All future 2012 events

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January
Australasian Tax Teachers Association Conference 2012   View Summary
16 January 2012 to 18 January 2012

Register online

To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.

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Tax change: convergence or divergence
Hosted by Sydney Law School and the University of Sydney Business School, Sydney, Australia

The Sydney Law School and the University of Sydney Business School are proud to be hosting the annual Australasian Tax Teachers Association Conference for 2012 from 16-18 January 2012.


The 2012 conference boasts strong international and comparative tax streams with additional focus areas such as the tax reform, tax compliance, and impact of tax on charities, the environment, natural disaster, crime, and business.

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Please note: Early bird rates has now been extended to until 14 December

Early bird to14 December 2011: $495 inc GST
Full fee (after 14 December): $530 in GST

Accompanying Person
Welcome reception: $45
Dinner: $125
Farewell and tennis: $20

Conference Program

The conference program will be available shortly. Please refer to the ATTA Conference website for details

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to12 MCLE/CPD units. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, pleaseclick here.

Comparative CPTED Conference   View Summary
24 January 2012

To register please click here

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About the conference

The Sydney Institute of Criminology (University of Sydney) is hosting a one-day Comparative CPTED Conference on 24 January 2012. This one-day conference will explore recent developments in CPTED practice and theory and will bring together an exciting array of academics and practitioners from England, New Zealand, Western Australia, Victoria, Queensland and other locations. National trends and local case studies will reveal different approaches and innovative developments in CPTED practice from numerous jurisdictions.

This conference will consider (amongst other things):

  • The Secured by Design initiative in England
  • The use of civilian built environmental professionals by the Greater Manchester Police in CPTED assessments
  • Urban renewal and CPTED approaches in New Zealand
  • The use of CPTED by planning professionals in Western Australia
  • The relationship between security risk assessment and CPTED
  • The design and management of parks according to CPTED principles
  • Implementing CPTED recommendations and the challenges facing local government
  • The role of police in CPTED

This conference will be of particular interest to:

  • Crime Prevention/Community Safety Officers
  • Crime prevention consultants
  • Police
  • Planners
  • Urban designers
  • Architects
  • Local government personnel
  • Criminology and built environment students, researchers and academics

Conference presenters include:

Dr Rachel Armitage (Reader (Criminology) and Deputy Director of the Applied Criminology Centre University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom)

Ms Leanne Monchuk (Research Assistant, Applied Criminology Centre University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom)

Dr Paul Cozens (Senior Research Fellow, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia)

Tony Lake (International Chair, International CPTED Association)

Chris Butler (Urban Designer, Harrison Grierson Consultants Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand)

Nicholas Martin (Director, Occams Razor, Security Risk Management Consultancy)

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The conference program is now available -click here

Food and refreshments will be provided throughout the day and drinks and canapés served at the conclusion of the conference.

Venue

Lecture Theatre 026,

Level 0, New LawAnnex(F10A)

Sydney Law School

Eastern Avenue
University of Sydney
(Camperdown campus)

To locate Lecture Theatre 026
The New Law Annex Building (F10A) is the triangular building adjacent to the main law building, closest to Eastern Avenue. Easiest access to Lecture Theatre 026, located on Level 0 of the Teaching Annex, is from the entrance on Eastern Avenue concourse, next to the café (Taste Baguette). Take the stairs or lifts to level 0 and follow the signs. From the carpark, please use lifts number 3 and 4 (on the City Rd side) for easiest access.

Registration*:
Full fee: $200 inc GST
F/T student: $130 inc GST
Sydney Law School alumni: $160 inc GST
University of Sydney staff: $160 inc GST

Discounts will be granted for group bookings of four or more people from the same organisation. For further enquires about these discountsor theconference,contact:Garner Clancey.

Discounts will be granted for group bookings of four or more people from the same organisation. Enquiries about these discounts or pertaining to any other matters in relation to this conference should be directed to Garner Clancey (garner.clancey@sydney.edu.au).

MCLE/LPDpoints will be advised on finalisation of the program.

Comparative CPTED Conference   View Summary
24 January 2012

To register please click here

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About the conference

The Sydney Institute of Criminology (University of Sydney) is hosting a one-day Comparative CPTED Conference on 24 January 2012. This one-day conference will explore recent developments in CPTED practice and theory and will bring together an exciting array of academics and practitioners from England, New Zealand, Western Australia, Victoria, Queensland and other locations. National trends and local case studies will reveal different approaches and innovative developments in CPTED practice from numerous jurisdictions.

This conference will consider (amongst other things):

  • The Secured by Design initiative in England
  • The use of civilian built environmental professionals by the Greater Manchester Police in CPTED assessments
  • Urban renewal and CPTED approaches in New Zealand
  • The use of CPTED by planning professionals in Western Australia
  • The relationship between security risk assessment and CPTED
  • The design and management of parks according to CPTED principles
  • Implementing CPTED recommendations and the challenges facing local government
  • The role of police in CPTED

This conference will be of particular interest to:

  • Crime Prevention/Community Safety Officers
  • Crime prevention consultants
  • Police
  • Planners
  • Urban designers
  • Architects
  • Local government personnel
  • Criminology and built environment students, researchers and academics

Conference presenters include:

Dr Rachel Armitage (Reader (Criminology) and Deputy Director of the Applied Criminology Centre University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom)

Ms Leanne Monchuk (Research Assistant, Applied Criminology Centre University of Huddersfield, United Kingdom)

Dr Paul Cozens (Senior Research Fellow, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia)

Tony Lake (International Chair, International CPTED Association)

Chris Butler (Urban Designer, Harrison Grierson Consultants Ltd, Auckland, New Zealand)

Nicholas Martin (Director, Occams Razor, Security Risk Management Consultancy)

______________________________________________________________

The conference program is now available -click here

Food and refreshments will be provided throughout the day and drinks and canapés served at the conclusion of the conference.

Venue

Lecture Theatre 026,

Level 0, New LawAnnex(F10A)

Sydney Law School

Eastern Avenue
University of Sydney
(Camperdown campus)

To locate Lecture Theatre 026
The New Law Annex Building (F10A) is the triangular building adjacent to the main law building, closest to Eastern Avenue. Easiest access to Lecture Theatre 026, located on Level 0 of the Teaching Annex, is from the entrance on Eastern Avenue concourse, next to the café (Taste Baguette). Take the stairs or lifts to level 0 and follow the signs. From the carpark, please use lifts number 3 and 4 (on the City Rd side) for easiest access.

Registration*:
Full fee: $200 inc GST
F/T student: $130 inc GST
Sydney Law School alumni: $160 inc GST
University of Sydney staff: $160 inc GST

Discounts will be granted for group bookings of four or more people from the same organisation. For further enquires about these discountsor theconference,contact:Garner Clancey.

Discounts will be granted for group bookings of four or more people from the same organisation. Enquiries about these discounts or pertaining to any other matters in relation to this conference should be directed to Garner Clancey (garner.clancey@sydney.edu.au).

MCLE/LPDpoints will be advised on finalisation of the program.

February
4th ANJeL Australia-Japan Business Law Seminar (Tokyo)   View Summary
11 February 2012

Registration

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

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About the conference:

The fourth ANJeL CLE Seminar aimed, especially at Australian practitioners in Japan, as well as Japanese practitioners interested in Australian law and the economy, introduces new Australian developments in labour law and consumer law, including dispute resolution aspects, comparing also some developments in Japanese law and practice.

Program:

2-3.15pm: Developments in Australian labour law - Professor Joellen Riley.
3.15-3.45pm: Commentary and Q&A - Peter Coney, Herbert Smith.
3.45-4pm: Break.
4-4.40pm: The 'Australian Consumer Law' 2010 -Professor Luke Nottage, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney

4.40-5.30pm: Commentary and Q&A - ProfessorSouichirou Kozuka, Gakushuin University, Law Faculty

Guest speakers:

  • Professor Joellen Riley, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney
  • ProfessorLuke Nottage, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney
  • Peter Coney, Herbert Smith, Tokyo
  • Professor Souichirou Kozuka, Gakushuin University, Tokyo

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To view the event flyer please click here

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 3 MCLE/CPD unit. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.

The privileges and immunities of international organisations    View Summary
16 February 2012

The privileges and immunities of international organisations - the adoption of the Waite and Kennedy Doctrine by Domestic Courts

Most constituent instruments of international organisations provide that they shall enjoy those privileges and immunities which are necessary for the fulfilment of their purposes or functions. Because separate multilateral privileges and immunities agreements often provide for unqualified 'immunity from legal process' international organizations usually enjoy de facto absolute immunity from suit. In its 1999 landmark judgment Waite and Kennedyv. Germany (and Beer and Regan v. Germany), the European Court of Human Rights held that the right of access to court under Article 6 of the European Convention on Human Rights might be restricted for legitimate purposes, such as protecting the independent functioning of an international organisation. However, such limitations were only legitimate and permissible if they were proportionate. In the Court's view, the proportionality of the grant of immunity depended upon the availability of 'reasonable alternative means.'

Over the last decade, this reasoning was followed by a number of domestic courts in Europe, which increasingly questioned the wide-ranging jurisdictional immunities of international organization. The influence of the Waite and Kennedy judgment is particularly fascinating in an area where traditional immunities under public international and human rights clash at a time of increasing calls for more accountability of international organisations. It also demonstrates the growing willingness of domestic courts to engage in applying and interpreting international law.

About the Speaker

August Reinisch is professor of international and European law at the University of Vienna. He currently serves as arbitrator on the In Rem Restitution Panel according to the Austrian General Settlement Fund Law 2001 on a pro bono basis. As of 2010 he is Dean for International Relations of the Law School of the University of Vienna.

His professional experience includes acting as expert adviser in Austrian and foreign court litigation as well as international arbitration; he was a Member of the ILA Committee on International Law on Foreign Investment, and he is a member of the ILA Study Groups on Accountability of International Organisations, State Insolvency, and the Role of Soft-Law Instruments in International Investment Law. He is president of the Austrian Branch of the ILA, Executive Board member of the European Society of International Law and of the German Society of International Law, as well as member of ASIL, ACUNS and other professional associations in the field of international law.

He has published widely in international law with a recent focus on international investment law, the law of international organizations, international responsibility, human rights and non-state actors.

August Reinisch holds Master's degrees in philosophy (1990) and in law (1988) as well as a doctorate in law (1991) from the University of Vienna and an LL.M. (1989) from NYU Law School. He is admitted to the Bar of New York and Connecticut (since 1990).

International law and the periphery   View Summary
17 February 2012 to 19 February 2012

Registration has closed.

The conference is now full.

Online registrations are only accepted for those paying by credit card for this event. The full conference rate is AUD$58 or EGP 320 per person payable in advance. Registration is free of charge for those with a confirmed speaking or chairing role in the program

To register and organise payment on site, please contact Fleur Johns, email: fleur.johns@sydney.edu.au or Thomas Skouteris email: tskouteris@aucegypt.edu.

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One year on from the "Arab Spring", join us in Cairo to explore contemporary geographies of international law. You are invited to reflect anew upon the "cores" and "peripheries" of international legal knowledge and practice in the face of recent structural shifts. Where (if anywhere) are they located today? Does international law project a disciplinary periphery, or several? Who or what occupies international legal peripheries today and what does peripheral status imply? What may be at stake in the mapping of cores and peripheries? Are there cores in the peripheral and vice versa? To what extent, if at all, do core-periphery dynamics in international law channel development and reform? Long associated with dependency theory, world systems theory and geographical analyses of trade, core-periphery schematics have nonetheless informed international legal thought, argument and policy-making in a wide range of ways. This conference will enable scholars of law and related disciplines to revisit core-periphery dynamics in global governance, in both their symbolic and their material dimensions, and contribute to their re-imagining for the current age.


Co-hosted by the American University in Cairo Law Department and Sydney Law School at the University of Sydney, this conference will afford both established and emergent scholars working in or around the international legal field an invigorating opportunity to explore the foregoing theme.

The Call for Papers and Panels submission process is now closed. We would like to thank everyone for the overwhelming response, leading to receipt of nearly 100 abstracts and half a dozen panel proposals. The Program of the conference will be posted within the next two weeks. All those who have made submissions will be advised of the outcome before that time.

Surveillance and/in Everyday Life Conference   View Summary
20 February 2012 to 21 February 2012

Registration

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

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The University of Sydney's Surveillance and Everyday Life Research Group is hosting a two-day international conference entitled, Surveillance and/in Everyday Life: Monitoring Pasts, Presents and Futures. The event, to be held in The University of Sydney's state of the art Law School Building, will bring together key international scholars, policy makers, practitioners, artists and social commentators to discuss the social, cultural, historical, political, legal, economic and technical dimensions of surveillance. Few topics have greater contemporary public relevance and social significance than the increased monitoring and visibility of everyday living and the emergent surveillance capacities of new information communication technologies and organizational practices.


The Surveillance and Everyday Life Research Group project brings together a number of early career, mid career and distinguished scholars from across The University of Sydney to critically and collaboratively examine the everyday production and experience of surveillance, and to explore the multitude of thematics emanating from the transactional interplays and exchanges among organizations, technologies and individuals.

About the conference

The intensification and diversification of surveillance in recent decades has been remarkable. CCTV cameras, private investigators, loyalty cards, body scanners, DNA swabs, RFID tags, Web 2.0 platforms/protocols and internet cache cookies constitute only some of the many instruments facilitating the routine extraction and collection of personal information.

Advancement in technological applications, and wider cultures of risk, uncertainty, distrust and consumption, have all helped to legitimate and naturalize surveillance as a multi-purpose tool in the everyday lives of individuals and organizations. Yet, whilst surveillance seems increasingly embedded in the physical and cultural fabric of contemporary living, and whilst surveillance today is qualitatively and quantitatively different from previous modes, it is by nomeans a novel phenomenon. From time immemorial, detailed records have been accumulated on the health, morality, cognitive development, motivations, sexualities, incomes, work activities and whereabouts of certain populations - not to mention on animal relations, planetary constellations, environmental conditions, and the like. In the past, as in the present, forms of life have been and are targeted by a polymerous array of monitoring and recording devices. Moreover, surveillance as a mode of social regulation, a cultural medium, a symbolic resource and a companion species is set to further dominate the political, economic and socio-cultural landscapes of future human societies and social assemblages; but with what implications for social justice, social relations and subjectivities? This conference critically considers the significance of everyday surveillance in relation to temporality, exploring the changing nature of surveillance as it relates to cultural specificities, past transformations, present landscapes and possible/emergent futures.

Confirmed keynote conference presenters include:

* Professor David Lyon, Queen's University, Canada
* Professor Kevin Haggerty, University of Alberta, Canada
* Professor Pat O'Malley, University of Sydney, Australia


There will also be a specialist 'anecdotal' roundtable keynote featuring leading surveillance practitioners, commentators and dissenters.


Program

Click here for a copy of the conference program.

Security Solutions Magazine is kindly acknowledged as the publications sponsor for this conference.

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Food and refreshments will be provided throughout the day and drinks and canapés served in the evening of 20 February 2012.


Registration fees:
Full fee: $220 (inc. GST)
F/T student: $50 (inc. GST)

MCLE/LPD points will be advised on finalisation of the program.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Nicholas Bala   View Summary
22 February 2012

Registration

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

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Professor Nicholas Bala of Queens University, Kingston, Ontario will deliver the first lecture as part of the SydneyLaw School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012. The title of the lecture will be 2011 Family Law Amendments and family violence: Has Parliament finally got it right?

Australia's post-separation parenting legislation is among the most complex and frequently amended laws of its kind in the world. The complexity and frequency of amendment are inter-related, as it is profoundly challenging to address a very broad range of cases by detailed directive legislation.

The 2006 reforms had significant positive effects, encouraging dispute resolution outside the courts. The 2011 amendments aim to address some problems created by the 2006 reforms, by dealing more effectively with family violence and ensuring that shared parental care is not used inappropriately, broadening the definition of family violence and giving priority to a child's safety over maintaining a relationship with both parents.

Despite its length and detail, the 2011 law does not give clear guidance for making complex decisions, often in a context of factual uncertainty and difficulty in predicting the future. All family justice professionals, including judges, must understand the risks posed by family violence, as well as the need for differentiated approaches to parenting plans when it is alleged. Although safety of children must be a priority, professionals must make individualised assessments that consider the '5Ps of family violence'.They must also take account of the stage of the proceedings and the resources available to ensure safety. They must also address the challenge of false or exaggerated allegations of family violence, as well as of false denials by perpetrators and false recantations by victims. Effective responses to family violence and other parenting issues depend more on public and professional education, resources, professional practices and research than on legislation. It is important to recognize both the value of a good legislative framework for family violence cases and its limitations.

Nicholas Bala is a leading Canadian expert on issues related to children, youth and families in the justice system, and a Law Professor at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada. Much of his research work is interdisciplinary, collaborating with psychologists, social workers, criminologists and health professionals to better understand how the law and the justice system should address such issues as parental rights and responsibilities after divorce, including parental alienation; spousal abuse and its effects on children, young offenders, child witnesses and child abuse. Nick has published extensively in journals in law, medicine, psychology and social work. His work is often quoted by all levels of court in Canada, including the Supreme Court of Canada, and has also been cited by courts in the United States and Britain.


This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012. Click here for the latest program information.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

The inter-American system for the protection of human rights: challenges for the future   View Summary
23 February 2012

Speaker: Claudio Grossman, Dean

American University Washington College of Law

To register click here

The Inter-American system for the protection of human rights involves norms of institutions that establish human rights obligations and supervisory organs for the 35 nations of the Western hemisphere. This presentation will examine the role of the system throughout history in fighting dictatorships and authoritarian regimes, within the process of democratic transitions, and in addressing challenges that lie ahead. It will also examine the methodologies utilized by the system, e.g., visits in loco, cases, the role of the supervisory organs within the context of a vibrant civil society, and the system's role in addressing issues such as impunity, the rights of vulnerable groups, due process and political rights, among others. The presentation will further examine the continuing validity and legitimacy of the human rights tradition vis-à-vis the expansion and implementation of rights.

CLAUDIO GROSSMAN is the Dean of American University Washington College of Law, Professor of Law and the Raymond Geraldson Scholar for International and Humanitarian Law. Since his appointment as Dean in 1995, WCL has further developed its intellectual creativity, pursuing numerous and exciting initiatives such as dual degree programs, summer and semester abroad programs, local summer programs and institutes, the LL.M. in Law and Government Program, LL.M. in Advocacy, new LL.M. specializations, joint LLM/MBA degree, the S.J.D. Program, the Supervised Externship Program, the Center on International Commercial Arbitration, the Intellectual Property Program, new clinics, and integrated sections and electives within the first year curriculum.

Dean Grossman is currently the Chair of the United Nations Committee against Torture. He is a member of the Governing Board of the International Association of Law Schools, member of the Board of the Inter-American Institute of Human Rights, and member of the International Objectives Committee of the Association of American Law Schools. Grossman is also serving as a referee in peer review evaluations for the European Research Council Dedicated Implementation Structure, under the Ideas Specific Programme, until 2013. He was a member of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights from 1993-2001, where he served in numerous capacities including President (1996-97; 2001), the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Women (1996-2000), and the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Populations (2000-2001). Dean Grossman is the author of numerous publications regarding international law and human rights and the recipient of numerous awards for his work in those fields including the 2010 Henry W. Edgerton Civil Liberties Award from the American Civil Liberties Union of the National Capital Area and the 2012 Deborah L. Rhode Award from the Association of American Law Schools' Section on Pro Bono and Public Service Opportunities.

Smart rules and regimes: legal design towards regulating innovation   View Summary
29 February 2012

Registration

To register click here

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Technological innovation, presents us with both new opportunities and new risks, with increasing speed and impact. What role can law play in fostering the opportunities while providing safeguards against the risks? This is the challenge of 'smart rules and regimes', achieving topicality of legal regulation while balancing interests involved; being adaptable and robust at the same time. What legal approach is necessary to meet regulatory needs? In the seminar some first thoughts are presented on the possibilities of a legal design methodology which, apart from offering guidelines to regulation in general could perhaps be dedicated especially to innovative areas of legal regulation, where traditional 'copy paste' legal methods may not suffice. As such, both the aspect of the internal structure of norms as the external regulatory context of rulesand regimes, are addressed.

About the speaker

Michiel A. Heldeweg (1957; LLM Groningen, 1985; PhD Maastricht, 1993) is full professor of Public Governance Law at the faculty of Management & Governance (MB) and the institute for Innovation and Governance Studies (IGS) at the university of Twente the Netherlands. He is a member of the Netherlands Institute of Government (NIG), an associate senior member of the Ius Commune Research School (Leuven, Maastricht a.o.), and associated to the Netherlands Institute for Law & Governance (NILG - Groningen, Amsterdam a.o.)
Heldeweg is an Honorary Judge in the District Court of Almelo (the Netherlands), serving on the Administrative Law Bench.

Professor Heldeweg's core research theme reads: legal design of smart rules and regimes, with particular relevance to fostering sustainable energy.

His focus is on safeguarding the public interest in the context of the (new) regulatory state, with special interest in hybrid organizations and hybrid regulatory strategies, particularly with regards to:

  • legal aspects of governance, especially in the delivery of public services (safeguarding public values).
  • legal aspects of regulation, especially balancing innovation and risk control (innovation enhancement & risk regulation).

This approach includes research into a methodology of legal design (especially of 'smart rules and regimes') and of legal risk management (especially legal quality). Major areas of applied focus: environment and energy.

His teaching involves various courses in bachelor and master programmes of European Studies, Public Administration and Business Administration, especially on Constitutional & Administrative Law, Law & Governance, Law, markets & innovation, Regulatory Governance & Law, Environmental Law, Legal Risk Management and Legal Governance Methodology.

March
Socio-legal norms in preventing and managing disasters in Japan and the Asia-Pacific   View Summary
1 March 2012 to 2 March 2012

Registration

Click here to register and for secure online payment

Early bird: $110 inc GST (until February 10, 2012)
Full fee: $220 inc GST (after February 10, 2012)
Sydney Law School Alumni: $176 inc GST
Full time Academic, Government/NGO, ANJeL member, Australia-Japan Society
of NSW member: $110 inc GST
University of Sydney Staff, Member of the China Studies
Centre, University of Tohoku Law Faculty Staff: Free (ID required)

The final session of the conference on March 2 (4.30pm) will be free to the public.

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About the conference:

Socio-legal norms in preventing and managing disasters in Japan: Asia-Pacific and interdisciplinary perspectives


This conference compares the preparedness for large-scale disasters and subsequent responses in Japan, focusing on the '3-11' events: the earthquake and tsunami that devastated north-east Japan on 11 March 2011 and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant radiation leaks. We will explore whether and how socio-legal norms may have differed significantly within Japan regarding the former, primarily a natural disaster; compared to the latter, a 'man-made' or artificial disaster.

The conference will focus on the legal or regulatory environment, but in broad social, economic and political context. It will bring together experts in relevant fields of domestic and international law as well as specialists in social history and literature, media studies and political economy. One working hypothesis is that cultural and social norms were more effective in helping both to prevent and manage responses to Japan's natural disaster, compared to the artificial disaster where political and economic factors played more significant roles. The project considers whether this phenomenon can be found in earlier periods and especially in other Asia-Pacific countries, particularly in China, Indonesia and New Zealand (susceptible to earthquakes and tsunamis), and the USA (the only other Asia-Pacific country to have experienced a serious nuclear emergency).

The conference will be divided into 4 main sessions:

1. Disaster-related socio-cultural and political-economic norms and practices in Japan: Professor Michael Lewis (University of Sydney), Dr Yasuko Claremont (University of Sydney), Dr Rebecca Suter (University of Sydney), Professor Kent Anderson (ANU/Adelaide), Associate Professor Leon Wolff (Bond University), Ms Kylie Fletcher-Johnstone (Bond University).


2. Regulatory frameworks and other legal norms in Japan: Professor Luke Nottage (University of Sydney), Professor Hiroshi Kabashima (Tohoku University), Associate Professor Hatsuru Morita (Tohoku University), Julius Weitzdoerfer (Max Planck Institute), Stacey Steele (Melbourne University) and Associate Professor Jin Chun (Daito Bunka University).


3. Regional comparisons - Indonesia, China, New Zealand, USA:Dr Nirartha Samadhi (BRR Institute), Dr Simon Butt (University of Sydney), Professor David Goodman (University of Sydney), Associate Professor Anxin Zhu (Nanjing University), Associate Professor Vivienne Bath (University of Sydney), Professor Michael Reich (Harvard), Mr Micah Burch (University of Sydney),Professor Elizabeth Toomey(Canterbury University).


4. International frameworks and cooperation: Professor Gillian Triggs (Dean,
Sydney Law School, University of Sydney), Dr Hitoshi Nasu (ANU).

Click here for a copy of the program/flyer

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this2 day conference is equal to 11.25 MCLE/CPD unit. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, please click here.


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For further information on the conference,please visit the Japanese Law and the Asia Pacific blog.

To donate to the ongoing reconstruction work in northern Japan please visit the Japanese Red Cross Society or the Consulate-General of Japan

International Economic Law Interest Group Research Symposium   View Summary
2 March 2012

Registration

Click here for secure online payment and regsitration.

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Jointly convened by the ANZSIL International Economic Law Interest Group and the Sydney Centre for International Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Sydney.

This symposium will entail presentation of current scholarship and research in international economic law. The goal of this symposium is to promote and facilitate discussion of works in progress relating to international economic law.

We have two keynote speakers:

  • Professor Alan Sykes of Standford University law School will speak (by skype) on The Economic Structure of Renegotiation and Dispute Settlement in the WTO.
  • Professor Giorgio Sacerdoti of Bocconi University law School and WTO Appellate Body Member 2001-2009 will address us at the end of the day with comments on all of the papers presented during the symposium.

Registration
ANZSIL member rates
Full fee: $110 inc GST
Full-time student: $77 inc GST

Non ANZSIL member rates
Full fee: $165 inc GST
Fulltime student: $110 inc GST

University of Sydney rates
University of Sydney staff: $77 inc GST*
University of Sydney full time students: $77 inc GST
Sydney Law School Alumni: $132 inc GST
* Sydney Law School staff: Free


*University of Sydney staff, please contact law.events@sydney.edu.au to register.


Program
The full conference program is available on the website of the Australian New Zealand Society for International Law.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to6.5 MCLE/CPD unit.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Paul Marcus   View Summary
5 March 2012

Register

Click here to register.

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Why the U.S. criminal justice system has some unusual features and other nations such as Australia do not

In this lecture as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012, Professor Paul Marcus will explore some of the key parts of the U.S. criminal justice system. He will point out that in many - if not most - other common law, English-speaking nations such as Australia, some of those major features are not closely followed, or are expressly rejected.

In particular, he will look at rules regarding the so-called Miranda doctrine, the exclusion of evidence, the entrapment defense, and sentencing of convicted defendants.

Over the last 20 years, Professor Marcus has spent a good deal of time working in and studying in, a number of nations outside the United States, looking at the criminal justice systems there, and writing about the differences one finds in these systems.

Paul Marcus is the Haynes Professor of Law at the College of William and Mary. Formerly the law dean at the University of Arizona, his teaching and research interests are in the criminal justice, comparative law, and intellectual property areas. He has spoken to many judicial, bar and university groups in the U.S., and has lectured in a number of other nations throughout the world. He is a graduate of the UCLA School of Law. Prior to going into teaching, Professor Marcus clerked on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, and practiced law in Los Angeles. He is the author of several books in the criminal justice area and has written numerous articles in the field as well. Professor Marcus regularly serves as a consultant in on-going criminal prosecutions.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012. Please click here for program details.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Understanding kinship: indigenous people and law   View Summary
13 March 2012

This event is now full

We thank you for your overwhelming response and apologise in advance for the inconvenience caused to those for whom have been unable to register.

For further information, please email: law.criminology@sydney.edu.au

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About the event

Join the Institute of Criminology for Lynette Riley's 'Kinship' presentation. Lynette Riley, Academic Coordinator of the Koori Centre, University of Sydney, will take participants through a kinship system demonstrating the components of moiety, totem, skin names, language and traditional affiliations, and individual identity. Through Lynette's presentation participants will begin to see why Aboriginal people face particular problems when interacting with the mainstream Australian legal system.

The Law Reform Commission of Western Australia Report Aboriginal Customary Laws (Final Report, The interaction of WA law with Aboriginal law and culture, Project 94, September 2006, p. 66) highlighted the importance of Kinship to Aboriginal people:
"Kinship is at the heart of Aboriginal society and underpins the customary law rules and norms... Importantly, kinship governs all aspects of a person's social behaviour...

It is important to note...that while the kinship system was an undeniable part of traditional Aboriginal society...it is also strongly instilled in contemporary Aboriginal society, including urban Aboriginals...certain kinship obligations, such as the duty to accommodate kin, are taken very seriously regardless of urban or remote location."

Although the kinship systems throughout Australia are extremely varied and it is not possible in this forum to examine the differences between them, participants in the workshop will gain a new and deeper understanding of how a kinship system operates.

By the end of the workshop participants will have gained insight into:

  • The social structure of Aboriginal society
  • How this social structure and world view differs from the western liberal world view
  • How this difference impacts upon Aboriginal people in the Criminal Justice System and the legal system more broadly

This workshop will be of interest to:

  • Legal practitioners in Criminal Law, Family Law and Care and Protection, intellectual property, Native Title, and any areas that involve Indigenous Australians.
  • Government personnel who interact with Indigenous Australians (especially DOCS, Juvenile Justice and Corrective services)
  • The Magistracy and Judiciary
  • Police
  • Students

The workshop will be facilitated by Tanya Mitchell, Lecturer in Criminal Law and Indigenous People and the Law at Sydney Law School. Tanya was a senior solicitor-advocate with the Aboriginal Legal Service in NSW and also with the North Australian Aboriginal Justice Agency in the Northern Territory before joining Sydney Law School as a full-time academic in 2010.

Numbers are limited to 80 so be sure to register early.

Group discounts are available. Please contact the Institute of Criminology for details. Email: law.criminology@sydney.edu.au

Light refreshments provided.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at thisworkshop is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units. For a full program of current MCLE/CPD eligible events, pleaseclick here.

Distinguished visitor: City of London Lord Mayor, David Wootton   View Summary
15 March 2012

Registration

To register please click here.

______________________________________________________

City of London Lord Mayor, David Woottonwill be visiting Sydney Law School on Thursday 15 March.

The Lord Mayor will meet with our students to discuss his role and share his perspective on the legal industry in the city of London. His presentation will include an introduction to The Rolls Building - a new specialist court complex situated in The City, designed to hear international disputes of high value.


About Lord Mayor, David Wootton

David Wootton took office as the 684th Lord Mayor of the City of London in November 2011. He was educated at Bradford Grammar School, and at Jesus College, Cambridge. He is a solicitor, trained at and a partner since 1979 in Allen & Overy LLP. He has been based in the firm's London office throughout his career. His practice has taken him to many parts of the world and he has handled transactions covering a wide range of countries and jurisdictions. He is a committee member of the City of London Law Society and Chairman of the City of London Branch of the Institute of Directors

He advises primarily on corporate transactions of all kinds: mergers and acquisitions, takeovers, IPOs, share issues, joint ventures. Increasingly in recent years he has been advising on corporate governance and compliance, both in terms of law and regulation and in terms of best practice, many such questions being important 'board room' issues

He has acted for companies, boards, investment banks, underwriters and other advisers, across a wide range of sectors: manufacturing, publishing, bio technology, engineering, leisure, transport, information technology, retail, utilities.

A morningtea will be offered after the discussion.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Erin Brockovich   View Summary
19 March 2012

Registration

Please note: this event is now full.

Please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au to be placed on a wait list.

___________________________________________________________________________

Paying it forward - Erin Brockovich 12 years on

The Erin Brockovich phenomenon as born from its movie beginnings and consolidated by years of environmental advocacy is as strongly identified in Australia today as when the iconic movie was released in 2000. In a case that went on to become a Hollywood movie Erin spearheaded a legal battle that led to the largest legal settlement in US history for a toxic tort involving 600 residents.

In this lecture, Erin will share her unique experiences over the past twelve years and look forward to the next twelve.

Now a successful author, international speaker and award winner Erin dedicates her time to advising several law firms in the US and exclusively to Shine Lawyers in Australia. For over 18 years she has continued to crusade for the rights of people and protection of the environment.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012. Please click here for program details.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Employment relations and the law series 2012 - week one   View Summary
21 March 2012

Register Online
To register and make your secure online payment, please click here.
______________________________
The Sydney Law School presents a seminar series covering key areas in employment relations and the law. The seminars will be presented by a number of qualified academics and lawyers with extensive knowledge and experience in the area of employment law.

This course provides an introduction to the regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia today. Topics covered include employers' and employees' rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act and the common law of employment, anti-discrimination law, occupational health and safety, and the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.

No formal qualifications are required for enrolment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email: law.events@sydney.edu.au.

Please note that this is projected schedule for the topics to be covered. Due to the demands on our expert presenters there may be a need to revise this schedule. Please check the website regularly for updates.


21 March: Introduction - Overview of labour market regulation
28 March: Classifying work: employment, contracting and consulting
4 April: The Statutory Safety Net - NES and modern awards
11 April: The employment contract
18 April: Termination of employment
25 April: BREAK FOR ANZAC DAY
2 May: Discrimination in the workplace (including adverse action claims)
9 May: Workplace Investigations

16 May: Managing workplace disputes
23 May: Occupational Health and Safety

30 May:Enterprise bargaining andindustrial action

To view the brochure, please click here.


Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

Book Launch: Foreign Investment and Dispute Resolution Law and Practice in Asia    View Summary
22 March 2012

Allens Arthur Robinson and Sydney Law School are pleased to invite you to celebrate the launch of Foreign Investment and Dispute Resolution Law and Practice in Asia. Edited by Professors Vivienne Bath and Luke Nottage of Sydney Law School, the book critically assesses the laws and policies affecting investment flows in major Asian economies. It brings together valuable insights from some of the region's leading practitioners and academics about investment treaties and foreign direct investment regimes in Asia. Foreign Investment and Dispute Resolution Law and Practice in Asia will be launched by Professor Michael Pryles, Chairman of the Singapore International Arbitration Centre.

For further information about the book click here.

To register your attendance, please email: Sarah.Rudd@aar.com.au.

April
Distinguished Speakers Program: Sir Lawrence Freedman   View Summary
2 April 2012

Online registration
Click here to register and make your secure online payment

______________________________________
The next stage of the nuclear age: better, worse or more of the same?

Sir Lawrence Freedman, Professor of War Studies and Vice-Principal of Kings' College London, will deliver his presentation as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012.

Most of the systems and concepts associated with nuclear strategy and arms control were developed during the first two decades of the nuclear age. In many ways they can be considered a success. No nuclear weapons have been used in anger since 1945. Yet if disaster is to be avoided this success must be sustained in a changing and unstable international system. This lecture will explore the ways in which the situation could get a lot worse or a lot better.

Sir Lawrence Freedman has been Professor of War Studies at King's College London since 1982, and Vice-Principal since 2003. He was appointed Vice-Principal at King's in 2003. He was educated at Whitley Bay Grammar School and the Universities of Manchester, York and Oxford. Before joining King's he held research appointments at Nuffield College Oxford, IISS and the Royal Institute of International Affairs. Elected a Fellow of the British Academy in 1995 and awarded the CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 1996, he was appointed Official Historian of the Falklands Campaign in 1997. He was awarded the KCMG (Knight Commander of St Michael and St George) in 2003. He was appointed in June 2009 to serve as a member of the official inquiry into Britain and the 2003 Iraq War.


This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012. Click here for the latest program information.


Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Drugs, crime and brief interventions for young offenders   View Summary
11 April 2012

Registration

To register and secure your online payment please click here.

___________________________________________________________

Drugs and crime interact in a variety of ways, but certainly tend to exacerbate each other. The evidence is clear that reduced drug use is associated with reduced crime. Frontline workers often feel ill-equipped to address the complexity of presentations of young offenders who use drugs, yet access to effective community or residential treatment is often elusive. This course will provide an update on the drug use of young people, available intervention options, and how those who come into contact with young offenders who use drugs may be able to provide helpful evidence-informed and brief interventions.

About the speaker:

John Howard (BA, MA(Couns), MClinPsych, DipCrim, PhD, MAPS) joined the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) in 2008 as a Senior Lecturer and works with the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre, as well as NDARC's international research activities and those with a focus on young people. He has worked in schools, juvenile justice, adolescent mental health and drug treatment, and universities. John is a consultant Clinical Psychologist and his major clinical, teaching and research areas are: adolescent substance use and 'street youth', comorbidity, depression and suicide in young people, working with marginalised youth and those with multiple and complex needs, adolescent psychotherapy, same-sex attracted youth, HIV infection in adolescents, resilience, youth treatment capacity-building and developing 'youth friendly' harm reduction. He consults to WHO, UNICEF, UNODC and UNESCAP on capacity-building for community treatment of young drug users and increasing access to harm reduction services for young injecting drug usersInternational work has taken him to Nepal, China, Thailand Viet Nam, Lao PDR, India, Philippines, Egypt and South Africa.

Registration fees

Full fee: $240 (inc GST) F/T student: $150 (inc GST) University of Sydney staff: $190 (inc GST) Sydney Law School alumni: $190 (inc GST)

ACCEL seminar series 2012   View Summary
11 April 2012

Registration

To register and secure online payment click here.

Enrol for individual seminars, priced at $130 each.

______________________________________________________________

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its annual seminar series in April and May 2012. In this year's series, ACCEL members will discuss their research for the recently published third edition of Environmental and Planning Law in NSW (Federation Press: 2012). The seminars will include analysis of the key developments in environmental law - including the Commonwealth's Clean Energy Future Package and the Durban Climate Change Conference that was held in November and December 2011. Our presenters will also discuss important changes to NSW laws such as the demise of Pt3A of the NSW planning legislation that facilitated approval of developments by Ministers and significant recent changes to pollution laws.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 11 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 -18 April

Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 3 - 2 May

Environmental Impact Assessment with Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 4 -9 May
Heritage with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 16 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 -23 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 -30 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Teaching Criminology, Crime and Criminal Justice    View Summary
13 April 2012

Teaching Criminology, Crime and Criminal Justice

Please click here to register

This workshop will explore innovative teaching and learning methods being applied/or applicable to criminology, criminal justice and related fields. With considerable growth in students enrolling in criminology and criminal justice programs in recent years, changing demands on graduates entering the field and developments in teaching technologies and techniques, this workshop provides a timely opportunity to review the latest trends in teaching and learning.

The following will be speaking at this workshop:


* Alan Moran (Director, Academic Studies, Brush Farm Academy, Corrective Services NSW)
*Professor John Alford (Professor of Public Sector Management, Australia and New Zealand School of Government)
* Dr Anthony Billingsley (International Relations, UNSW)
*Mike Bogle (Educational Technologist, UNSW)
*Dr Rohan Lulham (Design out Crime Research Centre, UTS)


Workshop sessions will be facilitated to enable review of the following themes:

* Relevant industry competencies and employment requirements
* Flexible teaching and delivery methods
* Innovative assessment techniques
* Future demands of criminology and criminal justice degree graduates


This free workshop is being organised and hosted by the University of NSW and the Sydney Institute of Criminology (University of Sydney).

A maximum of 40 participants will be able to register for this event.

ACCEL seminar series 2012 - Week 2   View Summary
18 April 2012

Week 2

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its annual seminar series in April and May 2012. In this year's series, ACCEL members will discuss their research for the recently published third edition of Environmental and Planning Law in NSW (Federation Press: 2012). The seminars will include analysis of the key developments in environmental law - including the Commonwealth's Clean Energy Future Package and the Durban Climate Change Conference that was held in November and December 2011. Our presenters will also discuss important changes to NSW laws such as the demise of Pt3A of the NSW planning legislation that facilitated approval of developments by Ministers and significant recent changes to pollution laws.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 11 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 -18 April

Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 3 - 2 May

Environmental Impact Assessment with Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 4 -9 May
Heritage with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 16 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 -23 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 -30 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Dame Hazel Genn QC   View Summary
19 April 2012

Register

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

_________________________________________

Access to justice

The lecture will discuss recent proposals for fundamental change to the Legal Aid system in England & Wales in the context of constrained resources, the increasing cost of the criminal justice system and developments in civil justice policy.

The lecture will reflect on access to justice principles and speculate on the social and legal impact of the proposed changes. The lecture will also discuss the way in which discourse and policy on mediation is being used to support and justify the withdrawal of public funding from civil justice.

Professor Dame Hazel Genn DBE, QC (Hon).

Dame Hazel Genn is Dean of Laws and Co-Director of the UCL Judicial Institute in the Faculty of Laws at University College London, where she is also an Honorary Fellow. She previously held a Chair and was Head of the Department of Law at Queen Mary, University of London. Since April 2006 she has been a Commissioner of the Judicial Appointments Commission and was a member of the Committee on Standards in Public Life 2003-7. She has worked with the Judicial Studies Board for over 15 years. She is a leading authority on civil justice and dispute resolution and has published widely in the field. In 2008 she delivered the Hamlyn Lectures on the subject of civil justice (published by Cambridge University Press in November 2009 entitled Judging Civil Justice). Dame Hazel's research has focused on the experiences of citizens and businesses caught up in legal problems and the responsiveness of the justice system to those needs. Her original studies have had a major influence on policy-makers around the world and she is regularly invited to lecture and provide advice abroad. In recognition of her work on civil justice, she was awarded a CBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List in 2000 and appointed DBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours List in 2006. In 2006 she was also appointed Queen's Counsel Honoris Causa and in 2008 was elected an Honorary Master of the Bench of Gray's Inn.

Class of 1971 LLB: 40 Year Reunion   View Summary
21 April 2012

Over the past decades, our class has celebrated the graduating year with an evening of fine food and wine, and an opportunity to catch up with your fellow classmates.

It's time again to celebrate!

Dinner will be preceded by a tour of the new Law School.

WHEN
Saturday 21 April 2012
6.30 for 7.30 to 11pm

VENUE
Law Foyer
Lvl 2, Sydney Law School
The University of Sydney

COST
$150 per person (Three course meal with wine, inc GST)


DRESS
Black tie

RSVP essential byMonday 16 April 2012
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

If you are unable to attend, but would like to leave a message for your classmates, please click here to register your apologies and supply a message, or advise the Alumni and Events Office via email.

Book Launch - Roddy's Folly: R. P. Meagher QC - art lover and lawyer   View Summary
23 April 2012

Registration

Please note, we have reached maximum capacity for this event and are no longer able to take registrations.

If you would like to be placed on a wait list, email: law.events@sydney and we will nofity you if a place becomes available.

________________________________________

The Sydney Law School is pleased to invite you to a book launch and cocktail reception to celebrate the contribution of the Late R. P. Meagher AO QCto the University of Sydney.

Damien Freeman's recent biography

Roddy's Folly:R. P. Meagher QC - art lover and lawyer (Connor Court Publishing 2012) will be launched by The Hon. Tony Abbott MHR

Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir AC CVO and the Hon Justice J. D. Heydon AC will share their recollections of Roddy as student and scholar at the University, and at the Bar and on the Bench in Phillip Street.

Copies of the book will be available on the night, alternatively, you can purchase a copy from Connor Court Publishing.

NSW crime statistics and trends   View Summary
24 April 2012

Registration

Click here to register.

______________________________________________________________

This seminar will explore the trends emerging from the latest New South Wales (NSW) crime statistics and consider reasons for the significant decline in particular offences (such as break, enter and steal and motor vehicle theft) over the last decade in NSW.

Key commentators will probe recent trends and seek to explain the decline of key offences.

Speakers will include:

  • Dr Don Weatherburn, Director, NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research
  • Ray Carroll, Executive Director, National Motor Vehicle Theft Reduction Council
  • Detective Superintendent Greig Newbery, Property Crime Squad, NSW Police Force.

This seminar will be of interest to:

  • Government policy-makers
  • Police
  • Security managers
  • Local government community safety personnel
  • Criminology students
  • Media

TheNSW Chapter of ASIS has kindly sponsored this seminar.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to3 MCLE/CPD unit.

Carbon Price Master Class   View Summary
24 April 2012

To register and for secure online payment click here

___________________________________________________________________________

On 1 July 2012 a carbon price will be imposed on liable entities under the Clean Energy Act 2011 (Cth). It will be a fixed price before moving on 1 July 2015 to a floating price. Liable entities are entitled, subject to certain rules, to offset their liabilities by relying on international and domestic offsets. In this Master Class, experts will take you step-by-step through the provisions of the carbon price mechanism, the taxation implications, the offsetting mechanisms and the carbon derivatives market.

Numbers for this class are limited so that the learning experience can be enhanced. The Master Class is suitable for liable entities, lawyers in private practice, in-house counsel, academics and other interested parties.

PROGRAM

1.30-2.00pmREGISTRATION
2.00-2.45pm

WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION:

The carbon price mechanism and the relevance of the 2011 Durban climate change negotiations
Professor Rosemary Lyster, Director, Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law

2.45-3.30pm

SESSION 1:

Understanding the practical taxation implications of the carbon price mechanism
Celeste Black, Sydney Law School

3.30-4.00pmAFTERNOON TEA
4.00-4.45pm

SESSION 2:

Understanding how to offset your carbon liabilities in international and domestic markets
Ilona Millar, Baker & McKenzie

4.45-5.30pmSESSION 3:

Understanding the current carbon derivatives market and how to use the market
Scott Farrell, King & Wood Mallesons

5.30pm

CLOSE AND DRINKS

To view a copy of the brochure click here

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 3 MCLE/CPD units.

SPECIAL EARLY BIRD RATE NOW AVAILABLE (until 13/4/12)

May
ACCEL seminar series 2012 - Week 3   View Summary
2 May 2012

Week 3

Registration

To register and secure online payment click here

______________________________________________________________

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its annual seminar series in April and May 2012. In this year's series, ACCEL members will discuss their research for the recently published third edition of Environmental and Planning Law in NSW (Federation Press: 2012). The seminars will include analysis of the key developments in environmental law - including the Commonwealth's Clean Energy Future Package and the Durban Climate Change Conference that was held in November and December 2011. Our presenters will also discuss important changes to NSW laws such as the demise of Pt3A of the NSW planning legislation that facilitated approval of developments by Ministers and significant recent changes to pollution laws.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 11 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 -18 April

Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 3 - 2 May

Environmental Impact Assessment with Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 4 -9 May
Heritage with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 16 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 -23 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 -30 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

JSI Seminar Series: Dr Arlie Loughnan   View Summary
3 May 2012

Madness at the Point of Intersection with Crime: Epistemology and Ontology

Click here to register

Understanding mental incapacity in criminal law is notoriously difficult; it involves tracing overlapping and interlocking legal doctrines, current and past practices of evidence and proof, and also medical and social understandings of mental illness and incapacity. With its focus on the complex interaction of legal doctrines and practices relating to mental incapacity and knowledge - both expert and non-expert - of it, the book on which this presentation is based offers a fresh perspective on this topic. Bringing together previously disparate discussions on mental incapacity from law, psychology, and philosophy, the book provides a close study of this terrain of criminal law, analysing the development of mental incapacity doctrines through historical cases to the modern era. It maps the shifting boundaries around abnormality as constructed in law, arguing that the mental incapacity terrain has a distinct character - 'manifest madness'.

About the Speaker: Dr Arlie Loughnan, University of Sydney

Dr Arlie Loughnan joined Sydney Law School in 2007. She is a graduate of the University of Sydney (BA Hons 1 LLB Hons 1), New York University Law School (LLM) and London School of Economics (PhD). Her research concerns criminal law and the criminal justice system, with a focus on the relationship between legal doctrines, practices, institutions and knowledge. Her particular interests are constructions of criminal responsibility and non-responsibility, the interaction of legal and expert medical knowledges and the historical development of the criminal law.

Dr Loughnan is the author of Manifest Madness: Mental Incapacity in Criminal Law (OUP, 2012). She is a member of the Institute of Criminology and the Editor of the Institute's journal, Current Issues in Criminal Justice (with Dr Murray Lee). She has been a member of the NSW Law Society's Criminal Law Committee since 2009. In 2010-11, she was the Academic Member of the NSW Bar's Professional Conduct Committee (No. 2) (with Dr R. Shackel). In 2010, Arlie served as a member of the Panel of Expert Advisors for the NSW Law Reform Commission reference on Complicity.

Who needs 'truth in takeovers'?   View Summary
8 May 2012

Registration

To register and for secure online payment click here. ______________________________________________________________

Keynote Speaker: Ronald C. Barusch

Commentator: David Friedlander

Chair: Professor John Stumbles

______________________________________________________________

Who needs 'truth in takeovers'?

This event is part of the Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate & Taxation Law 2012 Corporate Law Series.

About the seminar:

From the country that brought you poison pills, staggered boards and supervoting stock and all but encourages frustrating actions to defeat bidders in fighting hostile takeovers, the U.S. goes a very different, bidder-friendly, direction on 'truth in takeovers' types of issues. Although lying in U.S. tender offers is frowned upon even in the U.S., the tender offer rules adopted by the U.S. SEC set up a different dynamic. It intentionally leaves targets and shareholders having to make decisions when they are still guessing about whether the bidder has more in its pocket with which to bid.

Ronald C Barusch will discuss a U.S. perspective on ASIC's 'truth in takeovers' Policy and David Friedlander will provide an Australian perspective.

Come along to hear analysis of an area where Australia and U.S. practice are at opposite ends of the spectrum.

Keynote speaker:

Ronald C. Barusch previously a mergers and acquisitions lawyer with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP for over 30 years. Ron retired in 2010 after 25 years as a partner at the firm, including three years as office leader of Skadden's Sydney office. He is currently a visiting lecturer at Sydney Law School teaching 'Cross Border Deals - A U.S. Perspective'.

Ron also writes 'Dealpolitik' for The Wall Street Journal's Deal Journal providing a strategic look at deals currently making the headlines as well as the major forces at work in the deal-making world.

Commentator:

David Friedlander is a mergers and acquisitions and securities lawyer in the Sydney office of King & Wood Mallesons. He is consistently ranked as one of Australia's top mergers and acquisitions and equity capital markets lawyers. David regularly acts for both bidders and targets in takeovers and issuers and underwriters in securities offerings. David is integral to the firm's growth in Asia Pacific spending time working closely with our Hong Kong and China teams and is a member of the Board of the firm.

David holds a Bachelor of Commerce and Law degrees from the University of New South Wales and a Master of Laws degree from the University of Sydney. He is a member of the Australian Takeovers Panel, the ASX Capital Markets Panel and its Disciplinary Tribunal, the Australian Law Council's Corporations Committee and of the Legal Committee of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and a director of the Public Education Foundation

Chair: Professor John Stumbles

_________________________________________________________

Registration costs:
Full fee: $77 inc GST
Sydney Law School alumni: $66 inc GST
F/T student: $44 inc GST
Special rate applies for 3 or more registrations from one organisation: $55 inc GST

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1.25 MCLE/CPD unit

ACCEL seminar series 2012 - Week 4   View Summary
9 May 2012

Week 4

Registration

To register and secure online payment click here

______________________________________________________________

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its annual seminar series in April and May 2012. In this year's series, ACCEL members will discuss their research for the recently published third edition of Environmental and Planning Law in NSW (Federation Press: 2012). The seminars will include analysis of the key developments in environmental law - including the Commonwealth's Clean Energy Future Package and the Durban Climate Change Conference that was held in November and December 2011. Our presenters will also discuss important changes to NSW laws such as the demise of Pt3A of the NSW planning legislation that facilitated approval of developments by Ministers and significant recent changes to pollution laws.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 11 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 -18 April

Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 3 - 2 May

Environmental Impact Assessment with Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 4 -9 May
Heritage with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 16 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 -23 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 -30 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

They tried to make me go to rehab... young offenders and drug use   View Summary
9 May 2012

Click hereto register

The last young people in custody health survey showed that 89% of young offenders had tried illicit drugs, with cannabis (87%) the most common used. As well, 65% had used an illicit drug at least weekly in the year prior to custody, 65% reported committing crime to obtain alcohol or drugs and 20% were intoxicated (on alcohol, drugs or both) at the time of their offence.

This seminar will look at:

  • the latest research on cannabis use amongst young offenders
  • an innovative intervention program specifically designed for young people with low literacy skills
  • the effect of being caught with small amounts of drugs and their subsequent entanglement in the justice system
  • alternatives to incarceration

Speakers:

Melanie Simpson, Senior Research Officer/PhD Candidate, National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre

Geoff Wilkinson Program Manager, Alcohol and Other Drugs, Juvenile Justice

Jane Sanders, Principal Solicitor, Shopfront Youth Legal Centre

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW.

Humanities and Social Sciences Postgraduate Expo   View Summary
10 May 2012

The Faculties of Arts and Social Sciences and Education and Social Work will deliver a special postgraduate event with the Sydney Law School at the St James Campus in the CBD on 10 May 2012.

The University of Sydney Humanities and Social Sciences Postgraduate Expoprovides an opportunity for future postgraduate students to engage with staff from the following areas:

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

Faculty of Education and Social Work

Sydney Law School

With applications still open for semester 2 2012 entry, this event represents an excellent opportunity to obtain detailed advice and guidance in relation to the University's postgraduate courses in these areas.

Register online now
Globalisation, the global financial crisis and the reinvention of the state   View Summary
15 May 2012

Registration

To register and for secure online payment click here.

______________________________________________________________

Keynote speaker: Professor John Farrar

Chair: Dr Robert Austin

______________________________________________________________

Globalisation, the global financial crisis and the reinvention of the state

This event is part of the Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate & Taxation Law 2012 Corporate Law Series.

About the seminar:

This seminar will look at the relationship of globalisation, the GFC and the changing role of the state. Globalisation has been a fashionable concept for the last 20 years and filled a gap in US foreign policy after the disintegration of the USSR. The questions now are how does it stand in the light of the GFC and what is the role of the state in the West when facing competition from systems of state capitalism.

Keynote speaker:

Professor John Farrar is an Emeritus Professor at Bond University. He has held chairs at Cardiff, Canterbury, Victoria University of Wellington, Bond and Waikato. He was Dean of Law at the University of Canterbury (1985-88), Bond University (1993-96) and University of Waikato (2004-08). He was Acting Vice Chancellor of Bond University (1995-96) and Chair of Senate (2000-03). He was Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Adelaide (1986) and Parsons Scholar, Sydney Law School (1986 and 1987). He has been Visiting Professor at University of California Berkeley, University of Toronto, University of Western Ontario and Ghent University.
John is the author of a number of books and papers on Company and Commercial Law and Corporate Governance. He has also been active in law reform in the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia, and was a member of the Legislation Advisory Committee of New Zealand (2004-08).
In 2008 he was made an Honorary Life Member of the Australian Law Teachers Association for services to legal education in Australia and New Zealand.

Chair:

Dr Robert Austin taught company law and equity at the University of Sydney full-time from 1969 to 1990, and subsequently he has continued to teach part-time until the present day. He was a partner with Minter Ellison (1990-1998) and was a Judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales (1998-2010). He has recently returned to legal practice with Minter Ellison.

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Registration costs:

Full fee: $77 inc GST

Sydney Law School Alumni $66 inc GST

Sydney Law School Student $44 (inc GST)

Group Booking: $55 inc GST*

*Group Booking applies where 3 or more people from one organisation register for attendance.

ACCEL seminar series 2012 - Week 5   View Summary
16 May 2012

Week 5

Registration

To register and secure online payment click here

______________________________________________________________

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its annual seminar series in April and May 2012. In this year's series, ACCEL members will discuss their research for the recently published third edition of Environmental and Planning Law in NSW (Federation Press: 2012). The seminars will include analysis of the key developments in environmental law - including the Commonwealth's Clean Energy Future Package and the Durban Climate Change Conference that was held in November and December 2011. Our presenters will also discuss important changes to NSW laws such as the demise of Pt3A of the NSW planning legislation that facilitated approval of developments by Ministers and significant recent changes to pollution laws.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 11 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 -18 April

Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 3 - 2 May

Environmental Impact Assessment with Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 4 -9 May
Heritage with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 16 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 -23 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 -30 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

JSI Seminar Series: Shaun McVeigh    View Summary
17 May 2012

Conduct of Law: the Meeting of Laws and the Office of Jurisprudent

Registration

Click here to register.

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It is now twenty years since the High Court of Australia designated 'native title' as the site of engagement of Australian common law and jurisprudence with Indigenous law and jurisprudence in Mabo v State of Queensland (No. 2). Common law jurisprudence, however, continues to struggle to create the appropriate form and conduct of the relations between itself and Indigenous laws and jurisprudence. In light of recent attempts to amend the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth), it is timely, then, to return to the first question that is addressed in the meeting of laws in Australia, that of the authorisation of laws and the quality and conduct of the meeting place. This paper investigates, as a matter of jurisprudence, the quality and practice of the engagement of lawful relations. In particular it addresses the affect and effect of the forms of jurisdictional practice through which the common law tradition has engaged Indigenous laws and jurisprudence. In part this essay offers a reminder of the importance of jurisdictional form in the meeting of laws. In part it offers a reminder of the commitments that are made in the conduct of lawful relations within the common law tradition. To do this - and contribute to this legal theory seminar - this paper refreshes, if not revives, some of the ways in which jurisprudence can be understood in terms of a conduct of an office or as the product of a set of obligations and responsibilities. This paper develops some arguments and themes from a recent monograph Jurisdiction (2012) co-authored with Shaunnagh Dorsett (Law School, UTS) entitled Jurisdiction (2012). It should be understood as jointly written, if not presented, with Shaunnagh Dorsett.

About the Speaker: Shaun McVeigh

Shaun McVeigh is an Associate Professor at the Melbourne Law School, Prior to joining the University of Melbourne in 2007 taught and researched Griffith University in Queensland as well as Keele and Middlesex Universities in the United Kingdom. He has a long time association with critical legal studies and law and humanities in Australia and the UK and is currently president of the Law, Literature, & Humanities Association of Australasia. Shaun McVeigh has research interests in the fields of jurisprudence, and legal ethics. His current research projects centre around themes associated with refreshing a jurisprudence of jurisdiction; the importance of a civil prudence to thinking about the conduct of law (and lawyers); and, the continuing need to take account of the official character of law.

Allowance for Corporate Equity - What Does it Mean for Corporate Australia?   View Summary
21 May 2012

Register

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

One of the most surprising announcements from last year's Tax Forum was the proposal to commission a study of an Allowance for Corporate Equity. ACE would represent a major shift in corporate tax, potentially relieving many thousands of companies from tax - and driving up Australia's corporate tax rate beyond 40%! ACE is much more than tinkering!

This ½ day seminar will examine what an ACE could mean for Australia: what it is hoped an ACE would achieve, how it is meant to work, where the fault lines are to be found, what still remains unsettled in the basic design, who would win and who would lose under the policy and why. We will also examine how ACE works in the countries that currently employ it.

The keynote speaker will be Malcolm Gammie CBE, QC, a leading tax barrister from the UK, and the principal author of the seminal 1991 Institute Fiscal Studies report, Equity for Companies: A Corporation Tax for the 1990s.

Speakers

Malcolm Gammie CBE, QC, is a leading tax barrister in the UK and a former tax partner at Linklaters & Paines, London. He was the principal author of the seminal 1991 Institute Fiscal Studies report, Equity for Companies: A Corporation Tax for the 1990s. He was a member of the Mirrlees Review, the UK's Henry review. Malcolm Gammie is an Adjunct Professor at Sydney Law School and a Greenwoods and Freehills visitor at the Law School in 2012.

Graeme Cooper is Professor of Taxation Law at Sydney University Law School and a Consultant to Greenwoods & Freehills.


Program

9:00 - 9:15 Registration

9:15 - 10:15 Key Design Features of ACE. Malcolm Gammie

10:15 - 10:45 Morning tea

10:45 - 11:45 The Experience of Countries with ACE, and Some Issues for Australia. Graeme Cooper

11:45 - 12:30 Round table - What Next for Australia

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to2.75 MCLE/CPD units.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Lawrence Gostin   View Summary
23 May 2012

Registration

Click here to register and for secure online payment.
________________________________________

President Obama's Health Care Reform: The Supreme Court and the Future of the American Health System

Abstract

Nearly 30 years after President Nixon proposed the first major overhaul of the health care system, comprehensive reform became a reality when President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) on March 23, 2010. The ACA is expected to cover 32 million currently uninsured people by expanding Medicaid, offering subsidies to purchase insurance, and prohibiting pre-existing condition exclusions. Like Presidents Carter and Clinton before him, Barack Obama campaigned on a promise of health care reform. Opposition to the ACA was immediate. At least 26 federal lawsuits were filed challenging its constitutionality. The U.S. Supreme Court has allotted an unprecedented 5 1/2 hours for oral arguments on four issues: the individual purchase mandate, severability, the Medicaid expansion, and the Anti-Injunction Act. This is a rare moment in America's history where the Supreme Court could determine whether the United States coalesces behind an historical health system reform or retreats from it.

Professor Lawrence Gostin is the Linda and Timothy O'Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington DC, where he directs the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. Professor Gostin is also the Director of the World Health Organisation's Collaborating Centre on Public Health Law and Human Rights. Hislatest books are: Public Health Law and Ethics: A Reader (University of California Press, 2nd ed., 2010); Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint (University of California Press, 2nd ed. 2008); Principles of Mental Health Law & Practice (Oxford University Press, 2010). He is currently working on a book for Harvard University Press, entitled: Global Health Law: International Law, Global Institutions, and World Health.

Professor Gostinis a long-time friend of Sydney Law School and on the nomination of the Dean of Law and the Dean of Medicine, will be awarded a Doctor of Laws (honoris causa) by the University on 25 May.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012. Please click here for program details.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

This event is proudly co-presented by Sydney Law School and the United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney.

ACCEL seminar series 2012 - Week 6   View Summary
23 May 2012

Week 6

Registration

To register and secure online payment click here

______________________________________________________________

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its annual seminar series in April and May 2012. In this year's series, ACCEL members will discuss their research for the recently published third edition of Environmental and Planning Law in NSW (Federation Press: 2012). The seminars will include analysis of the key developments in environmental law - including the Commonwealth's Clean Energy Future Package and the Durban Climate Change Conference that was held in November and December 2011. Our presenters will also discuss important changes to NSW laws such as the demise of Pt3A of the NSW planning legislation that facilitated approval of developments by Ministers and significant recent changes to pollution laws.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 11 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 -18 April

Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 3 - 2 May

Environmental Impact Assessment with Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 4 -9 May
Heritage with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 16 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 -23 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 -30 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Sydney Law School Alumni Graduation Party 2012   View Summary
24 May 2012

Professor Gillian Triggs, Dean of the Sydney Law School, invites students graduating on 25 May 2012 to a celebratory cocktail reception on the eve of your graduation.

6.30-7.30pm, Thursday 24 May 2012

Program:

6.30pm - Drinks and canapés

6.50pm - Welcome: Professor Gillian Triggs, Dean, Sydney Law School

6.55pm - Alumni address: Professor Joellen Riley

7.00pm - Special guest: Naomi Hart, BA (Hons) 2009; LLB (Hons) 2011

Naomi graduated with First Class Honours in Law (ranking second in her graduating class), having also been awarded the University Medal in History. While at Sydney Law School, she won the Australia-wide Governor-General's Undergraduate Essay Competition, and undertook internships at the Sydney Centre for International Law and the Australian Human Rights Commission. She also mooted prolifically, with her successes including being the Runner-Up in the World Human Rights Moot in South Africa. She has returned to Sydney Law School to coach mooting teams competing in Vienna and Washington DC. In 2011, she spent four months in New Orleans working as a legal clerk defending men on death row. In that same year she was awarded the University of Sydney Convocation Medal, served on the Youth Advisory Committee of the Australian Red Cross and volunteered at the Children's Legal Service in Glebe. In 2012, she was named as an Affiliate of the Sydney Centre for International Law and has been published in theAustralian Journal of International Law.

Graduands are invited to bring family and friends along (max. 3 guests per person) to join the celebration.

Registration is essential, andinvitations including registration information have been distributed to graduands. If you are graduating from a law degreein the 25 May ceremony and did not receive your invitation, please contact theAlumni Relations Officer.

ACCEL seminar series 2012 - Week 7   View Summary
30 May 2012

Registration

To register and secure online payment click here

______________________________________________________________

The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) presents its annual seminar series in April and May 2012. In this year's series, ACCEL members will discuss their research for the recently published third edition of Environmental and Planning Law in NSW (Federation Press: 2012). The seminars will include analysis of the key developments in environmental law - including the Commonwealth's Clean Energy Future Package and the Durban Climate Change Conference that was held in November and December 2011. Our presenters will also discuss important changes to NSW laws such as the demise of Pt3A of the NSW planning legislation that facilitated approval of developments by Ministers and significant recent changes to pollution laws.

ACCEL's annual seminar will appeal to a wide audience and no formal qualifications are required for enrolment. Participants who attend a minimum of five (5) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

Program

Click here to view a copy of the program.

Seminar Timetable

Week 1 - 11 April
Environmental Planning Law with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 2 -18 April

Litigation with Dr Andrew Edgar

Week 3 - 2 May

Environmental Impact Assessment with Ms Nicola Franklin

Week 4 -9 May
Heritage with Ms Susan Shearing

Week 5 - 16 May
Pollution with Professor Zada Lipman

Week 6 -23 May
Climate Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

Week 7 -30 May
Water Law with Professor Rosemary Lyster

2012 Voiceless Animal Law Lecture Series   View Summary
30 May 2012

Hunted by land and sea - A legal exploration of commercial hunting in Australia and Canada.

Click here to register

Australia's iconic kangaroos are hunted in the largest commercial slaughter of land-based wildlife on the planet - almost 90 million have been lawfully killed in the last 20 years. Canada's harp seals are hunted in the world's largest commercial slaughter of marine mammals - almost 4 million have been lawfully killed in the last 20 years.

With two countries holding such similar records, it is worthwhile exploring the legal parameters of the hunts. In order to do this, Voiceless is proud to present Canadian lawyer Lesli Bisgould as our keynote speaker for 2012.

Lesli is a leader in animal law, having practised in the area for ten years, authored the first Canadian text on the subject and lectured widely throughout Canada and the US. In what is sure to be a fascinating presentation, Lesli will reflect on her experiences with the seal hunt and offer insights into Australia's own native hunt.

JSI Seminar Series: Dr Carlos Bernal-Pulido    View Summary
31 May 2012

The Evolution of Principle of Proportionality and the Paradox of Constitutional Rights

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Constitutions that guarantee constitutional rights necessarily create a paradox. They empower political authorities to limit constitutional rights. At the same time, they protect constitutional rights from limitations. Allegedly, the distinction between constitutional and unconstitutional limitations of constitutional rights provides a solution to this paradox. However, two questions arise: Under what conditions is a limitation of a constitutional right unconstitutional? And, who ought ultimately to decide whether limitations of constitutional rights are unconstitutional? The principle of proportionality is a legal standard used around the world with a twofold purpose: to assess whether limitations of constitutional rights are unconstitutional and to justify the ultimate power of constitutional and supreme courts to decide on the constitutionality of these infringements. Drawing from a comparative law analysis, this presentation aims to examine why the principle of proportionality has spread around the world as a standard for these purposes.

About the Speaker: Dr Carlos Bernal-Pulido

Dr Carlos Bernal-Pulido is a Senior Lecturer at Macquarie Law School. He has research interests in the fields of jurisprudence, comparative constitutional law and constitutional theory. He has published widely in all these fields in 7 different languages. His qualifications include a LLB from the Universidad Externado of Colombia (Bogota) (1996), a SJD from the University of Salamanca (Spain) (2001) and a MA (2008) and a PhD in Philosophy (2011) from the University of Florida (U.S.A).

June
Lunchtime Seminar: Anti-Corruption Regulation   View Summary
1 June 2012

Registration:

Click here to register and for secure online payment.

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Anti-corruption regulation is on the increase. From massive US corporate fines and jail for individuals to the expanding reach of the UK Bribery Act, the international attack on foreign bribery and corruption has never been stronger.

Australia is a signatory to the UN and OECD Conventions against foreign bribery but its response to international commercial bribery has often been criticised as patchy at best, half-hearted and non-existent at worst.

Australia is now going through a review of its compliance with its international obligations, conducted by the OECD. The review is beingled by two experienced OECD officials, William Loo and Chiawen Kiew.

While they are in Sydney William Loo and Chiawen Kiew will deliver a seminar to members of the public interested in the OECD Anti-Bribery convention and anti-corruption regulation in Australia and the Asia-Pacific Region. Specifically their presentation will cover:

  • what is foreign bribery and its impact on society;
  • the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention;
  • the OECD monitoring process, its successes and challenges; and
  • regional initiatives in combating bribery in the Asia Pacific Region.

The presentation will be introduced by Robert Wyld, theAustralian-basedAsia Pacific Regional Officer for the International Bar Association's Anti-Corruption Committee. Michael Ahrens, the Executive Director of Transparency International Australia will provide closing comments.

Program:

12.30 - 12.45 Registration

12.45 - 12.47 Introduction by Robert Wyld

12.47 - 13.40 Presentation by William Loo and Chiawen Kiew

13.40 - 13.50 Comments from Michael Ahrens

13.50 - 14.00 Questions

For a copy of the brochure click here

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1.25 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is proudly co-presented by Sydney Law School and Transparency International Australia.

Matt Laffan memorial address in social justice   View Summary
27 June 2012

Matt Laffan Address in Social Justice

To register, please click here.

Introduction

Andrew Buchanan, Chair of the NSW Disability Council and Consultant

Guest speaker

Peter FitzSimons, Motivational Speaker, Sports Commentator, Columnist and Author

Chair

Lee Burns, Professor of Taxation Law

On Sunday 1 March 2009, Sydney Law School alumnus Matt Laffan passed away after he fought and lost the biggest battle of his colourful and active life. In memoriam of the significant impact Matt has had in his short life, Sydney Law School has established an annual social justice address in his honour.

This year's address will be held on Wednesday 27 June, commencing with a recollection of Matt Laffan by Andrew Buchanan, followed by an address on Social Justice and Sport by Peter FitzSimons.

Matt Laffan had severe disabilities, but he will be remembered most for his impressive abilities. With enormous enthusiasm for life, Matt grabbed opportunities and made the most of them.

Peter FitzSimons is one of Australia's most prominent and successful media and publishing identities. His busy professional life involves co-hosting the breakfast program on Sydney's Radio 2UE, writing weekly columns for the Sydney Morning Herald and Sun Herald newspapers, appearing on Foxtel's Back Page television show and, when time permits, authoring best-selling books. A correspondent for London's Daily Telegraph as well, he is also in high demand as a guest speaker and presenter.

Andrew Buchanan is widely acknowledged as one of Australia's most exceptionally gifted and experienced communicators, in front of and behind the microphone, with unique expertise in staff motivation and facilitating corporate change acquired during his 25 year rise to senior management in the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD units.

July
ALTA Conference 2012   View Summary
1 July 2012 to 4 July 2012

Register Online

To register and make your secure online payment, please click here

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Legal Education for a Global Community


As legal educators, we work increasingly in a global context and our graduates seek professional opportunities throughout the region and the world. With law reform, trade practices and legal harmonisation taking place between individuals and communities around the globe, legal education faces a new challenge in the twenty first century.

Legal knowledge is no longer limited to domestic law but now encompasses knowledge of underlying concepts and principles in an international and comparative context, as well as knowledge of other domestic contexts. The demand for this kind of legal knowledgewhere this is driving the internationalisation of the legal curriculum.

In our increasingly interconnected academic fraternity, scholarly dialogue transcends national boundaries. Quality legal research increasingly incorporates a comparative approach and the application of our comparative research efforts are bearing fruit through engagement in law and development, social justice and human rights work.

The theme of this year's conference reflects this increasingly global outlook and invites comment debate and discussion on the benefits and challenges raised by this developing perspective.

We look forward to welcoming you to Sydney Law School.

To view the event flyer click here

For more information about the conference, pricing and registration, click here.

Towards a Modest Legal Moralism: Professor Antony Duff   View Summary
16 July 2012

About the seminar:

The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence and Sydney Institute of Criminology present the JSI seminar 'Towards a Modest Legal Moralism' by Professor Antony Duff.


After distinguishing between different species of Legal Moralism (positive vs. negative; modest vs. ambitious), Professor Duff will outline and defend a modest, positive Legal Moralism, according to which we have good reason to criminalize some type of conduct if (and only if) it constitutes a public wrong. Some of the central elements of the argument will be:

  • The need to look at the different processes of criminalization (of which legislation is only one), and to ask what kinds of consideration can properly figure in those processes.

  • The need to attend to the relationship, and the essential differences, between criminal law and other modes of legal regulation. What marks out criminal law is its focus on wrongs: it identifies a set of public wrongs, and provides for those accused of committing such wrongs to be called to formal public account.

Professor Duff will sketch some of the different routes by which we might be led to think of criminalizing a type of conduct, and the ways in which the conduct's wrongfulness figures on those routes.

About Professor Duff:

Professor Antony Duff is a leading expert on the philosophy of punishment and is internationally recognized for his expertise in criminal law and its structure. He was appointed as a professor in the Law School at the University of Minnesota in 2010 and is also a professor emeritus in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Stirling. Professor Duff is widely acknowledged as having generated renewed interest in criminal law theory through his major works: Intention, Agency, and Criminal Liability: Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law (Blackwell, 1990); Criminal Attempts (Oxford, 1996); and Answering for Crime: Responsibility and Liability in the Criminal Law (Hart 2007). Additional landmark books that have influenced thinking on punishment theory and philosophy include Trials and Punishments (Cambridge, 1986) and Punishment, Communication and Community (Oxford, 2001). He recently led a three-year interdisciplinary study of the criminal trial and with three colleagues produced The Trial on Trial, published by Hart in three volumes (Truth and Due Process, 2004; Judgment and Calling to Account, 2006; Towards a Normative Theory of the Criminal Trial, 2007). Professor Duff is founding co-editor of Criminal Law and Philosophy and serves on the editorial boards of Legal Theory and Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law. Professor Duff was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh in 1996 and a Fellow of the British Academy in 2004. He received an honorary D.Jur. from the University of Oslo in 2008.

The psychology of crime   View Summary
17 July 2012

Registration

To register and secure your online payment please click here
__________________________________________________________

The psychology of crime is a workshop examining the profession of criminal psychology (also referred to as forensic psychology). It will introduce and expand on questions such as: What do criminal/forensic psychologists do to assist police, the courts, the prisons, etc?

The workshop will explore the role of the forensic psychologist with examples of real (anonymous) cases. It is a must for anyone considering a career in the field of psychology, or for psychologists who would like an introduction to the forensic field. The workshop will also be useful for legal professionals and correctional staff in understanding psychological reports, explanations of bizarre behaviours and pathological diagnoses.

What people will know by the end of the workshop:

  • What forensic psychologists do and how we are trained to think
  • How psychologists study and understand criminal behaviour
  • Ways in which psychologists assess and explain criminal behaviour
  • How psychologists assist the courts in dealing with criminal behaviour
  • How psychologists treat certain types of criminal behaviour (violence, sex offences, murder)

Topics that will be covered during the workshop:

  1. "What is psychology?", with reference to famous experiments that taught us much about human behaviour. How does psychology assist people working with criminal behaviour?
  2. Assessment of a criminal offender: a look at how we do it. Real-life example of assessments (anonymous).
  3. Treating criminal offenders. Real-life examples of treatment that worked and some that didn't (anonymous).

Please note that the course content will at times involve details about violent crime that may be traumatic. If in doubt about your ability to emotionally deal with such course content, please contact the Sydney Institute of Criminology and discuss your concerns, or please DO NOT ENROL.

This workshop will be facilitated by Pan Tsomis.Pan is a forensic and clinical psychologist with a masters degree in psychology and a masters degree in criminology. He is a registered psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia (Registration No PSY0001404883), and a member of the Australian Psychological Society's College of Forensic Psychologists and College of Clinical Psychologists (Member No 17562). Pan was a psychologist with the NSW Department of Juvenile Justice, and has worked for the Commonwealth Department of Veterans' Affairs,for a child protection agency, and for the Mental Health Team in Port Macquarie and at the St George Hospital. He has been in private practice since 1998, primarily assessing and treating criminal offenders, victims of violent crime, as well as combat veterans and their families. He has taught psychology at the University of Sydney and criminology at the University of Western Sydney. He has presented papers and lectured on forensic psychological assessment at international conferences. He also regularly runs workshops on assessment and management of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), especially with regard to victims and perpetrators of violent crimes.

Registration fees

Full fee: $240 inc GST, F/T student: $150 inc GST, University of Sydney staff: $190 inc GST, Sydney Law School alumni: $190 inc GST

Book Launch: Legal Pluralism and Development   View Summary
23 July 2012

Registrations

To register, please click here.

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The Sydney Law School and The World Bank are pleased to invite you to the launch of Legal Pluralism and Development: Scholars and Practitioners in Dialogue (Cambridge University Press 2012) edited by Michael Woolcock and Caroline Sage (The World Bank) and Brian Z. Tamanaha (Washington University School of Law).

ABOUT THE BOOK:

Previous efforts at legal development have focused almost exclusively on state legal systems, many of which have shown little improvement over time. Recently, organizations engaged in legal development activities have begun to pay greater attention to the implications of local, informal, indigenous, religious, and village courts or tribunals, which often are more efficacious than state legal institutions, especially in rural communities. Legal pluralism is the term applied to these situations because these institutions exist alongside official state legal systems, usually in a complex or uncertain relationship. Although academics, especially legal anthropologists and sociologists, have discussed legal pluralism for decades, their work has not been consulted in the development context. Similarly, academics have failed to benefit from the insights of development practitioners. This book brings together, in a single volume, contributions from academics and practitioners to explore the implications of legal pluralism for legal development. All of the practitioners have extensive experience in development projects, the academics come from a variety of backgrounds, and most have written extensively on legal pluralism and on development.

Copies of the book can bepurchased via Cambridge University Press.

Book Launch: Fault Lines in Equity   View Summary
26 July 2012

Click here to register.

The Sydney Law School is pleased to invite you for drinks and canapés to celebrate the launch of Fault Lines in Equity, (ed) Glister and Ridge.

In this new collection of essays, leading scholars and practitioners from England, Australia and New Zealand tackle some of the intractable problems that bedevil equity lawyers across jurisdictions. The essays employ new historical, comparative and theoretical perspectives to cast light on the fault lines in equitable doctrine and methodology.

His Honour Justice Campbell of the New South Wales Supreme Court, Court of Appeal will launch the book at 6.15 pm

Distinguished Visitor: Bryan A. Garner   View Summary
31 July 2012

To register and secure online payment click here.

Bryan A. Garner is known throughout the English-speaking legal world for his publications and seminars on the techniques of effective legal writing and advocacy. He is probably best known for his magisterial work Garner's Dictionary of Legal Usage (now in its 3rd edition) and as editor in chief of Black's Law Dictionary (now in its 9th edition). Professor Garner has written over 20 books covering all aspects of legal writing and advocacy.

Professor Garner is a scintillating speaker. He has addressed lawyers, judges, and law students in hundreds of seminars throughout the United States and the common-law legal world. This is his first visit to Sydney.

In this seminar, "The Art of Legal Writing", Professor Garner will discuss the techniques for powerful, effective legal writing: how to take dull writing and turn it into gold.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD units.

Beyond Punishment: Frontiers of Penal Policy   View Summary
31 July 2012

Registration

Click here to register.

____________________________________________________________

How can prisons be managed in a way that achieves community expectations regarding punishment and deterrence while ensuring the realisation of human rights? What can we learn from other countries and prison systems about how to rehabilitate prisoners in a just, decent, humane and cost effective manner?

This colloquium brings together scholars at the forefront of penal policy and criminal justice: Vivien Stern CBE, Professor Andrew Coyle CMG, and Professor Patrick Keyzer.

CHAIR

Patrick Keyzer is the Executive Director - Centre For Law, Governance & Public Policy; and Associate Dean at the Faculty of Law, Bond University. Professor Keyzer is a barrister who has represented clients in constitutional cases in the High Court of Australia and the Queensland Supreme Court and Court of Appeal, and has also represented clients in communications to the United Nations Human Rights Committee.Patrick is co-author (with Bernadette McSherry) of Sex Offenders and Preventive Detention (Federation Press, 2009) and co-editor of Dangerous People (with Bernadette McSherry, published by Routledge New York). He is presently representing a number of prisoners in human rights litigation in various fora.

PRESENTERS

Baroness Vivien Stern was Secretary General of Penal Reform International from 1989 until 2006. In 1997 she was appointed a Senior Research Fellow of London University, based at the International Centre for Prison Studies. She was awarded a CBE in 1992 and was raised to the peerage as Baroness Stern of Vauxhall in 1999. Stern has been a member of several parliamentary committees and has written several books, including Creating Criminals: prisons and people in a market society; Bricks of Shame: Britain's prisons; Failures in Penal Policy; Imprisoned by Our Prisons: a programme for reform (Fabian Series); The Prisons We Deserve and A Sin Against the Future: imprisonment in the world. Baroness Stern is a patron of several charities including the Venture Trust, the Prisoners' Education Trust, New Bridge Foundation, the Royal Philanthropic Society, Clean Break, and Rethink. She was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 1992. In 2009 Stern was invited by the UK Government to conduct a review of UK rape laws. Her subsequent report has attracted significant approval.

Professor Andrew Coyle CMG is Emeritus Professor of Prison Studies in London University and Visiting Professor in the University of Essex. He is Director of the International Centre for Prison Studies, a post which he also held from between 1997 and 2005.] He is a prisons adviser to the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, the UN Latin American Institute, the Council of Europe, including its Committee for the Prevention of Torture, the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe and several national governments. Between 2003 and 2010 he was a member of the UK Foreign Secretary's Expert Committee against Torture. He was a founding member of the Task Force of WHO Europe on Health in Prison. Andrew Coyle was appointed by the Council of Europe as an expert to draft the revised European Prison Rules 2006 and has been retained by the Council to draft a Code of Ethics for Prison Staff

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW and is jointly hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, and the Centre for Law, Governance and Public Policy, Bond University.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to2 MCLE/CPD units.

Book Launch: Reforming Justice - A Journey to Fairness in Asia   View Summary
31 July 2012

Registrations

To register, please click here.

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The Sydney Law School is pleased to invite you to the book launch of Reforming Justice: A Journey to Fairness in Asia(Cambridge University Press, 2012)by Dr Livingston Armytage.

'Reforming Justice' calls for justice to be repositioned more centrally in evolving notions of equitable development. Justice is fundamental to human well being and essential to development. Over the past fifty years, however, overseas development assistance - foreign aid - has grappled with the challenge of improving 'the rule of law' with underwhelming and often dismal results around the world.

Development agencies have supported legal and judicial reforms in order to improve economic growth and good governance, but are yet to address mounting concerns about equity and distribution. Building on new evidence from Asia, Livingston Armytage argues that it is now time to realign the approach to promote justice as fairness and equity.

Dr Livingston Armytage is a graduate of the University of Sydney LLM (Hons I) '95. He recently completed his PhD in Law on Reforming Justice: The Journey to Fairness - 3 Case Studies from Asia and was awarded the Sydney University Medal for Outstanding Postgraduate Research in Law. He is a specialist in judicial and legal reform, advising governments, courts and international development agencies on improving justice systems around the world. Livingston is Founding Director of the Centre for Judicial Studies and adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Sydney.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the launch.

August
Launch: Forensic Science and Justice: From crime scene to court and beyond   View Summary
1 August 2012

Click here to register.

The Sydney Law School invites you to the launch of the Forensic Science and Justice: From crime scene to court and beyond Special Issue of the Current Issues in Criminal Justice Journal.

The upcoming Special Issue of the Current Issues in Criminal Justice will be launched on 1 August 2012. A small number of authors who have contributed to the Forensic Science and Justice: From crime scene to court and beyond Special Issue will discuss their contribution to the journal.

Speakers include:
Dr Rebecca Scott Bray (Co-Director, Sydney Institute of Criminology)
Associate Professor Roberta Julian (Director, Tasmanian Institute of Law Enforcement Studies and co-editor of the Special Issue)
Alastair Ross AM (Director, National Institute for Forensic Sciences)
Mehera San Roque (Senior Lecturer, UNSW)

Copies of the journal will be available to purchase at the launch.

This launch and event is kindly sponsored by the Forensic Document Services.

The Application of Public International Law to Cyber War: an Adequate Legal Framework?   View Summary
2 August 2012

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This seminar will explore the question of whether cyber attacks are prohibited under international law, given both the inherent hostility and their ability to generate grave destruction.

Since the dawn of the Information Age states have become highly dependent upon computer technology in order to effectively regulate their societies. This dependency, however, has been recognised by both hostile states and belligerent non-state actors, who have increasingly sought to target computer servers and the information that they hold.

Whilst a cyber attack that causes a plane to crash or opens the gates of a dam would certainly produce physical damage and thus constitute an unlawful use of force, the issue is that many cyber attacks will not produce such damage. Cyber attacks can interrupt government communications, cripple a state's financial sector or disable its military defence systems without manifesting physical damage.

The wealth of current academic literature invariably concludes that such cyber attacks do not constitute an unlawful use of force and thus fall outside the international regulatory framework. This is considered wholly unsatisfactory because of the devastating impact that cyber attacks can yield, regardless that this damage is non-physical in nature. International law is thus lambasted by contemporary cyber war literature for being outdated and deficient.

Dr Russell Buchan from the University of Sheffield disagrees with this common position and believes that cyber attacks are coercive in nature and amount to unlawful intervention under customary international law, constituting an internationally wrongful act.

Dr Buchan will be joined by Dr Emily Crawford from the Sydney Law School who will discuss current issues for the law of armed conflict with regards to hostilities in cyberspace and examine some current State practices relevant to cyber warfare.

About the speakers:

Dr Russell Buchan holds an LLB (Hons) degree in Law, an LLM in Public Law and a PhD in International Law. Russell has published widely in leading academic journals in the field of public international law, with his focus being on collective security, international criminal law, international humanitarian law and cyber war. Russell will publish a monograph in 2012 with Hart Publishing entitled 'International Law and the Construction of the Liberal Peace'. Russell is also currently the editor of the annual Special Issue of the International Community Law Review.

Dr Buchan was recently awarded a research fellowship to visit the University of Sydney to undertake research. While here, he will be concentrating on completing his upcoming monograph which relates to the international protection of fundamental human rights.

Dr Emily Crawford

Dr Emily Crawford is a post-doctoral fellow and associate at the Sydney Centre for International Law (SCIL). Previously at the Law Faculty at the University of New South Wales, Emily completed her Arts and Law degrees before working as a researcher at the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, before returning to UNSW to undertake her PhD. Her doctoral thesis on the disparate treatment of participants in armed conflicts was published by Oxford University Press in 2010.

Emily has taught international law and international humanitarian law, and has delivered lectures both locally and overseas on international humanitarian law issues, including the training of military personnel on behalf of the Red Cross in Australia. A member of the International Law Association's Committee on Non-State Actors, as well as the NSW Red Cross IHL Committee, Emily's current research project is looking at major developments in the conduct of armed conflicts in the 21st century, such as cyber warfare and targeted assassinations, and the implications for both domestic and international law.

Distinguished Speakers Program: The Right Honourable the Lord Kerr of Tonaghmore   View Summary
2 August 2012

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The Australian internet activist, the radical Jordanian cleric and the English businessman - recent cases concerning the UK's extradition obligations

In this Distinguished Speakers Program lecture, The Right Honourable the Lord Kerr will discuss the UK's extradition procedures as highlighted in the cases of Julian Assange, Abu Qatada and Christopher Tappin.


Lord Kerr served as Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland from 2004 to 2009, and was the last Lord of Appeal in Ordinary appointed before the creation of The Supreme Court. Lord Kerr was educated at St Colman's College, Newry, and read law at Queen's University, Belfast. He was called to the Bar of Northern Ireland in 1970, and to the Bar of England and Wales at Gray's Inn in 1974.He served as Junior Crown Counsel from 1978 to 1983, at which point he took silk and served as Senior Crown Counsel from 1988 to 1993. In 1993 he was appointed a Judge of the High Court and knighted. He became Lord Chief Justice and joined the Privy Council in 2004.

Lord Kerr succeeded Lord Carswell of Killeen as Northern Ireland's Lord of Appeal in Ordinary on 29 June 2009, the last Law Lord appointed before the creation of The Supreme Court.

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Seminar Series: Professor Kon Sik Kim   View Summary
3 August 2012

Dynamics of Corporate Governance in East Asia: a focus on China, Japan and Korea

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ABOUT THE LECTURE

Professor Kim's address will analyse recent developments in corporate governance in three East Asian countries, China, Japan and Korea. These countries have been, and still are, closely intertwined with each other, culturally, historically and economically.

From the perspective of corporate governance, it is noteworthy that each country has gone through (or, in the case of China, is still in) a period of economic growth initiated by the government. Despite this common ground, realities of corporate governance vary substantially among the three jurisdictions. Differences in corporate governance do not seem to be due to differences in the level of economic development. Moreover, although corporate governance in all these countries has been subject to the winds of change, the pattern of this change differs country to country.Professor Kim's address will consider some of the forces causing and obstructing corporate governance changes.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Professor Kon Sik Kim is a leading corporate and securities law scholar at Seoul National University (SNU), where he founded the Center for Financial Law in 2002. He has an LL.M. from Harvard Law School, and J.D. and Ph.D. from University of Washington Law School. Professor Kim has published and edited numerous books and articles in the field of corporate law, including a leading textbook on capital market law. He has visited Tokyo University, City University of Hong Kong, Harvard Law School and Duke Law School (Hong Kong Program) as visiting professor, and Munich University (Germany), Stanford Law School, Columbia Law School, and Renmin University(Beijing) as visiting scholar. Professor Kim has extensive experience in advising various institutions in Korea such as the Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Finance and Economy, Financial Supervisory Commission, Fair Trade Commission, Korea Exchange and Korea Securities Depository. He is currently on the advisory board of the University of Tokyo Law School and has been a director of three listed firms in Korea. He has extensive experience as expert witness or arbitrator in connection with a variety of litigation and arbitrations, both domestic and international.

COMMENTATORS

Kevin McCann AM, Chairman, Origin Energy Limited and Macquarie Group;

Nicola Wakefield Evans, Partner, King & Wood Mallesons

CHAIR

Professor Jennifer Hill ,Sydney Law School

This is a joint event between CAPLUS and Parsons Corporate.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Click here to download the event flyer

Planning Law Reform in NSW: Explaining the Revolution    View Summary
6 August 2012

This event is fully subscribed. To join a waiting list, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au
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ABOUT THE SEMINAR

This seminar will discuss the new laws being proposed for the development of land use plans by councils and the State Government and the settlement of planning disputes, which are due to go before parliament by years' end.

NSW planning law is undergoing generational change , with the recent release of a green paper on a new planning system for the State. This seminar will discuss the new laws being proposed for the development of land use plans by councils and the State Government and the settlement of planning disputes, which are due to go before parliament by years' end. With the new system set to revolutionise legal practice in planning law, this seminar will provide practitioners with a clear understanding of the background to the reforms and the likely future shape of the NSW planning system.


ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

Zada Lipman is an Emeritus Professor in Law specialising in Environmental Law, especially pollution, planning and coastal adaptation law. She has over 30 years experience teaching and researching in the area of Environmental Law. She is a co-author of Environmental Law and Planning in NSW (Federation Press 3rd ed 2012) and has published extensively. She is a member of the (World Conservation Union) IUCN Commission on Environmental Law and a member of the Commissions' Special Working Group on Enforcement and Compliance and Oceans, Coasts and Coral Reefs. She is the New South Wales and Pollution special editor of the Environmental and Planning Law Journal and the Australian editor of the Environmental Liability Journal (UK).

Dr Robert Stokes MP is the Liberal Member for Pittwater and Parliamentary Secretary for Renewable Energy. Before entering Parliament, Rob was a practising solicitor and Senior Lecturer with the Division of Law at Macquarie University. He holds a PhD in Law, Master of Laws, Bachelor of Laws, Bachelor of Arts, Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice and Diploma in Biblical Studies. Rob has been actively involved in volunteer work in the legal profession and has written numerous articles on environmental planning and NSW tax law in a variety of books and academic journals.


Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is presented by the Australian Central for Climate and Environmental Law.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Michel Rosenfeld    View Summary
9 August 2012

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The US First Amendment Run Amuck: Protecting Hate Speech, Letting Money Talk and Other Disproportionate Excesses as Viewed from a Comparative Perspective

Michel Rosenfeld is Justice Sydney L. Robins Professor of Human Rights and Director, Program on Global and Comparative Constitutional Theory at Cardozo Law School in New York. Rosenfeld was an associate with both Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom and Rosenman, Colin, Freund, Lewis & Cohen. He has lectured widely in the United States, and internationally. He is the author of several books, including Just Interpretations: Law Between Ethics and Politics and Affirmative Action and Justice: A Philosophical and Constitutional Inquiry, which in 1992 was named outstanding book on the subject of human rights in the US by the Gustave Meyers Center, and most recently The Identity of the Constitutional Subject. He is a coauthor of Comparative Constitutionalism: Cases and Materials (with Baer, Dorsen, and Sajo.) He is the coeditor of The Longest Night: Perspectives and Polemics on Election 2000; Hegel and Legal Theory; Habermas on Law and Democracy: Critical Exchanges, Deconstruction and the Possibility of Justice; and editor of Constitutionalism, Identity, Difference and Legitimacy: Theoretical Perspectives.

Professor Rosenfeld is an affiliated member of the graduate faculty of the New School University. He is a founding member and president of the United States Association of Constitutional Law (2004- ), editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Constitutional Law, and was president of the International Association of Constitutional Law (1999-2004). Among his many honors, he received the French government's highest and most prestigious award, the Legion of Honor. In August 2007, Professor Rosenfeld was appointed to an International Blaise Pascal Research Chair.

This lecture is presented as part of the Sydney Law School Distinguished Speakers Program 2012. Click here for a copy of the latest program.

Climate Change and Australia: Warming to the Global Challenge   View Summary
9 August 2012

To RSVP for this event, please email: law.scil@sydney.edu.au

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The Sydney Law School are pleased to invite you to the launch of Climate Change and Australia: Warming to the Challenge (Federation Press, 2012) written by Ben Saul, Steven Sherwood, Jane McAdam, Tim Stephens and James Slezak.

ABOUT THE BOOK

Climate is one of the most hotly debated issues of this century. Internationally, leaders have come under unprecedented scrutiny by civil society.

As Australia and the world face the consequences of extreme weather including severe floods, devastating bushfires and coastal erosion, the question is asked: 'Is climate change the cause?' Drawing on expertise from science, economics, geography and international law, the authors demystify the confusion surrounding climate change which comes from inconsistent media reports, complex scientific data and terminology, alarming and often paralysing predictions, and deliberate obfuscation of fact by vested interests. The book examines the science of global warming and the responses required; Australia's vulnerabilities and reactions to date; global climate law and politics from Rio to Cancún and beyond; food insecurity, water scarcity and conflicts over resources; climate-related displacement and migration; and global governance of climate change.

This book provides a clear, balanced account of the science on climate change, how it is affecting Australia and the world, and the policy options available.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

Ben Saul is Professor of International Law and an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the Faculty of Law, The University of Sydney.

Steven Sherwood is a Professor at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science and Director of the Climate Change Research Centre at the University of New South Wales.

Jane McAdam is a Professor and an Australian Research Council Future Fellow at the Faculty of Law, University of New South Wales and a non-resident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution in Washington DC.

Tim Stephens is Associate Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Sydney, and Co-Director of the Sydney Centre for International Law.

James Slezak is a partner and head of the Sustainability Practice at New York-based social change agency Purpose, and an affiliate at the Harvard Law School's Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

20th Annual Labour Law Conference   View Summary
13 August 2012

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For the last 20 years the Annual Labour Law Conference has brought together leading Australian and International labour law and industrial relations experts to debate the key issues confronting employers and employees.

This year's conference will be an opportunity to reflect on Australian labour law past and present and how it compares to European countries. There will be a large focus on plenary discussion around topics such as good faith bargaining, antidiscrimination, OHS, social media and unfair dismissal and the future of Australian labour law.

We are very excited about this year's program and our excellent line up of speakers for our 20th Anniversary.

Russell Lansbury, Emeritus Professor, Business School, University of Sydney
Mia Ronnmar, Professor in Private Law/Labour Law, Lund University, Sweden & Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations (IJCLLIR)
Andrew Stewart, John Bray Professor of Law, University of Adelaide
Ron McCallum, Emeritus Professor, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney
Giri Sivaraman, Principal, Maurice Blackburn Lawyers
Anthony Forsyth, Associate Professor, Department of Business Law and Taxation, Monash University
Therese MacDermott, Senior Lecturer, Macquarie Law School
Elizabeth Raper, 5 Wentworth Chambers
John Buchanan, Director, Workplace Research Centre
Meg Smith, Senior Lecturer, University of Western Sydney

Early Bird Full Day including catering: $795.00 inc GST Full Day including catering: $895.00 inc GST

University of Sydney staff and student rates are also available.

Contact Karen Treacy for more information: karen.treacy@sydney.edu.au.

This conference is presented by the University of Sydney's Workplace Research Centre in conjunction with Sydney Law School.

2012 Julius Stone Address - Professor Ran Hirschl   View Summary
16 August 2012

Online registration
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Across the Seven Seas of Constitutional Law and Religion

 

Contrary to what many liberals predicted or wished for, not only has religion not vanished, but has instead gained a renewed momentum worldwide. One of the outcomes of this religious resurgence is that the comparative study of constitutional law and religion has never been as relevant or exciting as it is today. In particular, it begs the question of how constitutional law and courts have been dealing with the ever-intensifying struggle over the place of religion in the public sphere. That courts in "separationist" regimes of state-and-religion (e.g. France) take an overall religion-limiting stance is not surprising. Two notably more difficult settings for probing into how courts domesticate religion are (i) countries where strong constitutional establishment of religion exists (e.g. in the predominantly Muslim world); and (ii) countries that take great pride in advancing an official multicultural agenda (e.g. Canada).

In this Address, Professor Hirschl will present a comparative analysis of religion-and-state jurisprudence and interpretive ingenuity in such settings in order to delineate a possibly universal religion-taming logic of constitutional law and courts. This will also provide an opportunity to examine how truly comparative is the study of comparative constitutional law in general, and comparative constitutional law of religion in particular.

 

About the speaker:

Ran Hirschl (PhD, Yale 1999) is Professor of Political Science and Law at the University of Toronto, where he holds a Canada Research Chair in Constitutionalism and Democracy. In 2012, he received a Killam Research Fellowship—one of Canada's most prestigious research awards, granted by the Canada Council for the Arts. His research interests focus on comparative public law and legal institutions. He is the author of three books: Towards Juristocracy: The Origins and Consequences of the New Constitutionalism (Harvard University Press, 2004 & 2007), Constitutional Theocracy (Harvard University Press, 2010) - winner of the 2011 Mahoney Prize in Legal Theory, and Comparative Matters (Harvard University Press, forthcoming in 2013), as well as over 70 articles and book chapters on comparative constitutional law and politics. Hirschl has been a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (Stanford), a Fulbright Scholar, and a Fellow at Princeton University's Program in Law and Public Affairs. He served as Jeremiah Smith, Jr. Visiting Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and as Global Visiting Professor of Law at NYU. In 2010, he received a University of Toronto Outstanding Teaching Award, and delivered the Annual Lecture in Law and Society at Oxford University.

This event is generously sponsored by the Educational Heritage Foundation

This event will be chaired by Dr Kevin Walton, Director of the Julius Stone Institute.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit.

Law vs Pharmacy Charity Rugby Cup   View Summary
17 August 2012

Students and alumni of the faculties of Pharmacy and Law will face off in a charity rugby match to be held on campus on the evening of Friday 17 August, competing not only for pride, but also to raise valuable funds for their designated charities.

The last match saw Pharmacy narrowly beat Law, and Law will be out to even the score!

Entry is by gold coin donation, and a bar and BBQ will be operating, with all proceeds from the event to go to the nominated charity of the winning team. An anonymous donor will also be matching all donations dollar for dollar, so please come along, support your team and give generously.

The event is being coordinated by Sydney University Pharmacy Association and Sydney University Law Society and with the support of both faculties.

For further information please contact pharmacy.alumni@sydney.edu.au or law.alumni@sydney.edu.au.

The Supreme Court of New South Wales Annual Corporate Law Conference   View Summary
21 August 2012

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Regulation of the financial services sector after Dodd-Frank and the sovereign debt crisis

Co-sponsored by the Supreme Court of New South Wales, the Law Society of New South Wales and the Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law of the University of Sydney Law School.

Please click here to view the full brochure.

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Seminar Series: Professor Howell E Jackson    View Summary
22 August 2012

The Resolution of Insolvent Cross-Border Financial Firms

To register and make your online payment, please CLICK HERE

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ABOUT THE LECTURE

The global financial crisis of 2008 and ensuing years has revealed many shortcomings in the international financial architecture. Most notably the authorities' inability to deal effectively with the failure of global firms engaging in extensive cross-border business.

The G20 has recognised this and has assigned the task of developing appropriate international standards to the Basel-based Financial Stability Board (FSB), itself a by-product of the financial crisis.

In October of 2011, the FSB released a proposed new international standard on resolution regimes:Key Attributes of Effective Resolution Regimes for Financial Institutions (Oct. 2011).

Professor Jackson's address will analyse the standards for effective national resolution regimes as documented in this proposed document as well as the many challenges for regulatory reform including the lack of consistency in national regulatory procedures; coordination of resolutions solutions as well as compliance enforcement.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Howell Jackson is the James S. Reid, Jr., Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. His research interests include financial regulation, international finance, consumer finance, federal budget policy, and entitlement reform.

Professor Jackson has served as a consultant to the United States Treasury Department, the United Nations Development Program, the World Bank/International Monetary Fund, and various other national and multi-lateral regulatory bodies. He is a member of the National Academy on Social Insurance, a trustee of the College Retirement Equities Fund (CREF) and its affiliated TIAA-CREF investment companies, a member of the panel of outside scholars for the NBER Retirement Research Center, and a senior editor for Cambridge University Press Series on International Corporate Law and Financial Regulation.

Professor Jackson is co-editor of Fiscal Challenges: An Inter-Disciplinary Approach to Budget Policy (Cambridge University Press 2008), co-author of Analytical Methods for Lawyers (Foundation Press 2003) and Regulation of Financial Institutions (West 1999), and author of numerous scholarly articles.

A former Acting Dean of Harvard Law School, Professor Jackson has been serving as a special adviser to the President and Provost of Harvard University since 2010. Before joining the Harvard Law School faculty in 1989, Professor Jackson was a law clerk for Associate Justice Thurgood Marshall and practiced law in Washington, D.C. Professor Jackson received J.D. and M.B.A. degrees from Harvard University in 1982 and a B.A. from Brown University in 1976.

COMMENTATORS

James Marshall ,Ashurst

John Martin ,Henry Davis York

CHAIR

Professor Jennifer Hill,Sydney Law School

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Click here to download the event flyer

Getting to the core of the Personal Property Securities Act 2009   View Summary
22 August 2012

Registration

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The Ross Parsons Centre Commercial Law Program at the Sydney Law School and Allens are pleased to invite you to the following seminar presented by Professor Charles W Mooney Jr:


Getting to the core of the Personal Property Securities Act 2009 (Cth): an overview of Article 9 of the US Uniform Commercial Code.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Charles W. Mooney, Jr. is the Charles A. Heimbold, Jr. Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma (B.A. (high honors) 1969) and the Harvard Law School (J.D. cum laude 1972). He has been a Visiting Professor of Law at the Georgetown University Law Center, the University of Virginia School of Law, Waseda University (Tokyo), and the University of Tokyo. Professor Mooney served as Interim Dean (1999-2000) and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs (1998-2000 and 2008-09) at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He was Chair of the University of Pennsylvania Faculty Senate for the 2004-05 academic year.

Until 1986 Professor Mooney was a partner of Shearman & Sterling in New York City, where he specialised in private financing transactions and banking law. Prior to 1981, Professor Mooney practised law in Oklahoma City with the firm of Crowe & Dunlevy.

Professor Mooney is a nationally and internationally recognized scholar in the areas of commercial, debtor-creditor, and bankruptcy law. He is a member of The American Law Institute, fellow of the American College of Commercial Finance Attorneys, and a fellow, Director, and former Regent of The American College of Bankruptcy. He has been and continues to be involved in many law-reform efforts on the state, federal, and international levels. He was a member of the Securities and Exchange Commission's Federal Advisory Committee on Market Transactions (appointed by the S.E.C., 1991-1997), and was a co-reporter for the Drafting Committee on the Revision of U.C.C. Article 9 (Secured Transactions). Professor Mooney also served as a United States Delegate and Position Coordinator, International Institute for the Unification of Private International Law (UNIDROIT), Convention on Security Interests in International Mobile Equipment, and also served in those capacities at the Diplomatic Conference in Cape Town, South Africa, that completed the Cape Town Convention on International Interests in Mobile Equipment and the Protocol on Aircraft Equipment. He also served as a member of the United States delegation for the UNIDROIT Convention on Intermediated Securities at government expert meetings and two sessions of the Diplomatic Conference in Geneva. In 2006 he was a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan, Tokyo, during the fall 2006 term, conducting comparative research on the legal regimes of Japan, the United States, and the UNIDROIT Convention on Intermediated Securities. He teaches in the areas of commercial, debtor-creditor, bankruptcy, international business, and real property law and he is the author of books, chapters, articles, and other materials in the commercial law and bankruptcy fields.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

INTENSIVE COURSE
Professor Mooney will also teach a four day intensive course on Personal Property Securities in the US for the Ross Parsons Centre at the Old Law School, St James Campus (9am-4pm on 20th- 21st, 23rd-24th August). This is being run as apart of Sydney Law School's Masters' programs however it is possible to enrol in this course by way of Legal Professional Development or as a single unit (without assessment). Inquiries should be directed to law.info@sydney.edu.au.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Helene Ruiz-Fabri   View Summary
23 August 2012

Register Online


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The sense and direction of multilateralism in international trade law

Multilateralism seems to deserve a reflection because it is nowadays - and has been for a while - called into question. This multilateralism, devised during the last third of the nineteenth century and having made amazing progress during the twentieth, not only knows heavy tensions but is questioned. Could it be outdated? The question might look audacious, if not excessive. Multilateralism is obviously not threatened to disappear and each day gives indeed evidence that it is very much alive. Nevertheless, it cannot escape questions that seem correlated to the debate on fragmentation, which has unfolded in international law over the course of the past two decades. The first question is about legitimacy and it will be explored more specifically by focusing on WTO.

About the speaker:

ProfessorHeleneRuiz Fabri is currently Dean of the Sorbonne Law School (University of Paris I - Panthéon Sorbonne), Director of the Joint Institute of comparative law of Paris (UMR de droit comparé - Paris I/CNRS) and Director of the Master 2 in International Economic Law. She teaches and researches International Law, WTO Law, International Dispute Settlement, and has published extensively in these fields. She also has expertise as a legal consultant at the Council of Europe, at the French administration and at the Organisation internationale de la Francophonie.

JSI Seminar Series: Dr Kirsty Gover   View Summary
23 August 2012

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As part of the JSI Seminar Series 2012, Dr Kirsty Gover will present the seminar Racial Discrimination and the Tribal Demos: the Impact of Tribes on Settler-state Political Theory.

As the western settler states reconfigure their constitutional arrangements to accommodate indigenous jurisdictions, they encounter a series of constitutive problems that otherwise rarely arise in the day-to-day of democratic governance. Settler societies are required to confront the puzzle of democratic self-constitution itself, namely, how can a demos enclose itself, by drawing boundaries, in a way consistent with liberal principles of non-discrimination? In settler-state public law and policy, and in academic commentary, it is generally agreed that tribes may exclude aspirant members on the basis of their race. In doctrinal terms this is in fact unavoidable, because in the law of all four countries, for better or worse, indigeneity is emphatically a measure of race and tribes are indigenous polities. In the settler societies, therefore, some liberal non-discrimination norms have been substantively modified in order to accommodate tribes as racially-constituted polities. The immutable characteristics of race, descent, ethnicity are present in the settler states not as a transitory remnant of premodernism, but as a necessary constitutive premise and a living organizational principle, of recognised tribes and therefore also of settler states. In this paper, Kirsty Gover argues that in the western settler states, tribal discrimination on the basis of race is tolerated (barely) because race is a constitutive principle of tribal polities, not merely the expression of tribal policy. To accommodate tribalism and make sense of their own constitutional origins in the process, settler states have come to rely on a normative distinction between constitutive premises (rules that constitute a polity) and prospective law and policy (rules that control entry to that polity once formed). This is a promising move, not just because it is a distinctive response to the exigencies of settler-state pluralism, but because it helps to draw our attention to the illiberal origins of liberal states. We cannot imagine a tribe that admits all comers, because such an entity would not be a tribe at all, but we can imagine a liberal polity that was first constituted on the basis of race, because race is shared descent writ large, and descent-based-membership is never far from the ideology of nation-states, liberal or otherwise.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dr. Kirsty Gover joined the Melbourne Law School faculty in 2009. Her research and publications address the law, policy and political theory of indigenous rights, institutions and jurisdiction. She has a particular interest in tribal constitutionalism. Dr Kirsty Gover is a graduate of the New York University (NYU) JSD Doctoral Program, where she was an Institute for International Law and Justice (IILJ) Graduate Scholar and New Zealand Top Achiever Doctoral Fellow. Kirsty received her B.A./LL.B. from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and her LL.M. from Columbia University, United States, where she was a Columbia University School of Law Human Rights Fellow and James Kent Scholar.

Dr. Gover is the author of "Tribal Constitutionalism: States, Tribes and the Governance of Membership" (Oxford University Press 2010). She is interested in the role played by "indigeneity" in the constitutionalism of settler societies, and in the importance of indigenous concepts of law and politics in settler state political theory. Recent work addresses the friction between tribal and settler state laws on the status of adopted children, the political theory of state-tribal jurisdictional agreements, and the absence of empirical reference to indigenous claims in theories of indigeneity.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event presented by the The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence.

Developments in international nuclear law: Helen G Cook   View Summary
29 August 2012

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The history of international nuclear law can largely be told from the perspective of international nuclear events, such as the incident at Three Mile Island in the United States in 1979, followed by the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the Ukraine in 1986. The events at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March 2011 have had, and will continue to have, a dramatic impact on international nuclear politics, international nuclear law and the international nuclear industry. This presentation will provide an overview of international nuclear law in commercial practice and consider the current and future developments in international nuclear law post-Fukushima. It will also address the particular aspects of international nuclear law that are relevant to Australian interests.

About the speaker:

Helen Cook is a Senior Associate at the US Law Firm Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman, where she specializes in the law of nuclear energy. Since graduating from Sydney University in 2004 with a BA/LLB, Helen interned at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia and the International Criminal Court before returning to Sydney to work at Allens Arthur Robinson. In 2007 Helen joined the UK law firm Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer in its Dubai and Abu Dhabi offices, where she worked for four years on energy and infrastructure projects in the Middle East. She became interested in nuclear power through advising the Government of Bahrain on the development of its civilian nuclear power program. Desiring to specialize in nuclear law, Helen moved to Washington DC in 2011 and joined the dedicated international nuclear power group at Pillsbury, where she is currently advising governments, developers, technology vendors, operators, fuel suppliers and international banks on many different aspects of civilian nuclear power programmes, including bilateral nuclear cooperation agreements, international nuclear law, export controls, nuclear liability and the procurement, construction and financing of new nuclear power plants.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law.

September
International Law and Remote Attacks in Armed Conflicts   View Summary
5 September 2012

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This seminar will look at whether remote attack challenges the law of armed conflict or is it the other way round with the law challenging remote attack? The presentation looks at a number of examples of remote attack, namely unmanned drone attacks, autonomous attacks using unmanned technologies, cyber warfare and attack in outer space. The seminar then looks at the question of liability issues when remote attacks go wrong, considering first criminal liability and then the liability to compensate as provided for in the law of armed conflict, with reference to the position of software/weapons designers.

About the speaker

Air Cdre William Boothby (ret.) has served in the RAF and well as the UK government, and is an expert on the law of armed conflict, serving as Deputy Director of Legal Services in the RAF, prior to his retirement in 2011. He has specific interests in the law on weapons and targeting, and was member of the Group of Experts that examined the question of Direct Participation in Hostilities convened by the ICRC, as well as the Group of Experts preparing and drafting the Tallinn Manual on Cyber Warfare, convened under the auspices of the NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence. He teaches at the Royal Holloway College of the University of London, at the Geneva Centre for Security Policy and at the Australian National University. His degrees/qualifications are BA in Economics, 1973 at Kent University in UK, qualified Solicitor in 1977, and PhD in international law at the University of Frankfurt (Oder) in Germany in 2008. His first book on 'Weapons and the Law of Armed Conflict' was published in 2009 by OUP. His second book, The Law of Targeting, is to be published in August 2012 by the same publisher.


Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

This event is presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law.

International Arbitration in UNCITRAL Model Law Jurisdictions   View Summary
13 September 2012

International Arbitration in UNCITRAL Model Law Jurisdictions: Comparing Recent Developments in Japan

Hosted by: Clifford Chance, Level 16, No. 1 O'Connell Street, Sydney

This event is now full. Please email your details tokylie.kolts@cliffordchance.com be placed on a wait list.

Organized by: Sydney Law School - Centre for Asian and Pacific Law (CAPLUS), Australian Network for Japanese Law (ANJeL) & Sydney Centre for International Law (SCIL)

Supported by: Australian Centre for International Commercial Arbitration (ACICA), Australasian Forum for International Arbitration (AFIA.asia), Australian International Disputes Centre (AIDC), Chartered Institute of Arbitrators - Australia (CIArb), Japan Commercial Arbitration Centre (JCAA), International Law Association (ILA).

Overview: This seminar will discuss recent case law and other topics related to international commercial arbitration in Japan, of particular interest from an Australian perspective, including: the standard of reasoning required from arbitrators, challenges to awards based on public policy or inability to present one's case, time limits for bringing challenges, interim measures, enforceability of multi-tiered dispute resolution agreements, confidentiality, and "Arb-Med" (legal and practical issues involved when arbitrators facilitate settlement, as is still quite frequent in Japan).

The seminar will also touch on some developments in other jurisdictions that have adopted the UNCITRAL Model Law for their arbitration legislation, especially the recent decision regarding Arb-Med rendered by the Hong Kong Court of Appeal in Gao Hai Yan & Anor v Keeneye Holdings Ltd & Ors [2011] HKEC 514. This will build on discussion from a 20 July seminar in Tokyo involving Dr J Romesh Weeramantry and the present speaker and commentator.

The seminar will also briefly consider the differing policy stances towards incorporating investor-state arbitration provisions in investment treaties adopted by Japan (positive) and Australia (now negative), and some implications for ongoing bilateral Free Trade Agreement and Trans-Pacific Partnership negotiations.

Speaker: Professor Tatsuya Nakamura specializes in international dispute resolution and ADR, especially arbitration. He is Professor of Law at Kokushikan University in Tokyo and General Manger of Arbitration Department of the Japan Commercial Arbitration Association. His publications include Japanese Arbitration Law Q&A (2004), International Business Disputes - Arbitration, Mediation and Negotiation (2012), and many articles and books in Japanese and English - including a chapter (with Luke Nottage) on Japan in Tom Ginsburg et al (eds) Arbitration in Asia (3rd ed. 2102, also at http://ssrn.com/author=488525). Prof Nakamura helped enact Japan's Arbitration Law 2003, as a member of the Consultative Committee of Experts on Arbitration for the Japanese Government's Office for Promotion of Justice System Reform of the Japanese Government. He is also on the International Arbitrators Panel of the Korean Commercial Arbitration Board.

Commentator: Dr Luke Nottage specialises in comparative and transnational business law (especially arbitration, contract law, and consumer product safety law). He is Associate Dean and Professor of Comparative and Transnational Business Law at Sydney Law School, ANJeL co-director, and director of Japanese Law Links Pty Ltd. Publications include International Arbitration in Australia (2010), Foreign Investment and Dispute Resolution in Asia (2011), and (at http://ssrn.com/author=488525) a paper summarising and identifying trends in recent case law under the International Arbitration Act 1974 (Cth). Luke has executive roles in ACICA (Rules Committee), AFIA (Council) a nd the Law Council of Australia (ILS). He is presently involved in a Japan-related arbitration in London, and has consulted for law firms world-wide, the EC, the OECD, the UNDP and the Japanese government. Luke is leading a research project (including Prof Nakamura) on "Fostering a Common Culture in Cross-Border Dispute Resolution: Australia, Japan and the Asia-Pacific", funded by the (DFAT-affiliated) Australia-Japan Foundation.

Chair: Tim Grave is a partner in Clifford Chance's Sydney office, specialising in commercial dispute resolution and related advice across a wide range of matters, including Corporations Act matters, directors duties, commercial and contractual disputes, equitable claims, trade practices, and investigations by regulators. In the last 12 months Tim has acted in two international arbitration related matters in the Federal Court. The first involved acting for a European applicant in successfully obtaining recognition and enforcement of a foreign arbitral award that was opposed by the Indian respondent. The second involved acting for Russian respondents in the first application in Australia for interim relief under the Model Law by way of freezing orders against the respondents' Australian assets.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Michael Sexton SC   View Summary
13 September 2012

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Is there a role still remaining for the States in the Australian federation?

The decisions of the High Court over the last century have largely concentrated legal and financial power in the federal government. The States continue to exist as political entities but are in many ways dependant on federal funding to carry out their traditional functions. Is this a good model for federalism in the 21st century? Is there any prospect of this trend being reversed in the decisions of the High Court? These are important issues for Australia over the coming decades.

About the speaker:

A graduate of the law schools of the universities of Melbourne and Virginia, Michael Sexton SC, spent some years as an academic lawyer before taking up practice at the NSW Bar. Since 1998 he has been Solicitor General for New South Wales. He is co-author of the Australian text on defamation law and the author of several books on Australian politics and history. In the area of public administration he has been chairman of the NSW State Rail Authority and a board member of the NSW Public Transport Authority, the NSW Library the Sydney Writers' Festival and the University of Technology Council.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

The Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) Information Session   View Summary
13 September 2012

Register to attend this special information session of the Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) intake for 2013. Find out more on admission requirements, exclusive features, fees and scholarships.

Register now.

The Sydney Juris Doctor (JD)
Sydney Law School is Australia's First. Since its inception, it has been at the forefront of developments associated with both the teaching and research of law.
Our aim is to provide you with a world-class legal education that prepares you for the global and international environment in which you will provide legal advice. The Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) ushers in a new era for the Sydney Law School and its teaching of law at graduate level. A comprehensive three-year degree, it has an unrivalled international focus, where you receive a comprehensive overview of the practice and profession of the law in Australia and how it relates globally, transnationally and internationally.

Unrivalled International Focus
Exclusive international features of the Sydney JD include:
The opportunity for you to study two core units in International Law - Public International Law and Private International Law
You have access to approximately 120 elective units of study across all areas of specialisation taught at the Sydney Law School, including comparative and international law
Exchange opportunities available for you in North America, Europe and the Asia Pacific at institutions including NYU, Humboldt and the National University of Singapore
You can undertake off-shore study in China, Japan, the United Kingdom and Nepal

2012 Kevin McCann Lecture on Energy and Resources Law: Mitchell H Hooke CEO Minerals Council of Aus.   View Summary
19 September 2012

Registrations

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Complacency, Backsliding and Envy are the Real Enemies of Sustainable Development. A lecture on the current challenges to the Australian mining and resources sector.

Australia is entering stormy waters. Indeed, there are all the ingredients of another "perfect storm". Unlike the confluence of events that precipitated the global financial crisis, this time key factors are of our own making.


The "mining boom" is not over. It is different. The underlying fundamentals of demand have not materially changed, just evolved. It is the supply side and Australia's capacity to compete for global custom that has markedly and acutely changed. Supply has caught up with, even exceeded, demand. Commodity prices are easing, and margins shrinking in the face of escalating costs. As the industry necessarily shifts from an era of price-led growth to volume-led growth, Australia is found wanting, increasingly vulnerable to competition from resource-rich emerging economies.


The strongest terms of trade in 150 years (driven by higher mineral commodity prices) has been masking the emerging structural deficits in Australia's economic circumstances. An increasing costs structure, declining productivity and a deteriorating sovereign risk reputation are undermining Australia's competitiveness and attractiveness as a place to do business in a highly globalised industry and world economy.


National complacency, economic policy reform inertia (and in some cases, back-sliding on three decades of pro-market reforms) and the politics of envy focused on the redistributive, rather than the productive, side of the economy, are all contributing to Australia's vulnerability.
The opportunity cost in constraining Australia's supply capacity is diminished national prosperity, not so much from my generation's perspective, but for future generations. This threatens the fundamental tenet of sustainable development - that today's generation does not compromise the capacity of future generations to prosper.


Few contest the underlying imperative of sustainable development, nor the equanimous consideration of its three fundamental pillars - environmental and social stewardship and economic development. This equation has been popularly and properly viewed through the prism of ensuring that environmental management and social welfare are pillars of equal imperative to economic development. But I suspect few appreciate that the economic pillar similarly needs servicing. It cannot be on auto-pilot, particularly if it is headed in the wrong direction.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Mitchell H Hooke (Mitch) has been Chief Executive Officer of the Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) since June 2002. The MCA is one of the nation's most significant industry bodies representing minerals exploration, production and processing.


Over the past two decades, Mr Hooke has made a significant contribution to the development of Australia's trade, economic and industry policy, across the mining, food and grocery industries. He is recognised for his knowledge and strategic leadership in public policy and practical issues affecting industries' contribution to Australia's sustainable development.


He was recently named the University of New England Distinguished Alumni recipient for 2010 - "in recognition of his contribution to the nation's social and economic welfare through strategic leadership and development of public policy."


Mr Hooke is also internationally active in global policy advocacy as a member of the Full Council of the International Council of Mining and Metals (ICMM) and Chair of its 40 member Associations Coordination Group. He is also engaged at the "coal face" of business as a Non-Executive Director of several companies based in the USA and Australia.


Mr Hooke was raised on a sheep property in Victoria's Western District, educated at The Geelong College and completed a Bachelor of Rural Science at the University of New England in Armidale, NSW. He is also distinguished as a sportsman as Captain of the All Australian Intervarsity Australian Rules Football team and Captain of the UNE Cricket XI and was admitted to the University's Sportsman's Hall of Fame. Mr Hooke is married with three adult daughters, based in Canberra (ACT), and has a horse property in the Southern Highlands, Bowral NSW.

The Durkheimian spell of international criminal law    View Summary
20 September 2012

"The regime knows it. That is why it does not hesitate to torture, to kill, to bombard. The regime knows that nobody will do anything. We are alone." J., an imprisoned opponent to the Syrian government spoke in Bab al-Musala in May 2012, while the 10th anniversary celebrations of the ICC Statute were being prepared in The Hague. The penalisation of the "most serious crimes of concern to the international community as a whole" by the Rome Statute is at times seen as emanating from an absolute moral sentiment shared internationally, reminiscent of Émile Durkheim's (1858-1917) way to see a society's "conscience collective" directly expressed in law, the law thus enjoying acceptance from all albeit pathological elements of the society. Durkheim's thinking on law appears pregnant with absences: of choices, individual will and agency, inclusions and exclusions, of relevance of economical or structural phenomenon. The ideology of international criminal law, representing a moral ideal of international solidarity, presupposes an absence of the need to make political choices in exercising authority, demonstrating power, cementing an order. Durkheim saw a religious origin or quality in all social phenomena, including criminal law, and its consequentalist aims had little role in his thinking: the core function of criminal justice lay in collective sentiments, group coherence, the ritualistic, even the performative. Echoes of this are perceptible in current views on international criminal law as having - more than preventive effects - heterogeneous positive functions in a community, be it local or global: attending to desires of retribution, bringing closure, expressing values, establishing a historical record, contributing to peace. The paper observes the international criminal law under its Durkheimian spell and asks: What happened from moral to law: why does J. feel alone? Where are the absentees? And who is playing those drums?

About the speaker


Dr. Immi Tallgren is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Erik Castrén Institute of International Law and Human Rights, University of Helsinki (Finland) working in the fields of international criminal law, international human rights law, legal anthropology, law & literature. Dr. Tallgren's interdisciplinary research draws upon her background as a diplomat advising the Finnish government and her work with a range of international and regional organisations, including the European Space Agency and Europol.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.


This event is presented by theSydney Centre for International Law.

State immunity, war crimes and human rights    View Summary
27 September 2012

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About the lecture:

The law of state immunity has long played an important role in allocating jurisdiction between states, keeping the courts of state A from becoming the keepers of the conscience of state B and its government in non-commercial cases. But following the rapid change to restrictive immunity in the 1970s and the almost equally rapid codification process that followed it (of which the Australian Foreign States Immunities Act 1984 was part), the law might have seemed once more settled and uncontroversial.

That is very far from being true. There have been a series of developments, revealing a struggle between those who would reduce immunity still further - especially of senior officials - and those who would draw the line at the distinction between commercial and governmental activity. These developments include:

  • The Pinochet case and its progeny;
  • The Rome Statute for an International Criminal Court, with its apparently conflicting provisions on immunity (Articles 27 and 98);
  • The uncertain future of the UN Convention on Jurisdictional Immunities of 2004;
  • China's apparent retreat to absolute immunity (Democratic Republic of the Congo v FG Hemisphere Associates LLP [2011] HKCFA 41 (8 June 2011))
  • The uncompromising stand of the International Court in Jurisdictional Immunities of the State (Germany v Italy; Greece intervening), Judgment of 3 February 2012;
  • Continued stresses in the law of immunity from execution (Sedelmayer v Russian Federation, various decisions in Sweden and Germany);
  • The decision of the NSWCA in Zhang v Zemin [2010] NSWCA 255 (5 October 2010).

Professor Crawford, ALRC Commissioner in charge of the ALRC reference leading to the 1984 Act, will review these developments and suggest a new synthesis.

About the speaker:

Professor James Crawford SC LLD FBA, is Whewell Professor of International Law and a Fellow of Jesus College at the University of Cambridge. He was a Member of the United Nations International Law Commission from 1992-2001 and Special Rapporteur on State Responsibility (1997-2001). In addition to scholarly work on statehood, self-determination, collective rights and international responsibility, he has appeared frequently before the International Court of Justice including in the Advisory Opinions on Nuclear Weapons (1996) and the Israeli Wall/Barrier (2004). He has also appeared before other international tribunals, and is actively engaged as an international arbitrator. Professor Crawford was a member of the Australian Law Reform Commission between 1982 and 1984, and produced reports on a range of topics including foreign state immunity. Professor Crawford was Dean of the Sydney Law School between 1990 and 1992.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit.

Report Writing Training Course    View Summary
27 September 2012

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This course is the first in a new partnership between Corrective Services NSW and the Sydney Institute of Criminology. This collaboration provides training courses to equip criminology students (and students from related disciplines) and those interested in a career in the criminal justice system with industry-relevant knowledge and skills.

This course will specifically focus on the preparation of pre-sentence reports and their use within the criminal justice system. This course will be delivered by an accredited Corrective Services NSW Trainer and will provide participants with an understanding of the key requirements of preparing a pre-sentence report. This course will be especially relevant to anyone interested in a career in corrections.

October
Beyond Punishment: Outsourcing Justice? The Privatisation of Prisons    View Summary
5 October 2012

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The Institute of Criminology is pleased to announce that Professor Malcolm Feeley, the 2012 Fulbright Flinders University Distinguished Chair in American Political Science, will deliver the first seminar in the 2012-2013 Beyond Punishment seminar series.


About the seminar
The United States and Australia lead the world in the development of private prisons. This development has generated considerable controversy and resistance. There are two well-rehearsed arguments against it. First, many thoughtful observers insist that private prisons are not the efficient and effective institutions that their proponents maintain they are. Second, many observers maintain that it in appropriate and morally wrong for the state to delegate one of its core functions to private contractors, and that it violates the basic understanding of constitutional governance. This seminar by Professor Malcolm Feeley acknowledges these two important objections to privatisation, but raises a third, arguably more important issue: that privatisation tends to expand the net of social control through entrepreneurial creativity. Indeed, privatisation is and has long been one of the major sources of innovation in the criminal justice system. This seminar will examine the historic and contemporary role of private entrepreneurs in developing innovations in the criminal process.


About the speaker
Professor Malcolm Feeley, who is the Claire Sanders Clements Dean's Chair Professor of Law at Boalt Hall School of Law, University of California, Berkeley, is one of two Fulbright Flinders University Distinguished Chairs for 2012. This Fulbright Scholarship was established through the support of Flinders University the U.S. Department of State and the Australian-American Fulbright Commission. Professor Feeley is in currently in Australia to undertake research into privatisation in the criminal justice system as part of a comparative study he is undertaking of the subject in the US, England and Australia.


Before joining the Boalt faculty in 1984, Professor Feeley was a fellow at Yale Law School and taught at New York University and the University of Wisconsin. He served as the director of the campus Center for the Study of Law and Society from 1987 to 1992. He has also been a visiting professor at Hebrew University, Kobe University, and Princeton University. Professor Feeley has written or edited over a dozen books, including The Process is the Punishment (1992), which received the ABA's Silver Gavel Award and the American Sociology Association's Citation of Merit, Court Reform on Trial (1989), which received the ABA's Certificate of Merit, and The Policy Dilemma (1981), Criminal Justice (with John Kaplan and Jerome Skolnick, 1991), Judicial Policy Making and the Modern State (with Edward Rubin, 1998), Federalism: Political Identity and Tragic Compromise (with Edward Rubin, 2008), and Fighting for Political Liberalism: Comparative Studies of the Legal Complex (with Terrence Halliday and Lucien Karpik, 2008). He has authored several dozen articles in social science journals and law reviews. His most recent articles examine issues of federalism, women and crime in the eighteenth century, prison privatisation, and the role of bench and bar in fostering political liberalism. Professor Feeley has received many awards including being appointed as a Russell Sage Foundation Fellow; and the Silver Gavel Award, American Bar Association. He has had a term as President American Law and Society Association, and is the recipient of numerous fellowships and grants.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit.

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW and is part of the Beyond Punishment seminar series. The event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School. The Institute thanks the Fulbright Commission for their support in Professor Malcolm Feeley, the 2012 Fulbright Flinders University Distinguished Chair in American Political Science, giving this Public Lecture.

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Seminar Series: Professor Colin Mayer   View Summary
9 October 2012

Crisis, Commitment and the Corporation

To register and make your online payment, please CLICK HERE

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ABOUT THE LECTURE

The corporation has been a source of immense prosperity and suffering. The scale of both its contributions and its problems is escalating to a global level and, in the process the deficiencies as well as the virtues of the corporation are becoming more evident.

Underpinning the firm is the concept of shareholder value - the notion that firms should be run in the interests of their shareholders. However, the stakeholders in the firm - its creditors, employees, suppliers, purchasers and communities - are broader than its shareholders. The nature of the organization and the functions it performs are determined by the degree of protection and authority that it grants to the different parties. The book argues that we need to give serious reconsideration to this feature of the firm and establish a model that is better suited to the wider group of constituents which are critical to its success. Written in the light of recent developments and policy debates, the book sets out an ambitious agenda for converting the corporation into a twenty-first century organization that we will have reason to value and trust.

Professor Mayer's seminar will bebased on his forthcoming book Firm Commitment: Why the Corporation is Failing Us and How to Restore Trust in It, which will be published by Oxford University Press in February 2013.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Colin Mayer is the Peter Moores Professor of Management Studies at the Saïd Business School at the University of Oxford. He is an Honorary Fellow of Oriel College, Oxford and of St Anne's College, Oxford, and a Professorial Fellow of Wadham College, Oxford. He is an Ordinary Member of the UK Competition Appeal Tribunal and a Fellow of the European Corporate Governance Institute. Colin Mayer was the first professor at the Saïd Business School in 1994, the Peter Moores Dean of the Business School between 2006 and 2011, and the first Director of the Oxford Financial Research Centre between 1998 and 2005. He was chairman of Oxera Ltd. between 1986 and 2010 and was instrumental in establishing it as a leading European economics consultancy firm.

Commentator: Mr Charles Littrell Executive General Manager, Policy, Research and Statistics, Australian Prudential Regulatory Authority (APRA).

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.25 MCLE/CPD units.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Vivienne Bath   View Summary
11 October 2012

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Foreign Investment, the National Interest and National Security - Foreign Direct Investment in Australia and China

China and Australia are both recipients of considerable amounts of inbound investment and maintain policies designed to encourage and attract it. Both countries are, however, considered by the OECD to maintain restrictive policies towards the admission of inbound investment. In addition, Chinese and Australian companies invest extensively overseas, including, in the case of Chinese companies, in Australia, where the extent and nature of foreign - particularly Chinese - investment in natural resources and rural land is increasingly controversial. The policies of the Australian and Chinese governments in relation to the admission of foreign direct investment ('FDI') both rely heavily on concepts of the national interest (in the case of Australia) and national security (in the case of China). Australia maintains a case by case screening regime based on a 'national interest' test; China has a detailed, highly regulated investment structure and review process which draws on concepts of 'national security' and 'national economic security', and has recently added an extra case by case review of certain foreign acquisitions on the basis of a "national security" test. In this lecture, Professor Bath will examine and compare the development and definition of concepts of national interest and national security - including the role of public opinion in both countries - and discuss the role they play in the admission of FDI in Australia and China.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Professor of Chinese and International Business Law , Faculty of Law, University of Sydney, and Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney. Prior to joining the Faculty of Law, Vivienne Bath was a partner of international firm Coudert Brothers, working in the Hong Kong and Sydney offices, and specialising in commercial law, with a focus on foreign investment and commercial transactions in the People's Republic of China. She previously practised as a commercial lawyer in New York and Sydney, and worked in the Federal Office of Parliamentary Counsel as a parliamentary draftsman.

Vivienne Bath has published widely in the area of Chinese law and is a frequent participant in conferences and seminars focussing on developments in the Chinese legal regime.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

This event is presented by the Sydney Law School in collaboration with the China Studies Centre

Trust in justice, legitimacy and compliance with the law: a European perspective   View Summary
15 October 2012

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This seminar will present the results of a large-scale empirical test of procedural justice theory in 26 European countries. A team based largely at LSE, Oxford and Birkbeck has used the fifth round of the European Social Survey (ESS) to test an elaboration of procedural justice theory which combines ideas from the work of Tom Tyler and David Beetham.

The ESS is an academically driven survey with around 50,000 respondents. In each round there are 'rotating modules' for which researcher can bid, and we were successful in winning space for questions on trust in justice. Our analysis shows that in most countries covered by the ESS public trust in the fairness of justice institutions supports public belief in their legitimacy, which in turn promotes cooperation and compliance with the law. The study has important implications about the quality of treatment received by the public from police and courts officials.

About the speaker:

Mike Hough is Co-Director of the Institute for Criminal Policy Research and Professor of Criminal Policy, Birkbeck, University of London. He began his research career in the British Home Office, and was a member of the team that started the British Crime Survey. Leaving in 1994, he set up an academic policy research centre, now based at Birkbeck, University of London. Mike's current research interests include: procedural justice theory and public trust in justice; public perceptions of crime and justice; policing and police legitimacy; crime measurement and crime trends; sentencing and sentencing guidelines; offender rehabilitation and desistance (and its evaluation).

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is presented by the Sydney Institute of Criminology in conjunction with the Australian Institute of Police Management

Lunchtime Seminar: Dr Jayampathy Wickramaratne Institute for Constitutional Studies (Colombo)   View Summary
16 October 2012

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ABOUT THE LECTURE

A Political Solution to the Ethnic Conflict in Post-war Sri Lanka

While Tamil separatists have been militarily defeated, the search for a political solution to the ethnic conflict in Sri Lanka continues with no immediate prospects of an agreement, due to extremist pressure and lack of political will.

The Lessons Learnt and Reconciliation Commission (LLRC) appointed by the Government has stated that a political solution is imperative to address the causes of the conflict. It said that the Government must take the initiative to have a serious and structured dialogue with all political parties, and those representing the minorities in particular, based on a proposal containing the Government's own thinking on the form and content of the dialogue process envisaged. Any devolutionary or power sharing mechanism, the LLRC stated, should be realized within the broad framework of a sovereign and multi-ethnic Sri Lankan State. Maximum devolution of meaningful powers to the periphery is essential and there should also be power-sharing at the centre. There should also be inbuilt mechanisms that would effectively address and discourage secessionist tendencies and safeguard the sovereignty and integrity of the State.

No serious proposals for the resolution of the conflict have emanated from the Government. Compounding the situation are serious issues of governance, a strong executive presidency without effective safeguards and waning respect for the rule of law. Today, the resolution of the ethnic crisis has become a part of a wider struggle for democratic governance.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dr. Jayampathy Wickramaratne counts over 34 years as a legal practitioner in Sri Lanka and specializes in constitutional law, human rights, administrative law and criminal law. In 2001, he was appointed President's Counsel, equivalent to Queen's Counsel in England. He holds a Master's degree in Public Administration and was awarded the Ph. D. degree for his thesis titled "Fundamental Rights in Sri Lanka". The thesis was published in 1996 with a second edition in 2006. He served as Consultant, Ministry of Justice and Constitutional Affairs and also as Senior Advisor, Ministry of Constitutional Affairs in Sri Lanka. Dr. Wickramaratne was a member of the Government's Constitution Drafting Team that drafted the Constitution Bill of 2000. He was also a member of the panel of experts appointed by the President to service the All Party Representative Committee (APRC) and was a signatory to the "majority report" which proposed a strong power-sharing arrangement as a solution to Sri Lanka's ethnic crisis. He chaired a committee appointed by the Inter-Ministerial Committee on Human Rights to draft a new constitutional Bill of Rights.

Dr. Wickramaratne has done several assignments for UNDP, UNODC, EU and Sida in the Lao PDR relating to law reform, human rights, criminal justice, human trafficking, international law, capacity building etc. He is a Director of the Institute for Constitutional Studies, a non-governmental organization working on constitutional issues including constitutionalism, devolution, power-sharing and human rights.

Dr. Wickramaratne has written extensively on issues relating to power-sharing, human rights and other constitutional issues and presented numerous papers at international and local events.

COMMENTATOR:

Dr Sarah Williams is a Senior Lecturer at the University of New South Wales. Sarah was the Dorset Fellow in Public International Law at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law (from 2008 - 2010), a Senior Legal Researcher at the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (from 2006 - 2007) and a Lecturer at Durham Law School, University of Durham (from 2003 - 2008). Sarah has also practised as a commercial solicitor in London and Sydney.

Sarah has acted as a consultant to the European Commission, the British Red Cross, the International Federation of the Red Cross and the British Institute of International and Comparative Law. Sarah is currently the co-editor of the PIL Current Developments section of the International and Comparative Law Quarterly.

Her main research areas include international law, in particular international criminal law, international humanitarian law and the law on the use of force. Sarah's book, on Internationalized Criminal Tribunals (Hart Publishing)was published in 2012.

This event is presented by the Sydney Centre for International Law.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

2012 Sydney Law School Postgraduate Information Evening   View Summary
18 October 2012

The Sydney Law School will hold its annual Postgraduate Information evening on Thursday, 18th October from 5.30-7pm.

The event is an opportunity for prospective candidates to meet face to face with our staff to discuss matters in relation to postgraduate study in law at the Sydney Law School.

Register for the 2012 Sydney Law School Postgraduate Information Evening

Sydney Law School will launch its 2013 Postgraduate Program in early October with the new Master of Law & International Development (MLawIntDev).

The new forthcoming specialist Master's degree recognises the importance of law in international development while building on Sydney Law School's reputation as Australia's leading Law School in the fields of international, global and transnational law.

Examine the role of law in international development, through six thematic clusters:

  • Development & Rights
  • Environment Climate Change & Sustainability in Development
  • Global Health Law & Development
  • Legal Pluralism
  • Rule of Law & Governance
  • Trade & Development

Further, Sydney Law School is set to deliver over 180 units of study in 2013 - a record number.

New units for 2013 will include:

  • Advanced Directors' Duties
  • Advanced Trusts: Theory & Practice
  • Comparative Taxation of Extractive Industries
  • European Health Law & Policy
  • Health, Development, Trade & Investment Law
  • International Family Law
  • Introduction to Anti- Corruption: Policy, Law & Practice
  • New Technologies, Risk & Environmental Law
  • Workplace Investigations

Attendees can find more out about Sydney Law School's coursework and research degrees and the Sydney Juris Doctor (JD)

The specialist postgraduate coursework program, one of Australia's largest, comprises the Sydney LLM - Master of Laws (LLM) as well as qualifications in the following disciplines:

The Sydney Law School's research degrees include:

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Seminar Series: Professor Robert Merkin   View Summary
23 October 2012

Should consumer protection laws be extended to insurance contracts?

To register and make your online payment, please CLICK HERE

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ABOUT THE LECTURE

Consumer policyholders have a high degree of protection in Australia. The Insurance Contracts Act 1984 (Cth), although not primarily a consumer measure, has its greatest impact in consumer cases and precludes reliance by insurers on defences made available by the worst excesses of the common law and freedom of contract principles. Operating alongside the 1984 Act is the General Insurance Code of Practice, as revised with effect from July 2012, promulgated by the Insurance Council of Australia. The evidence is that some 98% of consumer claims are paid.


The Unfair Contract Terms (UCT) laws, which were implemented in all Australian states and territories by 1 January 2011 as Subdivision BA of the Australian Securities and Investment Act 2001 (Cth), strike down unfair terms in standard form consumer contracts in a manner similar to that found in the UK's Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999 and Unfair Contract Terms Act 1977. The Australian UCT legislation does not apply to insurance contracts, by reason of the exclusion of other legislation in s 15 of ICA 1984.


Australia is now in its third year of consultation on the question of whether UCT should extend to insurance contracts or whether the existing regime for insurance contracts is adequate for the purpose. This seminar provides a UK perspective on the issue, examining the UK's experience of extending consumer legislation to insurance contracts and suggesting other possible ways forward.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Robert Merkin is Professor of Commercial Law at the University of Southampton and consultant to international law firm Norton Rose. He has written a number of books on insurance and reinsurance, and is a regular speaker on these subjects in many jurisdictions. In 2009 he delivered the Geoff Masel Memorial Lectures sponsored by the Australian Insurance Law Association, in 2010 he was awarded AILA's annual prize for contribution to Australian insurance law and in 2011 he gave the Richard Cooper Memorial Lecture in Brisbane. Rob is presently working, with Ian Enright, on the Fourth Edition of Sutton's Insurance Law in Australia.

Professor Merkin is President of the British Insurance Law Association, Vice-President of the International Association of Insurance Law and consultant to the English and Scottish Law Commissions.

Commentator: Rehana Box Partner, Ashurst.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.25 MCLE/CPD units.

The application of 'informal' international instruments before domestic courts: The case of Japan   View Summary
23 October 2012

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The application of 'informal' international instruments before domestic courts: The case of Japan

Every year a voluminous number of international instruments, which are neither part of treaties nor of customary international law, are produced by international organisations, treaty-monitoring bodies, informal gatherings of states, and transnational private organisations. Many of these instruments are adopted with the expectation that certain actions should be taken at the domestic level.

In this presentation, Machiko Kanetake discusses the application by domestic courts of 'informal' international instruments, which are neither internationally binding, nor formally given effect under domestic law. More specifically, she talks about (i) the kind of instruments employed by the courts, (ii) the purposes for which instruments are used, and (iii) the possible justification for the authority of domestic courts to employ informal instruments. In this seminar she focuses on the case of Japanese courts, and refers to other states' practices for comparative purposes.

In general, Japanese courts are reluctant to employ informal international instruments in their reasoning. Nevertheless, there are several noteworthy court decisions, especially in lower courts, which have found the interpretive use of informal instruments, such as General Comments issued by the UN Human Rights Committee and UN General Assembly resolutions. From the limited survey of domestic court decisions, this presentation demonstrates that the domestic courts have not been unaffected by the international expectation towards domestic organs to materialise informal international instruments within the domestic legal order.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
Machiko Kanetake is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Amsterdam Center for International Law (ACIL). She specialises in United Nations law, international organisations law, and interactions between national and international law. At the ACIL, she coordinates the research project on the interfaces between international and national legal orders. As part of the project, she has been conducting research on the application of international law and informal international instruments before Japanese courts.

Machiko received her Ph.D from Kyoto University, and LLM from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). During her doctoral study, she was appointed as a Hauser Visiting Doctoral Researcher (2010-11) of the Global Fellows Program at New York University (NYU) School of Law.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

This is being presented by Australian Network for Japanese Law (ANJeL), Centre for Asian and Pacific Law (CAPLUS) and Sydney Centre for International Law (SCIL).

All in the Family? The use of Family Intervention Programs and Methods in Juvenile Justice   View Summary
24 October 2012

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The Institute of Criminology is pleased to announce the first seminar in the 2012-2013 Juvenile Justice seminar series, which will explore models of family intervention and their effectiveness in reducing juvenile offending behaviour. In exploring the role of family intervention, the seminar will bring together key government, non-government organisation and academic perspectives. Critical attention increasingly is being paid to this area of juvenile justice practice; some jurisdictions are enthusiastic about the uptake of such programs, while others are more cautious. In light of this, it is timely that this seminar asks: how effective are family intervention programs and methods? Do they assist young people from deepening contact with the criminal justice system and prevent offending behaviour? Simply put, can and do they work?

About the speakers

Michael Szyjan Ph.D. is the Manager of the Intensive Supervision Program (ISP) in Juvenile Justice, NSW. Michael was trained as a Clinical Community Psychologist at DePaul University, Chicago. He has managed community mental health programs in the US including programs with offenders. Michael provided consultation to the Department of Community Services (DoCs) for the roll out of psychological services. His interest is in the development, implementation and evaluation of evidenced based programs within the NSW public service.

Bron Parker is Manager ALIVE, Catholic Care. She has an MA in Community Management. Originally from Adelaide, Bron worked in nursing with remote Aboriginal communities before moving to Melbourne and working with Community Services in child protection and with youth. She has been with CatholicCare for 20 years where she manages Adolescents Living Independently Via Empowerment (ALIVE). ALIVE was established in 1992 to work with 16-25 year olds at risk of homelessness and empower them with skills and information in their pursuit of secure independent living. ALIVE supports between 40 - 50 young people at any one time and offers a suite of programs, including programs specific to the needs of Juvenile Justice clients. These include the Joint Tenancy Assistance Program (JTAP), the Juniperina Housing and Support Program (JH&SP), and ALIVE HAP (Homeless Action Project) which are ALIVE's most intensive accommodation support programs. Bron has managed JTAP since its inception in 1997.

Associate Professor Brian Stout joined the University of Western Sydney in April 2012, as Associate Professor of Social Work in Department of Social Work, Welfare and Therapy Studies. Previously he was Associate Head of the School of Applied Social Sciences, De Montfort University, in Leicester, UK, where he worked for 9 years, primarily in Community and Criminal Justice. Associate Professor Stout's practice background is as a probation officer, in Northern Ireland, and has been involved in developing and delivering training and education for probation officers and other criminal justice professionals both in the UK and in South Africa. Most recently, he has been involved in a number of European criminal justice social work projects, and he has also contributed, as an international expert, to probation and prison training in Georgia and Chechnya.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW and hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.

JSI Series: Historical normativity and the basis of rights   View Summary
25 October 2012

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This presentation aims to outline a historical concept of rights. By this, Professor Patton means one that does not depend on any transcendent conception of the moral basis of rights or of the human nature in which they are supposedly grounded. He argues that the only plausible basis for rights lies in the public political culture, history and institutions of existing societies. However, if we view rights in this way, there remains the problem of explaining how rights can maintain their normative force and critical function in relation to existing institutions and practices. Patton argues that John Rawls's political liberalism can help resolve this problem and support a historical and critical conception of rights. Political liberalism draws a sharp distinction between moral, legal and political rights, while insisting that political normativity ultimately rests on the considered judgments of a people and the possibility of reasonable consensus among them. He argues that Rawls is committed to the historical character of such a consensus and therefore of the rights associated with a particular political conception of justice.

About the speaker

Paul Patton is Professor of Philosophy at The University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He is the author of Deleuze and the Political (Routledge, 2000) and Deleuzian Concepts: Philosophy, Colonization, Politics (Stanford, 2010). He is editor of Deleuze: A Critical Reader (Blackwell 1996), (with Duncan Ivison and Will Sanders) Political Theory and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (Cambridge, 2000), (with John Protevi) of Between Deleuze and Derrida, (Continuum, 2003) and (with Simone Bignall) Deleuze and the Postcolonial (Edinburgh 2010). He has translated work by Deleuze, Foucault, Nancy and Baudrillard. His recent publications deal with aspects of French poststructuralism and a variety of topics in contemporary political philosophy.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is hosted by The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence

Beyond Punishment: Facing the challenge of ageing prisoners   View Summary
29 October 2012

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The Institute of Criminology is pleased to announce the second seminar in the 2012-2013 Beyond Punishment seminar series will focus on issues with ageing prisoners and will be delivered by Azrini Wahidin, Reader in Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen's University Belfast.


About the seminar
For the first time in history, nations around the globe are faced with the dilemma of managing prisons with ageing populations. For legitimate reasons, prison officials responsible for making decisions about older prisoners are raising concerns about how best to respond to this major challenge. Although a number of countries have commissioned studies to investigate and make policy recommendations, the body of knowledge on elderly prisoners and the issues posed to prisons systems in meeting their special needs is not extensive. From an international perspective, prisons have been slow to respond to the physical and mental needs of older prisoners. As a consequence, a comparative analysis between countries can be an important first step in identifying best practice models and emerging policies. This seminar will identify some of the issues raised from the USA and UK's experience of managing the needs of prisoners in later life. It will also examine and address some of the issues and challenges facing policy makers and correctional / prison facilities in managing the health, social and care needs of an ageing prison population, and will conclude by considering a series of policy recommendations addressing the needs of the ageing prison population.

About the speaker
Azrini Wahidin is a Reader in Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen's University Belfast. She researches on the issues of imprisonment, engendering of punishment and the experiences of elders in prison in the UK and USA. Her previous work focused on older women in prison, managing the needs of elders in prison, abolitionism and women in the criminal justice system. Her latest research focuses on women who were volunteers in the Irish Republican Army. Author of a range of academic articles in international journals, single authored books and edited collections, Azrini is currently a visiting international scholar at the University of Melbourne in the School of Social and Political Sciences. A selection of her publications include: Older Women in the Criminal Justice System: Running out of Time (2004); Criminology (with Chris Hale, Keith Hayward and Emma Wincup, 2005); Ageing, Crime and Society (with Maureen Cain, 2006), Understanding Prison Staff (with Jamie Bennett and Ben Crewe, 2007) and Criminal Justice (with Anthea Hucklesby, 2009). She is a trustee of the Howard League for Penal Reform and the Irish Penal Reform Trust.

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW and is part of the Beyond Punishment seminar series. The event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.

Faces of Nepal - A photo exhibition   View Summary
29 October 2012 to 9 November 2012

Sydney Law School will host a special photo exhibition by students of the 2012 Himalayan Field School on behalf of the School in the Sky Foundation.

The School in the Sky Foundation was formed by students of Sydney Law School and Kathmandu School of Law to provide support for children in a remote area of Nepal. Current projects include provision of educational infrastructure for 400 children in Melamchi, Nepal.

Dave Marcus, CEO of the School in the Sky Foundation, invites law students and members of the University to gaze into "the Faces of Nepal" and unravel a striking story of human rights violations, attempts at reparation and the continuing journey for Nepal to achieve Peace and Reconciliation in a fragile political environment.

The exhibition runs from Monday 29 October to Friday 9 November on Level 1 of the Law School.

CANCELLED lecture: Corruption as a violation of human rights:   View Summary
29 October 2012

**Due to unforseen cirmcumstances, this event has been cancelled. **

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ABOUT THE SEMINAR

Corruption violates human rights, undermines the rule of law, distorts the development process, and dis-empowers the Indian state. While there are laws against corruption in India, the gap between the law in the books and the law in practice is wide. Corruption violates human rights of the people of India as it hinders the process of fulfilling civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights. The unequal application of law leading to selective enforcement due to corruption creates an environment of scant regard for law, legal institutions and judicial process. Corruption in India creates an environment whereby some people are given privileges due to their ability to pay bribes. A rule-of-law society is based upon the trust and faith of the people that they are governed on the basis of laws enforced in a fair, just, and reasonable manner. Corruption in India undermines this basic trust. The talk will focus on the relationship between corruption and human rights and to what extent domestic law, international law, including human rights ought to influence national efforts in the fight against corruption. The presentation will critically examine from a comparative and international law perspective the legal and institutional approaches in the fight against corruption, and the growth and development of the right to information in India for creating greater transparency and accountability in governance. The talk will discuss the contemporary civil society initiatives and social movements in India to develop legislative measures and independent institutional mechanisms, including the establishment of an independent commission against corruption (ICAC) similar to that of Hong Kong and Singapore to eliminate corruption.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Professor C. Raj Kumar is the Founding Vice Chancellor of O.P. Jindal Global University and the Founding Dean of Jindal Global Law School. Professor Kumar spearheaded the initiative to establish the O.P. Jindal Global University and four of its inter-disciplinary schools: Jindal Global Law School; Jindal Global Business School; Jindal School of International Affairs and the Jindal School of Government and Public Policy in the National Capital Region of Delhi (Sonipat, Haryana).

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

This is being presented byCentre for Asian and Pacific Law (CAPLUS).

November
Faces of Nepal - A photo exhibition   View Summary
29 October 2012 to 9 November 2012

Sydney Law School will host a special photo exhibition by students of the 2012 Himalayan Field School on behalf of the School in the Sky Foundation.

The School in the Sky Foundation was formed by students of Sydney Law School and Kathmandu School of Law to provide support for children in a remote area of Nepal. Current projects include provision of educational infrastructure for 400 children in Melamchi, Nepal.

Dave Marcus, CEO of the School in the Sky Foundation, invites law students and members of the University to gaze into "the Faces of Nepal" and unravel a striking story of human rights violations, attempts at reparation and the continuing journey for Nepal to achieve Peace and Reconciliation in a fragile political environment.

The exhibition runs from Monday 29 October to Friday 9 November on Level 1 of the Law School.

Sydney Law School Postgraduate Conference: Crossing Boundaries   View Summary
1 November 2012 to 2 November 2012

Registrations

To register and secure your online payment pleaseclick here

Call for Papers

Deadline 31 August 2012

The University of Sydney Postgraduate Law Conference brings together postgraduate research students and scholars from across the Asia Pacific region. The conference aims to give research students the opportunity to present their work to their peers and to leading academics, in a supportive and collaborative environment. In 2012, the theme of the conference is "Crossing Boundaries." The Postgraduate Law Research Students Committee invites research students in law and related disciplines (including sociology, cultural studies, philosophy, political economy, history, economics and business) to submit paper proposals that engage with this theme.

The conference theme seeks to provoke thinking about the form and role of 'boundaries' in our discipline, in our work and in our lives, and the role of research in 'crossing' these boundaries. The law as a discipline is replete with boundaries: between law and equity; between domestic and international jurisdictions; between private and public law. In our research we encounter and often challenge the boundaries of accepted methods of inquiry: doctrinal; anthropological; philosophical; sociological. And in our lives as aspiring scholars we meet the boundaries of our own limitations, often made explicit in the charting of our failures and successes throughout the research process. The idea of 'boundaries' and in some cases the aspiration to cross these boundaries, thus shapes our subjects of inquiry, our selection of method and the scope and substance of our endeavours.

We invite paper proposals that draw upon student's own research and experience to illuminate the broad theme of 'crossing boundaries.' We are interested in, amongst other things, the ways that the idea of 'boundaries' might emerge as a material legal concept (for example, in migration, border control, jurisdiction, constitutionalism, rights, criminal law, privacy, intellectual property, health law, emerging areas of law connected to the internet or nanotechnology) or in a more reflexive sense, in the way that the idea of 'boundaries' might constrain (or enliven) our approach to a chosen field of inquiry.

Various prizes will be awarded for the best written papers, including the prestigious University of Sydney Postgraduate Law Conference Prize. The winner of the prize for the best paper presented at the conference will be invited to submit their paper for publication in the Sydney Law Review.'

Keynote Speaker
The keynote speaker at the conference will be Professor Martin Krygier. Professor Krygier is the Gordon Samuels Professor of Law and Social Theory at the University of New South Wales and an Adjunct Professor at the Regulatory Institutions Network (RegNet) at the Australian National University. He is also Co-Director of the Network for Interdisciplinary Studies of Law, based at the University of New South Wales. Professor Krygier's most recent book is Philip Selznick: Ideals in the World (Stanford University Press, 2012).

The conference will take place at the New Law School Building, University of Sydney. Day one will include the keynote address and concurrent presentation sessions. Day two will run as a half day and involve discussion sessions on the PhD experience facilitated by leading academics.

Students are welcome to attend without presenting. Some funding is available to meet the travel and accommodation costs of students who are coming from inter-state and are presenting papers.

Deadline for Abstracts

Friday 31 August 2012

Click here for more details and to register

JSI Series: Obedience to Law: Reasons, Intentions, and Doing the Right Thing   View Summary
1 November 2012

To register, please click here

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What is it to obey the law? Michael Sevel begins to develop an answer to this neglected question. It has long been debated whether there is a general duty to obey the law, though little attention has been given to what that duty is a duty to do. At the same time, there is a large and growing literature that assumes that a person is sometimes justified in engaging in civil disobedience, though little attention has been given to what disobedience is. The prevailing view among legal theorists, more often assumed than argued for, is that obedience consists in acting for a certain sort of reason - for the reason that an authority requires that one so act. That view has recently come in for criticism, but Sevel thinks both the view and the criticisms are misguided. Obedience to law (or to any other putative practical authority, e.g., a corporate manager, parent, religious leader, and so on) requires acting with a certain sort of knowledge of the action one is required to do, as specified by the authority, regardless of one's reasons for doing it. This view makes salient the fact that authorities, whether or not they create reasons for action, nonetheless specify (and sometimes create) actions for their subjects to do, and further require that those actions, and not others, are to be done. Seeing the matter this way helps us avoid certain philosophical puzzles about how authorities can ever make a difference in the thought and action of their subjects.

About the speaker
Michael Sevel joined Sydney Law School in 2012 as Lecturer in Jurisprudence. Previously he was Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Miami School of Law (2011-12), where he taught jurisprudence, torts, and admiralty law, and Max Weber Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Law of the European University Institute (2010-11). He received a J.D. with honours and Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Texas at Austin, in 2008 and 2010, respectively. His research interests include jurisprudence, the rule of law, and maritime law.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.


This event is hosted by The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence

What Really Determines the Guidelines for Management of the Extremely Premature Infant    View Summary
1 November 2012

What Really Determines the Guidelines for Management of the Extremely Premature Infant - Are They Reasons or Rationalisations?

Dr. Geoffrey Miller

Authoritative bodies containing bioethicists, health professionals, and philosophers, from most parts of the modern industrialised world have issued guidelines on the management of the extremely premature infant with a gestational age of less than 25 weeks. Based on the premise that the mortality is so high, the morbidity so poor, and the burden of maximal intensive care so great, active treatment ought to be optional. This decision would be determined by informed parents in conjunction with knowledgeable physicians. However, on analysis of survival, quality of outcome, the results of active resuscitation, and the application of principles of both distributive and personal justice the ethical reasoning behind this becomes flawed as the facts that determine the premises are incorrect or self-fulfilling. Speculation on why this might occur will be presented in addition to a brief overview of the moral psychology of making moral judgments.

About the Speaker

Dr.Miller is Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at Yale University, Clinical Director of Yale Pediatric Neurology and the Co-Director of the Yale Pediatric Neuromuscular clinic. His recent academic interests are in Pediatric Bioethics and Pediatric Neuro-ethics. His publications include the books "Extreme Prematurity Practices, Bioethics and the Law" and "Pediatric Bioethics". He has presented on these topics at several international venues and he is a member of the Yale Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics and the Yale Program for Biomedical Ethics.

Presented by: The Centre for Health Governance, Law and Ethics at Sydney Law School and The Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine (VELiM) at Sydney Medical School

Restoring Responsibility: Promoting Justice, Therapy and Reform Through Direct Brain Interventions   View Summary
8 November 2012

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Direct brain intervention based mental capacity restoration techniques—for instance, psycho-active drugs—are sometimes used in criminal cases to promote the aims of justice. For instance, they might be used to restore a person's competence to stand trial in order to assess the degree of their responsibility for what they did, or to restore their competence for punishment so that we can hold them responsible for it. Some also suggest that such interventions might be used for therapy or reform in criminal legal contexts—i.e. to make non-responsible and irresponsible people more responsible. However, in this paper, Nicole Vincent argues that such interventions may at least sometimes fail to promote these responsibility-related legal aims. This is because responsibility hinges on other factors than just what mental capacities a person has—in particular, it also hinges on such things as authenticity, personal identity, and mental capacity ownership—and some ways of restoring mental capacity may adversely affect these other factors. Put one way, Vincent's claim is that what might suffice for the restoration of competence need not necessarily suffice for the restoration of responsibility, or, put another way, that although responsibility indeed tracks mental capacity it may not always track restored mental capacities.

About the speaker

Nicole Vincent conducts research into theories of responsibility, and she studies how these theories inform ethical, political and legal debate. In 2007, she obtained her PhD in philosophy of law from the University of Adelaide with a dissertation entitled "Responsibility, Compensation and Accident Law Reform". From late 2007 until early 2011 she worked at Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands on a research project entitled "The Brain and The Law". Since February 2011, Nicole has been a Macquarie University Research Fellow. Her research project entitled "Reappraising the Capacitarian Foundation of Neurolaw" has two components. First, it investigates whether capacitarian intuitions about the relationship between mental capacity and responsibility still obtain in contexts where mental capacity has been restored or enhanced. Second, she is also, with others, developing an Australasian Neurolaw Database.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is hosted byThe Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence.

2012 International Arbitration Lecture   View Summary
13 November 2012

2012: The Impact of International Arbitration on the Rule of Law
Presented by David W. Rivkin


Arbitration began as a means to resolve commercial disputes. From ancient Greece through to the 20th century, businesses sought a final determination of their disputes. In the process, they created a rule of law - enforcing contracts as they were written - and a lex mercatoria.

The certainty provided by this rule of law promoted the growth of commerce, international trade, created arbitration between states and developed a new body of public international law.

David W. Rivkin will examine the evolution of arbitration and its relevance in the 21st century. To what extent does it still effectively promote trade? Does it provide adequate levels of certainty? What is the impact of the increasing use of state to state arbitration? And will the creation of a new supranational law that establishes standards for sovereign behaviour provide greater certainty to modern-day merchants as they do business worldwide?

About the Lecture

The annual International Arbitration lecture, presented by Clayton Utz and supported by the University of Sydney, brings together key figures in international arbitration and the Australian business community to explore the real issues that could affect their international operations, and how international dispute resolution can contribute to their bottom line.

In this, its 11th year, the International Arbitration Lecture series continues to attract guest speakers from the four corners of the world to give their insights into the challenges facing international arbitration.

Following the success of last year, we will again offer the lecture via live streaming to invitees across the globe for our colleagues and friends that cannot attend the event in Sydney.

About the speaker - David W. Rivkin

David W. Rivkin, Co-Chair of Debevoise & Plimpton LLP's International Dispute Resolution Group, has more than 30 years of experience handling international arbitrations throughout the world and before virtually every major arbitration institution. Subjects of these arbitrations have included long-term energy concessions, investment treaties, joint venture agreements, insurance coverage, construction contracts, distribution agreements and intellectual property, among others.

David is consistently ranked as one of the top international dispute resolution practitioners in the world in guides such as Chambers Global and USA, IFLR Benchmark: Litigation, and The Legal 500, among others. In 2011, the National Law Journal named him as one of the "Most Influential Attorneys" in the United States. The Global Arbitration Review called a $750 million arbitration award he won for Hyundai Heavy Industries the Arbitration Win of 2010.

David holds many leading positions in international organisations, including Secretary-General of the International Bar Association; President of the North American Users' Council of the LCIA; Vice Chair of the Arbitration Institute of the Stockholm Chamber of Commerce and a member of the Board of the Singapore International Arbitration Centre; and a member of the Council of the American Law Institute, for which he is also an Adviser to the Restatement of the Law of International Arbitration.

He has written three books and more than 30 articles on international arbitration and international litigation. He is on the panels of many arbitration institutions and served as an arbitrator for the Court of Arbitration for Sport at the 2002, 2004 and 2008 Olympic Games.


JSI Series: New approaches to democratising constitutional functions   View Summary
15 November 2012

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The countermajoritarian difficulty, which is a reference to concern about the democratic legitimacy of judicial review based on a bill of rights, has prompted such a massive and insightful literature in the last few decades that scepticism was expressed by one US constitutional scholar, Mark Tushnet, about what insights are likely to be generated in the next few decades outside empirical research on particular systems of judicial review. Nevertheless, attempts have continued. This paper explores some recent radical responses to the countermajoritarian difficulty that seek to democratise institutions associated with constitutional functions. The paper focuses on some proposals for constitutional juries and democratising the amendment process by Ghosh, Spector and Zurn.

About the speaker

Dr Ghosh completed a BA/LLB, an LLM and a PhD at Sydney University Law School. The latter was awarded in 2005 and was on the republican revival in constitutional theory. He is a senior lecturer at the School of Law at the University of New England, where he teaches jurisprudence and administrative law. His research is broadly in the area of constitutional and political theory, with articles in, for instance, Oxford Journal of Legal Studies, History of Political Thought, and Sydney Law Review.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.


This event is hosted byThe Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Seminar Series: Dr Greg O'Mahoney   View Summary
19 November 2012

The taming of the shrewd - emerging issues in regulating market manipulation

To register and make your online payment, please CLICK HERE

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ABOUT THE LECTURE

This presentation will focus on two emerging issues in the regulation of market manipulation: first, the impact of technology and shifting market structures on market integrity; and second, the meaning of "artificial price" for the purposes of Australia's market manipulation regime.

Technology poses a number of challenges to regulators in respect of market manipulation. It enables less sophisticated market participants to engage in the kind of unlawful practices that were once the preserve of more resourced and powerful market players. It also arms more sophisticated investors with opportunities to undermine market integrity on an unprecedented scale. This part of the presentation will consider the difficulties, and opportunities, technological developments have presented to regulators seeking to protect markets against manipulative conduct.

The meaning of "artificial price" is essential to the operation, and effectiveness of Australia's market manipulation regime. This part of the presentation will consider the position following the recent decision of the Court of Appeal of the Supreme Court of Victoria in Director of Public Prosecutions (Cth) v J M [2012] VCSA 21. The approach in J M will be contrasted with the approach the Federal Court has taken in two earlier cases.

ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Dr Greg O'Mahoney is a barrister at Seven Wentworth Chambers. He is Adjunct Lecturer at Sydney University where he teaches Corporations Law and a postgraduate course on regulating manipulation and abuse in global securities markets. Prior to commencing at the Bar, he studied as a Rhodes Scholar at the University of Oxford, where he completed the BCL and was awarded a DPhil. He is co-authoring a book on market abuse and corporate disclosure in Australia to be published by Hart Publishing in the coming year. In 2005 - 2006 he was Associate to Murray Gleeson AC, Chief Justice of Australia

Commentator: Belinda Gibson, Deputy Chair, ASIC.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.25 MCLE/CPD units.

2012 Ross Parsons address in Taxation Law: Rethinking the Concept of Income in Tax Law and Policy   View Summary
19 November 2012

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For the much of the last century, the "Haig-Simons" definition of income has served as a touchstone for normative debates in North American tax law and policy. Notwithstanding this apparent prominence in policy and theory, however, existing income taxes in the United States and Canada have consistently departed from the Haig-Simons concept in at least three crucial respects - excluding "imputed income" from leisure, services, and durable goods, excluding gifts and inheritances, and recognizing gains and losses for the most part only when they are realized through a sale or other disposition and not as they accrue from one period to the next. Although these departures from the Haig-Simons ideal are usually explained on purely pragmatic grounds, they might also be justified on normative grounds. If so, it follows that one should also question the Haig-Simons definition as a normative ideal for the taxation of personal income. Indeed, the underlying rationales for this concept of income fail to provide a convincing foundation for the taxation of personal income. Nonetheless, the deficiencies of the Haig-Simons definition may also point to a more attractive concept of income based on participation in the market economy that might attract greater scholarly and popular support. As a result, the aim of this paper is not to challenge the taxation of personal income but to defend it.

About the speaker

David G. Duff is Professor of Law and Associate Dean at the University of British Columbia Faculty of Law, where he teaches and writes in the areas of areas of tax law and policy, environmental taxation, comparative and international taxation, and distributive justice.


Prior to joining UBC Law in 2009, Professor Duff was a faculty member of the University of Toronto Faculty of Law for thirteen years. Before that, he was a tax associate at the Toronto office of Stikeman, Elliott. He was also employed as a researcher with the Ontario Fair Tax Commission from 1991 to 1993 and as a tax policy analyst with the Ontario Ministry of Finance from 1993 to 1994. He is a member and former Governor of the Canadian Tax Foundation, a member of the International Fiscal Association, an International Research Fellow of the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation, and has been a visiting scholar at the law faculties at Auckland University, McGill University, Oxford University, and the University of Sydney.


Professor Duff has published numerous articles on tax law and policy, is the lead author on a textbook/casebook on Canadian income tax law, has co-authored a book on accident law, and has co-edited books on tax avoidance in Canada and Canadian climate change policy. He has written several articles on tax avoidance and the Canadian General Anti-Avoidance Rule (GAAR) and was cited in the Supreme Court of Canada's most recent GAAR decision in Copthorne Holdings Ltd. v. Canada, 2011 SCC 63: http://scc.lexum.org/en/2011/2011scc63/2011scc63.html.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

2012 Ross Parsons address in Taxation Law: Rethinking the Concept of Income in Tax Law and Policy   View Summary
19 November 2012

To register, please click here

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For the much of the last century, the "Haig-Simons" definition of income has served as a touchstone for normative debates in North American tax law and policy. Notwithstanding this apparent prominence in policy and theory, however, existing income taxes in the United States and Canada have consistently departed from the Haig-Simons concept in at least three crucial respects - excluding "imputed income" from leisure, services, and durable goods, excluding gifts and inheritances, and recognizing gains and losses for the most part only when they are realized through a sale or other disposition and not as they accrue from one period to the next. Although these departures from the Haig-Simons ideal are usually explained on purely pragmatic grounds, they might also be justified on normative grounds. If so, it follows that one should also question the Haig-Simons definition as a normative ideal for the taxation of personal income. Indeed, the underlying rationales for this concept of income fail to provide a convincing foundation for the taxation of personal income. Nonetheless, the deficiencies of the Haig-Simons definition may also point to a more attractive concept of income based on participation in the market economy that might attract greater scholarly and popular support. As a result, the aim of this paper is not to challenge the taxation of personal income but to defend it.

About the speaker

David G. Duff is Professor of Law and Associate Dean at the University of British Columbia Faculty of Law, where he teaches and writes in the areas of areas of tax law and policy, environmental taxation, comparative and international taxation, and distributive justice.


Prior to joining UBC Law in 2009, Professor Duff was a faculty member of the University of Toronto Faculty of Law for thirteen years. Before that, he was a tax associate at the Toronto office of Stikeman, Elliott. He was also employed as a researcher with the Ontario Fair Tax Commission from 1991 to 1993 and as a tax policy analyst with the Ontario Ministry of Finance from 1993 to 1994. He is a member and former Governor of the Canadian Tax Foundation, a member of the International Fiscal Association, an International Research Fellow of the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation, and has been a visiting scholar at the law faculties at Auckland University, McGill University, Oxford University, and the University of Sydney.


Professor Duff has published numerous articles on tax law and policy, is the lead author on a textbook/casebook on Canadian income tax law, has co-authored a book on accident law, and has co-edited books on tax avoidance in Canada and Canadian climate change policy. He has written several articles on tax avoidance and the Canadian General Anti-Avoidance Rule (GAAR) and was cited in the Supreme Court of Canada's most recent GAAR decision in Copthorne Holdings Ltd. v. Canada, 2011 SCC 63: http://scc.lexum.org/en/2011/2011scc63/2011scc63.html.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Working with Domestic Violence Offenders Training Course   View Summary
27 November 2012

To register for this training event, please click here.

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This course forms part of the new partnership between Corrective Services NSW and the Sydney Institute of Criminology. This collaboration provides training courses to equip criminology students (and students from related disciplines) and those interested in a career in the criminal justice system with industry-relevant knowledge and skills.

This course will specifically provide participants with information and tool work with and manage domestic violence offenders. This course will be delivered by an accredited Corrective Services NSW Trainer. This course will be especially relevant to anyone interested in a career in corrections or working with domestic violence perpetrators.

The Part IVA Reforms   View Summary
27 November 2012

Registration:

* Registration is no longer available - Sydney and Melbourne seminars are now full.

To register for the Melbourne seminar please click here

Topic:

The Assistant Treasurer has now released a draft of the long-awaited and much anticipated reforms to Part IVA. Just what will change in the Part IVA landscape - and how it will change - is vitally important to business and their advisers. This seminar will examine what the new Part IVA could look like:

  • The government's concerns about the design and operation of the current provisions
  • How the new provisions have been conceived
  • How the amendments are meant to work
  • What will change in handling Part IVA problems
  • The consultation process and next steps

Speakers:

Ms Kate Roff, Principal Adviser, Revenue Group - Law Design Practice

Kate, a Principal Adviser, in Treasury's new Law Design Practice, Revenue Group, has been working closely with Tom Reid, Chief Adviser, on developing the Part IVA reforms. Kate has been intimately involved in the design and execution of the new measures.

Mr Jonathan Woodger, Deputy Chief Tax Counsel, Southern Region, Australian Taxation Office (Melbourne only)

Jonathan has overall leadership of the ATO's interpretation of the income tax laws and resource rent taxes for the southern part of the country. Previously, Jonathan was Senior Tax Counsel. He is now Chair of the ATO's General Anti-Avoidance Rules (GAAR) Panel. Jonathan spent the first nine years of his career as a legislative drafter at the Office of Parliamentary Counsel in Canberra where he drafted a large amount of tax legislation

Mr Andrew England Chief Tax Counsel, Australian Taxation Office (Sydney only)

Andrew was appointed Chief Tax Counsel in 2011. He is chair of the ATO's Public Rulings Panel and Test Case Funding Panel. Since joining the ATO in 1989, Andrew has worked in a wide range of areas, including tax policy and legislation, law interpretation, litigation, audit, risk assessment and management. Andrew has also worked in the Commonwealth Attorney-General's Department, the Department of Prime Minister & Cabinet and the Treasury.

Professor Graeme Cooper, Sydney Law School

Graeme is Professor of Taxation Law at the University of Sydney and a Consultant to Greenwoods & Freehills. He is a member of the Roundtable commissioned by the government to assist in developing the new provisions.

Program:

  • Welcome and introductions
  • Ms Kate Roff, Principal Adviser, Revenue Group - Law Design Practice
  • Mr Jonathan Woodger, Deputy Chief Tax Counsel and Chair of the GAAR Panel (Melbourne only)
  • Mr Andrew England Chief Tax Counsel, Australian Taxation Office (Sydney only)
  • Professor Graeme Cooper, Sydney Law School
  • Questions

Time and Venue:

Melbourne

Greenwoods & Freehills, Level 42 101 Collins Street

8am to 9:30am (Breakfast from 7:45 am)

Sydney

Sheraton on the Park,161 Elizabeth St, Sydney, Sydney

4:30pm to 6pm (Followed by drinks)

Space is limited to 100 people so please register early

This event is sponsored by Greenwoods & Freehills.

Creating New Futures For All: Children, Youth, Disability and Situations of Forced Migration   View Summary
28 November 2012 to 30 November 2012

A Research Symposium initiative of The University of Sydney, One Billion Strong and AusAid.

To view the full symposium website and to register, please click here

JSI Series: Walking with empire   View Summary
29 November 2012

To register, please click here

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How does common law move? Unnoticed, but through jurisdiction. Noticing, this paper carefully engages with the vignette of a burial party that walked in colonial New South Wales. Forming part of a larger project that creates a minor jurisprudence of movement as a way of accounting for technical and material forms of Anglo-Australian common law practice, this paper illustrates some of common law's forms of movement, including the juridical form of walking and technologies of 'camping'. Working with a jurisprudential method of slowness, and paying attention to the productive relations between movement, jurisdiction and place, this paper attends to a jurisprudential question of conduct by asking what it might mean to walk with a colonial form of law. In doing so, it challenges the jurist to move well; to attend to the responsibilities of office.

About the speaker

Olivia Barr is a Lecturer in the Faculty of Law at the University of Technology, Sydney. Having travelled north from the University of Melbourne, where she recently submitted for examination a doctoral thesis creating a minor jurisprudence of movement, Olivia writes in critical jurisprudence and is currently curious about the Great South Road and questions of movement, lawful place and the creation and conduct of the laws of friendship.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this seminar is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is hosted by The Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence

December
2012 ACCEL Conference: Climate change, catastrophic risk and Disaster Law   View Summary
10 December 2012

To register and make your online payment, please CLICK HERE

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ABOUT THE CONFERENCE


Climate extremes become disasters when they cause widespread damage and severe alterations in the normal functioning of human and ecological communities and societies. Disaster risk management entails the policies, processes and strategies needed to improve understanding of disaster risk, foster disaster risk reduction and transfer, and promote continuous improvement in disaster preparedness, response, and recovery practices.

In the United States, Disaster Law has developed in response to disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and 9/11, where it became clear that the law is woefully unprepared to handle disasters although it plays a central role in: disaster prevention, mitigation and response; insurance/liability compensation; government assistance; and rebuilding.

This conference provides the latest scientific evidence on climate change and potential disasters. It discusses how the risk of such disasters should be spread between government, insurers and civil society and provides a framework for thinking about the evolution of Climate Disaster Law in the context of climate justice.

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

REGISTRATION: 1.30pm-2.00pm

WELCOME: 2.00pm-2.05pm
Introduction and welcome
Professor Rosemary Lyster, Director, Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law, Sydney Law School

WELCOME TO COUNTRY: 2.05pm-2.10pm

Mr Michael West, Metropolitan Local Aboriginal Land Council

OFFICIAL CONFERENCE OPENING: 2.10pm-2.20pm

Mr Mike Rothery, First Assistant Secretary, National Security Resilience Policy Division, Attorney-General's Department

SESSION 1: 2.10pm-2.40pm
Has or will the climate become "more extreme"?
Dr Lisa Alexander, Climate Change Research Centre, UNSW

SESSION 2 (KEYNOTE ADDRESS): 2.40pm-3.25pm
Climate Change as Extreme Sport: Catastrophic Risk, Disaster Law, and Climate Policy Professor
Professor Dan Farber, Center for Law, Energy and the Environment, Berkeley University

AFTERNOON TEA: 3.25pm 3.45pm


SESSION 3: 3.45pm-4.15pm
Adaptation - Beyond Uncertainty?
Dr Tony Coleman, Lonergan Edwards & Associates Limited

SESSION 4: 4.15pm-4.45pm
Destroying capabilities, disasters and climate change justice
Professor Rosemary Lyster, Director, Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law, Sydney Law School

Q&A: 4.45pm-5.00pm

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to3 MCLE/CPD units.

This event is presented by Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL)

Ross Parsons Corporate Law Seminar Series: The Hon. Ray Finkelstein and Dr Robert Austin   View Summary
10 December 2012

To register and make your online payment, please CLICK HERE

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Corporate Governance Review: Reflections on the board of directors

The session will canvass a range of topical corporate governance issues regarding the board of directors, such as: the extent to which directors can attend to, and be held accountable for, detailed management; the proper role of the board; the relationship between the full board and board committees; the extent to which the board can delegate, and can rely on the advice of others; and how directors can better manage the information inputs necessary for their decisions.

ABOUT THE SPEAKERS

The Hon. Ray Finkelstein QCgraduated in law in 1970 and was admitted to practice in 1971. Between 1971 and 1975 he worked in Melbourne as a solicitor and also as a tutor at Monash University. He was called to the Bar in 1975, specialising in equity, commercial and corporate law. He was appointed Queen's Counsel in 1986. Thereafter he concentrated on appellate work often acting for State and Federal Governments and their instrumentalities. He was acting Solicitor General for the State of Victoria during 1992. He was appointed a judge of the Federal Court in 1997 and held additional appointments as Deputy President of the Australian Competition Tribunal and the Copyright Tribunal of Australia.

In December 2008 he was appointed President of the Australian Competition Tribunal. He retired as a judge of the Federal Court and President of the Competition Tribunal on 30 June 2011 and has returned to private practice at the Victorian Bar. He is married to Leonie Thompson and has two sons, Michael and Joel.

Dr Robert Austinheld an academic position in the fields of equity and company law at the University of Sydney from 1969 to 1990, becoming Professor (1984) and Head of the Department of Law (1985). He has continued to teach, with emphasis in recent years on corporate takeovers, fundraising and corporate governance.

He was a partner with Minter Ellison from 1990 to 1998. He took responsibility for major matters with high legal analytical content. He was a member of the Takeovers Panel from 2001 to 2006. After serving as a Judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales from 1998 to 2010, he has returned to legal practice as a Senior Legal Consultant with Minter Ellison, and is Head of Minters' Corporate HQ Advisory Team.

His many publications include Ford's Principles of Corporations Law (with IM Ramsay); Austin, Ford and Ramsay, Company Directors: Principles of Law & Corporate Governance (2005); and Austin & Black's Annotations to the Corporations Act (with AJ Black).

Chair: Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD units.

Conference: Tackling Complex Needs: An Inter-disciplinary Exploration   View Summary
11 December 2012

To register, please click here.

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This one-day conference will explore 'complex needs'. By adopting a critical inter-disciplinary analysis, conference presenters will explore the multiple needs of criminal justice and human service clients more broadly.

Speakers will include:

  • Professor Eileen Baldry (University of NSW)
  • Associate Professor Susan Goodwin (University of Sydney)
  • Alison Churchill (Community Restorative Centre)
  • Leigh Garrett (OARS, South Australia)
  • Phillip Borg (Housing NSW)
  • Brendan Delahunty (NSW Ombudsman)
  • Jenny Bargen (Sydney Institute of Criminology)
  • Kat Armstrong (Women in Prison Advocacy Network)
  • Dr. Cathy Kezelman (Adults Surviving Child Abuse)
  • Dr Leanne Dowse (University of NSW)
  • Associate Professor Judy Cashmore (University of Sydney)
  • Corinne Henderson (Mental Health Coordinating Council)

CONFERENCE PROGRAM

WELCOME: 9.00am-9.10am
Introduction and welcome Sydney Institute of Criminology

SESSION 1: 9.10am-9.40am
Complex Needs - Setting the Scene Professor Eileen Baldry, UNSW

SESSION 2: 9.40am-10.30am
Disability, Trauma and Abuse Dr Leanne Dowse, UNSW; Kat Armstrong, Women In Prison Advocacy Network; Corinne Henderson, Mental Health Coordinating Council; Dr Cathy Kezelman, Adults Surviving Child Abuse.

MORNING TEA: 10.30am-11.00am

BREAK-OUT SESSIONS 1: 11.00am-12.30pm
Homelessness and Housing Phil Borg, Housing NSW; Assoc. Professor Sue Goodwin, University of Sydney; John Maynard and Dominic Grenot, City of Sydney,
OR
Drugs, Crime and Justice Ruth Marshall Dept. of Juvenile Justice; John Howard, National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre; Phil Naden and Nioka Bill, Aboriginal Legal Service NSW/ACT.

LUNCH 12.30pm-1.30pm

BREAK-OUT SESSIONS 2: 1.30pm-3.00pm
Post-Release Support: The Role of NGOs Leigh Garrett, Offenders Aid and Rehabilitation Service SA; Alison Churchill, Community Restorative Centre NSW; Vaughan Winther, Aust. Community Support Organisation VIC.
OR
Care/Crime Nexus Assoc. Professor Judy Cashmore and Jenny Bargen, University of Sydney; Brendan Delahunty, NSW Ombudsman.

AFTERNOON TEA: 3.00pm-3.30pm

PRESENTATION & PANEL 3.30pm-4.30pm
Legal Issues and Complex Needs: Shifting Terrain John McKenzie, Aboriginal Legal Service NSW/ACT, Deborah Macourt, Law and Justice Foundation

CLOSING REMARKS 4.30pm-5.00pm
Sydney Institute of Criminology

COCKTAIL RECEPTION from 5.00pm
Join us for a drink and canapé to conclude the conference

Author-meets-reader forum: Professor Anne Orford    View Summary
13 December 2012

Author-meets-reader forum:

International Authority and the Responsibility to Protect
by Professor Anne Orford
(Cambridge University Press, 2011)


Professor Anne Orford (University of Melbourne)

Dr Ben Golder (UNSW).

Dr Daniel McLoughlin (Adelaide Law School)

Dr Jacqui Mowbray (University of Sydney)

Dr Charlotte Peevers (UTS)

RSVP: If you would like to attend, please emaillaw.events@sydney.edu.au

ABOUT THE BOOK

The idea that states and the international community have a responsibility to protect populations at risk has framed internationalist debates about conflict prevention, humanitarian aid, peacekeeping and territorial administration since 2001. Anne Orford situates the 'responsibility to protect' concept in a wider historical and jurisprudential context, demonstrating that the appeal to protection as the basis for de facto authority has emerged at times of civil war or revolution - the protestant revolutions of early modern Europe, the bourgeois and communist revolutions of the following centuries and the revolution that is decolonisation. This history, from Hobbes to the UN, of the resulting attempts to ground authority on the capacity to guarantee security and protection is essential reading for all those seeking to understand, engage with, limit or critique the expansive forms of international rule authorised by the responsibility to protect concept.