities, or on a conception of the collectivity under which its identity is detached from that of its constituent members.

Instead, Lee views a collectivity as a kind of relationship among individuals; this makes a collectivity something more than the sum of its members, but not something having an autonomous existence apart from its members. To develop this idea, Lee employs the concept of a team. The paper makes two basic claims. First, where individuals participate in a team, doing their part towards a collective goal, they are entitled to share in the credit for the positive achievements resulting from their combined actions, and they also share in discredit for negative achievements of the group. This is so for each member, Lee argues, regardless of whether the member's individual contribution was a but-for cause of the group's achievement.

Second, Lee suggests that in the specific case of corporate teams, team-member responsibility can help help to explain why there should be liability of the corporate entity for crimes committed by members of the corporation (a group which Lee suggests typically includes its employees, officers, directors and, in some circumstances, its shareholders) in the pursuit of the corporation's goals.

About the Speaker

Ian B.Leeis an associate professor at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law. He has a B.Com. and LL.B. from the University of Toronto and an LL.M. from the Harvard Law School. He clerked with Justice Claire L'Heureux-Dubé of the Supreme Court of Canada, and practised with Sullivan & Cromwell LLP in New York and Paris before joining the Faculty of Law. During his visit at the Sydney Law School, he is working on a project on philosophical issues at the intersection of corporate law and public law.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Geoffrey Robertson QC   View Summary
19 April 2011

This event is now full

Registrations for this event are now closed. We apologise sincerely for the inconvenience.

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Humanitarian intervention and international law

Geoffrey Robertson QC is founder and head of Doughty Street Chambers, the UK's leading human rights practice, and a 'distinguished jurist' member of the United Nations Justice Council, having served as the first President of the Special Court in Sierra Leone. He is a Bencher of the Middle Temple; and a Recorder (part-time judge) in London; an executive Member of Justice, and a trustee of the Capital Cases Trust.

He has argued many landmark cases in media, constitutional and criminal law in the European Court of Human Rights, the House of Lords, the Privy Council and Commonwealth courts, and in federal courts in many nations.

He is currently serving as counsel to Julian Assange on the Wikileaks case, and has previously represented Tasmanian aborigines in the novel action which stopped the Natural History Museum from experimenting on the remains of their ancestors; defended the Chief Justice of Trinidad at impeachment proceedings; argued the Court of Appeal case which first defined 'terrorism' for the purpose of British law; argued for the right of the public to see royal wills; and represented a trust for the education of poor children in litigation in Anguilla over a billion dollar bequest

Mr Robertson is a widely published author and contributor to publications, and also writes and broadcasts regularly on international legal issues and creates Geoffrey Robertson's Hypotheticals for television and for ethics education.

This event is presented by the Sydney Law School and co-sponsored by the International Law Association.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011. Please click here for program details.

ACCEL seminar series 2011 - Week 2   View Summary
20 April 2011

Week 2

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 13 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 20 April
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 27 April
Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 4 - 4 May
Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 5 - 11 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 - 18 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 25 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Luigi Palombi   View Summary
21 April 2011

Pandora's box: the banning of gene patents - a very brief account

The reference to Pandora's box is a reference to the evil which have been unleashed on the world by gene patents. Despite the paradox which gene patents present (patents are for 'inventions' and genes are not inventions) those responsible for the administration of the patent system have in the past 30 years aided and abetted the perpetration of one of the greatest frauds ever committed on the modern world by deliberately distorting the law. The evil has made patent attorneys and their clients rich. It has fostered a laxity in patent regulatory behaviour. It has made hypocrites of scientists and doctors. It has destroyed the independence of universities and medical research institutions. It has corrupted judges and scholars. This is a brief account of how this happened and what is being doneto stop it.

The above seminar abstract is provided by the speaker and does not necessarily represent the views of Sydney Law School.

About the Speaker

Dr Luigi Palombi

Dr Luigi Palombi read law between 1977 and 1981 and economics between 1982 and 1985 at the University of Adelaide. He practiced law in Australia between 1982 and 1997, specialising in patent law and biotechnology. He led the Australian litigation team which challenged the validity of a patent over isolated hepatitis C virus nucleotides and polypeptides. His victory in that litigation resulted in invitations to lead international patent litigation teams in the United States as well as in the UK and Europe (including in the European Patent Office). Since completing his PhD (The Patenting of Biological Materials in the Context of TRIPS) he has headed the Genetic Sequence Right Project at the Australian National University. He has delivered invited papers and lectures in patent law at international legal and scientific conferences and meetings. His first book, Gene Cartels: Biotech Patents in the Age of Free Trade has been critically acclaimed by Nobel laureates, leading economists and patent law experts from around the world. In 2008 he spearheaded a campaign against the BRCA gene patents leading to an Australian Senate Inquiry into gene patents. He has made many guest appearances on Australian radio and television including on the ABC's 4 Corners, The Law Report, AM, The World Today and PM.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Carlos Bernal-Pulido   View Summary
21 April 2011

Law as social practice and the search for the ontological structure of law

To register please click here

In his Hart Lecture, delivered in 2001, Ronald Dworkin challenged the possibility that the law has an ontological structure. Legal positivists such as Austin, Hart, Coleman and, most recently, Shapiro have endorsed the claim that the law has the ontological structure of a social practice. This paper explores the different interpretations of this claim and assesses to what extend they succeed in responding to the challenge raised by Dworkin.

About the speaker

Carlos Bernal-Pulido has an LLB from the University Externado of Colombia, Bogota, an S.J.D. from the University of Salamanca and an MA in Philosophy from the University of Florida, where he is now a PhD candidate. He joined Macquarie Law School as a Senior Lecturer in September 2009. He has research interests in the fields of Jurisprudence, Constitutional Theory, Theory of Rights, Comparative Constitutional Law, Judicial Review, Torts, Ethics, Theory of Legal Norms and Theory of Action. For the U.S. academic year 2010-2011, Carlos has been appointed as a Senior Research Scholar at the Yale Law School.

Employment relations and the law - week six   View Summary
27 April 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

ACCEL seminar series 2011   View Summary
27 April 2011

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 13 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 20 April
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 27 April
Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 4 - 4 May
Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 5 - 11 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 - 18 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 25 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

POSTPONEMENT NOTICE - Distinguished Speakers Program: Dr Jeni Klugman   View Summary
28 April 2011

Please note that Dr Klugman's lecture, originally advertised for 28 April, is being postponed due to unforseen circumstances. We apologise for anyinconvenience.

Updated lecture dates will be advertised on the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011 webpage, as well as in the fortnightly Events E-Newsletter. Please click here if you would like to subscribe to the E-Newsletter.

May
Capacity for crime: adolescent brain development, mental health and youth crime    View Summary
2 May 2011

This event is now full

A podcast of this event will be made available after the event.

Please click here if you wish to be notified once this podcast becomes available.

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About the seminar

Recent advances in neuroscience have resulted in greater understanding of adolescent brain development. It now appears that the adolescent brain continues to develop through to early adulthood, which has significant implications for understanding youth crime.
This seminar will explore current thinking in the science of adolescent brain development and review recent research into the mental health of young people within the NSW juvenile justice system. By considering these features of youth crime, it will be possible to reflect upon the efficacy of current programs for young people.


This seminar is the third in a series sponsored by the Department of Human Services NSW - Juvenile Justice.

Guest speakers

Professor Hickie AM MD FRANZCP FASSA is theExecutive Director for the Brain & Mind Institute (BMRI). In 2006 he received the Australian Honours Award of Member (AM) for services to medicine. He wasappointed to the Prime Minister's Australian National Council on Drugs in 2007, and has led the BMRI as a founding member of the new National Youth Mental Health Foundation ('headspace').


From 2008-2013, Professor Hickie is one of the first round of new NHMRC 2008 Australian Fellows. In July 2008 he was appointed to the Federal Health Minister's new National Advisory Council on Mental Health, and in November 2009 he received the Research Australia National Advocacy Award for his work in mental health.

Professor David Fergusson has been the Principal Investigator and Executive Director of the Christchurch Health and Development Study (CHDS) for past 34 years; an internationally renowned longitudinal study of a birth cohort of 1,265 New Zealand children born in mid 1977. This cohort has now been studied from birth to age 30. Professor Fergusson is the author of over 350 scientific articles and books. His recent work has included research into: childhood sexual and physical abuse; family violence; youth unemployment; teenage pregnancy; juvenile delinquency; substance abuse; and youth mental health. His major research interests are the design and analysis of correlational studies and the study of personal adjustment in adolescence/young adulthood. He is fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand, honorary fellow of the New Zealand Psychological Society and honorary fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

Natalie Mamone is the Chief Psychologist at Juvenile Justice in NSW. She is a Specialist Forensic Psychologist with extensive experience as a psychologist over the last 16 years and has worked with offenders, both adult and juvenile, for 25 years. Her duties cover clinical direction for psychological and counselling practice, clinical supervision and consultation for specialist programs targeting the reduction of criminogenic needs and re-offending. Natalie was one of the chief investigators of the 2009 Young People in Custody Health Survey.

Visas for international students: pathways to a future in Australia   View Summary
3 May 2011

This masterclass is presented by the Migration Institute of Australia in partnership with Sydney Law School.

Pathways to a future in Australia will discuss the recent, significant changes to Australian immigration law and policies as they affect international students.


The seminar will be followed at 6.30 pm by the launch by Mr Ron Merkel QC of the new text by Professor Mary Crock and Laurie Berg, Immigration, Refugees and Forced Migration- Law, Policy and Practice in Australia (Sydney: The Federation Press, 2011).

Click here to register online.

Employment relations and the law - week seven   View Summary
4 May 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

ACCEL seminar series 2011   View Summary
4 May 2011

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 13 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 20 April
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 27 April
Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 4 - 4 May
Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 5 - 11 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 - 18 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 25 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Legal theory at Sydney series: Christopher Birch SC   View Summary
5 May 2011

Death, property and the problem of posthumous harm

To registerclick here

Legal philosophers have made only tentative efforts to justify a right to dispose of our property after we die. One promising avenue for justification is raised by the philosophical problem of posthumous harm.

Since Joel Feinberg and Thomas Nagel argued more than 20 years ago that we have interests of a sort that can lead to us being harmed by events after our death, a large literature has developed debating this assertion.

Two recent books and a substantial journal literature show increasing scepticism about whether there can be posthumous harm.

The paper will examine these recent counter-arguments to Feinberg & Nagel. It will be argued that the counter arguments depend upon a narrow theory of human welfare, and the existence of posthumous harm can be defended from a broader theory of value. Finally, it will be argued that if a coherent account of posthumous harm can be laid out, this could ground a right to have one's testamentary wishes respected after one's death.

About the speaker

Dr Christopher Birch SC, Sydney Law School

Christopher is a Senior Counsel practising as a Barrister at the Sydney Bar. He practises in many areas of civil law including probate law. Christopher also lectures in legal philosophy in the masters program at Sydney University and the under-graduate program conducted by the Law Extension Committee.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Mr Sandesh Sivakumaran   View Summary
5 May 2011

Re-thinking the Law of Internal Armed Conflict

The regulation of internal armed conflict by international law has come a long way in a very short space of time. Up until the early 1990s, there was a minimum of international law rules applicable to internal armed conflict. Today, the situation has changed almost beyond recognition with a healthy body of international law applicable to internal armed conflict. This change has taken place principally by analogy to the law of international armed conflict, the idea being that what is prohibited in international armed conflicts cannot but be prohibited in internal armed conflicts. This approach proved immensely important, filling in what was a more-or-less blank canvas. However, there are limits as to how far it can take us. Today, the canvas is no longer blank and a step back is needed in order to assess the existing state of affairs. Focusing not on the similarities between international and internal armed conflicts but on their differences will allow us to ascertain what further work is in order. It will allow us to identify gaps in regulation and refine relevant rules. It will also force us to re-think our approach to particular issues. Only in this way will we be able to develop further the international law of internal armed conflict.

Speaker: Mr Sandesh Sivakumaran, School of Law, University of Nottingham

Chair: Dr Emily Crawford

About the speaker: Sandesh Sivakumaran is a lecturer at the School of Law, University of Nottingham. He is an expert in public international law, with a particular focus on international human rights, international humanitarian law and international criminal law. In 2011 Oxford University Press will publish his book International Law in Internal Armed Conflict

Employment relations and the law - week eight   View Summary
11 May 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

ACCEL seminar series 2011 - Week 5   View Summary
11 May 2011

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 13 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 20 April
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 27 April
Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 4 - 4 May
Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 5 - 11 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 - 18 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 25 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster


The future of private international law in Australia   View Summary
16 May 2011

Registration

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

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Australia's prominent position in the world economic order depends on the ability of its businesses to sell their products and expertise internationally, and to engage in cross-border ventures. This process of globalisation has also broadened the opportunities of Australians to travel, whether for business, employment, education or personal reasons. The, perhaps inevitable, result of these developments is a growth in the number of disputes before Australian courts which have a cross-border element, whether of the parties or the subject matter.

This fact puts the subject of "private international law" in Australia into focus. When should an Australian court hear cases of this kind, and when should it send the parties elsewhere? Should local or foreign rules be applied? When will foreign decisions be recognised and enforced? The current approach to private international law in Australia consists of a rather eclectic mix of treaty obligation, local legislation and judicially created rules. By contrast, the European Union has moved to an almost exclusively legislative model.

Against this background, this seminar looks at the future of private international law in Australia. The four speakers will address this topic from the different perspectives of judge, legislator, practitioner and academic.

Confirmed speakers include:

Justice Paul Le Gay Brereton is a Judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, sitting principally in the Equity Division. Prior to his appointment, he practised as a solicitor and barrister in New South Wales. With Professor Martin Davies and Dr Bell, Justice Brereton is an editor of Nygh's Conflict of Laws in Australia, the 8th edition of which was published in 2010.

Dr Andrew Bell was called to the bar in 1995 and appointed as senior counsel in 2006. He specialises in matters of private international law, transnational litigation and arbitration and has appeared before the High Court in many of the leading cases. He is one of the co-editors of Nygh's Conflict of Laws in Australia.

Thomas John currently heads the Private International Law Section of the Commonwealth Attorney-General's Department. He holds law degrees from the University of Konstanz inGermany and from the University of Queensland, and is admitted to practice as a barrister in Australia. Thomas is an Associate Member of the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators and the Chair of the Law Council of Australia's European Focus Group.

Andrew Dickinson is the Professor in Private International Law at Sydney Law School. He divides his time between Australia and the UK, where he practices as a solicitor. Andrew is one of the specialist editors of Dicey, Morris & Collins: The Conflict of Laws, the leading work on English private international law.

Registration
Full fee: $88 inc GST
Sydney Law School alumni: $70.40 inc GST
Full time academic: $66 inc GST
Full time student: $44 inc GST

Brochure

Click here to view a copy of the seminar brochure.

Employment relations and the law - week nine   View Summary
18 May 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

Drugs, crime and brief interventions for young offenders   View Summary
18 May 2011

Registration

To register and pay by credit card online, please click here. A tax invoice will be emailed to you at the completion of the transaction.

Cheque or EFT payments are not accepted through online registration. Please click here for a registration form so that we can issue you with a tax invoice for cheque or EFT payments.

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Drugs and crime interact in a variety of ways, but certainly tend to exacerbate each other. The evidence is clear that reduced drug use is associated with reduced crime. Frontline workers often feel ill-equipped to address the complexity of presentations of young offenders who use drugs, yet access to effective community or residential treatment is often elusive. This course will provide an update on the drug use of young people, available intervention options, and how those who come into contact with young offenders who use drugs may be able to provide helpful evidence-informed and brief interventions.

About the speaker

John Howard (BA, MA(Couns), MClinPsych, DipCrim, PhD, MAPS) joined theNational Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) in 2008 as a Senior Lecturer and works with the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre, as well as NDARC's international research activities and those with a focus on young people. He has worked in schools, juvenile justice, adolescent mental health and drug treatment, and universities. John is a consultant Clinical Psychologist and his major clinical, teaching and research areas are: adolescent substance use and 'street youth', comorbidity, depression and suicide in young people, working with marginalised youth and those with multiple and complex needs, adolescent psychotherapy, same-sex attracted youth, HIV infection in adolescents, resilience, youth treatment capacity-building and developing 'youth friendly' harm reduction. He consults to WHO, UNICEF, UNODC and UNESCAP on capacity-building for community treatment of young drug users and increasing access to harm reduction services for young injecting drug usersInternational work has taken him to Nepal, China, Thailand Viet Nam, Lao PDR, India, Philippines, Egypt and South Africa.

Registration fees

Full fee: $220 (inc GST)

F/T student: $150 (inc GST)

University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)

Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

ACCEL seminar series 2011 - Week 6   View Summary
18 May 2011

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 13 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 20 April
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 27 April
Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 4 - 4 May
Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 5 - 11 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 - 18 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 25 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Police Power in China   View Summary
18 May 2011

Police power control has become a hot issue in China in recent years. In this seminar, Professor Xia Fei will discuss the police power of administrative management, the police power of criminal investigation and the improvement of the police power control system in China.

Guest speaker: Associate Professor Xia Fei, East China University of Political Science and Law

Dr Xia Fei is an associate professor of East China University of Political Science and Law. Her academic research field is criminal justice, especially the policing issue. She is the co-author of two books, Study on Order Maintenance and The history of Criminal Law in Western Countries. Her new book The Change of Police Power in England and Wales will be published in June. Professor Xia's recent articles include: The Change of Crime Reason and the Challenge to Police work,from Study on Order Maintenance, Edited by Guo Taisheng, 2010; and, The Transplantation of the Police System from the West in the Late Qing Dynasty, Journal of XinJiang Police Officers' Academy, 2008(4).

This event is presented byThe Centre for Asian and Pacific Law, the Institute of Criminology and the China Studies Centre.

To register

Please email law.caplus@sydney.edu.au by close of business on Monday 16 May 2011.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Mary Crock   View Summary
19 May 2011

Refugees, boat people and offshore processing: where to from here?

Boat people - or 'irregular maritime arrivals' as they are now styled - engender great controversy in Australia. Successive governments have attempted to comply with Australia's international legal obligations whilst undertaking extreme measures to exclude judicial oversight of the decision making process affecting these people. Establishing refugee processing centres outside of Australia's mainland has been a centrepiece of recent strategies. In the immediate aftermath of the High Court's ruling in Plaintiff M61/2010E v Commonwealth and Plaintiff M69 of 2010 v Commonwealth [2010] HCA 41, the Labor government has maintained its commitment to 'offshore processing', announcing a plan to create a processing centre on East Timor. For its part the Opposition has repeated its assertion that Australia should resurrect arrangements with Nauru that saw 'offshore entry persons' processed in that tiny country. Both proposals bear reconsideration in light of the High Court's ruling. In this seminar Professor Crock examines these proposals in light of the recent High Court jurisprudence.

About the speaker: Professor Mary Crock, Sydney Law School

Mary Crock came to academia in Sydney in 1995 after completing her PhD in immigration and refugee law. Her main field of research is migration, citizenship and refugee law. However, she has general interests in administrative law and international human rights law as well as in related fields of public law such as constitutional law and public international law.

Her specific research interests range from studies of the interaction between Parliament and the judiciary to the legal rights of migrants and refugees in general and of child migrants in particular. She is known for her work on immigration detention, but has also written and lectured on many other aspects of immigration and refugee law and their interface with other areas of law and other disciplines.

Mary's interest in migration and refugee law reflects her past involvement in direct advocacy work. Mary Crock helped to establish and run the Victorian Immigration Advice and Rights Centre Inc in Melbourne, now known as the Refugee and Immigration Law Centre (Vic). She has worked with Australian Senators (most notably in 1999-2000 on an inquiry into Australia's Refugee and Humanitarian Program) and with the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (preparing a report in 2000 on the Immigration Detention Centre at Curtin, near Broome in remote Western Australia).



Constitutional reform in the twenty-first century   View Summary
19 May 2011

Register Online

To register your attendance for this event, please click here.

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Guest speakers

The Hon Bob Carr, former Premier of New South Wales

The Hon George Brandis SC, Deputy Leader of the Opposition in the Senate

Associate Professor Anne Twomey, Director, Constitutional Reform Unit, Sydney Law School

Professor Gillian Triggs, Sydney Law School

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About the event

Join Sydney Law School in celebrating the launch of its Constitutional Reform Unit, dedicated to researching and advising on proposals for constitutional change in Australia. The launch will include a lively discussion on the pitfalls and prospects for Constitutional reform in the twenty-first century.

Program
5.30pm: Registrations
6-7pm: Guest speakers - discussion and questions
7-7.15pm: Launch of the Constitutional Reform Unit - Professor Gillian Triggs
7.15pm: Refreshments
Deepwater horizon: what happened, why and where do we go from here?   View Summary
23 May 2011

This lecture is co-presented by Sydney Ideas and Sydney Law School.

Speaker:Associate Professor Frank Alcock, Senior Fulbright Scholar to New Zealand and Associate Professor of Political Science at New College of Florida

Chair:Professor Rosemary Lyster, Director, Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law, Sydney Law School

The Deepwater Horizon drilling rig explosion in April, 2010 and the subsequent fire and offshore oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico is considered one of the major environmental disasters in US history. In his lecture for Sydney Ideas Frank Alcock will review the findings of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling. He includes the technical dimensions of the disaster, the regulatory context that allowed it to happen, ecological and economic impacts, report recommendations, and broader implications for offshore drilling activity and US energy policy.

Salient themes include a regulatory regime and industry culture poorly suited to manage risks, the absence of meaningful contingency planning, and considerable uncertainty regarding medium to long term impacts and implications. He will also include brief reflection on the findings of Australia's Montara Commission of Inquiry.

About the speaker:

Frank Alcock is an Associate Professor of Political Science at New College of Florida where he serves as the Director of Environmental Studies. From February through May 2011 Frank will be a Senior Fulbright Scholar based at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Frank's Fulbright project involves research and lecturing on New Zealand's climate policies with an emphasis on their emissions trading system. In addition to his work on climate policy, Frank is also lecturing on the Deepwater Horizon spill and its implication for U.S. energy policy.

Frank is a former Director of a Marine Policy Institute at Mote Marine Laboratory in Sarasota, FL and a Fellow with the Collins Center for Public Policy in Florida. His work with Mote and the Collins Center has focused on the potential risks and benefits of drilling near the Florida coastline and he testified before the Florida legislature on this topic.

Employment relations and the law - week ten   View Summary
25 May 2011

The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law.The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law, including the renowned Professor Ron McCallum AO.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Topics covered in the 10-week course include:

Week 1: Introducing employment law: overview of the legal regulation of work in Australia

Week 2: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting

Week 3: The statutory safety net: National Employment Standards and modern awards

Week 4: The employment contract

Week 5: Termination of employment

Week 6: Collective bargaining

Week 7: Industrial action

Week 8: Discrimination in employment: the Fair Work general protections, and anti-discrimination laws

Week 9: Occupational health and safety

Week 10: Workplace dispute resolution

Click here for a downloadable brochure (PDF) for the seminar series.

ACCEL seminar series 2011 - Week 7   View Summary
25 May 2011

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its inaugural annual seminar series covering key areas in climate and environmental law.

The seven-week seminar series will be presented by members of ACCEL, who will share their expertise in key areas of environmental law, including climate change, environmental impact assessment, biodiversity and water. The series is intended to provide an overview of recent developments in these areas to allow participants to stay up to date in this rapidly changing field.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 13 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 - 20 April
Environmental Impact Assessment with Mr Bernard Dunne

Week 3 - 27 April
Biodiversity with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 4 - 4 May
Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 5 - 11 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 - 18 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 - 25 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster


Lunchtime Seminar Series with Ben Saul & Irene Baghoomians   View Summary
26 May 2011

The Law School in the Sky: Learning and Teaching in the Himalayan Field School on Development and Human Rights

Speakers: Associate Professor Ben Saul & Ms Irene Baghoomians

In February 2011 Sydney Law School pioneered a unique new course on Development and Human Rights, held in Nepal over two weeks in conjunction with Kathmandu School of Law. The course was pedagogically innovative in its socio-legal and policy and practice-oriented teaching and learning methods, involving a combination of traditional reading materials and lectures, site visits (to various UN agencies and government bodies), field trips (to rural villages affected by development projects in Melamchi district, a Tibetan refugee settlement in Pokhara, and urban slum /squatter settlement in Kathmandu), and small group work (including empirical interviewing and debriefing). The Field School covered a range of inter-connected substantive issues affecting the developmental process, using Nepal as a case study to reflect on wider themes. The issues canvassed included:

  • The transition from armed conflict to peace after a Maoist insurgency and the end of the monarchy in Nepal (including issues of transitional criminal justice, drafting of new constitution and building a new legal system);
  • The protection of socio-economic rights (including food, water, housing and livelihoods), minority rights (of 'tribals' and 'dalits' in the caste system) and the 'right to development' in the context of international law;
  • The interaction between local disputes over natural resources, human displacement caused by development projects, environmental protection and climate change, in the context of fragile Himalayan ecologies;
  • The experience of women in development and human rights fields, in light of gender inequality in traditional Nepalese society; and
  • The protection of Tibetan and Bhutanese refugees in camp or mass influx situations, in the context of limited resources and the causes of, and solutions to, displacement.

This seminar reflects on the pedagogical and personal experiences of designing and coordinating the Field School, including by evaluating its highs (with some students rating the program as their greatest personal and professional experience ever) and lows (the latter including compulsory scholarly dancing).

Offshore resources law: recent developments    View Summary
30 May 2011

Register online

Click here to register and make your secure payment online.

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SCIL seminar series 2011

The Sydney Centre for International Law presents its seminar series on cutting edge developments in public and private international law.

The seminars in the series will be presented by members of the Centre and by other experts including leading judges and practitioners who will share their expertise in key areas of public and private international law of relevance, allowing participants to stay up to date in these rapidly changing fields.

Topics to be addressed include the future of private international law in Australia, the regulation of the offshore oil and gas sector in light of international developments, new UN rules concerning the human rights and corporate activities, the legal implications of an emerging Asia-Pacific community and the ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice.

The seminars are designed to appeal to a broad audience. Lawyers and barristers will be entitled to accrue CPD units for attending the seminars.

Program
30 May - Offshore resources law: recent developments
27 June - After Ruggie: the future of business and human rights - from courtrooms to boardrooms and beyond
30 August - SCIL and CAPLUS present: building an Asia Pacific community
September - Ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice

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30 May - Offshore resources law: recent developments

Guest speakers

Dr Tim Stephens Co-Director, Sydney Centre for International Law
Nathan Cecil Partner, Norton White
Andrew Beatty Partner, Baker & McKenzie
Megan Flynn Associate, Baker & McKenzie

Chair
Dr Tim Stephens Co-Director, Sydney Centre for International Law

About the seminar

This seminar will examine developments in the regulation of the offshore resources and energy sector in Australia and the region. It will consider the implications of the Report of the Montara Commission of Inquiry in July 2010 concerning the West Atlas oil spill, recent developments in the regulation of offshore carbon capture and sequestration projects. Also to be examined will be the important February 2011 Advisory Opinion of the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea, which considered the liability of governments for deep seabed mining operations, a case prompted by Nauru which is seeking to sponsor a plan of work for exploration for 'polymetallic nodules' in the Pacific.

June
CANCELLATION NOTICE | Distinguished Speakers Program: Dr Janet Albrechtsen   View Summary
2 June 2011

Due to unforseen circumstances, Dr Janet Albrechtsen has had to cancel her lecture as part of the Distinguished Speakers Program.We apologise for the inconvenience, and will contact all registered guests to arrange refund of the ticket price.

For other lectures as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011, please click here.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Charles Barbour    View Summary
2 June 2011

Between politics and law: Hannah Arendt and the subject of rights

To register click here

Perhaps Hannah Arendt's most frequently cited work - certainly in recent years - is the brief section of The Origins of Totalitarianism entitled 'The Perplexities of the Rights of Man', in which she argues that refugees and stateless persons expose the limits of so-called 'human rights'. Perhaps the best known phrase from that text is the concept of 'the right to have rights', or Arendt's suggestion that the only universal right is the right to belong to an organised political community. But if this phrase is well known, it has not been especially well received. More than a few commentators have pointed to its manifest circularity. How can we have rights, they wonder, before we have any rights. In this paper, Dr Barbour proposes a new interpretation of Arendt's 'right to have rights' - one that links it directly to her theory of action, and her notion that, inasmuch as they are a new beginning, each human has the capacity to begin something new. Dr Barbour set his reading of Arendt off against that of Jacques Ranciere and his current followers, who have recently developed a new set of criticisms of her work. Dr Barbour suggests that, while Ranciere's conception of equality is certainly stronger than Arendt's, it can only be given force if it is attached to something like her theory of action.

About the speaker - Dr Charles Barbour, University of Western Sydney

Dr Charles Barbour is a School-based Member of the Centre for Citizenship and Public Policy and a Lecturer in the School of Humanities and Languages at the University of Western Sydney. Prior to coming to Australia, Dr Barbour was based the Department of Socialogy, University of Alberta, Canada. His research interests in include politics and aesthetics, with a particular interest in contemporary political theory. Along with a number of chapters in books, he has articles published or forthcoming in journals such as 'Law, Culture and Humanities', 'Educational Philosophy and Theory', and 'Philosophy and Social Criticism'. He has also co-edited, with George Pavlich, the collection 'After Sovereignty' (Routledge-Cavendish 2009).

The psychology of crime   View Summary
7 June 2011

Registration

To register and pay by credit card online, please click here. A tax invoice will be emailed to you at the completion of the transaction.

Cheque or EFT payments are not accepted through online registration. Please click here for a registration form so that we can issue you with a tax invoice for cheque or EFT payments.

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The psychology of crime is a workshop examining the profession of criminal psychology (also referred to as forensic psychology). It will introduce and expand on questions such as: What do criminal/forensic psychologists do to assist police, the courts, the prisons, etc?

The workshop will explore the role of the forensic psychologist with examples of real (anonymous) cases. It is a must for anyone considering a career in the field of psychology, or for psychologists who would like an introduction to the forensic field. The workshop will also be useful for legal professionals and correctional staff in understanding psychological reports, explanations of bizarre behaviours and pathological diagnoses.

What people will know by the end of the workshop:

  • What forensic psychologists do and how we are trained to think
  • How psychologists study and understand criminal behaviour
  • Ways in which psychologists assess and explain criminal behaviour
  • How psychologists assist the courts in dealing with criminal behaviour
  • How psychologists treat certain types of criminal behaviour (violence, sex offences, murder)

Topics that will be covered during the workshop:

  1. "What is psychology?", with reference to famous experiments that taught us much about human behaviour. How does psychology assist people working with criminal behaviour?
  2. Assessment of a criminal offender: a look at how we do it. Real-life example of assessments (anonymous).
  3. Treating criminal offenders. Real-life examples of treatment that worked and some that didn't (anonymous).

Please note that the course content will at times involve details about violent crime that may be traumatic. If in doubt about your ability to emotionally deal with such course content, please contact the Sydney Institute of Criminology and discuss your concerns, or please DO NOT ENROL.

This workshop will be facilitated by Pan Tsomis.Pan is a forensic and clinical psychologist with a masters degree in psychology and a masters degree in criminology. He is a registered psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia (Registration No PSY0001404883), and a member of the Australian Psychological Society's College of Forensic Psychologists and College of Clinical Psychologists (Member No 17562). Pan was a psychologist with the NSW Department of Juvenile Justice, and has worked for the Commonwealth Department of Veterans' Affairs,for a child protection agency, and for the Mental Health Team in Port Macquarie and at the St George Hospital. He has been in private practice since 1998, primarily assessing and treating criminal offenders, victims of violent crime, as well as combat veterans and their families. He has taught psychology at the University of Sydney and criminology at the University of Western Sydney. He has presented papers and lectured on forensic psychological assessment at international conferences. He also regularly runs workshops on assessment and management of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), especially with regard to victims and perpetrators of violent crimes.

Registration fees

Full fee: $220 (inc GST)

F/T student: $150 (inc GST)

University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)

Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

International regulatory responses to the Global Financial Crisis: Part 2   View Summary
14 June 2011

Registration

Please click here to register.

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The second seminar in the two-part Corporate Governance Seminar Series looks at corporate governance reform and common law perspectives of regulating executive remuneration after the Global Financial Crisis, with international guest speaker Associate Professor Christopher M Bruner and Sydney Law School's Professor Jennifer Hill.

In the first half of 2011 the Ross Parsons Centre will host a number of international visitors with expertise in corporate law and governance. This special program of corporate law seminars will examine reforms to corporate governance and surrounding issues which have arisen in response to the global financial crisis.

Part 2 includes two components:

  • Corporate governance reform in a time of crisis - Associate Professor Christopher M Bruner, Washington and Lee University School of Law
  • Regulating executive remuneration after the Global Financial Crisis: common law perspectives - Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School

Click here to view a brochure with full details.

Venue

Minter Ellison Room, Level 13

Sydney Law School - St James Campus

173-175 Phillip St

Sydney

Legal theory at Sydney series: Alex Ziegert   View Summary
16 June 2011

Path dependence -A comparison of the differentiation paths of law in Europe and Japan

To register please click here

The paper examines and compares the paths of the development of law in Japan and Europe toward its current special function in modern society. These paths are identified as the differentiation processes which are taking place in the form of clearly delineated different cultural patterns of legal communication in spite of quite similar geo-political structures in East Asia and Europe.

The found differences in the differentiation history of law in East Asia and Europe, and historically different again in China, Japan and Korea, but not so much in Europe, can help to explain why comparative law has great difficulties in categorising law in East Asia, but not in Europe, and why it seems more appropriate to use the concept of legal pluralism for describing the role of law in East Asia than for describing law in Europe. These difficulties for comparative law are not merely "ideological" or "wrong methodology" but derive from a lack of depth in the historical and sociological analysis of the role and function of law compared with competing forms of social ordering (for instance, family, politics and economics as the most important ones).

In the light of such a more complex functional analysis of law it emerges that the development path of law in Europe is exceptional only in its speed and differentiation dynamics due to very special historical conditions but not different from the general patterns of the differentiation of law towards modern social structures of populations including in East Asia. Conversely, the examination of the differentiation paths of law in East Asia reveals that law there is lagging behind its "competitors" politics, economics and family, and is often stunted by "half-hearted" politics (legalism yes, rule of law no). The comparative analysis can show further that without the support of the special function of law the continued growth of modern social structures (social stability, welfare and well-being of populations on a high level of skills and knowledge) cannot be sustained.

About the speaker -

Associate Professor Alex Ziegert, Sydney Law School

Professor in Jurisprudence, Lucerne University (Luzern/Switzerland) an A/Prof Sydney . Born 1944 in Marienburg (Germany), studies in law, sociology, economics, history, Nordic and Slavonic languages and literature, and communication research at the University of Frankfurt (1966-1967) and the University of Münster (1967-1973); awarded Dr.phil by the University of Münster in 1975; DAAD-Post-doctoral Grant Research Fellow at the Institute for Sociology of Law at the University of Lund, Sweden 1973-1974; Research Fellow at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research (ZiF), University of Bielefeld in 1975; Senior Research Officer at the Max-Planck-Institute for International and Comparative Private Law in Hamburg/FRG ( October 1975 to July 1982); since August 1982 Lecturer (1989 A/Professor) in Jurisprudence in the Department of Jurisprudence, University of Sydney; Head of Department of Jurisprudence from January 1988 to January 1999; Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law (CAPLUS) 1998-2002 and Dean of the Faculty of Law 1992 to 1993.

ACCEL Conference 2011 - Regulating coal seam gas: implications for energy, food and water security   View Summary
17 June 2011

Register online

Click here to register and make your secure online payment.

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Regulating coal seam gas: implications for energy, food and water security

In countries like the United States and Australia there has been significant investment in, and government support for, the extraction of shale gas and coal seam gas (CSG). CSG is regarded as contributing to energy security while also producing an energy source which produces half the greenhouse gases compared with coal-fired generation. Yet the extraction of CSG has raised concerns for water and food security in Australia and was recently assessed by the Senate Environment, Communications and the Arts References Committee. It is currently under review by the National Water Commission and the NSW Department of Planning. From an Environmental Law perspective, which incorporates notions of risk and precaution, this conference will assess how the extraction of CSG is being regulated in New South Wales and Queensland. Anticipated changes to the NSW Environmental Planning and Assessment framework following the recent election will be addressed.


This conference will appeal to an interdisciplinary audience including academics, lawyers in private practice, consultants, government officials, non-government organisations, members of the public and students.

Keynote Speaker
Professor Alan Randall, Faculty of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

Guest Speakers
Brad Mullard, Executive Director, Mineral Resources
Fiona Simson, Vice President, NSW Farmers Association
Dr Nicola Durrant, Queensland University of Technology

Nicola Franklin, Sydney Law School

Chair
Professor Rosemary Lyster, Director, Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law


Program
1.30pm: Registration
2pm: Welcome by Professor Rosemary Lyster, Overview of CSG in Australia
2.10pm: Keynote by Professor Alan Randall, Novel interventions, risk, and precaution: toward a risk
2.50pm: Brad Mullard
3.15pm: Afternoon tea
3.30pm: Fiona Simson, Food for the future: can farmers live with CSG?
3.55pm: Dr Nicola Durrant, Regulating coal seam gas: the Queensland approach
4.20pm: Nicola Franklin, Regulating coal seam gas: the NSW approach
4.45pm: Q&A
5pm: Event concludes

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Conference costs
Full fee: $150 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $120 (inc GST)
NGO: $90 (inc GST)
Part time students: $90 (inc GST)
Full time students: $50 (inc GST)

To view a copy of the online brochure, please click here.

Litigating disputes in the WTO dispute settlement system   View Summary
22 June 2011

Registration

Click here to register.

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Litigating disputes in the WTO dispute settlement system: a distinctive system or a familiar extension of litigation under domestic law?

David Unterhalter, Member of the World Trade Organization Appellate Body and member of the Johannesburg Bar, will discuss various aspects of disputes in the WTO dispute settlement system, drawing on his experience since 2006 as a Member of the Appellate Body and his many years of experience in litigation in the fields of trade law, competition law, constitutional law and commercial law.

David Unterhalter serves as a member of the Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization. Hehas enjoyed a leading practice as a barrister in the fields of trade law, competition law, and public law. He practices in London and Johannesburg, where he is a Senior Counsel. Mr Unterhalter has been a Professor of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa since 1998, and from 2000 - 2006, he was the Director of the Mandela Institute, University of the Witwatersrand, an institute focusing upon global law. He has acted as an advisor to the South African Department of Trade and Industry and published widely in the fields of competition law, the law of evidence and public law. Mr Unterhalter holds degrees from Trinity College, Cambridge, the University of the Witwatersrand, and University College Oxford.

Chair: Dr Brett Williams, Faculty of Law, University of Sydney

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Associate Professor Christopher Bruner   View Summary
23 June 2011

Corporate governance in the common-law world: The political foundations of shareholder power

Professor Bruner will discuss his comparative work on political conditions affecting the relative power and centrality of shareholders in capital market-based corporate legal systems, with special emphasis on Australia and the United States. In particular, Professor Bruner will discuss how differing forms of social welfare protection for employees can impact the position of shareholders within a given country's corporate governance system.

Speaker: Associate Professor Christopher M. Bruner- Ethan Allen Faculty Fellow, Washington and Lee University School of Law

Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Daniel Wodak   View Summary
23 June 2011

Law, Language and Latitude

To registerclick here

Statue books, constitutions and judicial precedents are awash with provisions and prohibitions that rely on phrases like 'reasonable', 'fair' or 'cruel and unusual'. Are such laws vague and indeterminate? Do they grant judges a degree of discretion in legal adjudication? These questions are of central importance to contemporary jurisprudence, particularly in relation to the Hart-Dworkin debate. Considering Hart and Dworkin's positions in turn, Daniel Wodak will argue that Dworkin is wrong to rule out the possibility that judicial discretion exists, but right to claim that it raises serious ethical concerns. Understanding the nature, prevalence and implications of vague laws provides great insight into the intersection between adjudication, morality and legal theory.

About the speaker - Daniel Wodak

Daniel Wodak completed a Bachelor of Arts with First Class Honours in Philosophy in 2008, winning a University Medal and the John Anderson Prize for Best Thesis, and a Bachelor of Laws with First Class Honours in 2010, winning several jurisprudence prizes, the George Dalley Prize and a University of Sydney Academic Merit Prize. He has lectured and tutored Philosophy at Sydney University, and will shortly commence a PhD in Philosophy on a Fulbright Scholarship.

After Ruggie: The Future of Business and Human Rights - from courtrooms to boardrooms and beyond   View Summary
27 June 2011

Register online

Click here to register and make your secure payment online.

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SCIL seminar series 2011

The Sydney Centre for International Law presents its seminar series on cutting edge developments in public and private international law.

The seminars in the series will be presented by members of the Centre and by other experts including leading judges and practitioners who will share their expertise in key areas of public and private international law of relevance, allowing participants to stay up to date in these rapidly changing fields.

Topics to be addressed include the future of private international law in Australia, the regulation of the offshore oil and gas sector in light of international developments, new UN rules concerning the human rights and corporate activities, the legal implications of an emerging Asia-Pacific community and the ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice.

The seminars are designed to appeal to a broad audience. Lawyers and barristers will be entitled to accrue CPD units for attending the seminars.

Program
30 May - Offshore resources law: recent developments
27 June - After Ruggie: the future of business and human rights - from courtroomsto boardrooms and beyond
3 August - Australia's new policy on investor-state dispute settlement

30 August - SCIL and CAPLUS present: building an Asia Pacific community
September - Ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice

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After Ruggie: the future of business and human rights - from courtrooms to boardrooms and beyond

Guest speakers
David Kinley, Sydney Law School

Rachel Nicolson, Allens Arthur Robinson

Odette Murray, Attorney-General's Department

About the seminar

In June 2011, the UN Human Rights Council will consider the Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights. These Guiding Principles are the culmination of six years of research, consultation and discussion with governments, businesses and civil society by the UN Secretary-General's Special Representative on Business and Human Rights, Professor John Ruggie.

This seminar will evaluate the guiding principles - commending their strengths while criticising their weaknesses. We will consider whether the principles are adequate to address the broad diversity of corporate activities - from extractive industries to financial services.

The guidelines are likely to spur renewed engagement of governments and corporations with the business and human rights agenda. From grievance mechanisms to human rights due diligence, the guiding principles have the potential to significantly impact corporate operations. The directions that might be taken by Ruggie's successor in the mandate (to be decided in early June) will also be discussed.

The seminar will canvass some of the ways in which corporations and their legal advisers, both in Australia and abroad, are already responding to the business and human rights agenda. We will highlight how law firms could and should react in future as the business and human rights phenomenon gains pace.

The seminar will also focus on the role of litigation as a means of corporate human rights accountability, charting recent developments in the landscape of 'Alien Tort Claims Act' suits in the United States Federal Courts. Such suits have been brought against non-US corporations - including Australian corporations - though recent developments may halt this trend.

Distinguished Speakers Program: The Hon Sir Anthony Mason AC KBE   View Summary
30 June 2011

Register online

Click here to register and make your secure online payment.

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The Rule of Law in the shadow of the giant: the Hong Kong experience

Concerns about the future of the rule of law in Hong Kong were expressed in advance of 1 July 1997 when Hong Kong's constitution, the Basic Law, came into operation. The Basic Law is an enactment of the National People's Congress. The Basic Law granted a high degree of autonomy to Hong Kong and preserved Hong Kong's capitalist and common law legal systems and provided for an independent judiciary. The principal source of the concerns about the rule of law was article 158 of the Basic Law which vests the ultimate power of interpretation of that Law in the Standing Committee of the Congress. The lecture records the Hong Kong experience since 1 July 1997, as it relates to the rule of law, and does so with an eye to the future.

About the speaker

The Hon Sir Anthony Mason AC KBE was a Justice of the High Court of Australia from 1972-1987 and Chief Justice from 1987-1995. He was Commonwealth Solicitor-General from 1964-1969 and a Judge of the NSW Court of Appeal from 1969-1972. Until recently, he was Chancellor of UNSW, National Fellow at the Research School of Social Sciences at the ANU, a Judge of the Supreme Court of Fiji and President of the Solomon Islands Court of Appeal. He has been a non-permanent Judge of the Hong Kong Court of Final Appeal since 1997.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011. Please click here for program details.

July
Frustration & Force Majeure   View Summary
7 July 2011

Presented by the Commercial Law Association, The Ross Parsons Centre and the Journal of Contract Law this seminar offers insights into a range of current issues. Speakers include Donald Robertson, Professor John Carter and Professor Woody Hunter.

Diverse events of recent years, including the global financial crisis, earthquakes, floods and attendant shortages of raw materials have all served to bring the concepts of frustration and force majeure into prominence. This seminar considers the contemporary relevance of the distinction between frustration and force majeure and the allocation of contractual risks by special clauses such as force majeure clauses, material adverse change clauses and hardship clauses.

Click here to view the full brochure and for registration details.

Matt Laffan memorial address in social justice   View Summary
18 July 2011

Register online

To register, please click here.

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Matt Laffan Address in Social Justice

Forgotten Victims: criminal justice remembers

Guest speakers

Nicholas Cowdery QC, Former NSW Director of Public Prosecutions

Peter Strain, Barrister

Chair

Emeritus Professor Ron McCallum, Sydney Law School

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On Sunday 1 March 2009, Sydney Law School alumnus Matt Laffan passed away after he fought and lost the biggest battle of his colourful and active life. In memoriam of the significant impact Matt has had in his short life, Sydney Law School has established an annual social justice address in his honour.

This year's address will be held on Monday 18 July, commencing with a recollection of Matt Laffan by barrister Peter Strain, followed by an address by Nicholas Cowdery AM QC, Former NSW Director of Public Prosecutions.

Matt Laffan had severe disabilities, but he will be remembered most for his impressive abilities. With enormous enthusiasm for life, Matt grabbed opportunities and made the most of them. This capacity was recognised in him by Matt's former boss, Nicholas Cowdery AM QC.

Mr Cowdery is now an Adjunct Professor of Law at the Sydney Law School and a Visiting Professorial Fellow at the Faculties of Law in the Universities of NSW and of Wollongong. He is also legal expert consultant to the Commonwealth Secretariat, London.

He is recognised for his work, both here and abroad. As the President of the International Association of Prosecutors, he focused on helping countries de-stabilised by civil unrest, find the means by which to improve their criminal justice systems. His presentation this evening will explore the place of victims, their expectations and the remedies available to them.

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St John's College has established a scholarship in support of a disabled student or students in memory of Matt Laffan. Details of the scholarship can be found at
http://www.mattlaffan.com.au/scholarship. Donations to The Rector and Fellows of St John's College, which will be directed to the Matt Laffan Scholarship, are tax deductible.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD units.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Fault-lines in Immigration Policy: The Harvard-Sydney Immigration Summit 2011   View Summary
22 July 2011

This conference is part of a longer meeting for a range of international scholars, to develop the first large database of immigration and naturalization policies, the International Migration Policy and Law Analysis Database (IMPALA).

The event on Friday 22 July is designed to share more broadly the benefits of bringing these experts to Australia. It will showcase the recent work or thinking of a range of international scholars to discuss three key areas of immigration policy: Skilled migration (and the balance with family migration); refugees and humanitarian flows; and integration, settlement and citizenship.

The conference will open with an address bythe Secretary of the Department of Immigration and Citizenship, Andrew Metcalfe.

Confirmed panellists and speakers include:

Selecting the Best

  1. Professor Georg Borjas, Harvard University;
  2. Professor Michel Beine, University of Luxembourg;
  3. Mark Cully, Chief Economist, Department of Immigration and Citizenship;
  4. Professor Deborah Cobb‐Clark , Director of the Melbourne Institute

Manufactured Crises: The politics of asylum and detention

  1. Peter Hughes PSM, Former Deputy Secretary, Department of Immigration and Citizenship
  2. Professor Mary Crock, Professor of Public Law, The University of Sydney
  3. Dr Eiko Thielemann, London School of Economics and Political Science.

Managing Integration: Settlement and antiimmigrant sentiment

  1. Professor Jennifer Hochschild, Harvard University
  2. Professor Michael Hiscox, Harvard University
  3. Professor Murray Goot, Macquarie University

Registration

To RSVP for the Fault‐lines in Immigration Policy Summit, please email your details, including if any dietary requirements, to rsvpussc@sydney.edu.au. Please note that RSVPs close on Friday 15 July 2011.

If you have any questions on the event, please contact Craig Purcell or Tara Wolfson via email on rsvpussc@sydney.edu.au or phone (02) 9351 7852.

We request that you make your own travel arrangements for the conference.

Click here for a copy of the conference brochure.

This event is presented by the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, in collaboration with Harvard University and the Faculties of Law and Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Sydney.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Dan Priel   View Summary
26 July 2011

Institutional Morality and the Rule of Law

To register pleaseclick here

Lon Fuller famously argued that certain principles of legality are a challenge to legal positivism. This claim has proven very controversial. In this seminar Assistant Professor Dan Prielrevisits this debate and defends a version of Fuller's claim. The seminarwill begin by revisiting some of the arguments directed at Fuller's argument and point out their limitations. Assistant Professor Prielcontends, however, that the force of those arguments (either in support or against Fuller's view) is rather of limited force unless considered within a broader context. Priel argues that what has been missed from most discussions is a crucial distinction between morality between individuals and institutional morality. Most discussions of the relationship between the rule of law and morality focused on the former, whereas Priel argues that a better way of understanding Fuller's claim is in relation to institutional morality. Assistant Professor Priel's argument is that once we understand that law is not limited to the enforcement of existing social standards but to the creation of institutions, a problem emerges—that of assessing the morality of those institutions. The problem is that existing moral rules provide little guidance on this matter. The solution is found in the creation of certain procedural rules that help assess institutions not for what they do but on how they were promulgated. This point is of broader significance: it helps explain one relatively neglected question in contemporary legal philosophy, that of legitimacy.

About the Speaker

Assistant Professor Dan Priel,Osgoode Hall Law School

Dan Priel has recently joined Osgoode Hall Law School, where he currently is assistant professor. After completing his LL.B. in the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, Priel went to Oxford where he took the BCL and then completed his DPhil. He then spent two years as Oscar M. Ruebhausen Fellow-in-Law at the Yale Law School, and then taught in the University of Warwick School of Law. He is currently working on projects in general jurisprudence and private law (especially tort and restitution), and is interested in significance of politics to both areas.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to2 MCLE/CPD units.For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

The 50th anniversary of The Wagon Mound (No 1)   View Summary
28 July 2011

This event is now full

Due to an overwhelming response, registrations for this event are now closed. We sincerely apologise for the inconvenience.

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Guest Speakers
Professor Jane Stapleton, Australian National University and the Ernest E Smith Professor of Law, University of Texas, Austin, School of Law

Chair
The Hon Justice Steven Rares, Federal Court of Australia

Introduction by Professor Barbara McDonald, Sydney Law School

The Parsons Centre is grateful for the support for this lecture from Minter Ellison Lawyers, whose predecessors, Minter Simpson & Co, were solicitors for the plaintiffs in The Wagon Mound (No 1).

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On the 50th anniversary of The Wagon Mound (No 1): the neglected complexity of scope-of-liability rules

"After the event even a fool is wise. But it is not the hindsight of a fool: it is the foresight of the reasonable man which alone can determine responsibility."

Viscount Simonds, The Wagon Mound No 1

In 1951, a conflagration broke out at Morts Dock in Balmain, Sydney, when a spark ignited furnace oil, accidentally discharged by The Wagon Mound. Extensive damage was done to the docks and nearby vessels. It was nearly two decades before the legal consequences had played themselves out, with appeals in Overseas Tankship (UK) Ltd v Morts Dock and Engineering Co Ltd (The Wagon Mound (No 1)) and Overseas Tankship (UK) Ltd v Miller Steamship Co Pty Ltd (The Wagon Mound (No 2)) to the Privy Council in 1961 and 1967 respectively. Curious for many a law student is the fact that The Wagon Mound was successful in defending the first action but not the second. Unravelling this seemingly odd result illustrates the complexity of tort liability and the significance of the precise evidence brought by a plaintiff.

In The Wagon Mound No 1, the Privy Council formulated the remoteness of damage rules for negligence in terms of whether the type of damage was reasonable foreseeable to the defendant. The Wagon Mound No1became probably the most well-known Australian torts case throughout the common law world, including in the United States, discussed in all leading torts treatises and casebooks.

Professor Stapleton will argue that The Wagon Mound (No 1) is the start, not the end, of modern jurisprudence in the area, and that it constitutes merely the 'perimeter' rule within which liability is further constrained by a range of more demanding rules. As part of this discussion, she will examine the role of 'common sense' in determining causation.

About the speaker

Jane Stapleton is Professor of Law at The Australian National University College of Law, the Ernest E. Smith Professor of Law, University of Texas, School of Law, and a Statutory Visiting Professor and Member of the Law Faculty at Oxford University. She is an Honorary Bencher of Gray's Inn. For a decade she taught law at Balliol College Oxford where she remains an Emeritus Fellow. In 2000 she was elected a Member of the American Law Institute and in 2004 she was appointed to the Council of the Institute, the only foreigner to be elected to this body.

Professor Stapleton has lectured and published widely on the law of negligence, and has had a major influence on the development of the law of causation. Her work is constantly cited with approval by appellate courts in many common law jurisdictions, in academic publications and Reports of Law Commissions. She is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia. She will shortly take up an appointment as the Arthur Goodhart Visiting Professorship of Legal Science at the University of Cambridge.

This event is presented by The Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1.25 MCLE/CPD units.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please
click here.

JSI Guest Speaker Series: Professor Ken Himma   View Summary
28 July 2011

A Defence of Traditional Conceptual Analysis

This seminar is presented bythe Macquarie Centre for Agency, Values and Ethics and the Julius Stone Institute.

Speaker:

Professor Ken Himma, Seattle Pacific University

For further details please contact Macquarie Centre for Agency, Values and Ethics

August
19th Annual Labour Law Conference   View Summary
1 August 2011

2011's Labour Law Conference presents a high quality line up of experts significant issues facing labour today. Some of these topics and speakers include:

  • The impact of labour market informalisation on labour law - Judy Fudge, Lansdowne Chair in Law, Faculty of Law, University of Victoria, Canada
  • The labour law challenges facing Australian workers - Joel Fetter, Policy and Industrial Director, ACTU
  • Sham contracting - Leigh Johns, Australian Building and Construction Commissioner
  • State of executive contracts and executive pay -Jennifer Hill, Professor of Corporate Law, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney
  • Discrimination - Graeme Innes AM, Disability Discrimination Commissioner and Race Discrimination Commissioner
  • Bullying and harassment - Michael Harmer, Chairman and Senior Team Leader, Harmers Workplace Lawyers
  • An OHS update - Ingmar Taylor, Barrister, State Chambers and Michael Tooma, Partner, Norton Rose

Registration

Full fee: $900

Group Rate (2 or more): $700

Sydney Uni staff and student rates are also available - contact Karen Treacy for more information: karen.treacy@sydney.edu.au

For more information and to register go to www.wrc.org.au

This conference is presented by the University of Sydney's Workplace Research Centre in conjunction with Sydney Law School.

Voiceless Animal Law Lecture Series 2011: Reflections from the European Union   View Summary
1 August 2011

Voiceless Animal Law Lecture Series 2011: Reflections from the European Union

Register here www.voiceless.org.au/lecture

Voiceless is pleased to invite you to our keynote free public lecture at the University of Sydney as part of our 2011 Animal Law Lecture Series. This year Voiceless is proud to present leading policy adviser, Peter Stevenson, as international keynote speaker. Peter leads Compassion in World Farming's lobbying at the European Union (EU) and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).

He played a leading role in winning the EU bans on veal crates, battery cages and sow stalls as well as a new status for animals in EU law as sentient beings. In addition, he has written comprehensive legal analyses of EU legislation on farm animals and also of the impact of the WTO rules on animal welfare. In 2004 Peter was the joint recipient of the RSPCA Lord Erskine Award in recognition of

a "very important contribution in the field of animal welfare". This lecture, kindly supported by University of Sydney Law School, will be chaired by Ruth Hatten, Legal Counsel of Voiceless and will be opened by Prof Gillian Triggs, Dean of Law. It will feature a welcome by Brian Sherman AM, as well as a presentation by Dana Campbell, CEO of Voiceless. An event highlight will be a panel discussion featuring Lee Rhiannon MP, Cate Faehrmann MLC, Celeste Black, Senior Lecturer at the University of Sydney, and Dana Campbell.

To viewbrochure click here

Information Session - Professor Timothy Endicott, Oxford University   View Summary
2 August 2011

Registration

Click here to register online.

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Professor Timothy Endicott, Dean, Faculty of Law, Oxford University, will be visiting Sydney Law School on Tuesday 2 August to meet with our students and to discuss study opportunities at Oxford University.

About Professor Endicott

Timothy Endicott has been Dean of the Faculty of Law since October 2007. He is a Fellow in Law at Balliol College, and has been a Professor of Legal Philosophy since 2006. Professor Endicott writes on Jurisprudence and Constitutional and Administrative Law, with special interests in law and language and interpretation.

He is the author of Vagueness in Law (OUP 2000), and Administrative Law (OUP 2009). After graduating with the AB in Classics and English, summa cum laude, from Harvard, he completed the MPhil in Comparative Philology in Oxford, studied Law at the University of Toronto, and practised as a litigation lawyer in Toronto. He completed the DPhil in legal philosophy in Oxford in 1998.

A light lunch will be offered before the discussion.

Reforming the World Health Organization: innovations in the global governance of health   View Summary
2 August 2011

Centre for Health Governance, Law & Ethics at Sydney Law School and the George Institute for GlobalHealth present:

Reforming the World Health Organization: innovations in the global governance of health

To register click here

The World Health Organization (WHO) has a powerful mandate to act as the global coordinating authority for improving human health. At the present time, however, WHO finds itself overshadowed by global public/private health initiatives (eg the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation; the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria), large bilateral programs (eg the US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief: PEPFAR), as well as private philanthropies with global reach (the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation). WHO's funding base limits the scope of its activities, and as a specialised UN agency controlled by members, WHO is subject to political pressures from member countries, from the private sector and from civil society.

In this seminar, Professor Lawrence Gostin, an eminent public health lawyer and global health advocate, will draw on his work with the WHO on governance reform, outlining the challenges the organisation faces, and explaining how reform of WHO could both re-assert its unique capacity for global leadership and lead to improvements in global health.

Keynote speaker:

Professor Lawrence Gostin is the Linda and Timothy O'Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington DC; Director, O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law; and Director, WHO Collaborating Centre on Public Health Law and Human Rights. He serves on the Director-General's Advisory Committee on Reforming the World Health Organization, and in 2007, the WHO Director-General appointed him to the International Health Regulations (IHR) Roster of Experts and the Expert Advisory Panel on Mental Health.

Professor Gostin has led major law reform initiatives in the US, including the drafting of the Model Emergency Health Powers Act (MEHPA) to combat bioterrorism and the 'Turning Point' Model State Public Health Act. He is also leading a drafting team on developing a Model Public Health Law for the World Health Organization, and is currently engaged in three major international initiatives on global health governance with regard to frameworks for human services and global health and a global plan for justice. He is widely published, and holds numerous editorial appointments in prestigious academic journals throughout the world.

Responder: Professor Stephen Leeder is Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Sydney; and Director, Menzies Centre for Health Policy. He has a long history of involvement in public health research, educational development and policy, and his research interests as a clinical epidemiologist have been mainly asthma and cardiovascular disease. Professor Leeder has more than 35 years of experience in epidemiological research, medical education reform and in mentoring young investigators.

Responder:Associate Professor Stephen Jan Senior Health Economist, Renal & Metabolic Division The George Institute for Global Health

Chair:Associate Professor Rebecca Ivers Director, Injury Division, The George Institute for Global Health

To view the event brochure click here

Australia's new policy on investor-state dispute settlement    View Summary
3 August 2011

Register online

Click here to register and make your secure payment online.
____________________________________

SCIL seminar series 2011

The Sydney Centre for International Law presents its seminar series on cutting edge developments in public and private international law.

The seminars in the series will be presented by members of the Centre and by other experts including leading judges and practitioners who will share their expertise in key areas of public and private international law of relevance, allowing participants to stay up to date in these rapidly changing fields.

Topics to be addressed include the future of private international law in Australia, the regulation of the offshore oil and gas sector in light of international developments, new UN rules concerning the human rights and corporate activities, the legal implications of an emerging Asia-Pacific community and the ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice.

The seminars are designed to appeal to a broad audience. Lawyers and barristers will be entitled to accrue CPD units for attending the seminars.


Program
30 May - Offshore resources law: recent developments
27 June - After Ruggie: the future of business and human rights - from courtrooms to boardrooms and beyond
3 August - Australia's new policy on investor-state dispute settlement
30 August - SCIL and CAPLUS present: building an Asia Pacific community
September - Ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice
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Australia's new policy on investor-state dispute settlement

Guest speakers
Max Bonnell, Partner, Mallesons Stephen Jaques and Adjunct Professor, Sydney Law School
Associate Professor Chester Brown, Sydney Law School
Associate Professor Luke Nottage, Sydney Law School

Chair

Robert Pritchard, Managing Director, ResourcesLaw International

This event will take place under the Chatham House Rule

About the seminar

In April 2011, the Gillard Government announced in its Trade Policy Statement: Trading Our Way to More Jobs and Prosperity that it would significantly restrict the practice of including investor-state dispute settlement provisions in bilateral investment treaties and free trade agreements. In doing so, it adopted one of the recommendations of the Australian Productivity Commission's report on bilateral and regional trade agreements, which was published in December 2010. The stated reasons for this major policy shift include the Government's concern that it should not support provisions that would constrain the ability of Australian governments to make laws on social, environmental and economic matters, or provisions that confer greater legal rights on foreign businesses than those available to domestic businesses. This change in Australia's approach to the negotiation of international investment agreements has been welcomed by some constituencies, but has also caused disquiet in others.

This seminar will focus on this new policy, and consider the implications for the Australian Government, Australian private business, and other stakeholders in inward and outward foreign investment.

Background reading: Nottage, Luke R, The Rise and Possible Fall of Investor-State Arbitration in Asia: A Skeptic's View of Australia's "Gillard Government Trade Policy Statement" (10 June 2011) Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 11/32; Investor-state Arbitration Policy and Practice after Philip Morris v Australia (1 July 2011).

This seminar is presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law and the Australian Network for Japanese Law. It is also supported by the Chartered Institute of Arbitrators - Australian Branch and the Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration. ____________________________________

Registration fees
Full fee: $135 (inc GST)
SLS Alumni: $108 (inc GST)
CIArb member: $108 (inc GST)
ACICA member: $108 (inc GST)
Govt/NGO: $33 (inc GST)
Academic and F/T student: $33 (inc GST)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD units.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Dr David Bennett AC QC   View Summary
4 August 2011

Registration

Click here for registration and secure online payment.

_________________________________________

Life at the Bar

David Bennett suggests that it has always seemed to him that any law graduate who selects any of the careers available to him or her other than the Bar has to be brain-dead. It is like being paid for eating chocolate. To make this proposition good, under the three classifications of sex, religion and politics, he will describe some of his more interesting cases. The subject-matters range from tampons to Tampa, although the alphabetical spread is somewhat wider.


Dr David Bennett AC QCwas the Solicitor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia from 1998-2008, and President of the NSW and Australian Bar Associations from 1995-1997. A solicitor (1964) and barrister (1967), Dr Bennett was appointed as a Queen's Counsel in 1979. He is a member of the International Legal Services Advisory Committee and of the Takeovers Panel, and a council member of International Commission of Jurists (Australian and NSW sections) and of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law. He is currently a barrister specialising in appellate advocacy and constitutional law.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011. Please click here for program details.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Understanding Kinship: Indigenous People and Law    View Summary
4 August 2011

Event full, registration closed

Join the Institute of Criminology for Lynette Riley's 'Kinship' presentation. Lynette Riley, Academic Coordinator of the Koori Centre, University of Sydney, will take participants through a kinship system demonstrating the components of moiety, totem, skin names, language and traditional affiliations, and individual identity. Through Lynette's presentation participants will begin to see why Aboriginal people face particular problems when interacting with the (colonial) Australian legal system.

The Law Reform Commission of Western Australia Report Aboriginal Customary Laws (Final Report, The interaction of WA law with Aboriginal law and culture, Project 94, September 2006, p. 66) highlighted the importance of Kinship to Aboriginal people:

"Kinship is at the heart of Aboriginal society and underpins the customary law rules and norms... Importantly, kinship governs all aspects of a person's social behaviour...

It is important to note...that while the kinship system was an undeniable part of traditional Aboriginal society...it is also strongly instilled in contemporary Aboriginal society, including urban Aboriginals...certain kinship obligations, such as the duty to accommodate kin, are taken very seriously regardless of urban or remote location."

Although the kinship systems throughout Australia are extremely varied and it is not possible in this forum to examine the differences between them, participants in the workshop will gain a new and deeper understanding of how a kinship system operates.

By the end of the workshop participants will have gained insight into:

  • The social structure of Aboriginal society.
  • How this social structure and world view differs from the western liberal world view.
  • How this difference impacts upon Aboriginal people in the Criminal Justice System and the legal system more broadly.

This workshop will be of interest to:

  • Legal practitioners in Criminal Law, Family Law and Care and Protection (the 2-hour workshop is worth 2 CLE points).
  • Government personnel who interact with Indigenous Australians (especially DOCS, Juvenile Justice and Corrective services).
  • The Magistracy and Judiciary.
  • Police.
  • Students.

The workshop will be facilitated by Tanya Mitchell, Lecturer in Criminal Law and Indigenous People and the Law at Sydney Law School. Tanya was a senior solicitor-advocate with the Aboriginal Legal Service in NSW and also with the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency in the Northern Territory before joining Sydney Law School as a full-time academic in 2010.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to2 MCLE/CPD unit.For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.


When interests collide: The impact of US law on non-human animals and their advocates   View Summary
4 August 2011

When Interests Collide: The Impact of U.S. Law on Non-human Animals and Their Advocates

To register click here



Human interests are judged more important under U.S. law than the interests of non-human animals, allowing the detrimental effects of human action on those non-human animal interests to continue with little change from advocate action. The constitutional challenge to a law designed to stop crush videos, the ongoing controversy over chimps used in research, the rescue of companion animals during disasters, and the protection of human economic interests from wildlife have all appeared in the news and in the courts and legislatures. The law, whether legislative or judge-made, resulting from these situations makes clear the impact of the legal status of non-human animals as property both on the non-human animals and their human advocates. This talk will focus on the tension between the interests of humans and the interests of non-human animals and their advocates, using the examples of the current situation of the chimps at the Alamogordo Primate Facility in Alamogordo, NM, the symbolic nature of laws such as the PETS Act, the efforts to label animal advocates as terrorists, and the recent Congressional action to remove the gray wolf from the endangered species listing in a departure from normal procedure under the Endangered Species Act.

About the speaker

Professor Marsha Baum is Professor of Law at the University of New Mexico School of Law, and a leading international authority on companion animals, emergenciesand the law. Professor Baum researches treatment of companion animals in the United States during disasters, such as Hurricane Katrina, and legislative action by the United States Congress to address some of the identified shortcomings.

Marsha is the author of three books, including When Nature Strikes: Weather Disasters and the Law (Praeger/Greenwood, 2007), and has taught a wide range of courses, including Animal Law and Animal Law Moot Court Competition. She is currently conducting comparative research on the management of companion animals in disasters.

Sydney Law School gratefully acknowledges the support of the late Sabina van der Linden-Wolanski in hosting Animal Law Visiting Scholar, Professor Marsha Baum.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Fiona Burns   View Summary
11 August 2011

Adverse Possession in England and Australia

Adverse possession has a long legal lineage. It was well-suited to a legal system when title was relative and was based on the concept of possession. However, in the modern era adverse possession increasingly appears to be a somewhat dangerous anomaly, particularly in the light of title-by-registration. The presentation considershow and to what extent the various states and territories of Australia have implementedadverse possession into their title-by-representation systems; and how England has modifiedthe principle of adverse possession in its Land Registration Act 2002.Some suggestions will be made about possible future directions for law reform.

CPTED Plus   View Summary
12 August 2011

Registration

To register and pay by credit card online, please click here. A tax invoice will be emailed to you at the completion of the transaction.

Cheque or EFT payments are not accepted through online registration. Please click here for a registration form so that we can issue you with a tax invoice for cheque or EFT payments.

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People engaged in crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) work often come from diverse backgrounds, with diverse professional development needs. This workshop will address various aspects of CPTED practice to aid practitioners in their work. This workshop has been designed to respond to the needs identified by practitioners at previous Sydney Institute of Criminology professional development events and will focus on:

  • Reading and understanding architectural plans
  • Adopting an appreciative inquiry approach to working with key stakeholders
  • Going behind the CCTV screens
  • Ways of thinking about perception of crime
  • Conducting and reviewing crime risk assessment reports

Sessions will be delivered by:

  • Dr Gavin Smith (University of Sydney)
  • Jonathan Knapp (SJB Urban)
  • Laurie Gabites (Trustee and Board Member of the Safe Communities Foundation of New Zealand (SCFNZ);Regional Director of the International CPTED Association (ICA))
  • Garner Clancey (Adjunct Lecturer, Sydney Institute of Criminology)
  • Dr Murray Lee (Co-Director, Sydney Institute of Criminology)

This workshop will be of interest to:

  • Crime Prevention/Community Safety Officers
  • Crime prevention consultants'
  • Police
  • Planners
  • Urban designersArchitects
  • Local government personnel
  • Criminology and built environment students

Registration fees

Full fee: $220 (inc GST)

F/T student: $150 (inc GST)

University of Sydney staff: $176 (inc GST)

Sydney Law School alumni: $176 (inc GST)

Inaugural R P Meagher Lecture   View Summary
18 August 2011

This event is now full

Due to an overwhelming response, registrations for this event are now closed. We sincerely apologise for the inconvenience.

For further enquiries, please contact the Event Coordinator, email:law.events@sydney.edu.au.

_____________________________

Guest speakers

The Hon Justice J D Heydon AC

The Hon Tom Bathurst QC, Chief Justice of NSW

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Varieties of judicial method in the late twentieth century

The Honourable Justice JD Heydon AC will deliver the inaugural R P Meagher Lecture, recognising and celebrating the career of eminent alumnus and former Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales Court of Appeal, The Honourable RP Meagher AO QC.

The Chief Justice of New South Wales, the Honourable TF Bathurst, will introduce the lecture, which will take place at 6 pm on Thursday 18 August in the Banco Court of the Supreme Court of New South Wales

RP Meagher (1932-2011) was a graduate of the University (BA 1954, LLB 1958) and was awarded Doctor of Laws (honoris causa) in 2000. In 1960 he began a long period of service as a part time lecturer to the Faculty of Law, where he lectured in Roman Law and held the title of Challis Lecturer in Equity. His lectures were a source of inspiration and challenge for generations of law students. He was a co-author of the ground breaking Meagher Gummow and Lehane's Equity Doctrine and Remedies, and was a co-editor of many editions of Jacobs' Law of Trusts.

He practised at the Bar and soon become one of the nation's leaders in appellate advocacy, and was appointed as a Queen's Counsel, and a member of the New South Wales Bar Council, serving as its President in 1979-1981. He was appointed as a Judge of Appeal of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, where his qualities as a judge were especially appreciated by law students because of the succinctness of his opinions and the sharp phrases which he often deployed against those of contrary views. He retired from the bench in 2004.

The Honourable Justice John Dyson Heydon AC was appointed to the High Court in February 2003, after having been a judge of the New South Wales Court of Appeal since 2000. He graduated in arts from the University of Sydney, and, as the Rhodes Scholar for New South Wales in 1964, graduated as Master of Arts and Bachelor of Civil Law from Oxford University. He was admitted to the New South Wales Bar in 1973 and was appointed a Queen's Counsel in 1987. At age 34, he was elected Dean of the University of Sydney Law School for 1978-79. He practised at the Bar from 1979 until his appointment to the Court of Appeal. He has published a number of legal texts, including his first book, The Restraint of Trade Doctrine, in 1971, and is a co-author, with RP Meagher and M J Leeming, of Meagher, Gummow and Lehane's Equity Doctrine and Remedies, 2002, and co-editor of Jacobs' Law of Trusts. Justice Heydon AC was appointed a Companion in the General Division of the Order of Australia in 2004.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at thislecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD units.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please
click here.

Rescheduled - JSI Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Reg Graycar   View Summary
18 August 2011

**Please note, this event is has beenrescheduled to the 22 September.**

For more information please click here

Rescheduled -Thu 22 September - JSI Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Reg Graycar - A feminist adjudication process: is there such a thing?

Chasing the greased pig down Wall Street   View Summary
22 August 2011

Register Online

To register and secure your online payment please click here.

____________________________

Chasing the greased pig down Wall Street: a gatekeeper's guide to the psychology, culture and ethics of financial risk-taking

The recent financial crisis poses difficult questions for lawyers, auditors, and independent directors at large financial firms: was some of what happened the product of perceptual bias - the failure to comprehend the risk - and if so, is there something corporate "gatekeepers" can do to temper those biases? The lecture will address the way perceptual biases can play out in financial settings, with special attention to the emotional competitive impulses that thrive when markets are running at full throttle.

Professor Donald C. Langevoort is the Thomas Aquinas Reynolds Professor of Law and Co-Director, Joint Degree in Law and Business Administration at Georgetown Law. Prior to joining Georgetown in 1999 Professor Langevoort was the Lee S. and Charles A. Speir Professor at Vanderbilt University School of Law. Professor Langevoort has received the Paul J. Hartman Award for excellence in teaching at Vanderbilt. After private practice, he joined the staff of the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission as Special Counsel in the Office of the General Counsel.

For a copy of the event brochure, please click here.

____________________________

Registration costs
Full fee: $77 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $66 (inc GST)
F/T student: $44 (inc GST)
Special rate applies for 3 or more registrations from one organisation: $55 (inc GST)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

The Supreme Court of New South Wales Annual Corporate Law Conference   View Summary
23 August 2011

This year's conference, co-hosted by the Ross Parsons Centre, The Law Society of New South Wales and the Supreme Court of New South Wales, will address the question, Where is the Securities Market Heading?

Guest speaker, Professor Donald Langevoort of Georgetown University, together with leading Australian lawyers will address issues of vital importance in the wake of the financial crisis. The conference will be of interest to everyone who has contact with securities markets, including lawyers, investment bankers, corporate directors and executives, and regulators.

Please click here to view the full brochure and click here for enrolment details.

This conference is presented by the Supreme Court of NSW, the Law Society of NSW and and the Ross Parsons Centre at Sydney Law School.

Religious vilification, anti-discrimination law and religious freedom    View Summary
24 August 2011

Registration

Click here to register online.

_____________________________________________________________

In this address, The Honorable Greg Smith SC MP, Attorney-General for New South Wales, will offer his views on the appropriate balance to be found between religious freedom and laws that prohibit discrimination and vilification. The address will be given to the Panel of Experts of the International Religious Liberty Association, which is meeting for the first time in Australia; but it is open to anyone to attend.

The Hon Greg Smith SCMP was elected as the Member for Epping in 2007 and soon after was appointed as the Liberal Party's Shadow Attorney General, Shadow Minister for Justice and Shadow Minister for Juvenile Justice in the New South Wales Parliament. He became Attorney-General after the Coalition won government in March 2011.

After graduating from Sydney University with an LLB, he practised as a solicitor in several city firms and later at the Commonwealth Deputy Crown Solicitor's Office inSydney from 1975 -84. In 1982-83 Greg worked as an Instructing Solicitor to the Stewart Royal Commission into Drug Trafficking. Following this appointment he became the Senior Assistant DPP when the Commonwealth DPP Office opened in Sydney and held this post until 1985 when he was appointed the Senior Adviser (Legal) to the National Crime Authority in Sydney.

Greg was admitted to the Bar in 1987 and appointed a NSW Crown Prosecutor in the same year. From 1992-93 he was seconded to ICAC as Counsel Assisting on the Operation Milloo investigation into police corruption, and in 1998 was appointed a Deputy Senior Crown Prosecutor. He has prosecuted hundreds of criminal trials. He was appointed the Deputy Director of Public Prosecutions in April of 2002, a post where Greg was to regularly appear in the High Court and other appellate courts as well as assisting in the management of the Office and the performance of the Director's functions where delegated. Before leaving the DPP Greg was appointed a Senior Counsel in 2004.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to1 MCLE/CPD units.

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Jennifer Hendry   View Summary
25 August 2011

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Jennifer Hendry

Legal Pluralism and Normative Contestability - is it really all about conflict?

To register please click here

Beloved of postmodernists, legal pluralism is a concept that has suffered as a result of its popularity as much as its malleability, resulting in it becoming rather stretched and 'thin'. This dilution has occurred in two main ways, namely concerning its character and its utilization (this could be alternately phrased as the concept's object and method).

In terms of the former, focus rests on the distinction that can be drawn between legal and normative pluralism. The inclusion of, for example, self-regulation and social practice on the spectrum of legality has had the arguable effect of distorting legal pluralism by forcing a specifically legal character upon social norms. The vital practical difference here is between the identification and the application of something as law.

As for the latter, the utilization of the concept is ultimately dependent on whether the approach adopted is a descriptive or an instrumental one. The neutral descriptive approach identifies instances of normative plurality and accommodates them, allowing for the existence of conflicting rules in different socio-legal spaces without concerning itself with resolution. The instrumental approach is a more politicized one in that it identifies a certain degree of emancipatory potential within the very notion of plurality.

This presentation will argue that the concept of legal pluralism need not remain modest and thin but rather that, by clarifying its own contours in line with specific situations, 'spaces', and ends, can regain some of its 'thickness' and purchase.

Jennifer Hendry is a lecturer at the University of Leeds School of Law and the deputy director of the Centre for European Law and Legal Studies. Before joining Leeds, Jen wrote her doctoral thesis on the topic 'Unitas in Diversitate? On Legal Cultures and the Europeanisation of Law' at the European University Institute (EUI) in Florence, and then spent a year in the Netherlands as a postdoctoral research fellow in the Tilburg Institute for Comparative and Transnational Law (TICOM) at Tilburg University. Her main research interests are in the areas of legal and social theory and comparative law and legal studies, specifically the concepts of 'legal culture' and legal pluralism. She is a visiting research fellow at the University of Sydney's Department of Philosophy during summer 2011.

SCIL and CAPLUS present: building an Asia Pacific community    View Summary
30 August 2011

Register online

Click here to register and make your secure payment online.

This event is co-presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law (SCIL) and the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law (CAPLUS), with support from the China Studies Centre (CSC).

_________________________________

SCIL seminar series 2011

The Sydney Centre for International Law presents its seminar series on cutting edge developments in public and private international law.

The seminars in the series will be presented by members of the Centre and by other experts including leading judges and practitioners who will share their expertise in key areas of public and private international law of relevance, allowing participants to stay up to date in these rapidly changing fields.

Topics to be addressed include the future of private international law in Australia, the regulation of the offshore oil and gas sector in light of international developments, new UN rules concerning the human rights and corporate activities, the legal implications of an emerging Asia-Pacific community and the ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice.

The seminars are designed to appeal to a broad audience. Lawyers and barristers will be entitled to accrue CPD units for attending the seminars.

Program
30 May - Offshore resources law: recent developments
27 June - After Ruggie: the future of business and human rights - from courtrooms to boardrooms and beyond

3 August - Australia's new policy on investor-state dispute settlement
30 August - SCIL and CAPLUS present: building an Asia Pacific community
September - Ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice

_________________________________

SCIL and CAPLUS present: building an Asia Pacific community

Guest speakers

Chair and Discussant: Professor Peter Drysdale, Australian National University

Ms Irene Baghoomians, Sydney Law School
Mr Micah Burch, Sydney Law School

Professor Philomena Murray, University of Melbourne
Dr Luke Nottage, Sydney Law School
Professor Ben Saul, Sydney Law School

Dr Brett Williams, Sydney Law School

About the seminar

This session will consider regulatory implications of the proposal by Kevin Rudd to go beyond existing mechanisms within the vibrant Asia-Pacific region to promote better "habits of cooperation" in economic, security and socio-political affairs.

A leading political scientist and former diplomat, Professor Philomena Murray (University of Melbourne), will set this initiative in the context of existing institutions in the region as well as other parts of the world (EU, South America, Africa) as well as other recent developments proposals (including one from Japan for an "East Asia Community": see generally http://www.aspi.org.au/publications/publication_details.aspx?ContentID=273&pubtype=5).

As experts in international business law, Dr Luke Nottage, Dr Brett Williams and Mr Micah Burch will consider innovative ways to develop Free Trade Agreements and tax treaties to advance more ambitious yet sustainable economic integration, as well as more effective resolution and avoidance of disputes involving both states and firms within the region (see already: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1509810 and http://blogs.usyd.edu.au/japaneselaw/).

ProfessorBen Saul will examine regional securities issues.

Professor David Kinley and Ms Irene Baghoomians will consider human rights implications include new initiatives from ASEAN.

To download a copy of the seminar brochure, please click here

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Registration fees
Full fee: $165 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni/Govt: $132 (inc GST)
F/T students/academics and NGO: $44 (inc GST)
CSC Members: FREE

CSC Members please note: to register your free attendance, please contact the Event Coordinator at email: law.events@sydney.edu.au to secure your place.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 3 MCLE/CPD units.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please
click here.

CANCELLATION NOTICE: Understanding carbon pricing and the Direct Action Plan   View Summary
30 August 2011

Due to unforseen circumstances, the seminar 'Understanding carbon pricing and the Direct Action Plan: What are the strengths and weaknesses?' has been cancelled.

We apologise for the inconvenience, and will contact all registered guests to arrange refund of the ticket price.

September
Distinguished Speakers Program: Dr Robert Austin   View Summary
1 September 2011

Register online

Click here to register and make your secure online payment.

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What should we expect our company directors to do?

In the famous Bell Group case, 2009, Justice Owen agreed that over the entrance to boardrooms the Statute has rightly painted the declaration: "the buck stops here". But how can boards of directors of large companies, meeting approximately once a month, be expected to accept responsibility for the whole management of the corporate enterprise? Does the law really allocate responsibility to the directors for everything that goes wrong in the management of the business? What should the proper balance of responsibilities be between directors and executive officers? To what extent should non-executive directors be permitted to rely on the advice of executive officers and expert advisers (an issue considered by the trial judge and on appeal in the James Hardie case, and by the trial judge in the Centro case)? Should the law leave directors free to exercise their business judgment? Do we need law reform to ensure that directors are fully responsible for what they can and should do, but not for what is beyond their reach?


Dr Robert Austin taught company law and equity at the University of Sydney full-time from 1969 to 1990, and subsequently he has continued to teach part-time until the present day. He was a partner with Minter Ellison (1990-1998) and was a Judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales (1998-2010). He has recently returned to legal practice with Minter Ellison.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011. Please click here for program details.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD units.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please
click here.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Dr Hannah Tonkin    View Summary
1 September 2011

State Control over Private Military & Security Companies in Armed Conflict

The proliferation of private military and security companies (PMSCs) in armed conflict raises concerns about state control over military/security activities. Hannah Tonkin critically analyses the key international obligations on states to control PMSCs in armed
conflict and identifies the circumstances in which PMSC misconduct may lead to state responsibility.

About the Author


Dr Hannah Tonkin completed a masters and doctorate in international law at the University of Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, after having previously completed degrees in science and law at the University of Adelaide. She has worked as a lawyer at the UN International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and taught international law at the University of Oxford. She is now a lawyer at the UN International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania.

2011 Ross Parsons Commercial Law Address   View Summary
7 September 2011

Register online

To register, please click here.

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Guest Speaker

Professor Francis Reynolds, University of Oxford

Chair

Professor John Carter, Sydney Law School

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Breach of warranty of authority: an unusual doctrine

The action for breach of warranty of authority, on which there are several Australian leading cases, is an unusual one in imposing liability for certain types of statement causing economic loss, and strict liability at that, well back into the nineteenth century. There is still international disagreement as to whether it is right to do this, and whether the action is rightly classified as contractual rather than tortious (which would have implications for damages as well as liability). Puzzles are also beginning to emerge as to exactly what promise the person concerned makes about the supposed principal, the range of persons to whom the promise is to be regarded as made, and how the doctrine interacts with situations where the principal is unidentified, or does not exist, or where the agent can be said to have been his own principal.

The lecture will be of interest to commerical lawyers and barristers.

To view a copy of our online brochure, please click here.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD units.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Privacy Forum - Do we need a right to privacy?   View Summary
12 September 2011

Do we need a right to privacy?

New federal privacy laws, affecting the rights of everyone in Australia, are expected to soon be drafted. Join some of the country's foremost experts on the subject to discuss exactly what the right balance should be between privacy and the need for accountability and public scrutiny under the law.

Those taking part in the panel-style debate, with roving microphone to field questions, include:

  • Richard Ackland - Journalist, Media Commentator and Lawyer
  • Chris Merritt- The Australian newspaper's Legal Editor
  • David Rolph - Associate Professor - Sydney Law School
  • Andrew Stone - Australian Lawyers Alliance Director and Barrister

To view brochure please click here

Enquiries

Mandy Wyer - Australian Lawyers Alliance Public Affairs Manager

Email: mandy@lawyersalliance.com.au or phone 0418 270 656

Beyond punishment: imagining rehabilitation   View Summary
21 September 2011

THIS EVENT IS NOW FULL.

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The Sydney Institute of Criminology will continue hosting the Beyond Punishment series starting with the first instalment titled 'Imagining Rehabilitation'.

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW.

About the Seminar:

Rehabilitation is a term often used but rarely interrogated. It can mean different things in a range of penal policy and political contexts. Not only do divergent models of rehabilitation exist, but the goals of rehabilitation should also be subject to critical discussion. This seminar explores the present and futures of rehabilitation.

Speakers:

Keynote Speaker

Pat Carlen, BA, PhD is Visiting Professor at Kent University, Editor-in-Chief of the British Journal of Criminology, co-founder of the UK campaigning group Women in Prisonand has published 19 books and many articles on criminal and social justice. She has conducted research in England, Scotland, Australia, New Zealand, Israel, USA and Peru, and given public or invited lectures in all those countries as well as in The Netherlands, Denmark, Portugal, Spain, Canada, Austria, Hungary, Sweden and South Africa. Her work has been translated into Japanese, Norwegian, Dutch, Portuguese and Spanish. In 1997 she was awarded the American Society of Criminology's Sellin-Glueck Prize for Outstanding International Contributions to Criminology, in 2010 the British Society of Criminology's Award for Outstanding Achievement and in 2011 an Honorary Doctorate in Laws from Lincoln University. A collection of her selected works entitled A Criminological Imagination: Essays on Punishment, Justice, Discourse was published in Ashgate's Pioneers in Contemporary Criminology in 2010.

Guest Speaker

Luke Grant (Corrective Services NSW) was appointed Assistant Commissioner, Offender Services and Programs in June 2006. He is responsible for offender services and programs in custody and in the community including Corrective Services Industries and inmate classification and case management. Prior to this, Mr Grant had been Assistant Commissioner, Offender Management since December 2000. He has held a number of positions in the areas of inmate classification, programs and education and has a background in tertiary education.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at thislecture is equal to2 MCLE/CPD units.

For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, pleaseclick here.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Reg Graycar   View Summary
22 September 2011

A FEMINIST ADJUDICATION PROCESS: IS THERE SUCH A THING?

To register for this event please click here

The paper the subject of this seminar is being published in a collection called Gender and Judging (edited by Ulrike Schultz and Gisela Shaw, Hart, 2012) and brings together two separate but related areas of Professor Graycar's research: first, her work on gender and judging (or adjudication)(see eg her chapter in the Julius Stone festschrift, "Gender, Race, Bias and Perspective: Or how otherness colours your judgment"), - and secondly work Graycar has done with Jane Wangmann as part of an ARC funded study on legal responses to systemic injuries or historical harms (Graycar and Wangmann, 2007).

One of the focuses of the research on historical harms was an agreement made in the mid 1990s between a group of women survivors of childhood abuse and the government of Ontario (the "Grandview Agreement") that established what has often been described as a "feminist" process for addressing the injuries that these women sustained.

The chapter (and this seminar) interrogate the suggestion that creative redress packages could enhance gender equality. Specifically, Greycar asks whether a model such as what the Grandview Agreement put in place can appropriately bear the ascription of a 'feminist' adjudication process. More broadly, the chapter considers whether there is such a thing as a 'feminist' adjudication process.

The chapter (and seminar) will address the following issues

  • Has the feminist inquiry - often presented as "will women judges/decision-makers make a difference" - been misplaced? Are we failing to ask whether adding women, or more specifically feminists, or indeed, any jurisprudential outsiders to the existing legal structures can itself bring about any effective change?
  • Should we instead focus on whether there is space for feminist insights to be introduced into the legal decision-making process, and if there is, at what stage? Can feminist insights assist in designing adjudication processes, rather than being introduced only at the decision-making stage?
  • What if anything distinguishes a 'feminist' process from a 'good' process?

Professor Reg Graycar

Professor Graycar is a member of the International advisory board for SSRN, Women, Gender and the Law, and a member of the editorial boards of the Australian Feminist Law Journal, the Adelaide Law Review, Griffith Law Review, the Media and Arts Law Review and Australian Feminist Studies. She is also a member of the International Advisory Board for the Centre for Feminist Legal Studies, University of British Columbia, and the AHRB centre for Gender, Sexuality and Law (UK). Professor Graycar has worked with the Australian Institute of Judicial Administration and a number of courts, both in Australia, and overseas, on their judicial education programs. She also practises as a barrister, and is a member of the Human Rights Committee of the NSW Bar Association. She was a Director of Women's Legal Services (NSW) Ltd (the largest community legal centre in NSW) from 2000 to 2009 and was Chair of the Board from 2006-2008.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to2 MCLE/CPD units.For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Robert McCorquodale    View Summary
22 September 2011

Registration

Click here to register.

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The International Rule of Law and Corporations: Security and Human Rights Challenges

With all the conflict in the world and with states apparently determined to upholdtheir own power, can there be a rule of law that applies in the international system? If it exists, can it be relevant to non-state actors, such as corporations? Are the impacts of the corporation's activities on human rights lost in the desire for international order and security?

This lecture will argue that there is an international rule of law and it is in the interests of international corporations to have it. It will look at some of the developments in international economic and trade law in this regard, as well as the challenges to corporations by international human rights law. If an international rule of law includes human rights then the lecture will consider how this can affect business activities.

Professor Robert McCorquodale is the Director of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law in London. He is also Professor of International Law and Human Rights, and former Head of the School of Law, at the University of Nottingham.

Previously he was a Fellow and Lecturer in Law at St. John's College, University of Cambridge and at the Australian National University in Canberra. Before embarking on an academic career, he worked as a qualified lawyer in commercial litigation with leading law firms in Sydney and London.

Robert's research and teaching interests are in the areas of public international law and human rights law. He has published widely on these areas, and has provided advice to governments, corporations, international organisations, non-governmental organisations and peoples concerning international law and human rights issues, including advising on the drafting of new constitutions and conducting human rights training courses.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011. Please click here for program details.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Launch of the Clinical Ethics Resource featuring Professor Julian Savulescu   View Summary
26 September 2011

Registration

Click here to register your attendance.

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The Centre for Health Governance, Law & Ethics and the Centre for Values, Ethics & Law in Medicine (VELIM) are pleased to present the launch of the Clinical Ethics Resource website, sponsored by NSW Health. The launch will also feature a presentation by Professor Julian Savulescu, Uehiro Chair in Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford, who will discussThe Futility of Futility.

In modern times death has, for most of us, become a managed process, where treatment is selectively withheld and withdrawn, commonly on grounds of futility. In this paper Professor Savulescu argues that the concept of medical futility is deeply flawed. He will argue that judgements of medical futility are really covert judgements of best interests, which are frequently mistaken, or judgements about distributive justice. Decisions about medical futility would be best reframed as explicit resource allocation and distributive justice issues.

The evening will also feature the launch of the Clinical Ethics Resource:

The Clinical Ethics Resource aims toprovide an extensive range of resources addressing the ethical and legal issues experienced by those working in clinical environments. Health professionals face challenging issues on a daily basis. This website seeks to offer resources and best practice guidelines to assist with those decisions.

The website is part of a larger study into the practice of clinical ethics in New South Wales, sponsored by NSW Health. The aim of the project is to identify what resources are necessary to develop clinical ethics capacity within the New South Wales health system, for example providing clinical ethics committees and/or making clinical ethics training more widely available. This web-based resource is aimed at providing initial support to people who are looking for further information and resources.

Guest presenters:

Professor Julian Savulescu is Uehiro Chair in Practical Ethics at the University of Oxford and Director of the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics. He is also Director for the Program on Ethics and New Biosciences in the James Martin 21st Century School. Previously, he was editor of the Journal of Medical Ethics and Director of the Ethics of Genetics Unit at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne and has held a range of ethicist positions in both Australia and the UK. He is qualified in medicine, bioethics and analytic philosophy and has been published in many international journals including the British Medical Journal, Lancet and The Australasian Journal of Philosophy and Bioethics.

The Clinical Ethics Resource will be launched by Dr Greg Stewart, Deputy Director General of NSWHealth.

Dr Greg StewartMBBS, MPH, FRACMA, FAFPHM is the Director of Population Health for the NSW Health Reform Transition Organisation (Western). He was previously Chief Health Officer of NSW; Chief Executive Officer of Wentworth Area Health Service; Director of Health Services of Central Sydney Area Health Service; and Director of the Public Health Unit of South Western Sydney Area Health Service. Greg is a member of the NSW Medical Council and the Boards of Sydney Water and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, and is the Honorary Secretary/Treasurer of the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine. He has chaired the NSW Health Clinical Ethics Advisory Panel since its inception in 2003.

To view the event flyer please click here

Kevin McCann Lecture on Energy and Resources Law   View Summary
27 September 2011

Registration

Due to an overwhelming response, registrations for this event are now closed. We sincerely apologise for the inconvenience.

For further enquiries, please contact the Event Coordinator, email:law.events@sydney.edu.au.

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Resources and Energy at the heart of structural change in Australia's economy.

Guest speaker:

The Hon Martin Ferguson AM, MP
Minister for Resources and Energy; Minister for Tourism

Martin has a Bachelor of Economics degree (Hons) from Sydney University. He was elected to Federal Parliament as the Member for Batman in 1996 and served continuously as a Shadow Minister until the election of the Labor Government on 3 December 2007.

Martin served successively as Shadow Minister for:

  • Employment and Training - 20 March 1996 to 26 August 1997
  • Employment and Training, Population and Immigration and Assistant to the Leader on Multicultural Affairs - 26 August 1997 to 20 October 1998
  • Employment, Training and Population - 20 October 1998 to 3 October 1999
  • Regional Development, Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Services and Population - 03 October 1999 to 25 November 2001
  • Regional and Urban Development, Transport and Infrastructure - 25 November 2001 to 23 August 2002
  • Regional Development, Transport, Infrastructure and Tourism -
    23 August 2002 to 02 July 2003
  • Urban and Regional Development, Transport and Infrastructure -
    2 July 2003 to 26 October 2004
  • Primary Industries, Resources and Tourism - 26 October 2004 to
    24 June 2005
  • Primary Industries, Resources, Forestry and Tourism - 24 June 2005 to 10 December 2006
  • Transport, Roads and Tourism - 10 December 2006 to 3 December 2007

Previously, Martin was President of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU) after working for the Federated Miscellaneous Workers' Union of Australia since 1975. As president of the ACTU, Martin was a member of advisory councils and foundations including the Social Security Review, the Economic Planning Advisory Council, the National Labour Consultative Council and the Advance Australia Foundation.

Martin was also a member of the ILO Governing Body from 1990 to 1996. He was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in June 1996.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.25 MCLE/CPD unit(s).

For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

October
2011 Sydney Law School Postgraduate Information Evening   View Summary
12 October 2011

To register please click here

The Sydney Law School will hold its annual Postgraduate Information evening on Wednesday 12 October from 5.30-7pm.

The event is an opportunity for prospective candidates to meet face to face with our staff to discuss matters in relation to postgraduate study in law at the Sydney Law School.

The Dean will deliver a brief presentation on the law school's postgraduate program at 5.45pm.

Light refreshments will be available.


For further information
For more information regarding this event email: law.pginfoevening@sydney.edu.au

For an information pack, tel: +61 2 9351 0351/+61 2 9351 0267/+61 2 9351 0361 or email: law.postgrad@sydney.edu.au.


Time: 5.30-7pm

Location: Assembly Hall, Old Law School, St James Campus, Ground Floor, 173-175 Phillip Street Sydney NSW 2000

Cost: Free however registration is essential

Contact: Greg Sherington

Phone: +61 2 9351 0202

Email: law.postgrad@sydney.edu.au

More info: http://sydney.edu.au/law/fstudent/coursework/

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Dr Lael Weis    View Summary
13 October 2011

Guest Speakers Series: Dr Lael Weis

Property, Constitutionalism and Natural Law: The Left-Liberal Dilemma

To register please click here

One strategy for defending the higher law status of constitutionally protected interests is to demonstrate that they are grounded in "natural law". Left-liberals are united in rejecting this kind of strategy to characterise property rights even though many use it to defend other constitutional interests. Their concern is that characterising property rights as "natural" will effectively prohibit redistributive taxation; yet, there is no way to classify property as a constitutionally protected interest without characterising it as such. This paper argues that left-liberals have been too quick to reject the idea that property merits constitutional protection because of assumptions being made about both the natural law theory of property and, more generally, the natural law characterisation of "fundamental" interests that a constitution protects. It suggests that left-liberals who desire to protect critical natural, environmental, and cultural resources could benefit from reconsidering this strategy.

About the Speaker

Dr Lael Weis, Melbourne Law School

Dr Weis joined Melbourne Law School's Centre for Comparative Constitutional Studies in July 2010 as a McKenzie Post-Doctoral Fellow. She holds a PhD and JD from Stanford University from the Department of Philosophy and Law School. She completed her dissertation, "Public Purpose, Common Good: Constitutional Property in the Democratic State," while a fellow at the Stanford Humanities Center during the 2009-10 academic year. Her research interests lie at the intersection of constitutional legal theory, democratic political theory, and property law.

Youth Justice Conferencing Seminar: Principles of Restorative Justice   View Summary
17 October 2011

The Sydney Institute of Criminology is pleased to announce the first instalment in the 2011-2012 Juvenile Justice sponsored seminar program titled 'Youth Justice Conferencing Seminar: Principles of Restorative Justice'.

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW.

To register please click here

About the seminar:

The seminar considers the current state of evidence and practice in restorative justice and youth justice conferencing, which has been an important aspect of dealing with young offenders under the Young Offenders Act in NSW. It brings together a range of perspectives on the youth justice conferencing process including research from the Australian Institute of Criminology, the experience of a youth justice conferencing convenor and the police's involvement in the process.

About the Speakers:

Dr Kelly Richards, is a Senior Research Analyst at the Australian Institute of Criminology, where her research focuses on juvenile justice, restorative justice, human trafficking and sexual violence. Kelly holds a PhD in Criminology from the University of Western Sydney, and has held positions as a Lecturer and Researcher at the University of Western Sydney, the University of Technology Sydney, and Sydney University. She is also currently a Visiting Fellow in the Centre for Restorative Justice at the Australian National University. In 2010, Kelly was awarded the ACT Government Office for Women Audrey Fagan Churchill Fellowship to study restorative measures for the reintegration of child sex offenders in Canada, the United States, and the United Kingdom. She has published widely in the discipline of criminology, and recently released an edited collection, Qualitative criminology: Stories from the field, with Federation Press.

Bryan Boulton is a Youth Justice Conferencing Convenor based in Lismore. Since March 2010 Bryan has convened more than 20 conferences in a large regional area that includes Lismore, Casino and remote regional areas such as Tabulam. He retired from the NSW Police Force in November 2004 after 25 years of service which included being Crime Managerfor the Richmond Local Area Command. Bryan was a senior Police Officer when the Young Offenders Act was first passed and his LAC had high rates of referrals to the youth justice conferencing system.

Assistant Commissioner Carlene York, Commander, Northern Region, NSW Police, will address the youth justice conferencing process from the perspective of police involvement.

Training course: Crime Prevention Evaluation   View Summary
18 October 2011

Registrations Closed - registrations for this event have now closed because interest has exceeded the number of places available.

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Evidence-based crime prevention requires sound evaluations to be conducted. Unfortunately, few crime prevention programs in Australia are ever rigorously evaluated. This can result in promising initiatives being de-funded and popular, but not necessarily successful, programs being adopted.

Crime prevention practitioners often feel ill-equipped to conduct evaluations. This one-day training course will help practitioners to: feel more confident in understanding evaluation reports; develop evaluation plans; and contract external evaluators. Through the use of three case studies (focusing on public space closed-circuit television systems, prevention efforts to address alcohol-related problems and youth diversionary programs), this practical training course will help to equip practitioners with evaluation skills and knowledge.

The following staff from the Australian Institute of Criminology and the Sydney Institute of Criminology will be delivering this training:

  • Peter Homel
  • Katie Willis
  • Anthony Morgan
  • Jess Anderson
  • Garner Clancey

This training will be especially relevant to:

  • Local government Community Safety Officers
  • Police Crime Prevention Officers
  • Non-government and government program managers
  • Criminology students

Registration fees

Full fee: $250 (inc GST)

F/T student: $170 (inc GST)

University of Sydney staff: $200 (inc GST)

Sydney Law School alumni: $200 (inc GST)

This training course will be delivered by the Australian Institute of Criminology and the Sydney Institute of Criminology.

Ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice    View Summary
18 October 2011

Registration

Click here to register and payonline

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Ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice

About the seminar

As the recent financial crisis has shown, ethical judgments made by public and private lawyers in one locale may have far-reaching global ramifications of potentially devastating import. This is especially the case when the lawyers in question are engaged in legal dealings with an explicit cross-border dimension, whether in a transactional or a litigious setting.

Lawyers in such circumstances may be called upon to grapple with conflicting professional regulations, cultural and linguistic norms and work practices, all while engaging with multiple substantive bodies of law. The ethical calls that such lawyers make may reverberate like the proverbial flapping of a butterfly's wings.

In this seminar, experienced legal practitioners will speak alongside a professional ethicist regarding the ethical dilemmas lawyers routinely face when involved in cross-border work, the impacts that can flow from those, and some strategies for handling them. For the benefit of those with NSW practising certificates, this seminar will satisfy the requirement for annual completion of a MCLE/CPD unit concerned with ethics and professional responsibility.

Panellists:

Ezekiel (Zeke) Solomon

Ezekiel (Zeke) Solomon is a senior partner of Allens Arthur Robinson. He has extensive experience in corporate and commercial law, including international business transactions, mergers and acquisitions, and the development and financing of major infrastructure, energy and resources projects. He served as resident partner in charge of Allens' office in New York from 1986 - 1993 and has worked extensively in Asia, including as an adviser to the Indonesian Government on foreign investment legal and policy issues and major project negotiations.

Zeke graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Laws (Honours) from Sydney University and Master of Laws from Harvard Law School, where he was a Fulbright scholar. He is an Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Law, University of Sydney and in the Faculty of Law, University of Technology Sydney.

He has served on the Board of Directors of the Australian Government's Australia India Institute and currently serves as a director of the United States Studies Centre and as a member of the Advisory Council of the China Studies Centre at University of Sydney, and a director of the National Gallery of Art Foundation, Canberra and the American Australian Association. He was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia in 2010 for services to the law, to international business and to the arts.

Jane Walton M Int Bus & Law LLB BTh FAICD

Jane Walton is a lawyer and ethicist who specialises in areas where legal duties and constraints interface with the much greyer area of human ethical judgement and decision making, in particular, corporate governance, board processes and reviews, and issues relating to organisational culture.

Jane's background includes practising as a solicitor in general commercial practice and in law reform. She was one of the founders of the St. James Ethics Centre and served on the board of management for ten years. She has also been a part time Senior Fellow of Melbourne University Law School where she has taught legal ethics to the post graduate Melbourne Juris Doctor students and has significant experience as a professional non executive director. Jane has studied with the Australian Institute of Social Analysis on group and organisational dynamics and Nungalinya College in Darwin on cross cultural issues. She has a Masters of International Business and Law from Sydney University which focussed heavily on cross cultural issues of ethics, culture and legal systems.

Jane is a senior facilitator for the Australian Institute of Company Directors, writing for and teaching the premium programme, Mastering the Board Room, the International CDC Programme in Singapore, Hong Kong and Dubai, and the core Company Director's programmes throughout Australia for over eight years. Jane also teaches the in-house lawyers programme on organisational development for the NSW College of Law, business ethics for the Chartered Secretaries Governance diploma, and in the Australian Graduate School of Management's MBA programme. She is the co-author of the practical guide for company directors, How to Identify and Manage Conflicts of Interests.

Jane is Managing Director of The Walton Group based in Sydney with associates in Brisbane and Melbourne. The Walton Group advises government, public and private sector organisations, company boards and individuals on matters involving governance, particularly for organisations in transition, and on issues relating to board and corporate culture and performance.

The Walton Group is presently expanding to include five new senior advisors who will extend the governance practice to include environmental and sustainability reporting under the latest integrated international GRI framework, further strategic development and HR skills, as well as support in equity raising and M&A activity. With its Hong Kong based partner, the Red Flag Group, The Walton Group is now working with boards and management teams, throughout Australia and Asia, applying multi disciplinary perspectives to build individual and organisational capacity and performance by working to increase the effectiveness of boards and aligning the underlying values, mission, strategy and behaviours, at every level of an organisation's governance and operations.

Weyinmi Popo

Weyinmi Popo's practice is focused on mergers and acquisitions for listed and unlisted companies, equity capital markets, joint ventures, and private equity transactions. He acts for large and medium-sized U.K., U.S., Australian, and multinational companies, private equity funds, and pension/superannuation funds in Australia and overseas. He also advises on Australian corporate law and foreign investment regulations.

Weyinmi recently advised Sumitomo Chemical Company Limited on its A$610 million tender offer to acquire up to 20 percent of Nufarm Limited; Lowe's Companies, Inc. on the establishment of its multimillion Australian home improvement joint venture with Woolworths Limited and on their joint takeover bid to acquire Danks Holdings Limited; Developers Diversified Realty on the redemption of its joint venture interests with Macquarie DDR Trust; Australian Health Management in its A$367 million demutualisation and sale to Medibank Private; and a consortium consisting of Harbour Vest Partners, Paul Capital Partners, Pantheon Ventures, and Partners Group in its A$837 million take-private of Macquarie Capital Group Alliance.

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SCIL seminar series 2011

The Sydney Centre for International Law presents its seminar series on cutting edge developments in public and private international law.

The seminars in the series will be presented by members of the Centre and by other experts including leading judges and practitioners who will share their expertise in key areas of public and private international law of relevance, allowing participants to stay up to date in these rapidly changing fields.

Topics to be addressed include the future of private international law in Australia, the regulation of the offshore oil and gas sector in light of international developments, new UN rules concerning the human rights and corporate activities, the legal implications of an emerging Asia-Pacific community and the ethics of cross-jurisdictional practice.

The seminars are designed to appeal to a broad audience. Lawyers and barristers will be entitled to accrue CPD units for attending the seminars.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please

click here.

Sydney Law School Foundation Reception   View Summary
19 October 2011

Registration

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

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Sydney Law School Foundation Reception

The Sydney Law School Foundation is pleased to dedicate its annual event to the Hon James Spigelman AC QC, celebrating his significant contributions to the law and work for social justice.

This year's Law Foundation Reception will be held on Wednesday 19 October at Sydney Law School from 6.30-8.30pm.

Special guest:
The Honourable James Spigelman AC QC graduated from the University of Sydney in 1967 with a Bachelor of Arts, before going on to complete his LLB in 1971 and receiving the University Medal in Law. Later in his career, the University awarded him an LLD (2004). As a student leader, he took an active role in the 1965 Freedom Rides to rural NSW alongside student activist, Charles Perkins.

While admitted to practise as a solicitor in 1972, he served as Senior Advisor and Principal Private Secretary to the Prime Minister Gough Whitlam until 1975, at which time he was appointed Secretary to the Department of Media. Not commencing his practice at the NSW Bar until three years after his admission there in 1976, he served for several years as a member of the Australian Law Reform Commission and spent some time abroad. While at the Bar, he focused predominantly on constitutional law, administrative law and appellate work. In 1986, James was appointed Queen's Counsel. He then served as Solicitor-General of NSW in 1997 before receiving his appointment as the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of New South Wales in 1998.


On 18 March 2011, James announced his decision to retire as Chief Justice. He retired on 31 May 2011 and was succeeded on the bench by Tom Bathurst QC.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Wojciech Sadurski   View Summary
20 October 2011

"Reason of State" and Public Reason

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"Reason of state" is a concept that is rarely used in contemporary legal and political philosophy (in contrast to everyday parlance); "public reason" is ubiquitous, however, especially in liberal philosophy, as a legitimacy-conferring device. In this paper, written for an international symposium on Reason of State at Tsinghua University Law School in Beijing, Professor Sadurski argues that the unpopularity of the notion of "reason of state" is partly due to its notorious ambiguity. He distinguishes between three different usages of the notion: a "thin" usage (where "reason of state" is equivalent to the common good), an "ironical" usage (where it is used in a pejoratively to denounce a pretext to apply illegitimate or illegal means) and a "pre-emptive" usage (where "reason of state" acts as a legitimate second-order exclusionary reason to override otherwise mandatory first-order rules of action). Professor Sadurski argues that only the "thin" use is helpful, in a by-and-large liberal-democratic context. He then discusses the main (and much more familiar) dilemmas related to the concept of public reason, especially in the most influential, Rawlsian interpretation, and defends the concept against the usual critiques. In the end, he compares the two concepts and argues that a "thin" usage of "reason of state" is functionally equivalent to public reason and that both resonate with the theory of "input democracy" (focusing, as it does, on the legitimacy of reasons - or motivations - for applying coercive rules to individuals). A problematic (and distinguishing) feature of "reason of state" is its emphasis on the state: as a privileged interpreter of such reasons and/or as identifying the range within which the "constituency" of public reason is ascertained. There are good reasons to distrust both of these consequences: the former because of its potentially authoritarian consequences, the latter because of reasons provided by cosmopolitan political conceptions.

About the Speaker

Professor Wojciech Sadurski is Challis Professor in Jurisprudence in the University of Sydney. He also holds a position of Professor in the Centre for Europe in the University of Warsaw, and is visiting professor (in 2010 and 2011) at the University of Trento, Italy and in Cardozo Law School in New York.

He was Professor of Legal Theory and Philosophy of Law in the Department of Law, European University Institute in Florence (1999- 2009). He also taught as visiting professor, at a number of universities in Europe, Asia and the United States. He has written extensively on philosophy of law, political philosophy and comparative constitutional law.

Do directors owe duties to stakeholders?   View Summary
24 October 2011

Registration

To register and secure your online payment please click here.
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Keynote Speaker: Professor Bob Baxt AO

Commentator: Alan Cameron AO

Chair: Professor Jennifer Hill

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Do directors owe duties to stakeholders?

About the seminar:

Corporate governance is now a key issue concerning the way in which directors conduct their business. More and more stakeholders are interested in how companies conduct their affairs and may seek a "remedy" in appropriate circumstances. Judges at times appear to suggest that directors should take into account interests other than those of shareholders, even though they generally do not go so far as to say there is a duty owed by the directors to those other interests.

Many directors worry about the risks they face if they fail to balance the interests of shareholders (the traditional view) with the interests of other stakeholders in the company. Do directors in fact owe such a duty? This seminar will explore these issues and possible reforms.

Keynote Speaker:

Professor Bob Baxt AO has played a number of roles in this extensive legal career including Dean of the Monash Law School in 1980 to 1988, author in the corporate law and competition law fields, chairman of the Trade Practices Commission (the predecessor of the ACCC) and has recently retired as a Partner of Freehills. He has been given the title of Emeritus Partner by the firm. Prior to becoming a Partner at Freehills in 2005, Bob Baxt had been a Partner at Arthur Robinson (later Allens Arthur Robinson) from 1991 to 2005.

Whilst an academic, Professor Baxt helped establish the Company and Securities Law Journal, the Australian Business Law Review and the Journal of Banking and Finance Law. He has been chairman of the Law Committee of the Australian Institute of Company Directors since 1994 and has served as a consultant for the Australian Law Reform Commission on two major references. He has been asked to advice governments at both federal and state levels on a range of issues.

Professor Baxt was honoured in the Queen's Birthday Honours Awards in 2003 by being awarded an Order of Australia for services to the law and has been awarded the Centenary Medal

Commentator:

Alan Cameron AO works principally as a company director, and an advisor on corporate governance and regulatory issues. He is Chairman of National e-Conveyancing Development Limited, Hastings Funds Management Limited , the insurance companies in the BT Financial Group, and of ASX Compliance Pty Limited, and is Deputy Chancellor of the University of Sydney. Alan is a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors.

He was national executive partner of Blake Dawson from 1989 to 1991, and managing partner from 1982 to 1985.He has been the Commonwealth Ombudsman and served for eight years as chairman of the Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) and its predecessor.

Chair: Professor Jennifer Hill

To view a copy of our online brochure, please click here.

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Registration costs:
Full fee: $77 (inc GST)
Sydney Law School alumni: $66 (inc GST)
F/T student: $44 (inc GST)
Special rate applies for 3 or more registrations from one organisation: $55 (inc GST)

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1.25 MCLE/CPD unit. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

2011 Sydney Law School Postgraduate Conference   View Summary
27 October 2011 to 28 October 2011

Register online

To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.

For more event details please refer to the Postgraduate Conference website.

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About the conference

The conference will provide a forum for the discussion of specific legal research projects, as well as an opportunity to explore broader issues around research method, theory, critique and the culture of law.
The conference will take place over two days at the New Law School Building, University of Sydney. Day one will include the key note address and concurrent presentation sessions. Day two will run as a half day and involve a roundtable discussion session about the PhD experience facilitated by relevant academics. Concurrent roundtable discussions of research, method, theory and critique will also take place on day two.

Students are also welcome to attend the conference without presenting.

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Keynote speaker: Professor Gerry Simpson
Professor Simpson holds the Kenneth Bailey Chair of Law at Melbourne Law School, the University of Melbourne, where he is Director of the Asia Pacific Centre for Military Law, and Convenor of The Global Justice Studio. He is also a Visiting Professor of Public International Law at the London School of Economics, where he held a Chair until 2009, and is currently an AFP/Open Society Fellow (based in Tbilisi, Georgia). He is the author of Great Powers and Outlaw States (Cambridge, 2004) and Law, War and Crime: War Crimes Trials and the Reinvention of International Law (Polity 2007).

For further enquiries
Contact Belinda Reeve: law.pgrc@sydney.edu.au

2011 Ross Parsons Address in Taxation and Book Launch   View Summary
27 October 2011

This event is now full. To join a waiting list, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au

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The Ross Parsons Centre for Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law is pleased to announce the 2011 Ross Parsons Address in Taxation Law. This year's lecturer is Professor Dr Wolfgang Schön of Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance (Germany). His topic is the Distinct Equity of the Debt-Equity Distinction.

As part of this event The Hon Justice RF Edmonds, Federal Court of Australia will launch a special anniversary edition of Ross Parson's seminal publication, Income and Taxation in Australia. The evening concludes with a cocktail function generously sponsored by Thomson Reuters.

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2011 Ross Parsons Address in Taxation and Corporate Law

Lecture: The Distinct Equity of the Debt-Equity Distinction

Professor Dr Wolfgang Schön

About the lecture:

Economists and lawyers around the world regard the different tax treatment of debt and equity as a major reason for inefficient and inequitable taxation of cross-border finance. Moreover, the increasing "hybridization" of financial instruments apparently renders the traditional divide between bondholders and shareholders more and more meaningless. Proposals for uniform treatment of debt and equity instruments (seen for example in the ACE proposal from the UK and the CBIT proposal from the US, both considered by the Henry review) are on the rise.

Against this background, the lecture will address the relevant features of the debt/equity divide in corporate law and finance; consider the teleology of this distinction in the context of income taxation, corporate tax, and international tax allocation. The lecture will try to present a fresh view on the underlying policy choices.

Professor Dr Wolfgang Schön

Professor Schön is the Director of Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance, Department of Business and Tax Law, Munich; Vice President of the Max Planck Society; Honorary Professor for Civil Law, Corporate Law and Tax Law, Munich University.

He was the David Tillinghast Lecturer at NYU in 2004; Anton Philips Professor, Tilburg University in 2004/05, has been the International Research Fellow, Oxford University Center for Business Taxation since 2006; Vice-Chair of the Permanent Scientific Committee of the International Fiscal Association since 2008; Visiting Professor, NYU Law School 2009 and 2011; Honorary Doctorate, Université Catholique de Louvain 2009; Co-Editor, World Tax Journal since 2009; Member of the Academia Europaea and the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences.

Book Launch

RW Parsons, Income Taxation in Australia: Principles of Income, Deductibility and Tax Accounting

Facsimile edition of the original 1985 publication

The book will be launched by The Hon Justice RF Edmonds, Federal Court of Australia.

2011 marks the 50th anniversary of Ross Parsons' appointment as a Professor at Sydney Law School, and the 25th anniversary of his retirement. It is also 26 years since the publication of Ross Parsons' authoritative work, Income Taxation in Australia: Principles of Income, Deductibility and Tax Accounting. Those 26 years have cemented its reputation as the leading work on 'the common law' of Australian income tax. The careful reasoning, depth of analysis and the astute insights it contains are still unmatched.

Sydney Law School and Thomson Reuters are marking this occasion by re-publishing Professor Parsons' original book, supplemented by two additional papers written after his retirement - on the High Court decisions in Myer and John, and on the Roberts and Smith judgment.

The Hon Justice RF Edmonds, Federal Court of Australia

Justice Edmonds is one of Australia's leading tax jurists. He was appointed to the Federal Court in May 2005 from the New South Wales Bar. He was called to the Bar in 1985 and was appointed Senior Counsel in 1995. In his practice at the Bar, he appeared in many of the leading tax cases of the last 25 years, including Orica, Hart, Consolidated Press Holdings, Firth, Prestige Motors, Allina, Westfield and Mercantile Credits. As a judge of the Federal Court he has delivered leading judgments in some of the most significant recent cases - including RCI, Ashwick (Qld), Virgin Holdings and Deutsche Asia Pacific Finance- and has been at the forefront of developing the jurisprudence in some of the new areas of Australian tax law such as the GST (Reliance Carpet, South Steyne Hotel and QANTAS) and the corporate consolidation system (Hastie Group).

He graduated from the University of Sydney with Bachelor of Arts and Master of Laws.

To view the event flyer please click here

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Lunchtime Seminar Series with Professor Ken Oliphant,   View Summary
27 October 2011

The Global Unity of the Common Law of Tort

Professor Ken Oliphant is a Director of the Institute for European Tort Law while on leave from the University of Bristol where he is a Professor of Tort Law. Professor Oliphant has published extensively in the fields of European and English tort law and compensation for incapacity.Professor Oliphant is also a member of the European Group on Tort Law and in 2009 was elected to membership of the highly influential American Law Institute.

November
Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Bernhard Schlink   View Summary
3 November 2011

Register online

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Proportionality: the solution that became the problem

Abstract

The modern democratic state fulfils ever more tasks and gets involved in ever more spheres of life. How can individual freedom and equality be protected against this omnipresent state? The solution to the problem is, worldwide, the principle of proportionality. But the principle brought new questions and conflicts; the solution became a problem in itself. The lecture follows this career of the principle of proportionality.

Professor Bernhard Schlink became a Judge at the Constitutional Court of North Rhine-Westphalia in 1988 and a Professor for Public Law and the Philosophy of Law at Humboldt University from 1992 until he retired in 2006.

He is also a celebrated writer who published novels including The Reader(1995) that depicts the story of a German lawyer who has an affair with an older woman. She disappears only to reappear again as a defendant in a war crimes trial.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011. Please click here for program details.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please
click here.

A Not-So-New Eugenics: Harris and Savulescu on human enhancement    View Summary
3 November 2011

The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence presents the lunch seminar:

A Not-So-New Eugenics: Harris and Savulescu on human enhancement

Speaker

Dr Rob Sparrow, Australian Research Council Future Fellow Visiting Fellow, Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, University of Sydney; and, Senior Lecturer, School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies, Monash University.

About the seminar:

In Enhancing Evolution: The Ethical Case for Making Better People (2007), John Harris argues that a proper concern for the welfare of future human beings implies that we are morally obligated to pursue human enhancement. Similarly, in "Procreative Beneficience: Why We Should Select The Best Children" (2001) and in a number of subsequent publications, Julian Savulescu has suggested that we are morally obligated to use genetic (and other) technologies to produce the best children possible. In this seminar Dr Sparrow argues that if we do have such obligations then their implications are much more radical than either Harris or Savulescu admit. There is an uneasy tension in the work of these authors, between their consequentialism and their (apparent) libertarianism when it comes to the rights of individuals to use—or not use—enhancement technologies as they see fit. Only through a very particular and not especially plausible negotiation of the tension between their moral theory and their policy prescriptions can Harris and Savulescu obscure the fact that their philosophies have implications that most people would find profoundly unattractive.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Noel Pearson   View Summary
8 November 2011

Registration

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Noel Pearson is the Director of the Cape York Institute for Policy and Leadership, a regional organisation sitting at the nexus of academia, policy formation and community engagement and providing policy oversight for other Cape York oriented organisations. He was born in Cooktown and spent his early years in Cape York, before attending high school in Brisbane then completing a degree is Laws and History at the University of Sydney.

Mr Pearson has been strongly involved in campaigning for the rights of Cape York Aboriginal people and played a pivotal role in the establishment of the Cape York Land Council in 1990. He also worked on both Native title cases including the historic WIK decision, with the resulting High Court decision is recognised as one of the most important Native Title cases in Australian History.

Throughout the past ten years, Mr Pearson has been involved in many key Indigenous issues including, as a member of the Indigenous Negotiating Team during the drafting of the Native Title Act in 1993. He also participated in the drafting of the Cape York Heads of Agreement for which he and other Cape York leaders were signatories on behalf of Cape York Aboriginal people. This historic agreement ensured an effective cooperative platform between Indigenous, Conservation, Mining and pastoral interests in Cape York.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2011. Please click here for program details.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.
For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please
click here.

JSI Legal Theory at Sydney Series: Alexandre Lefebvre   View Summary
10 November 2011

Human Rights as a Way of Life

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It seems self-evident that the purpose of human rights is to care for other people. They are designed to protect others, criticize power, and realize global social justice. In this seminar, however, Alex Lefebvre proposes to look at human rights the other way around: as a form of self-care. Lefebvre will consider whether their central purpose is to bring about a transformation of the self, or, more pointedly, a transformation of oneself. Understood in this way, human rights would be a medium through which we relate to, improve upon, and care for ourselves.


Alexandre Lefebvre is a lecturer in Government and Philosophy at the University of Sydney. He is the author of The Image of Law: Deleuze, Bergson, Spinoza (Stanford University Press) and co-editor of Bergson, Political, and Religion (Duke University Press). He is presently working on a book titled Human Rights as a Way of Life: on Bergson's Political Philosophy.

Politics of CCTV: trajectory and directions   View Summary
14 November 2011

Register online
To register, please click here

This seminar has been made possible through the generous sponsorship of the NSW Chapter of ASIS International (www.asisnsw.org.au) and Sydney University's Surveillance of Everyday Research Group (http://surveillanceandeveryday.com/).

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About the seminar
Closed circuit television (CCTV) has become ubiquitous in everyday life. Many of our daily movements through urban landscapes are routinely captured by CCTV cameras. This seminar will explore the use and impact of CCTV from different perspectives and consider possible future developments.

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Keynote speaker
Dr Gavin Smith
completed, at the University of Aberdeen, an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded PhD thesis which considered the everyday practices of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) operators as they interacted with mediated spaces through the glassy lens of a video camera and television screen. He holds, from the same university, a Master of Arts degree in Sociology (With First Class Honours) and a Master of Research degree in Social Research Methods (With Distinction).

Gavin is an active member of The Australian Sociological Association, The British Sociological Association, The British Society of Criminology and The Surveillance Studies Network. He is an international collaborator on The New Transparency Project based at Queen's University, Canada, a multi-million dollar Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada-funded cross disciplinary research initiative investigating the social implications of surveillance societies - http://www.sscqueens.org/projects/the-new-transparency and is on the editorial board of the international journal, Surveillance and Society- http://www.surveillance-and-society.org/ojs/index.php/journal.

Guest speakers
Meg Mundell
is an author, journalist and PhD candidate (University of Western Sydney) with a keen interest in place, social justice and power relations. Her first novel, BLACK GLASS (Scribe, 2011), is set in a near-future city ruled by surveillance, class divisions, and the covert manipulation of public space. Gaining favourable reviews in major newspapers both here and in NZ, BLACK GLASS has helped re-ignite public discussions about the impact on surveillance on everyday life, especially for more vulnerable people. Meg's journalism has appeared in The Age, Sydney Morning Herald, The Monthly, New Matilda and The Big Issue. She has published fiction in Best Australian Stories, New Australian Stories, Meanjin, Sleepers Almanac, Eureka Street and other collections.

Steve Van Zwieten iscurrently the Managing Director of Exact Security which provides security solutions to businesses. Prior to setting up Exact Security in September 2010,Steve wasthe General Manager of ATMAAC International.Hehsbeen involved in the provision and management of security services at licensed premises for the past twenty five years. In 2004, hewas appointed to the position of General Manager of Penrith Panthers and was previously the Director of Security and Surveillance of the Panthers Group.

Steve has also held the positions of Senior Regional Vice President of ASIS International (2002-2009), Vice Chairman of the ASIS International Security Gaming and Wagering Council and Chairman of the Australasian Security Gaming and Wagering Sub Committee.He isa current member of Australasian Security Professional Council and Vice President and Board member of Security Providers of Australia Associated Limited.

Chair: Garner Clancey

Postponed - Training course: Working with clients with complex needs   View Summary
22 November 2011 to 23 November 2011

Unfortunately, due to unforeseen circumstances the Working with Complex Needs training course scheduled for 22 and 23 November 2011 has been cancelled. It is anticipated that this course will be offered in 2012 (possibly in a modified form). Relevant information about the re-scheduled training course will be provided through CrimNet, the Sydney Law School E-News and on the website of the Sydney Institute of Criminology in the coming months.

Registrations are currently closed for this course. For further enquiries, please contact Garner Clancey:garner.clancey@sydney.edu.au.

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The Community Restorative Centre (CRC) is offering a 2 day training workshop for community workers engaged in working with clients caught up in the criminal justice system who present with complex needs.

The aim of this 2 day training package is to provide community workers with both theory and practise strategies for working with clients with complex needs. The training is focussed on the interaction between drug and alcohol use, cognitive impairment, mental health, trauma and involvement in the criminal justice system.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course participants will:

  • Identify the key features of 'complex needs' clients and understand the difference between complex and multiple needs
  • Have a working knowledge of the relationship between alcohol, drug use, cognitive impairment and mental health problems and practise some interventions which can be used with this client group.
  • Begin to think critically about the role of diagnosis in working with complex needs clients.
  • Develop an understanding of cognitive impairment, mental health, personality disorder and identify some of the common features.
  • Understand different models and approaches used in working with the client group, including: trauma informed practice, the good lives model, positive behavioural support , mindfulness and inclusive practice.
  • Identify what is meant by challenging behaviour, and begin to think critically about the extent to which challenging behaviour is defined in some ways by our own expectations

Registration fees

Full fee: $300 (inc GST)

F/T student: $200 (inc GST)

University of Sydney staff: $240 (inc GST)

Sydney Law School alumni: $240 (inc GST)

Julius Stone Address 2011 - Professor Leslie Green   View Summary
23 November 2011

Online registration
To register your attendance click here.

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A democratic constitution: the basics


Can a legal order be both constitutional and democratic? It can if the constitution fulfils three basic tasks: if it constitutes a democratic people, if it empowers that people, and if it protects popular power. Other much-discussed matters, including the role of judicial review and representative government, are of importance only through their connection to these basics.

This event is generously sponsored by the Educational Heritage Foundation


Professor Leslie Green
Leslie Green is the Professor of the Philosophy of Law at the University of Oxford and Pauline and Max Gordon Fellow of Balliol College. He also holds a part-time appointment as Professor of Law and Distinguished University Fellow at Queen's University, Canada. After beginning his teaching career at Lincoln College, Oxford, Professor Green moved to Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. He has visited and taught at many other law faculties, including Berkeley, Columbia, NYU, Chicago and, for some years, at the University of Texas at Austin. He writes and teaches in the areas of jurisprudence, moral and political philosophy and constitutional theory. He serves on the board of many law journals and is co-editor of Oxford Studies in the Philosophy of Law.

This event will be chaired by Dr Kevin Walton

To view a copy of the event brochure, please click here.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.


Human Rights: Old Dichotomies Revisited    View Summary
25 November 2011 to 26 November 2011

Registration

This event is now full.To join a waiting list, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au

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The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence and the Sydney Centre for International Law are pleased to announce a major conference being held in November 2011.

The purpose of this conference will be to reflect upon the traditional, 'classical' dilemmas and taxonomies in the philosophy of human rights, in the light of recent developments in theories of rights and in the international law of human rights. We all have been taught, and have taught, a number of traditional dichotomies that have been entrenched in theories of human rights for a number of decades: moral versus legal, positive versus negative, first-generation versus second- (and third- ) generation; vertical (against the state) versus horizontal (against other citizens); universal versus relative (or particular); judicially-enforced versus legislatively-protected, etc. Have these dichotomies retained their validity and only the circumstances of their practical applications been altered or have they outgrown their validity altogether?

There have been important developments in the philosophy of human rights and in the international law of human rights, both of which may shed a new light on the dilemmas encapsulated by these (and other) dichotomies.

The conference will bring together the leading international and Australian scholars in jurisprudence and in international human-rights law who will be asked to reflect upon the relevance (or otherwise) of the traditional "dichotomies" at the end of the first decade of the 21st Century.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Professor Tom Campbell, Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics (CAPPE)
  • Professor Leslie Green, Oxford University
  • Professor David Kinley, University of Sydney
  • Professor Susan Marks, London School of Economics
  • Professor Thomas Pogge, Yale University and CAPPE
  • Professor Jeremy Waldron, New York University & Oxford University
  • Professor Neil Walker, University of Edinburgh

Program

Click here for a copy of the program.Click here for abstract details.

Registration

Full fee: $200 inc GST

Concession: $120 inc GST(Alumni/ FT Academic / NGO)
F/T student: $20 inc GST

To express interest or for further information, please contact:

Professor Wojciech Sadurski or Dr Kevin Walton, Sydney Law School

Email: law.jsi@sydney.edu.au

The conference will be organised jointly by JSI (Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence) and SCIL (Sydney Centre for International Law) at Sydney Law School, with CAPPE (Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics) as the co-organiser. It will be prepared by a program committee, chaired by Wojciech Sadurski, with Tom Campbell, David Kinley, Euan MacDonald and Kevin Walton as members. The organising committee will be chaired by Kevin Walton, Director of Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence.

The Paul Byrne lecture   View Summary
28 November 2011

Waitlist now available

Due to the overwhelming interest in this event, registrations have now closed. We are happy however to include your details on our waitlist and contact you if places become available. If you would like to be placed on the waitlist, please register your details below.

Please click here tobe placed on the waitlist.

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Guest Speaker: The Hon Michael Kirby AC CMG

Paul Byrne SC graduated in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney, and worked with the Public Solicitor's Office as a solicitor. He became a barrister in 1979, and was appointed a public defender. In 1983 he was awarded a Master of Laws degree with First Class Honours, and was awarded a University Medal. He was appointed Director of the Criminal Law Review Division and a Commissioner of the New South Wales Law Reform Commission. In 1995 he took silk and continued an outstanding career as an advocate, taking on the toughest cases, in courts at all levels, with a deep sense of responsibility and the utmost commitment to justice and fair process.

This lecture will honour Paul Byrne who had a life long interest in the criminal law and the criminal justice system, as well as his active participation and generous support of the Institute of Criminology at the Sydney Law School.

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The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund

The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund has been set upto honour and continue Paul's interest in the criminal justice system by supporting the ongoing activities of the Institute of Criminology, such as lectures, seminars, publications, and awards.

Attendees of the Paul Byrne lecture are warmly invited to make a donation to The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund. Gifts to The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund support the activities of the Sydney Institute of Criminology and other activities in the field of criminal law at Sydney Law School, in memory of the late Paul Byrne SC.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Spend less and reduce crime: hear how this is done in the United States   View Summary
29 November 2011

Registration

To register your attendance click here

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International guest speaker, Steve Aos, Director of the Washington State Institute for Public Policy, will discuss the Institute's criminal justice research findings, and how they believe that the key to success is to think more generally about crime.

The Institute is responsible for conducting practical, non-partisan research at legislative direction on issues of importance to Washington State.

Mr Aos explains that what citizens want is less crime and less taxpayer spending.

Washington State has learned that only by thinking of the criminal justice system as a whole - from prevention, juvenile justice to adult corrections and sentencing - can one allocate resources across 'silos' in such a way to achieve those goals.

This seminar will be attended by Minister for Justice and Attorney General, Greg Smith.

Steve Aos has 35 years of experience conducting cost-benefit analyses and communicating the results to policymakers in a wide range of public policy areas, as well as in the private sector. His current work at Washington State Institute for Public Policy focuses on identifying and evaluating the costs and benefits of programs and policies that reduce crime, improve K-12 educational outcomes, reduce child abuse and neglect, improve mental health and reduce substance

abuse. Steve also has many years of experience in energy economics and regulatory policy.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to2 MCLE/CPD unit. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

Doing Drugs: The ethics, economics and politics of national and international medicines policies   View Summary
29 November 2011

The Centre for Values, Ethics and the law in Medicine,Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics, Department of Pharmacology and theAustralian Institute of Health Innovation, University of New South Wales present:

Doing Drugs: The ethics, economics and politics of national and international medicines policies

Medicines play an important role in the prevention and treatment of many diseases. At the same time, however, they can have serious adverse effects (>140,000 Australians are admitted to hospital every year for problems related to medicine) and are expensive (PBS expenditure in 2009 was $7679.3 million). The principal challenge, therefore, is to design systems and policies that enable equitable access to the medicines that people need, that ensure their safety and quality, and that do so at a cost that individuals and the community can afford. This is not straightforward task, however, and around the globe governments struggle to respond to global economic constraints, increasing drug costs, rapid developments in biotechnology-based pharmaceuticals, aging populations, changes to intellectual property rights, changing consumer expectations, and the globalisation of clinical research and drug development.

This symposium, which is presented by the Centre forValues, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, The Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics and the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Sydney and the Australian Institute of Health Innovation at the University of NSW, addresses some of the challenges confronting the development of medicines policy in Australian and internationally. Speakers include eminent scholars from a range of disciplines, including public health, pharmacology, sociology, health economics, bioethics, politics and consumer advocacy.

December
JSI Guest Speakers Series: Professor Kunal Parker    View Summary
6 December 2011

Common Law, History, and Democracy in America, 1790 - 1900

Speaker: Professor Kunal Parker, University of Miami

To registerclick here

In the book from which this talk is derived, Professor Parker will argue for a change in our understanding of the relationships among law, politics, and history in nineteenth century America. Since the turn of the nineteenth century, a certain anti-foundational conception of history has served to undermine law's foundations, such that we tend to think of law as nothing other than a species of politics. This is the tendency inaugurated by the writings of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. When law is thus viewed, the activity of unelected common law judges appears to be an encroachment on the space of democracy. This was precisely the view adopted by critics of the common law in early twentieth century America. It remains our view and, indeed, has shaped the modern writing of American legal history. Professor Parker argues, however, that the world of thenineteenth century looked rather different. Democracy itself was constrained by the sense thathistory possessed a logic, meaning and direction thatdemocracy could not contravene. In such a world, far from seeing law in opposition to democracy, it was possible to argue that law--specifically, the common law -- often did a better job than democracy of guiding America along history's path. What might be the implications for our own understanding of taking nineteenth century understandings of the relationships among law, history, and democracy on their own terms?

JSI Guest Speakers Series: Professor Grimm    View Summary
13 December 2011

The National Constitution and the Internationalization of Law

Speaker:Professor Dieter Grimm, Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin

To register click here

In this seminar, Professor Grimm will examine the nature of national constitutions prior to the process of internationalisation.He will then consider the ways in which this process has affected these constitutions. In particular, he will ask whether and, if so, how it has had a different impact on the constitutions ofthe United States and Europe. He will also explore the possibility of constitutionalisation at the international level.

About the speaker

Dieter Grimm studied Jurisprudence and Political Science in Frankfurt, Freiburg, Berlin, Paris, and Harvard. From 1967 to 1979, he was a Research Lecturer at the Max Planck Institute for European Legal History in Frankfurt and, from 1979, Professor for Public Law at Bielefeld University, where he was also Director of the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research. From 1987 to 1999, Dieter Grimm was a Justice on the Federal Constitutional Court. In 1996, he was appointed Distinguished Member of the Global Law Faculty at New York University Law School and, in 1999, was awarded the Major Federal Service Cross with Sash and Star. In 2000, he was appointed Professor of Public Law at the Humboldt University of Berlin and a Permanent Fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. From October 2001 until March 2007 he was also the Rector of the Wissenschaftskolleg.

Beyond Punishment - Authority, Legitimacy, and Professionalism: Private or Public Sector Prisons?   View Summary
15 December 2011

Registrations for this event are now closed

Due to an overwhelming number of registrations now received for this event, we have had to close registrations. For more information, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au.

We sincerely apologise for the inconvenience.

Speaker

Alison Liebling, Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, England

This event is being run as part of the Beyond Punishment seminar series sponsored by Corrective Services NSW. This event is also sponsored by The GEO Group Australia Pty Ltd and Urbis.

About the seminar:

What does the evidence tell us about the relative quality, legitimacy and professionalism of public versus private sector prisons? This seminar reports on the findings from a detailed Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded evaluation of four private and two public sector prisons in England and Wales. Two private sector prisons appeared in the lowest end of a quality spectrum, and two at the highest end, complicating any simplistic argument that 'private is better'. Drawing on well validated measures of the moral and social climate of prisons, clear strengths and weaknesses were found in each sector. In particular, there were variations in the professional use of authority by staff. Distinctive power distributions in each sector generated different types of penal order, leading to different outcomes. The evaluation, and its developmental methodology, help to clarify our understanding of prison life, quality and effects, and suggests that some public sector strengths are overlooked in contemporary policymaking. It also raises critical questions about the purpose, uses, effects and management of prisons as well as 'what matters' in evaluation.

About the Speaker:

Alison Liebling is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Cambridge and the Director of the Institute of Criminology's Prisons Research Centre. She is regarded as a leading prisons scholar, a pioneer in the use of Appreciative Inquiry in prisons research, and a specialist in the study of prison suicide, privatisation, the work of prison officers, and the management of prisoners. Professor Richard Harding said in a recent review that 'no-one is more knowledgeable than Professor Liebling in the English-speaking world of research into prison issues'. She has published several books, including Suicides in Prison (1992), Prisons and their Moral Performance: A Study of Values, Quality and Prison Life (2004), The Effects of Imprisonment ((with Shadd Maruna, 2005), and recently, a second edition of the Prison Officer (2010). She has also published widely in criminological journals, and is co-editor-in-chief of Punishment and Society: The International Journal of Penology. Alison's recently completed study of public and private sector prisons, with Dr Ben Crewe, was rated by two reviewers as 'outstanding', with comments including, 'the quality of analysis is strong. The collection of the data was impeccable'. She has also recently completed a repeat study of the nature and quality of staff-prisoner relationships at Whitemoor high security prison, described as: 'a genuine tour de force, a carefully crafted and sophisticated academic analysis, based on painstaking fieldwork …'. It was noted that the developmental methodology and analysis used in the public-private sector study 'could readily be applied to all areas of public policy service delivery via the public and the private sector, particularly relating to closed institutions (psychiatric wards, juvenile institutions, police cells', hospitals and care homes).

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For further details see: http://www.crim.cam.ac.uk/people/academic_research/alison_liebling/