All future 2016 events

View All Summary Expand all
February
ACCEL 2016 Conference: 'The Legal Implications of the Paris Agreement'   View Summary
11 February 2016

Registration

***This event has reached full capacity - registration is now closed.***

___________________________________________________________


The Twenty First Conference of the Parties under the United Nations Convention on Climate Change concluded in December 2015 with the Paris Agreement. This Agreement contains a commitment to keep the rise in global temperatures to well below 2°C above pre-industrial temperatures and to pursue efforts towards limiting the rise to 1.5°C. Obligations are imposed on all countries to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and to engage in adaptation planning, technology innovation and capacity building.


In addition, the Agreement contains a five yearly 'pledge and review' process to ensure that countries continuously improve their efforts to deal with global climate change. Developed countries are required to provide finance to developing countries and for the first time developing countries can also provide South South financial support. There will also be a five yearly Global Stocktake so that collective progress towards achieving the purpose of the Paris Agreement and its long-term goals can be assessed. A new Transparency Framework provides that the information provided in reports by each Party on achieving its obligations will be subject to a technical expert review, in accordance with guidelines and procedures adopted by the Parties. A multilateral and facilitative examination will also consider the expert review's report and identify any issues related to non-compliance with the Agreement. An Implementation Mechanism will be established under the Agreement. It will consist of a committee that will be expert-based and facilitative in nature, and function in a manner that is transparent, non-adversarial, and non-punitive.

This conference, presented by the Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL), showcases three keynote speakers who will be visitors to ACCEL in 2016 -Professor Richard Stewart (NYU School of Law), Professor Jonathan Verschuuren (Tilburg Law School) and Advocate Mr Roger Cox who mounted the litigation in Urgenda Foundation v The State of the Netherlands. Members of ACCEL and guest speakers from the Law School at the University of Tasmania will give shorter presentations on various supplementary aspects of the Paris Agreement.

Conference Program

9 am - 9.10 am

Welcome and Introductions - Professor Joellen Riley, Dean, Sydney Law School and Associate Professor Ed Couzens, ACCEL Director

9.10 am - 9.35 am

Part I - Perspectives on the Paris Agreement

Keynote address: 'Beyond Paris: The Way Forward' - Professor Richard Stewart, NYU

9.35 am - 10.05 am

'Differentiation in the Paris Climate Agreement: A Retreat or New Direction?' - Associate Professor Jeff McGee, University of Tasmania

10.05 am - 10.30 am

'Soft law in the Paris Agreement - strength or weakness?' - Dr Peter Lawrence, University of Tasmania

10.30 am - 11 am

Morning tea

11 am - 11.25 am

Part II - Justice implications of the Paris Agreement

Keynote address: 'The Paris Agreement: agriculture and food security' - Professor Jonathan Verschuuren, Tilburg University

11.25 am - 12.05 pm

'Climate disaster risk reduction, climate justice and the Paris Agreement' - Professor Rosemary Lyster, Sydney Law School

12.05 pm - 12.30 pm

'Paris, Climate Finance and Environmental Justice' - Dr Kate Owens, Sydney Law School

12.30 pm -1.30 pm

Lunch

1.30 pm - 2.05 pm

Part III - Domestic applications of the Paris Agreement

Keynote address: 'Climate Change Litigation beyond Paris: Urgenda Foundation v The State of the Netherlands' - Advocate Roger Cox, Paulussen Advocaten, Maastricht

2.05 pm - 2.35 pm

'Implications of the Paris Emissions Reduction Commitments for Biodiversity' - Associate Professor Ed Couzens, Sydney Law School

2.35 pm - 3 pm

'The role of Constitutions and the Public Trust Doctrine in a post-Paris world' - Danny Noonan, Our Children's Trust, JD student Sydney Law School


This event is presented by the Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law(ACCEL)

JSI Seminar Series: Amalia Amaya   View Summary
18 February 2016

Registration

Click here to register

___________________________________________________________

The Tapestry of Reason: An Inquiry into the Nature of Coherence and its Role in Legal Argument

Coherence theories of law and adjudication have been very popular in the last decades. Although these theories significantly advance the case for coherentism in law, a number of problems remain open in the current state of the coherence theory in law.

In a recent book and in this seminar, Amalia Amaya attempts to develop a coherence-based model of legal reasoning, which addresses, or at least mitigates, these problems. This model has four main elements: a constraint satisfaction approach to coherence, an explanatory view of coherence-based legal inference; a contextualist approach to legal justification; and a conception of legal justification that importantly depends on the epistemic responsibility of subjects. Amaya concludes by exploring the implications of the version of legal coherentism proposed for a general theory of legal reasoning and rationality.

Amalia Amaya is Research Fellow at the Institute for Philosophical Research at the National Autonomous University of Mexico. She holds an LLM and a PhD from the European University Institute and an LLM and a SJD from Harvard Law School. She works primarily in philosophy of law, with a particular focus on the epistemology of legal proof, the theory of legal reasoning, and judicial ethics. Some recent publications include: "Exemplarism and Judicial Virtue" (Journal of Law and Literature, 2013), "Coherence, Evidence and Legal Proof" (Legal Theory, 2013) as well as two books Law, Virtue, and Justice (co-edited with Ho Hock Lai) (Hart Publishing, 2012) and The Tapestry of Reason: An Inquiry into the Nature of Coherence and its Role in Legal Argument (Hart Publishing, 2015).

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD points
Republic of Brazil v Durant and the Principles of Tracing   View Summary
25 February 2016

Registration


***This event has reached full capacity. To join a wait list, email: law.events@sydney.edu.au**
______________________________________________________


Republic of Brazil v Durant and the Principles of Tracing

Presented by Adjunct Professor Joe Campbell


In Republic of Brazil v Durant [2015] UKPC 35; [2015] 3 WLR 599 the Privy Council permitted property held on trust to be traced through several bank accounts notwithstanding that the lowest intermediate balance rule was breached, and that backwards tracing was involved.


This lecture examines the correctness of the result the Privy Council reached, and the adequacy of its reasoning. In so doing it considers the various different equities that can be involved in tracing, and the often overlooked aspect of Hagan v Waterhouse (1991) 34 NSWLR 308 at 357 - 359 that permitted tracing through a bank account in overdraft."


Chair: Professor Matthew Conaglen, Sydney Law School


About the Speaker

Adjunct Professor Joseph Campbell was a judge of the Supreme Court of New South Wales from 2001 until his retirement in 2012. He sat as a first instance judge in the Equity Division 2001-2006, and as a judge of the Court of Appeal 2007-2012. In 2013 he was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Law. Also in 2013 he became an Adjunct Professor at Sydney Law School, and has taught in undergraduate courses in Equity, Introduction to Property and Commercial Law and Interpretation. Additionally, he is Deputy Chair of the Electoral Commission of NSW, and has sat occasionally as an Acting Judge in the NSW Court of Appeal.


This event is presented by Sydney Law School in partnership with the Bar Association.


Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 .5 MCLE/CPD unit.

SCIL International Law Year in Review Conference   View Summary
26 February 2016
***This event has reached full capacity - registration is now closed.***

_____________________________________________


The Sydney Centre for International Law at Sydney Law School is delighted to present the fourth International Law Year in Review Conference, to be held at the Law School on 26 February 2016. The conference will give participants insight into the latest developments in international law over the preceding year, especially those most salient for Australia.

Speakers at the conference will include leading academics, practitioners and government lawyers, and will provide an in-depth and critical analysis of contemporary developments in international law on topical themes, including Australia's participation in international cases in the International Court of Justice and the World Trade Organization. Participation will enable lawyers and non-lawyers alike to remain abreast of important trends in international affairs.

The program for the day includes panels on human rights and security issues, and dedicated panels on major issues in international economic and trade law, including the Plain Packaging litigation, the negotiations on the FTA, and the TTP/TTIP. Our Literary Lunch guest will be Miles Franklin Award-winning author Frank Moorhouse, whose works Grand Days, Dark Palace, and Cold Light, examined Australia's involvement in international law and international relations during the time of the League of Nations and early days of the UN, and the formation of Australia's international legal personality in the post-World War II era.


Conference Program

Please click here to download the conference program.


Registration (GST Inclusive)
Early Bird Full Day: $175 (closes 29 January 2016)
Full day: $200 (after 29 January 2016)

Students: $99 (full day registration)

Morning sessions: $100 (includes morning tea and lunch)
Afternoon sessions: $100 (includes afternoon tea and cocktail reception)

Law & Business Discussion Panel: Women in Law, Business, Politics and Development   View Summary
29 February 2016

Registration

Click here to register for this seminar


Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
_____________________________________________________

Major gender gaps persist around the world, from business and political life, to development opportunities more broadly. These constraints are increasingly well recognized across a range of domains, from sports and entertainment, to access to jobs and violence against women. The importance of law in addressing gender discrimination and gaps has moved to the forefront of the global development agenda.

This Panel discussion, which is a joint initiative of the University of Sydney Business School and University of Sydney Law School, brings together several prominent experts and practitioners to discuss and debate these challenges in the spheres of law, business, politics and development. The Panelists will highlight key obstacles, as well as promising policy and regulatory responses to achieve gender equality.

Chairs
Adjunct Professor Hugh Harley, University of Sydney Business School, Financial Services Leader, Australia, PwC
Professor Jennifer Hill, University of Sydney Law School


Panellists
Dr Jeni Klugman, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University*
Sam Mostyn, Non-Executive Director
Professor Pippa Norris, John F. Kennedy School of Government,Harvard University
Professor Gillian Triggs, President, Australian Human Rights Commission


*Please note that Dr Jeni Klugman will teach an intensive course on Gender Inequality and Development in Sydney Law School’s postgraduate program on 7-10 March 2016.


Upcoming Courses
Corporate Governance
Fundamentals of Corporate Law
International Financial Transactions: Law and Practice
Regulation of Corporate Crime
Takeovers and Reconstructions
US Corporate Law

For a full list of all Law & Business courses, click here.
Single unit enrolment is available for these courses.


MCLE/CPD points: 1.5

This event is co-presented by the University of Sydney Business School and University of Sydney Law School

March
Distinguished Speakers Program: Public Reason and Administrative Legitimacy   View Summary
3 March 2016

Registration


Click here for online registration.



Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
_______________________________________________________________


Public Reason and Administrative Legitimacy
Presented by Jerry L. Mashaw is Sterling Professor of Law, Emeritus at Yale Law School


In this address Professor Mashaw will make three principal arguments. First, that public reason as theorized in political and moral philosophy is quite problematic. Although for the last several decades public reason has been almost the only game in town in political and moral philosophy when addressing the organization of collective action, none of its variants are without serious difficulties.


Secondly, he will argue that some such practice of public reasoning is crucially important to the maintenance of a functioning and acceptable conception of democracy and democratic citizenship in modern administrative states. This seems to be one of those cases in which an idea may work reasonably well in practice although it doesn't work very well in theory.


Third, although he will argue that some forms of public reasoning as a practice are necessary to the legitimation of collective action, and ubiquitous in the administrative regimes of advanced democracies, all is not well in practice either. The forms of reasoning deployed in administrative governance are both procedurally demanding and substantively disappointing. Hence, public reason in practice tends to be simultaneously legitimating and delegitimating. This dual aspect of reasoning in practice presents a crucial challenge for the design of public institutions in the 21st century.

About the speaker
Jerry L. Mashaw is Sterling Professor of Law, Emeritus at Yale Law School, where he teaches courses on Administrative Law, social welfare policy, regulation, legislation, and the design of public institutions. He formerly taught at Tulane University and the University of Virginia, and has lectured and taught abroad in Europe, Latin America, China, New Zealand and Australia His award winning books include Bureaucratic Justice (1983), The Struggle for Auto Safety (with David Harfst 1990), and Greed, Chaos, and Governance: Using Public Choice to Improve Public Law (1997), and Creating the Administrative Constitution: The Lost 100 Years of American Administrative Law (2012). Professor Mashaw past President of the National Academy of Social Insurance, a Fellow the National Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was founding Co-editor (with O.E. Williamson) of the Journal of Law, Economics and Organization.


Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1 MCLE/CPD unit.

Is the Director's Duty of Care, Skill and Diligence Irrelevant to Corporate Governance today?   View Summary
7 March 2016

Registration
Click here to register for this seminar

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
_____________________________________________________
Seminar Title: Is the Director's Duty of Care, Skill and Diligence Irrelevant to Corporate Governance Today?

The director's duty of care, skill and diligence is commonly regarded as a core mechanism of corporate governance. However, in the Anglo-American environment at least, the director's duty of care has become increasingly marginalised as a corporate governance mechanism, to the extent that it today fulfils a merely peripheral governance role at best. Moreover, it would appear that securities fraud actions based on related allegations of misleading disclosure - rather than company law actions for director negligence per se - are now becoming the shareholder mechanism of choice for redressing mismanagement concerns arising from internal control failings in US and UK public companies.

The recent Citigroup Securities Litigation in the US and also the ongoing RBS shareholder rights issue action in the UK are notable examples in this regard. This seminar examines the above trend, and draws comparisons with the corresponding experience in Australia, where the company law duty of care would still appear to represent a relevant and effective governance mechanism in public companies.

About the Speaker
Dr Marc T. Moore is a Reader in Corporate Law at the University of Cambridge, and a Fellow of Murray Edwards College, Cambridge. He has previously held teaching positions at University College London (2009-2014) and the University of Bristol (2004-2009). In 2011, Marc was a visiting professor in the Adolf A. Berle, Jr. Center on Corporations, Law & Society based at the Seattle University School of Law.

Marc has written extensively in the field of company law, with particular regard to Anglo-American corporate governance and corporate theory. In 2012 he was awarded a prestigious Philip Leverhulme Prize, for outstanding scholars who have made a substantial and acknowledged contribution to their field of study. In 2013 his book, Corporate Governance in the Shadow of the State (2013, Hart Publishing), was shortlisted for the SLS Peter Birks Prize for Outstanding Legal Scholarship.

Marc has been invited to deliver guest lectures on his work in a number of countries, including the UK, USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, Italy and Iceland. Aspects of his work have also featured in both national and overseas popular media. .

Marc is originally from Blantyre, Scotland. He is a graduate of the University of Glasgow.

Commentator:
Greg Golding, Partner, King & Wood Mallesons

Chair:
Dr Kym Sheehan, Lecturer, Sydney Law School

MCLE/CPD points: 1

Sydney's Lockout Laws: Cutting Crime or Civil Liberties?   View Summary
14 March 2016

Registration

This event has reached full capacity, and registration is now closed. To join a waitlist email law.events@sydney.edu.au.

_________________________________________________________

Join us at the Sydney Institute of Criminology where a panel of diverse speakers will explore the Sydney Lockout Laws: the science and statistics, the impacts, and conundrums and trade-offs in regulating the night-time economy.

Since being introduced, Sydney's Lockout Laws have been contentious, and have highlighted a range of concerns about Sydney's night-time economy, including safety, alcohol-fuelled violence and crime, civil liberties, entertainment and enjoyment. This panel event canvasses some of the debates in the community. It will discuss: what is the evidence for and against the laws? How are they impacting the community? What is reasonable and unreasonable regulation?

This event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney. 2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology, and this panel event is the first in a schedule of events that showcases the contributions of the Institute to public debate, research and policy.

About the speakers:
Dr Don Weatherburn has been Director of the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research in Sydney since 1988 and is an Adjunct Professor with the School of Social Science and Policy at the University of New South Wales. He has published on a wide range of topics: including drug law enforcement policy, liquor-licensing enforcement, the economic and social correlates of crime, criminal justice administration, juvenile recidivism and crime prevention. He has also published three books: Delinquent-prone Communities, Law and Order in Australia: Rhetoric and Reality and Arresting Incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous Imprisonment.

Professor Murray Lee is a Professor of Criminology at the University of Sydney Law School. He is the author of Inventing Fear of Crime: Criminology and the Politics of Anxiety (2007), co-author of Sexting and Young People (2015) and  Policing and Media: Public Relations, Simulations and Communications (2014), co-editor of Fear of Crime: Critical Voices in an Age of Anxiety (2009), and editor of the scholarly journal Current Issues in Criminal Justice. He is author of over 50 book chapters and refereed journal articles. His current research interests involve fear of crime, policing and the media, 'sexting' and young people, crime prevention, confidence in criminal justice systems, and the spatial determinants of crime.

Associate Professor Kane Racefrom the Department of Gender & Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney has published widely in the areas of drug use, sexuality, HIV and public health; and is recognised for his contribution to HIV prevention and policy in Australia and internationally. Kane is a founding member of the Association for the Social Sciences and Humanities in HIV and a member of the editorial advisory boards of the International Journal of Drug Policy, Contemporary Drug Problems, Biosocieties, Culture, Health & Sexuality, and Sexualities. He is an active volunteer for Unharm, an organisation devoted to drug law reform and making drug user safer, where he has played a leading role in efforts to mobilise queer community around this issue recently.  His book Pleasure Consuming Medicine: the Queer Politics of Drugs (Duke University Press, 2009) examined how moral and legal distinctions around drug use are bound up in the moral policing of citizenship.  He has lived in the inner east of Sydney for over 20 years. 

Professor Kate Conigrave
Kate is an Addiction Medicine Specialist and Public Health Physician. As a doctor, she treats patients with alcohol and other drug problems at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital. At the University of Sydney she is involved in research and training of doctors and other health professionals. Kate also acts as a director for FARE - the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education. Kate has published over 100 reports in refereed journals, and is an editor on two clinical books on alcohol and drug problems. She has received the Senior Scientist Award from the Australasian Professional Society for Alcohol and Other Drugs. Kate is on the Editorial Advisory Boards of two international journals, and has acted as consultant to the World Health Organization on early intervention for alcohol problems.

 Chair:
Associate Professor Julia Quilter
is a graduate of Sydney University, UNSW (LLB) and Monash University (PhD). Prior to joining the University of Wollongong in 2010, she spent ten years practising as a solicitor and barrister, working mainly in public law and criminal law. She worked at the NSW State Crown Solicitor’s Office and was the Special Counsel to the NSW Solicitor General and Crown Advocate, appearing as junior counsel in constitutional and criminal law matters in the High Court, NSW Court of Appeal and NSW Court of Criminal Appeal.  Shespecialises in research and teaching on criminal law and criminal justice policy. Her research focuses on criminal law responses to alcohol-related violence and ‘one punch’ fatalities, sexual assault, the operation of public order laws and the law’s treatment of intoxication. She is a regular media commentator on criminal justice issues, and a co-author of Criminal Laws: Materials and Commentary on Criminal Law and Process in NSW (Federation Press, 6th ed, 2015).

Employment Relations and the Law Seminar Series 2016    View Summary
16 March 2016
Untitled Document

Registration

To register   click here

Please note: Online registrations must be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To arrange an alternative payment method, please contact   law.events@sydney.edu.au
_____________________________________________

This popular annual series is made up of 10 evening seminars and provides an introduction to the current regulation of employment and labour relations in Australia. Topics include the fundamentals of employer and employee rights and obligations under the Fair Work Act, the common law of employment, work health and safety and anti-discrimination law, as well as the regulation of collective bargaining and industrial action.  Special interest topics include Contemporary Issues - social media, Workplace Investigations, and equality and diversity in work with a focus on gender and disability.

SEMINAR SCHEDULE (subject to change)


Date

Topic

 

16 March

Introduction

Joellen Riley

23 March

The Employment Contract

David Chin

30 March

BREAK

6 April

Termination of employment

Kate Peterson

13 April

Fair Work System, NES and Awards

Jacquie Seemann

20 April

Enterprise Bargaining

Shae McCrystal

27 April

Work Health and Safety

Ron McCallum

4 May

Contemporary Issues - Social Media

Elizabeth Raper

11 May

Workplace investigations

Jane Seymour

18 May

Gender and Equality at Work

Belinda Smith

25 May

Disability and Diversity

Belinda Smith

Presenters
Seminars will be presented by experts from Sydney Law School and the profession including:

Registration fees (inc GST)
Full Fee Early bird (until 1 March): $990
Full fee (after 1 March): $1,200
Group (3+from the same org.): $900 pp
Sydney Law School Alumni: $792
University of Sydney Staff: $495

No formal qualifications are required for enrollment, and participants who attend a minimum of eight (8) seminars in the series will be issued with a certificate of attendance.

University of Sydney staff receive a 50% discount on the series fees. For details on how to register, please email:law.events@sydney.edu.au.

Information for lawyers and barristers: Attendance at this seminar series is equal to 20 MCLE/CPD units, based on 2 points per seminar attended.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership - Objectively    View Summary
17 March 2016

Registration


Click here for online registration.



Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.


_______________________________________________________________


The Trans-Pacific Partnership - Objectively

Is the largest free trade agreement in human history, the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP), truly a paradigm shift towards trade liberalisation, higher labor and environmental standards, improved intellectual property protection, and regulatory coherence? Or, does TPP manage trade in favour vested, even plutocratic interests, at the expense of the common good? Coverage of TPP tends to be unbalanced, but this seminar, based on the title of Professor Bhala's forthcoming book, "TPP Objectively," is different. It offers a neutral, albeit not value free, of the key points in the 30 Chapters of this remarkable and controversial treaty. The seminar sets the devilish details of TPP in the broader contexts of economic, national security, and social justice theory.

Dr Williams will comment on Professor Bhala's presentation and contribute some further analysis of some specific aspects of the TPP (including trade in legal services, the politically sensitive agricultural products, movement of people, regulatory coherence) and about the overall impact of the TPP on the WTO and the world trading system, and Australia's place in it.

Professor Nottage will describe some of the noteworthy features of the TPP chapter on Investment and the Investor State Dispute Settlement provisions, (based largely upon his comments published on his blog Japanese Law and the Asia -Pacific.


Speaker: Professor Raj Bhala, Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law and Rice Distinguished Professor, University of Kansas Law School

Commentators:

Dr Brett Williams, Research Affiliate of the Sydney Centre for International Law and of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law, and Principal, Williams Trade Law

Professor Luke Nottage, University of Sydney Law School


Chair:

Adjunct Professor Donald Robertson, University of Sydney Law School


About the speakers:


Raj Bhala is Associate Dean for International and Comparative Law, and Rice Distinguished Professor, at the University of Kansas School of Law. He entered the legal academy after practice at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, where he twice won the President's Award for Excellence, thanks in part to his service as a delegate to the United Nations Conference on International Trade Law. He is InternationalLegal Consultant for the Bahrain and Saudi Arabian offices ofa major Canadian law firm, Blake, Cassels & Graydon. A graduate of Harvard Law School, before which he completed Masters degrees at LSE and Oxford as a Marshall Scholar, and an undergraduate degree at Duke, Raj is the author of one of the world's leading textbooks in international trade law, the first treatise on GATT in nearly 50 years, and the first non-Muslim American scholar to author a textbook on Islamic Law. He is currently working on a new book on TPP, and one on the law of India.


Brett Williams, principal of Williams Trade Law, is a lawyer, academic and technical assistance consultant, based in Sydney, specializing in the regulation of international trade especially the World Trade Organization and bilateral and regional trade agreements. He is a Research Affiliate of both the Sydney Centre for International Law and the Centre for Pacific and Asian Studies. He has taught World Trade Organization law at the University of Sydney Faculty of Law since 2001.


Professor Luke Nottage specialises in international arbitration, contract law, consumer product safety law and corporate governance, with a particular interest in Japan and the Asia-Pacific. He is founding Co-Director of the Australian Network for Japanese Law (ANJeL), Associate Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney, and Comparative and Global Law Program coordinator for the Sydney Centre for International Law. Luke is also a Director of Japanese Law Links Pty Ltd. His major research project over 2014-16 is an ARC Discovery Project on foreign investment dispute resolution.


Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 MCLE/CPD unit.


Presented jointly by the Sydney Centre for International Law and the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the Faculty of Law of the University of Sydney



April
JSI Seminar Series: The Evolution and Transformation of Judicial Review Regimes    View Summary
7 April 2016


Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

The Evolution and Transformation of Judicial Review Regimes


Speaker: Professor Theunis Roux, University of New South Wales


Judicial review regimes self-evidently evolve and change character over time. The Lochner era in the United States, for example, is associated with a shift from a regime in which law claimed authority on the basis of its separateness from politics, to its exact opposite - a regime in which a politicised Supreme Court pursued a substantive vision of social justice and sought authority for its decisions in the moral attractiveness of that vision and its capacity to win public support. But what drives these changes, and is it possible to expand the Lochner example into a more general theory of the evolution and transformation of judicial review regimes? This paper, the theoretical chapter from a forthcoming study of the Politico-Legal Dynamics of Judicial Review, addresses itself to these questions. Taking the Lochner example as paradigmatic, the paper argues that judicial review regimes evolve on the back of competing claims to legal and political authority in respect of major policy choices. It then presents a typology of four judicial review regimes based on a stylised account of the main types of legal and political authority claim. The remainder of the study uses these four ideal types as an heuristic to investigate the way in which actually existing judicial review regimes stabilise around particular forms of law/politics interaction and the factors that occasionally drive (or fail to drive) a transition to new forms. The practical dimension of the study concerns its implications for the way constitutional democrats (judges, other legal professionals and civil society activists and social movements) engage judicial review regimes.

Theunis Roux is Professor of Law and Associate Dean (Research) at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia.  Before relocating to Australia in January 2009, he was (for four years) the founding director of the South African Institute for Advanced Constitutional, Public, Human Rights and International Law (SAIFAC), an independent research centre based on Constitution Hill, Johannesburg.  His main research interest is in comparative constitutional law, focusing on the politics of judicial review in new democracies.  His book on the first South African Constitutional Court (The Politics of Principle) was published by Cambridge University Press in April 2013.  He is a former Secretary-General of the International Association of Constitutional Law, and was previously co-editor of the leading commentary on South African constitutional law, Stuart Woolman et al Constitutional Law of South Africa.  In addition to his academic work, Theunis has acted as a consultant to the South African government and UN Habitat in the areas of land restitution, land tenure reform and regulation impact analysis. 

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD points

Did Dworkin's 'Equality of Resources' almost dissolve the problem of free will (and nobody noticed)?   View Summary
12 April 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________________________

JSI Seminar Series: D
id Dworkin’s ‘Equality of Resources’ almost dissolve the problem of free will (and nobody noticed)?

Speaker: Dr Nikolas Kirby, Blavatnik School of Government

In his paper ‘On the Currency of Egalitarian Justice, Jerry Cohen initially compliments Ronald Dworkin on being the first philosopher to incorporate the responsibility intuition of the right into the egalitarian theory of the left. He then critiques Dworkin’s theory on the basis of expensive tastes, arguing that this implies thatwe should drop Dworkin’s resourcist version of responsibility-sensitive egalitarianism in favour of his own heterodox welfarist conception. And only then, does Cohen make his famous remark with respect to being ‘up to our necks in the free will problem,’ that is, in order to decide which choices individuals should be held consequentially responsible for, we must first determine which choices reflect a genuine metaphysically determined ‘free will.’

What has not been the object of much reflection, however, is that if Dworkin can respond to the expensive tastes problem (admittedly, inter alia other problems), then not merely would there be no need to drop his resourcist theory for Cohen’s welfarism, but also no solution to the freewill problem would be needed to determine a just distribution, and thus no such solution would be needed to determine consequential responsibility for individuals’ actions. Dworkin would have an account of those actions that we should bear the consequences of, and those we should not, without ever having to rely upon any premise about freewill. In itself, this alone would be a very important result, since much of our anxiety about the existence, non-existence and diminishment of free will is driven by a need to assign consequential responsibility to individuals for their actions. If the freewill problem persists, then its practical relevance virtually disappears. However, in this paper, Nikolas Kirby shall push further.

First, he shall argue that if we can offer such a Dworkinian account of consequential responsibility without ever having to rely upon any premise about freewill, then with such an account in hand we can begin to tack backwards: first to offer an account of moral responsibility without any premise about freewill, and then finally to (dis)solve the problem of free-will itself. Secondly, he shall argue that whilst there remains a missing piece of the puzzle - how to respond to Cohen’s expensive tastes objection (although understood in a different light that I shall explain) - we can now see that the answer to that objection need not be deeply metaphysical. Instead, the answer to that objection may depend on more standard, and hopefully solvable, moral and epistemological debates between liberals and perfectionists.In sum, the free will problem may not be solved (yet), but starts to look a lot more soluble.

Dr Nikolas Kirby is Departmental Lecturer in Philosophy and Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government. He was educated at the University of Sydney (BA (Hons), LLB (Hons)) where he was awarded the University Medal for philosophy, and the Convocation Medal. He then went on to study at the University of Oxford (BPhil, DPhil) as a Rhodes Scholar. He has worked in law, academia and politics in Australia. He is a co-founder and chair of the Good Lad Workshop, a social enterprise that engages boys and men in discussions about masculinity, sexism and lad culture. He plays Australian Rules Football for the University of Oxford during the winter, and village cricket in the summer.


Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 2 MCLE/CPD points

Legitimating Practices: Revisiting the predicates of police legitimacy    View Summary
13 April 2016

About

Procedural justice theory predicts a relationship between police behaviour, individuals' normative evaluation of police, and decisions to comply with laws. Yet, prior studies of procedural justice have rather narrowly defined the potentially relevant predicates of police behaviour. In this talk I describe a study that sought to expand the scope of procedural justice theory by considering a broad array of policing components, including unobserved actions such as electronic surveillance, respecting the limits of one's legal authority, and the unequal or equal distribution of policing resources between different groups. Analysing data from a national probability sample of adults in England and Wales, the findings (a) present a comprehensive investigation of the heterogeneous elements of policing related to legitimacy judgments and (b) contribute to debate about the nature of legitimacy.


This event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney. 2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology, and this event is part of a suite of events throughout the year that showcases the Institute's commitment to criminal justice research and supporting the work of visiting scholars.


About the Speaker
Jonathan Jackson is a Professorof Research Methodology and a member of the MannheimCentre for Criminologyat the LSE. Jon is an editor of the British Journal of Criminologyand on the editorial board of Race and Justice: An International Journal.

He has held visiting appointments in criminology at Oxford, Sydney, Griffith and Cambridge, in psychology at New York University and John Jay College of Criminal Justice, in law at Yale, and in government at Harvard.

Sydney Institute of Criminology 50th Anniversary Lecture: Southern Criminology and Global Justice   View Summary
19 April 2016

Registration


CLICK HERE to register
_____________________________________________________________________


Sydney Institute of Criminology 50th Anniversary Lecture Series: Southern Criminology and Global Justice

Delivered by Professor Kerry Carrington, School of Justice, Faculty of Law, Queensland University of Technology, Australia

The Sydney Institute of Criminology presents the first lecture in a series celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Institute. Join us as Professor Kerry Carrington reflects on where criminology has come from, and a bold new vision of where it is heading.

About the lecture
Almost 85% of the world's population live in what might be termed the 'global south', comprising three continents. A large proportion of the world's police and around half of the world's 10.2 million prisoners are detained in the continents of the global south, across Asia, Africa, Oceania and South America. Yet criminology has concentrated mostly on problems of crime and justice in the global North. Where criminology has taken root in the global South it has tended to borrow and adapt metropolitan assumptions. Consequently criminologies of the periphery have, until recently, accepted their subordinate role in the global organisation of knowledge. This has stunted the intellectual development and vitality of criminology, both in the South, across Asia and globally. It has also perpetuated the relative neglect of pressing criminological issues which affect both North and South, as well as the neglect of crimes outside the large metropoles of the global North.

This lecture outlines how Southern criminology aims to fill this void, to transform criminological agendas to make them more befitting, inclusive of and responsive to the global problems of justice and security in the 21st century. Southern criminology seeks to globalise and democratise criminological practice and knowledge, to liberate it from its Anglophone northern bias, to renovate its methodological approaches and to inject innovative perspectives into the study of crime and global justice from the periphery. It offers not another form of opposition, but a series of projects of retrieval. Its purpose is not to denounce but to re-orient, not to oppose but to modify, not to displace but to augment.

As a way of illustrating how Southern Criminology might usefully contribute to better informed responses to global justice, this lecture explores three distinct projects that could be developed under such a rubric. These include firstly, certain forms and patterns of crime specific to the global periphery; secondly, the distinctive patterns of gender and crime in the global South shaped by diverse cultural, social, religious and political factors; and lastly the distinctive historical and contemporary penalities of the global south and their links with colonialism.

About the speaker
Professor Kerry Carrington is the Head of the School of Justice in the Faculty of Law at Queensland University of Technology. She was born in Mt Isa and is the first of six siblings to attend university thanks to Gough Whitlam's reforms to higher education. She has worked in government and the Australian Parliament, and in the tertiary sector for 26 years. Kerry is the author of Feminism and Global Justice (2015) Offending Youth (2009), Policing the Rural Crisis (2006), Who Killed Leigh Leigh (1998) several earlier books and around 100 other publications. In 2014 she was the recipient of the American Society of Criminology Lifetime Achievement award from the Division of Critical Criminology. In 2013 she was awarded the American Society of Criminology, Distinguished Scholar Award, from the Division of Women and Crime. Kerry is the first Australian woman to receive these awards.

Kerry has always been a public intellectual committed to open democratic flow of knowledge. This has made her a sought-after speaker around the world on women, crime and justice systems, and an advocate for a fairer society.

This event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney. Founded in 1966, the Institute has maintained a commitment to critical dialogue on criminal justice matters throughout the past 50 years. This event showcases the Institute of Criminology's contribution to supporting new ideas and theoretical innovation.

MCLE/CPD = 1.5 points

What can be done about wrongful convictions?   View Summary
28 April 2016

Registration

Click here to register your attendance.


About the event

Join us at the Sydney Institute of Criminology for a panel discussion exploring miscarriages of justice and wrongful convictions with prominent US experts, Professor Jon Gould and Professor Richard A. Leo, and leading Australian researchers, Dr Bob Moles andMs Bibi Sangha. This panel event, chaired by Associate Professor David Hamer, will discuss two projects on wrongful convictions in the United States and Australia respectively.

Professor Jon Gould will discuss some of the key findings and implications of his four-year collaborative US study, Preventing Wrongful Convictions, funded by the National Institute of Justice. The study employed quantitative and qualitative analyses of 'erroneous convictions' and 'near misses' to understand the many potential causes of wrongful convictions. Professor Richard A. Leo will share his deep understanding of the role of false confessions in wrongful convictions.

Dr Bob Moles andMs Bibi Sangha will discuss the findings from the Australian Networked Knowledge and Flinders University Miscarriages of Justice Project (FUMOJ), and explore what appears to be a long series of wrongful convictions in South Australia, including the significant causal role apparently played by South Australia's former Chief Forensic Pathologist, Dr Colin Manock.


This event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney. 2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology, and this panel event is part of a suite of events throughout the year that showcases the contributions of the Institute to criminal justice research, policy and debate.

Speakers

Professor Jon Gould

School of Public Affairs & Washington College of Law, American University, Washington D.C.

A lawyer and social scientist, Professor Gould combines empirical research with policy advocacy to advance government reform and administration. His work focuses on civil rights and liberties, justice policy, and legal change, helping to make academic research relevant and accessible to policymaking. He has published on the subjects of wrongful convictions, hate speech, police conformance with the Constitution, and judicial treatment of race and gender, among others. His first book, Speak No Evil: The Triumph of Hate Speech Regulation (University of Chicago Press, 2005) was a co-winner of the Herbert Jacob award for the best book in law and society. His second book, The Innocence Commission: Preventing Wrongful Convictions and Restoring the Criminal Justice System (New York University Press, 2007) was named an Outstanding Academic Title by the American Library Association.

Prior to joining American University, Professor Gould was associate professor and director of the Center for Justice, Law and Society at George Mason University. He has practiced law with the Washington, D.C. office of Mayer, Brown and Platt; helped to direct programming for the International Human Rights Law Institute; and worked on the national staffs of two presidential campaigns. From 2014-2016 he has been on leave from American University as Director of the Law and Social Sciences Program at the National Science Foundation.


Professor Richard A. Leo

Hamill Family Chair Professor of Law and Social Psychology, Dean's Circle Scholar, University of San Francisco

Professor Leo is one of the leading experts in the world on police interrogation practices, the impact ofMiranda, psychological coercion, false confessions, and the wrongful conviction of the innocent. Professor Leo has authored more than 100 articles in leading scientific and legal journals as well as several books, including the multiple award-winningPolice Interrogation and American Justice(Harvard University Press, 2008);The Wrong Guys: Murder, False Confessions and the Norfolk Four(The New Press, 2008) with Tom Wells; and, most recently,Confessions of Guilt: From Torture to Miranda and Beyond (Oxford University Press, 2012) with George C. Thomas III. He is currently working on a book that is tentatively entitled,The Innocence Revolution: A Popular History of the American Discovery of the Wrongly Convicted(with Tom Wells).


Dr Bob Moles
Founder and Director, Networked Knowledge

Dr Moles studied at Queens University, Belfast, and Edinburgh University. After holding academic positions at the law schools of Australian National University and Adelaide University, Dr Moles established the Networked Knowledge project to investigate and report upon alleged serious miscarriages of justice which are said to have taken place in South Australia over the last 30 years.With Dr Sangha and others, Dr Moles has made a significant contribution to the creation of a new opportunity for appeal in South Australia and Tasmania for the potentially wrongful convicted, and has done considerable work on a number of miscarriages of justice, including the Henry Keogh case.


Ms Bibi Sangha
Senior Lecturer and Director, Flinders University Miscarriages of Justice Project (FUMOJ), Flinders Law School, Flinders University

Ms Sangha studied at Middlesex University and the London School of Economics. She was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn in London and has practiced in Malaysia, including the last Privy Council appeal from Malaysia. Prior to joining Flinders Law School in 1994, she was at the Australian National University.In 2007 she was commissioned to provide an expert report to the Goudge Commission of Inquiry into Pediatric Pathology in Canada. Ms Sangha currently runs the Flinders University Miscarriages of Justice Project. In 2015, the Australian Universities' committee of Deans for Arts Humanities and Social Sciences recognised the FUMOJ project as one of the four most significant research projects in Australia in terms of social impact.


Associate Professor David Hamer
Sydney Law School, University of Sydney

Associate Professor Hamer's primary research interest is in the law of evidence. He takes an interdisciplinary approach, interrogating the law - and the proof process more broadly - using tools drawn from probability theory, narrative theory and psychology. His interest in evidence law often flows over into areas of substantive law and broader issues, in particular law's continuing struggle with the notion of causation, criminal justice, and the causes of and solutions to wrongful convictions. He has published widely in these areas in leading Australian and international law journals.

May
Law and Business Seminar: Realising the public potential of corporate law   View Summary
3 May 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register for this seminar

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.



Realising the public potential of corporate law:
Statutory directors' duties and civil penalty enforcement in Australia

This seminar is a joint Law & Business/ASIC event.

The seminar focuses on ASIC's enforcement role in contemporary Australian corporate law. Traditionally corporate law has been viewed as having characteristics that are commonly associated with private law, leaving no or a very limited role for the state in its enforcement. An alternate view is that corporate law has, and should be recognised as having, characteristics that are usually associated with public law and as a consequence, there is a role for public enforcement.

Australia is unusual in the extent to which its corporate law allows for public enforcement. For example, unlike the US and the UK, Australian corporate law contains statutory directors' duties supported by a civil penalty regime that gives ASIC standing to take court based proceedings following a breach. This raises interesting questions as to the appropriate role of a public regulator when it acts to enforce breaches of what arguably are codified fiduciary and common law duties that represent private rights, traditionally only enforceable by the company to whom they are owed.

In these circumstances, the public nature of corporate law in Australia is largely determined by the types of cases the regulator chooses to pursue and the interests it seeks to represent. Through the use of these provisions, ASIC has the potential to influence governance standards in Australian boardrooms, in the public interest. This presentation will draw on recent studies by the author to illustrate how the public potential of corporate law has developed in Australia and how the regulator has sought to influence governance standards in Australian boardrooms through the litigation it has commenced.


About the Speaker

Associate Professor Michelle Welsh is the Acting Head of the Department of Business Law and Taxation and the coordinator of the Ethical Regulation Research Group at the Monash Business School. Michelle is the current President of the Australasian Corporate Law Teachers Association.

Michelle undertakes research in the area of corporate law, corporate regulation, enforcement and compliance and has published in leading Australian corporate law journals, law reviews and international journals. Michelle has been invited to present her research at national and international workshops and conferences including: the University of Michigan, the University of British Columbia, Osgoode Hall Law School, the Law Society of Hong Kong, the Hong Kong Institute of Chartered Secretaries and the Hong Kong Securities and Futures Commission.

Commentator
Michael Kingston, Chief Legal Officer, Australian Securities and Investments Commission


Chair
Dr Greg O'Mahoney, New Chambers


MCLE/CPD points: 1

Rack 'em, Stack 'em and Pack 'em": Decarceration in an Age of Zero Tolerance   View Summary
11 May 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register
_________________________________________________

Sydney Institute of Criminology 50th Anniversary Lecture:
Rack 'em, Stack 'em and Pack 'em": Decarceration in an Age of Zero Tolerance

Delivered by Dr Don Weatherburn (BOCSAR), Sydney, Australia

The Sydney Institute of Criminology presents the second lecture in a series celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Institute. Join us as Dr Don Weatherburn reflects on the state of imprisonment in NSW.

About the lecture
In the 66 years between 1918 and 1984, the Australian imprisonment rate rose by just 13 per cent. In the 29 years that followed, it more than doubled. Australia now has more than 36,000 people behind bars. Our imprisonment rate exceeds that of Canada, the United Kingdom and most of Europe. The Indigenous imprisonment is now more than 45 per cent higher than it was at the time of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody. The rate of female imprisonment has quadrupled since 1982. In this lecture, Dr Don Weatherburn (NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research) will discuss how we got to this point, what costs and benefits we've accrued along the way, and what measures might be effective in reducing rates of imprisonment.

About the speaker
Dr Don Weatherburn has been Director of the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research in Sydney since 1988 and is an Adjunct Professor with the School of Social Science and Policy at the University of New South Wales. He has published on a wide range of topics: including drug law enforcement policy, liquor-licensing enforcement, the economic and social correlates of crime, criminal justice administration, juvenile recidivism and crime prevention. He has also published three books:Delinquent-prone Communities,Law and Order in Australia: Rhetoric and RealityandArresting Incarceration: Pathways out of Indigenous Imprisonment.

About the chair
Eileen Baldry (BA, DipEd, MWP, PhD) is Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Academic Chair UNSW Equity, Diversity and Inclusion Board and Professor of Criminology at UNSW Australia. Eileen researches and teaches in the areas of Criminology and Social Policy, in particular in regard to vulnerable people in criminal justice systems. She has been and is Lead and Chief Investigator on major grants from the ARC, NHMRC and other funding bodies and has authored over 100 peer-reviewed books, articles and reports. She is involved in a voluntary capacity with development and justice community agencies and is a past recipient of the NSW Justice Medal.

This event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney. 2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology, and this lecture is part of a suite of events throughout the year that showcases the contributions of the Institute to criminal justice research, policy and debate.

MCLE/CPD=1.5 points

Climate Change and Renewable Energy: Chinese Perspectives and Policies   View Summary
17 May 2016
Registration

CLICK HERE to register
_________________________________________________

Climate Change and Renewable Energy: Chinese Perspectives and Policies

China, the world's largest greenhouse gas (GHG) emitter, has not been subject to any emissions abatement requirement under the international climate regime established by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (1992) and the Kyoto Protocol (1997). While the regime has taken important steps to mobilize members of the international community to tackle climate change, the Kyoto Protocol has failed to mitigate effectively due to the non-participation of the US and the absence of control on GHG emissions by developing countries such as China. The North-South divide has long caused deadlocks in the global climate negotiation most vividly seen at the Copenhagen Conference (2009) where China rejected any suggestion of a legally binding cap on its GHG emissions and the US refused to accept the legal obligations of deeper cut by developed countries. The Paris Agreement (2015) promises a more effective climate regime by securing the participation of the US and China, but challenges remain in implementation.

A/Prof Yuhong Zhao will review China's evolving role in the global climate governance, from a vocal advocate of the "common but differentiated responsibilities" (CBDR) at the Rio Summit (1992) to a responsible state and leader of the developing countries to accept legal obligations to cap its GHG emissions.

Dr Penelope Crossley will discuss the likely future development of renewable energy law as the regulation and governance of renewable energy has historically been highly fragmented internationally. Dr Crossley will raise the question of whether the benefits of laws harmonising or converging outweigh the costs involved in terms of the loss of local preferences.

About the Speakers

Associate Professor Yuhong Zhao joined the Chinese University of Hong Kong in September 2006. Her teaching and research expertise includes Chinese environmental law, international and comparative environmental law and policy, and the legal system of the PRC.

Dr Penelope Crossleyis a lecturer at Sydney Law School. She specialises in the complex legal issues associated with the energy and resources sectors.

This event is co-presented by the China Studies Centre and the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney (CAPLUS)

Capitalism Without Democracy: The Private Sector in Contemporary China   View Summary
26 May 2016

Registration

Click here to register for this seminar


Capitalism Without Democracy: The Private Sector in Contemporary China

The stunning expansion of China's private sector growth has led observers to assume that its growing ranks of capitalists represent a force for democratization. Tsai's research in ten provinces finds little evidence for this belief, but shows that private entrepreneurs have nonetheless had a structural impact on Chinese politics through a variety of "adaptive informal institutions." The ability of China's party-state to respond constructively to private sector interests has been a source of authoritarian resilience for the past three decades. Can the present government retain this flexibility as China enters a period of slower economic growth?

About the Speaker
Professor Kellee S. Tsai is the Division Head and Chair Professor of Social Science, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Prior to joining HKUST, Professor Tsai served as Vice Dean for Humanities and Social Science and Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. A scholar of contemporary Chinese politics and economic development, Tsai's research addresses broader debates in comparative politics, the political economy of development, and the study of informal institutions and endogenous institutional change. She has published five books, including Back-Alley Banking: Private Entrepreneurs in China (Cornell University Press, 2002), Rural Industrialization and Non-Governmental Finance in Wenzhou (co-authored in Chinese, 山西经济出版社 2004), Japan and China in the World Political Economy (co-edited with Saadia Pekannen, Routledge, 2005), Capitalism without Democracy: The Private Sector in Contemporary China (Cornell University Press, 2007), and State Capitalism, Institutional Adaptation, and the Chinese Miracle (co-edited with Barry Naughton, Cambridge University Press 2015).


This seminar is co-presented by the China Studies Centre and the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney (CAPLUS)


CPD Points: 1.5

June
JSI Seminar Series: "In a Place Where There Are No Humans, Strive to Be a Human"   View Summary
9 June 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________________________

"In a Place Where There Are No Humans, Strive to Be a Human": Dignity, Law, & Two Kinds of Spirituality

Speaker: Julian Sempill, Melbourne Law School


The question "what is dignity?" is a profoundly important one. Also of importance are a range of questions about what each of us should do as a person, and what we should do as a community, in order to promote dignity. Julian Sempill's paper is part of an inquiry into one such question. The question concerns the relationship between dignity and our institutional practices, and, in particular, the practices of our legal institutions. The question is this: "How should we understand the relationship between law and dignity?" Sempill's conclusions are as follows. Law can and should make a distinctive contribution to meeting our need for dignity. It is morally necessary that the law promotes dignity in a manner consistent with the demands of justice. However, actual legal systems are capable of unjustly failing to promote dignity. Not only can they unreasonably fail to promote dignity: under certain circumstances, distinctive and potentially salutary features of actual legal systems may become special, grotesque instruments of indignity. In arguing in favour of those conclusions, Sempill disagrees with the views of Jeremy Waldron, who has recently produced a substantial body of work on the relationship between law and dignity. In particular, he disagrees with Waldron's contention that, "There is an implicit commitment to dignity in the tissues and sinews of law—in the character of its normativity and in its procedures."


Julian Sempill is a Senior Lecturer at Melbourne Law School, where he has taught since 2009. D.Phil., Law (Oxon.) (as of 04-06-16), B.A./L.L.B. (Hons) (Melb.). In "Ruler's Sword, Citizen's Shield: The Rule of Law & the Constitution of Power" 31 Journal of Law & Politics 333 (2016) (University of Virginia), he offers a fresh perspective on the Rule of Law debate. He is currently working on a book entitled Power & the Law: A Political Person's Guide, as well as a project exploring the relationship between law and dignity.


CPD Points: 2

JSI Seminar Series: Reason of State, Public Reason, and the Question of Religion   View Summary
16 June 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________________________

Reason of State, Public Reason, and the Question of Religion

Speaker: Professor Miguel Vatter, UNSW

Rawls seems to have conceived of his idea of public reason as a counter to the tradition of reason of state. The latter tradition attempted to justify the reason of state as a neutral instrument to bring to an end the wars of religion based on faith. The way it did this was to apply the formula: "cujus regio, ejus religio" (whose realm, his religion). In other words, the sovereign had the right to determine the public confession of the state, while relegating to matters of individual conscience issues of faith. In this paper, Miguel Vatter discusses in what ways the idea of public reason reinterprets the relation between religion and state in a way that subverts reason of state. He will suggest that the question of the public role of religion was primary in Rawls's mind when recovering the idea of public reason, and indeed the role of religion in the public sphere has been perhaps the main way in which Rawls's contribution has been received, at least in continental political philosophy. Rawls seems to have been motivated by the approach to religion put forward by some of the Founding Fathers in their thoughts on constitutionalism, which Vatter shall argue contained messianic aspirations. These aspirations, roughly put, tend towards the elimination of the difference between rich and poor, and towards the universal access to knowledge. Vatter wants to argue that Rawls's famous proviso seems to leave open a path that reinforces an emancipatory dynamic between messianic claims (he is thinking of discourses like the ones of Martin Luther King or Nelson Mandela, but also of more recent social movements like Occupy) and constitutionalism.

Miguel Vatter is professor of politics at UNSW. His areas of research include republicanism, biopolitics, and political theology. Some recent work includes: "The Republic of the Living. Biopolitics and the Critique of Civil Society" (Fordham, 2014); "Machiavelli's The Prince. A Reader's Guide" (Bloomsbury 2012); and he is co-editor with Vanessa Lemm of "The Government of Life. Foucault, Neoliberalism and Biopolitics" (Fordham, 2014).

CPD Points: 2

Family Comes First: Implementing Family Intervention in Juvenile Justice   View Summary
22 June 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register
_____________________________________________________________________

Family Comes First: Implementing Family Intervention in Juvenile Justice

The goal of family intervention programs in juvenile justice is reducing recidivism through enhancing family relationships. By aiming services at families who would benefit from assistance in providing more effective parental guidance of children and young people, the Act Now Together Strong (ANTS) program seeks to join Juvenile Justice staff with families to work collaboratively towards positive outcomes for young offenders. ANTS has been implemented in the Western Region of NSW, including Dubbo, Orange, Bourke and Griffith. This seminar will explore the recent evaluation of ANTS, asking, what are the benefits of ANTS? Are the benefits region specific? Can they be extended to other areas, and how? This seminar will hear from Professor Chris Trotter who has been instrumental in evaluating the ANTS program, with further key insights from Juvenile Justice Staff.

Please join us for this first seminar of the 50th Anniversary 2016-2017 Juvenile Justice seminar series, examining the possible futures of juvenile justice family intervention programs.

About the speakers

Professor Chris Trotter worked for many years in youth justice, child protection and adult corrections prior to his appointment to Monash University in 1991. He has undertaken many research projects and published widely on the subject of effective practice with involuntary clients particularly those in the criminal justice system. He has an international reputation for his work particularly in relation to pro-social modelling. He has published 6 books including Working with Involuntary Clients, now in its third edition and published in multiple languages and Collaborative Family Work. Dr Trotter is Director of the Monash Criminal Justice Research Consortium and is currently engaged in several research projects on effective practice in criminal justice including work with families.

Leonie Bender is the Regional Director, Juvenile Justice, Western Region, NSW. She has twenty-five years experience in both the public and private sector, with twenty years being in senior management roles. This has included aged care and rehabilitation, community welfare and family services and within Juvenile Justice. Leonie has held senior management positions for the past sixteen years within Juvenile Justice, supported by tertiary qualifications in Social Welfare and Public Sector Management. As Regional Director, Leonie is responsible for the strategic focus and service delivery to juvenile offenders and their families across Riverina Murray, Central West and Far Western NSW.

Craig Biles is Area Manager, Juvenile Justice, Central West, Dubbo, and oversees service delivery in the Central West Region of NSW. Craig was born in Dubbo and raised in the western region of NSW. He has been with Juvenile Justice for 18 years. Craig's professional experience is complemented by formal tertiary qualifications in social welfare obtained through Charles Sturt University. Over his working life he has been privileged to be a part of a team to develop and deliver a range of training and program initiatives to support both staff and clients to achieve better outcomes.

Jason Coyle is a Juvenile Justice Caseworker, Dubbo, NSW. He commenced working with Juvenile Justice in 2008, firstly as a Youth Officer at Orana Juvenile Justice Centre, before making the transition in 2012 to a community case worker based out of the Dubbo Office. Jason's primary role is in frontline services including assessments, report writing and program delivery, and his main focus is to support clients in targeted areas to address their offending behaviours.

CPD Points: 2

This event is sponsored by Juvenile Justice NSW and hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.

2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology. Founded in 1966, the Institute has maintained a commitment to critical dialogue on criminal justice matters throughout the past 50 years. This event celebrates the relationship the Institute of Criminology has with external criminal justice stakeholders and its ongoing commitment to criminal justice research, policy and debate.

July
Distinguished Speakers Program: Advancing Global and National Health Security   View Summary
20 July 2016

Registration

Click here for online registration.

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.


Advancing Global and National Health Security: Lessons from SARS and MERS to Ebola and Zika

Presented by Professor Lawrence Gostin, Linda and Timothy O'Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington DC.

Over the past decade, the world has faced a series of global health crises involving contagious diseases with pandemic potential. From novel influenzas (H5N1 and H1N1), coronaviruses (SARS, and MERS) to the Ebola and Zika viruses, governments and international organisations have struggled to act quickly and decisively. The consequences loom large in both economic and human terms. Modelling by the Institute of Medicine suggests that the economic costs of a 21st-century pandemic could exceed USD$60 billion annually, placing pandemic disease in a category similar to war, terrorism and financial crises. Despite this, global investments in risk mitigation frameworks for pandemic disease remains inadequate and leaves countries exposed to significant disruption, financial harm, and avoidable mortality.

Professor Lawrence Gostin has served on two high-level commissions inquiring into the lessons learned from the 2015 West Africa Ebola epidemic: the Commission on a Global Health Risk Framework (National Academy of Sciences, supported by WHO, World Bank, Gates Foundation, and Rockefeller Foundation), and the Independent Panel on the Global Response to Ebola (Harvard University/London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine). In this seminar, Professor Gostin will reflect on lessons learned from these and other global commissions into the Ebola epidemic and global health risk framework, with short responses from three Australian experts in the field. In his keynote presentation, Professor Gostin will argue that the lessons from past epidemics point to three key drivers of change: national health systems, the World Health Organisation (WHO) and UN System reform, and accelerated Research and Development. Each of these drivers of change requires system-wide accountability mechanisms to improve their performance and to reduce the human and economic cost of future epidemics.

About the speaker

Professor Lawrence Gostin is the Linda and Timothy O'Neill Professor of Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington DC, where he directs the O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law. Professor Gostin is also the Director of the World Health Organisation's Collaborating Centre on Public Health Law and Human Rights. Professor Gostin is a global health diplomat who has worked to advance health and human rights in many capacities in the international arena. These include membership of the WHO's Expert Advisory Panels on the International Health Regulations, on mental health, and on smallpox; the Independent Global Commission on the Ebola Epidemic, and the Global Fund/World Bank/WHO Equitable Access Initiative.

Professor Gostin is the author of many books and scholarly articles including Global Health Law (Harvard University Press, 2014); Public Health Law and Ethics: A Reader (University of California Press, 2nd ed., 2010); Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint (University of California Press, 2nd ed. 2008); and Principles of Mental Health Law & Practice (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Professor Gostin is a long-time friend of Sydney Law School and the University of Sydney and on the nomination of the Dean of Law and the Dean of Medicine, was awarded a Doctor of Laws (honoris causa) by the University in 2012.

Responders

ChairDr Sascha Callaghan, University of Sydney

CPD Points: 1.5

Are you interested in studying health care law, public health law, or global health law? Sydney Law School offers a Master of Health Law and Graduate Diploma in Health Law which is open to both legally qualified candidates as well as those without a law degree. Click here for more information or contact the coordinator of the program, Professor Magnusson, at: roger.magnusson@sydney.edu.au

JSI Seminar Series: Following Derrida: After the Animal Question and Before Society   View Summary
28 July 2016
Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

Following Derrida: After the Animal Question and Before Society

Speaker: Dr Melanie White, University of New South Wales

More than ten years has passed since Jacques Derrida gave his series of lectures titled 'The Animal that Therefore I am'. In these lectures, Derrida maintains that the history of modern philosophy demonstrates a largely unquestioned opposition between human and animal. This opposition forms the basis of all the so-called great questions - questions about law, justice, and human rights among others - and the concepts that seek to delimit the properties of the human. The purpose of this paper will be to consider whether the dominant question in sociology, namely, the question of the origins and ground of society, is in fact, the question of the animal. Dr Melanie White will draw on the work of the French sociologist Emile Durkheim (1858-1917) in order to consider this question from the perspective of two classic oppositions used to theorise society: individual/collective and machine/organism. She will demonstrate that, following Derrida, these oppositions come into being in Durkheim's social theory through the exercise of distinctly human capacities for 'collective representation' and 'moral obligation'.

Dr Melanie White is Senior Lecturer in Social Theory at the University of New South Wales. She teaches in the Sociology & Anthropology program in the School of Social Sciences. She has a special interest in the social theories of the French thinkers Emile Durkheim, Henri Bergson and Georges Canguilhem, along with a growing interest in the vitalism of Georg Simmel. Melanie's current research concerns the place of the animal in the constitution of the discipline of sociology in 19C France.

CPD Points: 2

August
Law & Business Seminar: Network Neutrality and Innovation   View Summary
4 August 2016

Registration
CLICK HERE to register for this seminar

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

____________________________________________________________________________________

Network Neutrality and Innovation

The crux of the debate over network neutrality can be boiled down to the claim that the Internet's existing architecture represents an essential foundation for its success that must be preserved.It may come as a surprise that the engineering literature is replete with commentaries noting the many things that the Internet was not designed to do well.The basic insight is that every architecture necessarily involves tradeoffs, and no architecture can do everything.In addition, it also implies that every architecture is to some extent a reflection of the times in which it arose and that architectures tend to favor innovations consistent with the design while hindering innovations that have needs that the architecture was not designed to support.This seminar will examine the architectural commitments embedded in the Internet's design. It will also explore how the environment surrounding the Internet has changed over the past twenty years and how further innovation may depend on permitting the architecture to evolve to meet these new demands.

About the Speaker
Christopher S. Yoo is the John H. Chestnut Professor of Law, Communication, and Computer & Information Science and the Founding Director of the Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on the insights that the principles of network engineering and imperfect competition provide into the regulation of the Internet and intellectual property. He is building an innovative integrated interdisciplinary program designed to produce a new generation of professionals with advanced training in both law and engineering. His major research initiatives include a study of innovative approaches to connecting more of the world's citizens to the Internet; an exploration of the legal aspects of providing privacy and security for autonomous vehicles and medical devices; and a comparison of competition law in China, Europe, and the U.S. as applied to technology industries.

Before entering the academy, Professor Yoo clerked for Justice Anthony M. Kennedy of the Supreme Court of the United States and Judge A. Raymond Randolph of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. He also practiced law with Hogan & Hartson (then Hogan Lovells) under the supervision of now-Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr. He also served as a professor at the Vanderbilt Law School, where he led the Technology and Entertainment Law Program. He is a graduate of Harvard College, the Anderson School at UCLA, and the Northwestern University School of Law. The author of four books and more than seventy articles and book chapters, Professor Yoo testifies frequently before Congress, the Federal Communications Commission, the Federal Trade Commission, and foreign regulatory authorities.

Commentator
Peter Leonard, Partner, Gilbert + Tobin

Chair
Associate Professor Kimberlee Weatherall, Sydney Law School


CPD points: 1

Upcoming Events:

2016 Law & Business Seminar Program

Upcoming Course:

Communications/ Technology Regulation

Semester 2 Intensive

4, 5 & 8, 9 August 2016

A chance to study the challenges around internet regulation, online privacy, telecommunications and network policy, with leading US thinker Professor Christopher Yoo. If you would like to study this course, we offer two study options -

Study without assessment. This will count towards your Continuing Professional Development (CPD) requirements.

Study with assessment. This can be counted towards a full degree, if you are already enrolled or should you subsequently apply for entry into a degree program.

Click here to apply.

Integrity in Asian Sport Symposium   View Summary
8 August 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register
_________________________________________________

Integrity in Asian Sport Symposium


As Asia (and Japan in particular) prepares to become the centre of the international sporting world in the latter half of the decade, a roundtable of international sports law experts examines the confluence of Asian regionalism and integrity in sport.

Participants
Professor Keiji Kawai, Doshisha University (Kyoto), 'Matchfixing in Sumo'
Matt Nichol, Monash University, 'The Essendon Doping Scandal and Corporate Governance'

Discussants
Professor Jeremi Duru, American University, Washington School of Law
Micah Burch, Sydney Law School

CPD Points: 1.5


This symposium is supported by ANJeL (Australian Network for Japanese Law)


Upcoming Course:

International Sports Law

Examine how professionalism, internationalisation, and commercialisation have resulted in an increasing intersection of the law with sporting activity with Professor Jeremi Duru, American University, Washington College of Law.

Semester 2 Intensive

3, 4 & 8, 9 August

9am - 5pm

Click here for course outline.

Study Options: If you would like to study this intensive, we offer two study options:

Study without assessment. This will count towards your Continuing Professional Development (CPD) requirements.

Study with assessment. This can be counted towards a full degree, if you are already enrolled or should you subsequently apply for entry into a degree program.

Click here to apply.

Pharmacotherapies and Crime: the impact of drugs on offending behaviour   View Summary
9 August 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register
_____________________________________________________________________

Pharmacotherapies and Crime: the impact of drugs on offending behaviour

This seminar brings together a number of experts to discuss the emerging evidence around pharmacological interventions and their impact on offending behaviour and recidivism.

How might drug treatments such as Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) and anti-androgens interact with the criminal justice system? Do treatments like these mandate difficult actions on offenders, or do they enhance justice outcomes? How are they comparable to other well established treatments, such as opioid substitution therapies or cognitive behavioural therapy? And how do medical treatments engage with behavioural questions around offending? Are the side effects of such interventions mitigated by justice outcomes? What is the scope for coercive drug treatment? Criminal justice practice and historical theoretical thinking have long debated the biological aspects of offending and treatment.

This seminar will explore the evidence base for use of certain drugs and their individual impact on offending, including the critical ethical, moral and legal dimensions of their use.

Please join us for this first seminar of the 50th Anniversary 2016-2017 Corrective Services NSW Beyond Punishment seminar series, examining the possible futures of offender treatment.

About the speakers:

Professor Tony Butler is the Program Head of the Justice Health Research Program at the Kirby Institute, UNSW Australia.Over the past twenty years Tony has worked on numerous projects in the justice health area in Australia involving both adult and juvenile offenders and has authored or co-authored numerous peer-reviewed journal articles and reports on prisoners' health. He has led studies examining mental illness among prisoners, the role of traumatic brain injury in offending behaviour, and a randomised control trial of a pharmacotherapy for impulsive-violent offenders. He implemented Australia's first national prisoner health research study - the National Prison Entrants Bloodborne Virus Survey, and initiated the national data collection on prisoners' health. He leads the NHMRC funded Australian Centre for Offender Health Research.

Professor David Greenberg is an Adjunct Professor of Forensic Psychiatry, University of New South Wales. He is the past Chair and Professor of Forensic Psychiatry at the University of Western Australia. He has practiced in medicine and forensic psychiatry for the past 37 years; authored over 60 international peer reviewed articles and book chapters and also read over 100 peer reviewed papers at national and international conferences. The focus of much of his research has been with perpetrators of sexual offences, paraphilia disorders and risk assessment for sexual violence. He is the past recipient of awards from both the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law and the American Academy Forensic Sciences. He directs the Statewide Community and Court Liaison Service and is a winner of the New South Wales Premier's Public Sector Gold Award (Social Justice Section). He was awarded the 2015 Deans of Medicine Award for major contribution to postgraduate teaching.

Professor Michael Farrell is the Director of the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at the University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW. He worked in London for over 20 years where he was a Consultant Addiction Psychiatrist in the Maudsley Hospital and a Professor of Addiction Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Kings College London. His extensive research interests include treatment evaluation, drug dependence in prisons, Evidence Based Practice and Treatment Evaluation, translation of new evidence into practice. He is a member of the WHO Expert Committee on Drug and Alcohol Dependence. He has published over 200 scientific papers.

Associate Professor Barbara Meyer is an Associate Professor in the School of Medicine and Director of the Lipid Research Centre at the University of Wollongong, NSW. She is also an Honorary Fellow at the University of Glasgow, Scotland. She is currently serving on the Board of Directors for the International Society for the Study of Fatty Acids and Lipids (ISSFAL) and she was the Nutrition Society of Australia President Elect (2010-2011); President (2012-2013) and Immediate Past President (2014-2015). She is currently the Chair of the newly formed Oceanic Nutrition Leadership Program (2015 onwards). Barbara is recognised internationally for her research on omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in relation to health and disease including complicated pregnancies like pre-eclampsia, cardiovascular disease, depression, and more recently aggressive behaviour. Her research work on omega-3 intakes has informed the National Health & Medical Research Council Nutrient Reference values. She has published over 70 papers and is on the Editorial Board for several international journals.

Associate Professor Mitch Byrne is a Clinical and Forensic Psychologist with almost 30 years applied experience. He has also undertaken an academic role since 1997 where his key research interests have included forensic risk assessment and treatment, Psychopathy, Autism, PTSD, treatment adherence, and the role of n-3 PUFAs in behavioural regulation. Mitch is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Wollongong where he is the Director of the Post Graduate Clinical Training program. He also maintains an active clinical and forensic practice.

Dr Sascha Callaghan is a lawyer and lecturer in health law and ethics at the University of Sydney. She has published widely in the area of health care decision-making, mental health and cognitive impairment. She also has a research interest in law and reproduction and medical treatment in pregnancy. Sascha is the lawyer member of the Ethics of Clinical Practice Committee for Sydney Local Health District, and a member of a number of research collaboration networks including the Sydney Health Policy Network and the Network for Bodies Organs and Tissues. She is currently a lead researcher in the Sydney Neuroscience Network on intersections between neuroscience, law and ethics.

Dr Maggie Hall is a criminologist, criminal lawyer and social worker with a national and developing international reputation for her research with prisoners. In her role as a public intellectual she regularly responds to media, official and academic requests for expert advice and commentary on keyissues in criminal justice and penality.Dr Hall is currently expanding her portfolio of publications with a range of articles in refereed journals and a forthcoming monograph called "The Lived Sentence" with a flagship international publisher in law, criminology and criminal justice.

The chair of the event is Dr Allan McCay. Allan teaches at the University of Sydney Foundation Program and is an Affiliate Member of the Centre for Agency, Values, and Ethics, at Macquarie University. His research focuses on free will and the criminal law, and he has a particular interest in neuroscience and behavioural genetics, as factors in sentencing. He holds a PhD from the Sydney Law School and is a member of the management committee of the Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence at the Law School. Formerly a solicitor in Scotland and Hong Kong, he has also been a visiting researcher at the University of California, Riverside, the University of Stirling and the Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, Oxford University.

CPD Points: 2

This event is sponsored by Corrective Services NSW and hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School.

2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology.Founded in 1966, the Institute has maintained a commitment to critical dialogue on criminal justice matters throughout the past 50 years. This event celebrates the relationship the Institute of Criminology has with external criminal justice stakeholders and its ongoing commitment to criminal justice research, practice, policy and debate.

Symposium: Consumer and Contract Law Reform in Asia   View Summary
10 August 2016

Please note that the event has been rescheduled. It was previously advertised as 27 July 2016.


Registration

Click here to register for this symposium

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
______________________________________________________________________________

Symposium: Consumer and Contract Law Reform in Asia

Private law and regulatory frameworks impacting on consumer protection are being reformed in many parts of Asia, the world economy's fastest-growing region. This development is important for Australian exporters and outbound investors, as well as policy-makers engaged over 2016 in a five-yearly review of the Australian Consumer Law.

In 2013, China amended its 20-year-old consumer rights statute to expand consumer protection and increase liability exposure of businesses, and case law of its highest court has ruled on long-standing controversies in consumer cases. These legal developments are likely to be further consolidated in China's ongoing civil law codification. Japan is considering a Bill for the first comprehensive reform of the contract law provisions of its Civil Code in over a century, which is also influencing a review of the Consumer Contracts Act 2000. A new statute adds representative actions for damages claims.

The Indian Parliament is debating the Consumer Protection Bill 2015, with a focus on product liability, safe food and new consumer protection agencies for regulation and redress.

In Southeast Asia, ASEAN has worked since 2007 to "trade up" to higher harmonised standards of consumer protection law, to avoid a regulatory "race to the bottom" in conjunction with liberalised trade and investment under the ASEAN Economic Community, implemented from 2016. Most member states now have framework consumer protection laws, providing product safety regulation, and half allow strict liability compensation claims for unsafe goods. Thailand also enacted a US-style class action regime in 2015, in addition to 2008 legislation facilitating individual consumer law claims. Singapore recently enacted "Lemon Law" provisions (inspired by EU law) to facilitate consumer contract claims, and required goods to meet ISO or other specified standards - approximating the "general safety requirement" under Malaysia's 1999 Consumer Protection Act (also following EU law). Malaysia also added provisions on unfair contract terms to this Act in 2010.

Further background:
Nottage, Luke R. and Thanitcul, Sakda, Economic Integration and Consumer Protection in Southeast Asia: ASEAN Product Liability Law and Safety Regulation (December 13, 2015). ASEAN PRODUCT LIABILITY AND CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY LAW, Winyuchon Publication House, Thailand, 2016; Sydney Law School Research Paper No. 15/100: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2703130

Speakers:
Professor Sakda Thanitcul, Chulalongkorn University
Professor Hiroo Sono, Hokkaido University
Associate Professor Jeannie Paterson, Melbourne University
Professor May Fong Cheong, visiting Professorial Fellow at UNSW Faculty of Law, Adjunct Professor at Multimedia University (Malaysia)
Professor Gail Pearson, Sydney Business School
Professor Bing Ling, Sydney Law School
Professor Luke Nottage, Sydney Law School


Registration fees (inc GST):
Full Fee= $75
Alumni/Government Organisations =$65
Students/Academics/NGOs =$45


Other events:
You may also be interested in our upcoming Governing Food Conference which is being held on 1 - 3 November 2016. For further information, click here

JSI Seminar Series: Dworkin's Literary Analogy   View Summary
23 August 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

Dworkin's Literary Analogy

Speaker:Dr Samuel Shpall, University of Sydney

For decades Ronald Dworkin defended the view that legal interpretation is constructive. One of his most fascinating arguments for this idea, which turns on an analogy between legal and literary interpretation, has been more or less ignored by philosophers of law -- probably because they have not been especially interested in the claims about literary interpretation that it presupposes. In this paper, Sam Shpall aims to explore Dworkin's analogical argument with the sensitivity it deserves, and to evaluate its implications for his overall anti-positivist project and the correct theory of legal interpretation.

Sam Shpall is a lecturer in the Department of Philosophy. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California in 2011, and was a Postdoctoral Fellow there from 2011-2013. From 2013-2015 he was the Postdoctoral Associate in Law and Philosophy at Yale University, and a Lecturer at the Yale Law School. He also taught philosophy in four New York State Correctional Facilities from 2014-2015 as a faculty member of the Bard Prison Initiative.

CPD Points: 2

___________________________________________________

Other upcoming events:

Julius Stone Address 2016: The Democratic Deficit

13 October 2016

Is the authority and legitimacy of international organisation threatened or undermined by a democratic deficit, and what, if anything, can be done about it? In his lecture, Professor Joseph Raz will include observations about the reasons for the success and for the moral legitimacy of democratic decision-making in states, and their possible role in international bodies.

Distinguished Speakers Program: Professor Philippe Sands QC   View Summary
24 August 2016

Registration

***We have reached full capacity for this event. Email law.events@Sydney.edu.au to join a wait list ***


Lecture: East West Street: A Personal History of the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity'

Wednesday 24 August
6-7pm, followed by a cocktail reception

Join us for our next distinguished speaker lecture: 'East West Street: A Personal History of the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity' presented by author and international lawyer, Professor Philippe Sands QC, (University College London and Matrix Chambers) on 24 August. Professor Sands will also introduce a free screening of his documentary My Nazi Legacy the following evening.

Drawing from his acclaimed new book - part historical detective story, part family history, part legal thriller - Philippe Sands explains the connections between his work on 'crimes against humanity' and 'genocide', the events that overwhelmed his family during the Second World War, and the remarkable, untold story that lay at the heart of the Nuremberg Trial: how Rafael Lemkin and Hersch Lauterpacht - the two prosecutors who brought 'genocide' and 'crimes against humanity' into the Nuremberg trial and international law - discovered that the man they were prosecuting - Hans Frank, Hitler's personal lawyer and Governor General of occupied Poland - had murdered their own families.

His new book East West Street: On the Origins of Crimes Against Humanity and Genocide (Alfred Knopf/Weidenfeld & Nicolson) will be available for purchase and signing after his presentation.

Registration will commence at 5.30pm, for a 6-7pm lecture followed by a cocktail reception.

This event is co-presented by Sydney Law School and Sydney Ideas


Registration (inc GST)*
Full fee: $15 inc GST
University of Sydney alumni: $10 inc GST
F/T student: $10 inc GST
*Cost includes cocktail reception following the lecture.


Venue:
Law Foyer, level 2, Sydney Law School
New Law Building (F10), Eastern Avenue
The University of Sydney (Camperdown campus)

CPD points: 1

________________________________________________________

Complimentary film screening
My Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did

6-7.45pm, Thursday 25 August


This thought provoking documentary explores the relationship between two men, each the sons of high-ranking Nazi officials, and Philippe Sands, whose family perished in the Holocaust. Philippe Sands met Niklas Frank and Horst van Wächter while researching his book East West Street, and as the three travel together on an emotional journey through Europe and the past, the film explores how each of them cope with their own devastating family history.

Venue

Charles Perkins Centre
Auditorium
Building D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road)
University of Sydney, Camperdown

Click here to register for film only

_____________________________________________________________

About the speaker
Philippe Sands QC is Professor of Law at University College London and a practising barrister at Matrix Chambers. He appears before many international courts and tribunals, including the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice, and in 1998 acted for Human Rights Watch with Reed Brody in the Pinochet cases at the House of Lords in London. He is the author of Lawless World (2005) and Torture Team (2008) and several academic books on international law, and contributes to the New York Review of Books, Vanity Fair, the Financial Times and The Guardian. He is a vice president of the Hay Festival and a member of the board of English PEN and of the Tricycle Theatre.

Film screening: My Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did    View Summary
25 August 2016

Registration

Click here for online registration

_____________________________________________________________

Complimentary film screening

My Nazi Legacy: What Our Fathers Did is an outstanding documentary about history and guilt from author and human rights lawyer Professor Philippe Sands QC (University College London and Matrix Chambers) concerning the two elderly sons of prominent officials in Nazi Germany.

Join us for a free screening with Professor Sands on Thursday 25 August.

About the film

What if your father was a Nazi? This is the harrowing question raised in David Evans' thought-provoking documentary. While researching his book East West Street, international lawyer Philippe Sands encountered two men whose fathers were high-ranking Nazi officers during the Second World War: Niklas Frank, whose father was executed after being found guilty of war crimes by the Nuremberg tribunal, and Horst von Wächter, whose father was Frank's deputyandgovernor of Galicia in occupied Poland. The men have strikingly opposite views on their relationship with their fathers. While Frank condemns his father's actions, von Wächter can't bring himself to think of him as a murderer.

From these extraordinary encounters, a gripping conversation emerges, resulting in the men journeying to Poland where members of Sands' family were murdered during the war. At a time when extremism and anti-Semitism are on the rise, this fascinating and personal encounter is a devastating and timely meditation on remembrance and moral responsibility.

Watch trailer now

Registration is essential
Click here for complimentary registration


Venue

Charles Perkins Centre

Auditorium (12A) -the auditorium is located adjacent to the main Charles Perkins Centre building.

Building D17, Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road)
University of Sydney, Camperdown
Camperdown Campus


Directions:

From Missenden Road Camperdown, go down Johns Hopkins Drive (next to Royal Prince Alfred Hospital) until you reach the Charles Perkins Centre. The auditorium (12A) is on the side near the Centenary Institute.


Look for Taste café, the auditorium is located on the lower floor (take stairs or lift to lower level). ____________________________________________________________

About the speaker

Philippe Sands QC is Professor of Law at University College London and a practising barrister at Matrix Chambers. He appears before many international courts and tribunals, including the International Criminal Court and the International Court of Justice, and in 1998 acted for Human Rights Watch with Reed Brody in the Pinochet cases at the House of Lords in London. He is the author of Lawless World (2005) and Torture Team (2008) and several academic books on international law, and contributes to the New York Review of Books, Vanity Fair, the Financial Times and The Guardian. He is a vice president of the Hay Festival and a member of the board of English PEN and of the Tricycle Theatre.

September
JSI Seminar Series: Writing Histories With Julius Stone: Jurisprudence in Relation    View Summary
1 September 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

Writing Histories With Julius Stone: Jurisprudence in Relation

Speaker: Ann Genovese, Melbourne Law School

In The Province and Function of Law (1946) Julius Stone argued that 'any ideal of what 'ought to be' in the sphere of law must be based on a prior or concurrent assessment of the concrete situations in which it is sought to realise the idea'. Writing in the 1940s, Stone saw how other disciplines -sociology, psychology and other empirically and human based social sciences- increasingly discussed the function of law in shaping social conditions, and understood that forming relations between disciplines was an imperative for jurisprudents in a post war world. What social science practice, in all its forms, offered to law, he argued, was insight into how to shape 'the fact of actual ethical attitudes of real people', and that those insights could, and should, be explored, in relation to law. 'Jurisprudence,' Stone wrote, 'is first of all the examination of law in light of other disciplines'.

Legal and historical scholarship has rightly celebrated the reception and the legacies of Julius Stone's jurisprudence, in particular on this central intervention of rethinking jurisprudence's relationship with other disciplines, in order to expand the purview of our institutional legal techniques. This is now, arguably, an orthodox conversation about how Stone's work resides in our legal thinking today. In this paper, Ann Genovese would like to contribute to this conversation, but from an unorthodox starting point. In her work she is interested as a general proposition in examining how Australian jurisprudents come to know their jurisprudence in the late twentieth century. In her current project, this has involved developing a methodology (in which historiography and jurisprudence writing are drawn into relation), and interrogating a particular subject matter (how feminist thinking about how human relations, as institutional and disciplinary problems as much as lived experience, could be known and challenged, including by law.) By discussing two examples of Julius Stone's work -from 1946, and 1967- Associate Professor Genovese will illustrate what the shape of her project looks like in terms of method and source. In doing so, she will question what it means to inherit both an Australian jurisprudential tradition that enables disciplinary relationships, and an Australian feminist tradition that destabilises those relationships' expression and form.

Ann Genovese is an Associate Professor at Melbourne Law School. She is an historian of modern Australian jurisprudence. Her work focuses on how Australians have practiced and experienced their law since 1950. She has been the recipient of four ARC grants, including the Court as Archive (with Trish Luker and Kim Rubenstein.) Her publications include (with Ann Curthoys and Alexander Reilly) Rights and Redemption: History, Law and Indigenous People, 2008); Sovereignty: Frontiers of Possibility, 2013 (with Julie Evans, Alexander Reilly and Patrick Wolfe eds.), and Australian Critical Decisions, 1982 and 1983 (a collection commemorating the Tasmanian Dams and Koowarta decisions, forthcoming 2016).

CPD Points: 2
Distinguished Speakers Program: Baroness Jean Corston   View Summary
13 September 2016

Registration

Click here for online registration.

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.aufor an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
_____________________________________________________________


Women in the Criminal Justice System: More often troubled than troublesome

About the lecture

The growth in female imprisonment is almost entirely due to increased policing and increased toughness on the part of the courts. It's not a crime-driven problem, Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research (BOCSAR). Source: SMH, 18/6/16.

After the death of six women who were incarcerated at HMP Styal in the UK in 2003, The Right Honourable Baroness Corston published a 2007 report about women in the criminal justice system. This became known as the Corston Report. The Report focused on the diversion of women offenders and potential offenders away from criminal behaviour through the provision of women-focused policy and services.

The UK Government implemented 41 of the 43 recommendations in the Corston Report. The main outcome has been the expansion of community justice centres, as an alternative to prison. These 'one-stop-shops' for female offenders have been implemented to reduce recidivism and deter criminal behaviour by addressing the social, health and welfare issues that are unique to women.

In her Distinguished Speakers lecture, Baroness Corston will speak on the background to her report, the findings and recommendations, and developments in policy and practice in the subsequent nine years since the report's release.

Baroness Jean Corston has been invited to Australia by the Sydney Law School,Sydney Community Foundation and partners -the Zonta Club of Sydney, Shine for Kids, Reichstein Foundation, WIPAN, Miranda Project. Her visit is timely when one considers that women convicted of a crime in NSW were nearly 50 per cent more likely to be sent to prison in 2015 than in 2005. Nearly three-quarters of the increase since 2005 has been for non-violent crimes such as property, drug and traffic offences.

This event is proudly hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney. 2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology, and this lecture is part of a suite of events throughout the year that showcases the contributions of the Institute to criminal justice research, practice, policy and debate.

About the speaker

From 1992, Baroness Corston was the Labour Member of Parliament for Bristol East, and was in the House of Commons until 2005. She served on Select Committees on Agriculture and Home Affairs, and was the founding chair of the Parliamentary Labour Party Women's Group in 1992. She chaired several parliamentary and party groups in parliament. On the election of the Labour government in 1997, she became Parliamentary Private Secretary to the Secretary of State for Education and Employment, staying in this post until 2001, and was the first woman to be elected by Labour MPs as Chair of the Parliamentary Labour Party. She was the founding Chair of the UK Parliament's Joint Committee on Human Rights, a Select Committee with membership of both houses of Parliament, continuing in that role until 2005. Baroness Corston currently chairs both the House of Lords Select Committee on Social Mobility in the Transition from School to Work and the All Party Parliamentary Group for Women in the Penal System.

CPD points: 1

JSI Seminar Series: Knowing the Law   View Summary
22 September 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

Knowing the Law

Speaker: Dr Michael Sevel, University of Sydney

In New South Wales, the law forbids fraud, murder, and theft. But how do you know? How does one find out what the law is in a community? How does one properly justify a belief about what the law is (around here)? Are there any general truths about the sources of legal knowledge and how beliefs about the law are to be justified? In the history of jurisprudence, one finds diverse, and often eccentric and counter-intuitive, answers to these seemingly straightforward questions. In fact, historically, philosophical questions about legal knowledge have been largely ignored; writers in jurisprudence have been more interested in the 'nature' or 'metaphysics' of law, rather than how we come to know of it.

In this talk, Michael Sevel considers the problems of legal knowledge anew. He suggests that in virtually every case, we learn about the law, and justify our beliefs about it, on the basis of the words and claims of others - what theorists of knowledge have called 'testimony.' He considers the prospects and implications of this deceptively complex idea for long-standing and fundamental questions in jurisprudence, relating to the nature of legal reasoning, legal positivism, and the ideal of the rule of law.

About the speaker
Michael Sevel is a Lecturer in Jurisprudence at Sydney Law School. He was previously Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of Miami School of Law, and Max Weber Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Law of the European University Institute. He researches issues in general jurisprudence, the rule of law, and moral and political philosophy. He also has interests in international law, and admiralty and maritime law.

In 2015-2016, he was a Visiting Research Professor at the Center for Ethics and Public Affairs in the Murphy Institute at Tulane University. He is currently writing the first comprehensive treatment of the moral, legal, and political philosophy of Joseph Raz, under contract with Oxford University Press.

CPD Points: 2

Learning Together: Building Learning Communities Across Prison Walls   View Summary
23 September 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register
_____________________________________________________________________

Learning Together: building learning communities across prison walls

What has cellular biology got to do with inclusivity, higher education and public safety? Drawing on sociological, criminological and educational theory, this talk explores how we might build learning communities that span prison and university boundaries and considers what the individual, institutional and social effects of this might be. The talk draws on students' experiences of Learning Together - a educational partnership between the University of Cambridge and HMP Grendon in the UK.

About the speakers:

Ruth Armstrong is a British Academy Post-Doctoral Fellow at the Institute of Criminology in Cambridge and Amy Ludlow is a College Fellow and Lecturer in Law in Cambridge. Together, they have created an educational initiative called Learning Together, which brings together students in university and students in prison to study with each other in the prison environment.

CPD Points: 1.5

2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology. Founded in 1966, the Institute has maintained a commitment to critical dialogue on criminal justice matters throughout the past 50 years. This event celebrates the relationship the Institute of Criminology has with external criminal justice stakeholders and its ongoing commitment to criminal justice research, practice, policy and debate.

Book launch of Shareholder Power and Hedge Fund Activism seminar   View Summary
26 September 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register for this seminar

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________


Book launch of Shareholder Power and Hedge Fund Activism seminar

About the book launch and seminar

This seminar presented by Professor Frank Partnoy (University of San Diego School of Law) and Professor Randall Thomas (Vanderbilt Law School) will address the phenomenon of hedge fund activism. It will cover the primary differences between hedge fund activism and other forms of institutional investor activism, and trace the history of activism from the 1980s to today.
Professors Partnoy and Thomas will describe the "first wave" of activism, including the positive stock market returns documented by scholars as well as the various tactics used by the funds. They will also describe recent research into the "second wave" of hedge fund activism, which began after the global financial crisis. Contrary to previous suggestions that the returns to hedge fund activism have declined, hedge fund activism has continued to be perceived as a winning strategy in recent times even as both the number of activists and their interventions have roughly doubled. This presentation will uncover some surprising reasons why some hedge fund activists are more successful than others.

The seminar will be combined with the launch of the book on "Shareholder Power", edited by Professor Jennifer Hill, Sydney Law School and Professor Randall Thomas, Vanderbilt University Law School.

Research Handbook on Shareholder Power
Much of the history of corporate law has concerned itself not with shareholder power, but rather with its absence. Yet, as this Handbook shows, there have been major shifts in capital market structure that require a reassessment of the role and power of shareholders. This book provides a contemporary analysis of shareholder power and considers the regulatory consequences of changing ownership patterns around the world. Leading international scholars in corporate law, governance and financial economics address these central issues from a range of different perspectives including historical, contemporary, legal, economic, political and comparative.

About the Speakers

Professor Frank Partnoy is the George E. Barrett Professor of Law and Finance and the founding director of the Center for Corporate and Securities Law at the University of San Diego. He is a graduate of Yale Law School. During the 1990s, he structured derivatives at Morgan Stanley and wrote F.I.A.S.C.O.: Blood in the Water on Wall Street, a best-selling book about his experiences there. He has written more than two dozen scholarly articles published in journals including The University of Chicago Law Review, The University of Pennsylvania Law Review, and The Journal of Finance. He also is the co-author of a leading corporate law casebook. His recent books includeWAIT: The Art and Science of Delay, Infectious Greed: How Deceit and Risk Corrupted the Financial Markets, and The Match King: Ivar Kreuger, The Financial Genius Behind a Century of Wall Street Scandals, which was a finalist for the Financial Times/Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year.He has written regularly for The New York Times and the Financial Times, as well as The New York Review of Books and The Atlantic, and has appeared on numerous media programs, including 60 Minutes, The NewsHour, and The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. Professor Partnoy has testified as an expert before both houses of Congress, and has been a consultant to major corporations, banks, pension funds, and hedge funds regarding various aspects of financial markets and regulation.

Professor Randall Thomas has earned a reputation of being one of the most productive and thoughtful corporate and securities law scholars in the United States. His recent work addresses issues such as hedge fund shareholder activism, executive compensation, corporate voting, corporate litigation, shareholder voting, and mergers and acquisitions. He joined the Vanderbilt law faculty in 2000 to develop and direct the Law and Business Program, having served previously in on the law faculties of the University of Iowa, the University of Michigan, Duke University, Harvard Law School, Boston University, and the University of Washington. Prior to teaching law, Professor Thomas was in private practice for four years and was a law clerk for U.S. District Judge Charles Joiner of the Eastern District of Michigan. An acclaimed teacher, Professor Thomas teaches courses in the area of corporate law, including Corporations and Mergers and Acquisitions.

Chair: The Hon Justice Margaret Beazley AO

Commentator:The Hon Justice Ashley Black

MCLE/CPD points: 1.5


Upcoming Events:


2016 Law& Business Seminar Program

October
Law & Business Seminar: The M&A Year in Review   View Summary
11 October 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register for this seminar

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

_________________________________________________________________________

The M&A Year in Review

In this 2016 Ross Parsons Law & Business Seminar, David Friedlander and Ron Barusch will analyse and discuss some of the key cases, reforms and corporate governance developments in law and business during 2016, both in Australia and the United States.
In addition, this year deals are facing increased regulatory challenges worldwideand there is a noticeable increase in deal execution timelines. With elections this year in Australia and the U.S. the presenters will discuss how developments in 2016 couldaffectfuture transactions.

About the Speakers
Ron Baruschwrites 'Dealpolitik' for The Wall Street Journal providing a strategic look at deals currently making the headlines as well as the major forces at work in the deal-making world. Previously a mergers and acquisitions lawyer with Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP for over 30 years, Ron retired in 2010 after 25 years as a partner at the firm, including three years as office leader of Skadden's Sydney office.He is also currently a visiting lecturer at Sydney Law School teaching 'Cross Border Deals.'

David Friedlander is a partner of King & Wood Mallesons. He is head of Australian public mergers & acquisitions. David regularly acts for both bidders and targets in takeovers and issuers and underwriters in securities offerings. He has also worked on the defence side of several high-profile shareholder activist campaigns. He is a member of the Australian Takeovers Panel and several other key corporate law bodies. David is integral to the firm's growth in Asia Pacific spending time working closely with our Hong Kong and China teams and is a member of the International Management Committee of the firm.

Chair
Dr Olivia Dixon, Sydney Law School

MCLE/CPD points: 1


Upcoming Events:


2016 Law& Business Seminar Program

ACCEL Seminar: A Stocktake on the Emissions Reduction Fund   View Summary
12 October 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

ACCEL Seminar: A Stocktake on the Emissions Reduction Fund 

The Climate Change Authority has recently released a report, Towards a climate policy toolkit: Special Review of Australia's climate goals and policies. In the context of this report, the Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) invites you to attend a seminar entitled  'A Stocktake on the Emissions Reduction Fund'  to hear a range of views on the report.

 

About the speakers

Three experts will present:

Professor Jonathan Verschuuren, Tilburg Law School, The Netherlands. Professor Verschuuren has been a visiting Professor at Sydney Law School during 2016 as a recipient of a prestigious European Union Marie Curie Fellowship. His research project is entitled "Towards a Regulatory Framework for Climate Smart Agriculture" and has included an empirical study of the Carbon Farming Initiative.

Olivia Kember, The Climate Institute. Olivia is Head of Policy at The Climate Institute. She has worked in the US, UK, Australia and New Zealand across the fields of journalism, diplomacy and resources.

Olivia has provided policy analysis and advice for the New Zealand Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade and the NSW Minerals Council. She was the recipient of a Fulbright award to study in the United States and holds an MA in Security Studies from the University of Georgetown. She has led multi-stakeholder research and advocacy projects on climate mitigation and adaptation, provided policy advice and analysis to state and federal governments, and represented The Climate Institute in energy sector forums including CSIRO's Future Grid Forum and the CO2CRC Australian Power Generation Technology Assessment Reference Group.

Freddy Sharpe, CEO Climate Friendly.


Program

5.15pm

Registration

5.30pm

Welcome

5.35pm

Olivia Kember, The Climate Institute
'Strengths and weaknesses of the Emissions Reduction Fund in the context of The Climate Change Authority's Special Review'

5.55pm

Professor Jonathan Verschuuren, Tilburg Law School, The Netherlands
'Towards a Regulatory Framework for Climate Smart Agriculture: an empirical analysis of the Carbon Farming Initiative'

6.15pm

Freddy Sharpe, Climate Friendly
'The Emissions Reduction Fund - a successful supply side policy for carbon, and a necessary but not sufficient part of an environmental policy'

6.35pm

Q&A

7.00pm

Close

 

CPD Points: 1.5

This seminar is presented by The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL).

Julius Stone Address 2016: Professor Joseph Raz    View Summary
13 October 2016

Registration

This event is now closed as we have reached maiximum capacity. ________________________________________________________

Julius Stone Address 2016: The Democratic Deficit

Is the authority and legitimacy of international organisation threatened or undermined by a democratic deficit, and what, if anything, can be done about it? In his lecture, Professor Raz will include observations about the reasons for the success and for the moral legitimacy of democratic decision-making in states, and their possible role in international bodies.

About the speaker
Joseph Raz is Thomas M. Macioce Professor of Law at Columbia Law School and Research Professor (part-time) at The Dickson Poon School of Law at Kings College London. From 2006 to 2009, he was Research Professor at Oxford University, where, from 1985 to 2006, he was Professor of the Philosophy of Law and Fellow of BalliolCollege. After completing a Magister Juris at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 1963 and a DPhil at Oxford University in 1967, he was Lecturer and then, from 1971, Senior Lecturer in the Law Faculty and the Department of Philosophy at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. In 1972, he was appointed as Fellow and Tutor in Law at Balliol College and CUF Lecturer at Oxford University.

Professor Raz has been a Fellow of the British Academy since 1987 and was appointed an Honorable Foreign Member of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences in 1992. He holds Honorary Doctorates from the Katholieke Universiteit, Brussels, King’s College London, and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has been a visiting professor at many institutions around the world and has delivered numerous keynote and named lectures, including the Kobe Lectures in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Seeley Lectures at Cambridge University, the Tanner Lectures at Berkeley and the Storrs Lectures at Yale University. His publications include The Concept of a Legal System,Practical Reason and Norms,The Authority of Law, The Morality of Freedom, Ethics in the Public Domain,Engaging Reason,and Between Authority and Interpretation. The Morality of Freedom won the W.J.M. Mackenzie Book Prize in 1987 and the Elaine and David Spitz Book Prize in 1988.

Please see time/venue details for the Julius Stone Address 2016 at the bottom of the page.

This event is generously sponsored by the Educational Heritage Foundation.

Lawyers/barristers: attendance at this lecture is equal to 1.5 CPD points.

___________________________________________________

Other upcoming events:

Legitimacy and the State Conference
14-15 October 2016

Traditionally, legitimacy has been associated exclusively with states. But are states actually legitimate? And why should questions of legitimacy be about only them?

This Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence conference focuses on these two questions. It will examine both critiques and defences of the legitimacy of the state, and will consider assumptions about the nature of authority that inform the usual focus of discussions of legitimacy on the state. Finally, the conference will enquire into the legitimacy of supranational institutions and law beyond the state.

These questions will be examined in papers by eleven distinguished academics. Each paper will be introduced and discussed by an expert commentator, to whom the author will have an opportunity to respond, before being discussed by all participants.

Click here for more conference details and to register.
_______________________________________________________


2016 Julius Stone Address
13 October 2016

Time and venue:

Challenges to the bilateral investment regime? India, China and the Asian Region   View Summary
13 October 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

Challenges to the bilateral investment regime? India, China and the Asian Region

About the seminar

This seminar will feature Professor Jaivir Singh, an eminent academic from the Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, and a panel of experts from Sydney Law School and Sydney Business Law (Professors Gail Pearson, Vivienne Bath and Luke Nottage), and will discuss important issues and developments in India, China and the Asian region in relation to investment treaties, with a particular focus on the controversial issue of investor-State arbitration.

Professor Jaivir Singh, "Indian Reaction to BIT Arbitration."

Professor Singh will discuss the variety of reactions in India to investor-state dispute resolution ranging from setting up a New Model BIT, instituting internal reforms in some areas and noting some of the bravado on tax matters in the face of ongoing arbitration.

Professor Luke Nottage, "US vs EU vs Other Models for Investment Treaties in the Asian Region."

Professor Nottage will contrast the US approach to investment treaties (exemplified by the TPP) and the recent EU approach (including the permanent investment court in lieu of ad hoc ISDS arbitration panels, in its FTA with Vietnam), with a discussion of implications for Australia's ongoing FTA negotiations with India and Indonesia (bilaterally, as well as via the ASEAN+6 RCEP).

Professor Vivienne Bath, "China, investment policy and agreements, and the 'One Belt One Road.'"

Professor Bath will look at recent developments in China's investment policies and bilateral and multilateral treaties dealing with investment, with particular reference to China's "One Belt One Road" vision.

Chair: Professor Gail Pearson, Sydney Business School

About the speakers

Jaivir Singh is Professor, Centre for the Study of Law and Governance, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi with research interests in Constitutional Studies, Labour Law and International Investment Agreements.

Luke Nottage is Professor of Comparative and Transnational Business Law at Sydney Law School, founding Co-Director of the Australian Network for Japanese Law and Associate Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney with research interests in international arbitration, contract law, consumer product safety law and corporate governance, with a particular interest in the Asia-Pacific region.

Vivienne Bath is Professor of Chinese and International Business Law at Sydney Law School and Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the University of Sydney with research interests in Chinese commercial law, international investment law, private international law and international business law.

Gail Pearson is Professor, Business Law Department, Sydney Business School with research interests in financial services, commercial and consumer laws, as well as Indian consumer and commercial law.

CPD Points: 1.5

This event is sponsored by the Sydney Business School, the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law and the China Studies Centre.

Legitimacy and the State Conference   View Summary
14 October 2016 to 15 October 2016

Registration


CLICK HERE to register

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.
_____________________________________________________________________

Legitimacy and the State Conference

Traditionally, legitimacy has been associated exclusively with states. But are states actually legitimate? And why should questions of legitimacy be about only them?

This Julius Stone Institute of Jurisprudence conference focuses on these two questions. It will examine both critiques and defences of the legitimacy of the state, and will consider assumptions about the nature of authority that inform the usual focus of discussions of legitimacy on the state. Finally, the conference will enquire into the legitimacy of supranational institutions and law beyond the state.

These questions will be examined in papers by eleven distinguished academics. Each paper will be introduced and discussed by an expert commentator, to whom the author will have an opportunity to respond, before being discussed by all participants.

About the authors and commentators


Authors

L.S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values, Princeton University, and Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy, Australian National University.

Professor, Columbia University, and Research Professor, King's College London.


Commentators

Events details:

Friday 14 October: 9am - 6pm

Registration and refreshments: 8.30am

Cocktail reception: 6-7pm

Dinner: 7-9pm


Saturday 15 October: 9am - 5.30pm


Registration: (inc. GST)

Full fee: $350

Full time student: $50

Dinner: $70 (optional)

 

JSI Conference 2016 - Legitimacy and the State Flyer

___________________________________________________

Other upcoming events:

Julius Stone Address: The Democratic Deficit

13 October 2016

Speaker: Professor Joseph Raz

Is the authority and legitimacy of international organisation threatened or undermined by a democratic deficit, and what, if anything, can be done about it? In his lecture, Professor Raz will include observations about the reasons for the success and for the moral legitimacy of democratic decision-making in states, and their possible role in international bodies.


2016 Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture   View Summary
17 October 2016

Registration

Click here to register

_______________________________________________________________

Uniform Evidence Law at 21

Guest Speaker: Stephen Odgers SC

It has been 21 years since NSW and the Commonwealth enacted uniform evidence legislation (UEL), largely based on the work of the Australian Law Reform Commission. Since then a number of other jurisdictions have followed suit (Victoria, Tasmania, A.C.T., Northern Territory). The legislation has introduced a number of important reforms in the law of evidence, particularly in criminal proceedings, and has on balance been a successful exercise in law reform. However, there have been problems, some the consequence of judicial construction of the UEL, requiring amendment. In 2005, the Australian Law Reform Commission (along with the NSW and Victorian Law Reform Commissions) proposed changes to the 10-year-old UEL and these were subsequently enacted. Now the UEL is 21 and it is time to consider new amendments - partly to deal with problems that have arisen in the last decade, partly to ensure proper implementation of the policy framework around which the legislation was constructed. It is also time for the remaining hold-out jurisdictions (Queensland, South Australia, Western Australia) to adopt the UEL.

About the speaker

Stephen Odgers SC is a leading appellate advocate, prominent legal author and distinguished legal academic. He is a graduate in Arts (Hons) in 1977 and Laws (Hons) in 1980 from the Australian National University and has a Master of Laws (1985) from Columbia University in New York, USA. He was a Senior Lecturer at the University of Sydney (1986-1988) and was appointed an Adjunct Professor of Law in 2006.

Stephen has been actively involved in Australian law reform for many years. He was a Senior Research Officer at the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) between 1980-1984, working primarily on reform of the law of evidence. Largely based on the recommendations of the ALRC, NSW and the Commonwealth proclaimed uniform evidence legislation (UEL) on 1 September 1995. In 2005, he was a Member of the Advisory Committee to ALRC for Report 102, Uniform Evidence Law (2005). Stephen has also been Chair of the Criminal Law Committee of the NSW Bar Association since 2002 and has been the author of many discussion papers on law reform issues for the Bar Association over a number of decades. He is also a member of the Law Council of Australia's criminal law consultative committee.

Stephen began practice as a barrister in NSW in 1989 and was appointed as Senior Counsel in 2000. He was one of the founding members of Forbes Chambers in Sydney in 1990, and has practised from there ever since. Although his primary area of practice is the criminal law, in all jurisdictions in the Commonwealth, he has practised across many areas of the law. He has appeared in many leading cases in the High Court of Australia, as well as courts at the intermediate appellate level, in respect of substantive law, sentencing and evidentiary matters. In particular, he has appeared in a number of UEL cases in the High Court, including Lee v The Queen (1998) 195 CLR 594; Graham v The Queen (1998) 195 CLR 606; Mann v Carnell (1999) 201 CLR 1; Melbourne v The Queen (1999) 198 CLR 1; Adam v The Queen (2001) 207 CLR 96; Em v The Queen (2007) 232 CLR 67; Aytugrul v The Queen (2012) 247 CLR 170; GW v The Queen (2016) 328 ALR 583; IMM v The Queen [2016] HCA 14.

Stephen has authored many leading texts and publications including Uniform Evidence Law (now in 12th edition); Uniform Evidence Law Cases and Materials (with M Kumar and E Peden, now in 5th ed); Principles of Federal Criminal Law (now in 3rd ed); Australian Criminal Justice (with M Findlay and S Yeo, now in 5th ed); Sentence - The Law of Sentencing in NSW Courts for State and Federal Offences (now in 3rd ed). Stephen has been the General Editor of the Criminal Law Journal since 1990 and is an editor of Federal Offences (LBC).

Previous speakers include:

2015 - The Hon Justice Virginia Bell AC

2014 - The Hon. J D Heydon AC QC

2013 - The Hon. M Gleeson AC QC

About Paul Byrne SC
This is the fifth Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture honouring Paul Byrne SC, who had a life long interest in criminal law and the criminal justice system, as well being an active participant and generous supporter of the Institute of Criminology at the Sydney Law School.

Paul Byrne SC graduated in Arts and Law from the University of Sydney, and worked with the Public Solicitor's Office as a solicitor. He became a barrister in 1979, and was appointed a public defender. In 1983 he was awarded a Master of Laws degree with First Class Honours, and was awarded a University Medal. He was appointed Director of the Criminal Law Review Division and a Commissioner of the New South Wales Law Reform Commission. In 1995 he took silk and continued an outstanding career as an advocate, taking on the toughest cases, in courts at all levels, with a deep sense of responsibility and the utmost commitment to justice and fair process. This is thefourth Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture honouring Paul Byrne SC, who had a life long interest in criminal law and the criminal justice system, as well being an active participant and generous supporter of the Institute of Criminology at the Sydney Law School.


The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund
The Paul Byrne Memorial Fund has been set up to honour and continue Paul's interest in the criminal justice system by supporting the ongoing activities of the Institute of Criminology, such as lectures, seminars, publications, and awards. Attendees of the Paul Byrne SC Memorial Lecture are warmly invited to make a donation to The Paul Byrne SC Memorial Fund. Gifts to The Paul Byrne SC Memorial Fund support the activities of the Institute of Criminology and other activities in the field of criminal law at Sydney Law School, in memory of the late Paul Byrne SC.


CPD Points: 1.5


2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology. Founded in 1966, the Institute has maintained a commitment to critical dialogue on criminal justice matters throughout the past 50 years. This event celebrates the relationship the Institute of Criminology has with external criminal justice stakeholders, and its ongoing commitment to criminal justice research, policy and debate.

JSI Seminar Series: Systems Precede Existence   View Summary
18 October 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

Systems Precede Existence: On EU Constitutionalism, Crisis and Political Existentialism 

Speaker: Jiří Přibáň, Cardiff University

This presentation focuses on the semantics of sovereignty as a political and legal concept and its persistence in the post-sovereign social condition. The autopoietic social systems theoretical analysis of legal and political paradoxes associated with the concept of sovereignty captures both the persistence and productive uses of sovereignty within the systems of positive law and politics. However, it also explains historical evolution of the concept of popular sovereignty as the legitimation of power without recourse to the transcendental foundations of modern society. 

The autopoietic systems theoretical view of sovereignty thus represents a powerful critique of quasi-theological conceptualizations of popular sovereignty as the general will of demos - the nation as a ‘real’ existing constituent power and the substance of the state and/or any other political organization of modern society. It contrasts the normative idea of popular sovereignty as polity representing the totality and cultural unity of society to the functionally differentiated legal and political procedures in which the people - demos - exercises its sovereignty only through self-limiting legal subsystems of constitutional rights and political operations of different branches of constitutionally codified and separated power. 

Sovereignty as the pre-political substance of constituent power of demos establishing the normative foundations and legitimacy of the state as its constituted political organization can be described by the autopoietic systems theory of law and politics as part of collective symbolism and cultural communication evolving both within and beyond the societal imagination of nationhood and the modern nation state. Recent theories of European and global imagined communities of cosmopolitan values and universal humanity are strong evidence of the fact that demos as the sovereign nation is not the final and ultimate stage in cultural and normative imaginations of popular sovereignty.

Jiří Přibáň is professor of law and Director of the Centre of Law and Society at Cardiff University. He is author and editor of numerous books in English and Czech, most recently the SLSA (Socio-Legal Studies Association) award winning monograph Sovereignty in Post-Sovereign Society (2015), Self-Constitution of Europe (editor, 2016), Legal Symbolism (2007), Liquid Society and Its Law (editor, 2007), Systems of Justice in Transition (co-editor, 2003), Dissidents of Law (2002), Law's New Boundaries (co-editor 2001) and The Rule of Law in Central Europe (co-editor, 1999). He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Law and Society and regularly contributes to the Czech and European media.

CPD Points: 2

 

Sydney Institute of Criminology 50th Anniversary Lecture: Bearing Witness to the 'Pain of Others'   View Summary
27 October 2016

Registration


CLICK HERE to register
_____________________________________________________________________


Sydney Institute of Criminology 50th Anniversary Lecture Series: Bearing Witness to the 'Pain of Others': Frontiers of Research and Resistance

Delivered by Professor Phil Scraton, School of Law, Queen's University, Belfast.

The Sydney Institute of Criminology is delighted to present the final lecture in a series celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Institute. Please join us as Professor Scraton discusses the politics and challenges of critical criminological research.

About the lecture
Central to critical social research is the premise that 'knowledge', bounded by academic disciplines and their contextual 'domain assumptions', is neither value-free nor value-neutral. Rather, it is derived and reproduced within structural relations of inequality and oppression underpinning established social, political and economic orders. Critical social research locates the experiential realities of individuals and communities within their historical, structural and reproductive contexts. It foregrounds analysis of the determining contexts of class, 'race', gender, sexuality and age, prioritising the impact of inequalities on the lives of the 'powerless'.

Acknowledging the consolidation of critical analysis within criminology, this presentation focuses on the institutional contexts of marginalisation and criminalisation in the administration state power and authority. Drawing on in-depth documentary analysis and qualitative and observational research (the Hillsborough disaster; politics of incarceration; childhood in transition in Northern Ireland) it explores the profound political, ethical and personal challenges involved in bearing witness to the 'pain of others'. This research demonstrates how structural relations of power, authority and legitimacy establish the determining contexts of daily life, social interaction and individual opportunity. Focusing on the 'view from below', hearing testimonies from the margins, revealing institutionalised deceit and pursuing 'truth recovery', the presentation argues that in 'bearing witness' critical social research is transformative. It addresses 'personal troubles' as 'public issues' and seeks alternative accounts to secure 'truth' and acknowledgement.

About the speaker
Phil Scraton PhD is Professor of Criminology in the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice, School of Law, Queen's University, Belfast and Director of the Childhood, Transition and Social Justice Initiative. Recently he has held visiting professorships at University of Sydney, Monash University, UCL Law School and University of Auckland. He has contributed regularly to Amherst College's Inside-Out programme at Hampshire County Jail and was Lowenstein Research Fellow at Amherst, Massachusetts, 2013.

A regular contributor to academic journals and edited collections, his books include: Hillsborough: The Truth (Mainstream); The Incarceration of Women (co-authored with Linda Moore, Palgrave Macmillan); Beyond September 11: An anthology of dissent (Pluto); Power, Conflict and Criminalisation (Routledge); The Violence of Incarceration (co-edited with Jude McCulloch, Routledge); 'Childhood' in 'Crisis'? (Routledge). He has edited special issues of Social Justice on Deaths in Custody and Detention (with Jude McCulloch) and Current Issues in Criminal Justice on the criminalisation and punishment of children and young people.

Recent co-authored research reports are: Childhood in Transition: Experiencing Marginalisation and Conflict in Northern Ireland (Save the Children/ Prince's Trust); The Hurt Inside: The Imprisonment of Women and Girls in Northern Ireland and The Prison Within (both for the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission); Children's Rights in Northern Ireland (Northern Ireland Commissioner for Children and Young People); Children of Imprisoned Parents (Danish Institute for Human Rights/ Eurochips). He was Principal Investigator for an ESRC-funded knowledge-exchange project on the impact of negative media images of children and young people in the North of Ireland (2012-2015).

A founder member of Inquest, he was a member of the Hillsborough Independent Panel (2010-2012) and primary author of the ground-breaking Hillsborough:The Report of the Independent Panel (2012). This research was received the Vice-Chancellor's inaugural award for research impact and was runner-up in the 2013 THES UK Research Project of the Year. For his work on Hillsborough, and other contributions to research in the city, in September 2016 he was awarded the Freedom of the City of Liverpool and Honorary Doctor of Laws of the University of Liverpool, his alma mater.


CPD Points:1.5

This event is hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, University of Sydney. Founded in 1966, the Institutehas maintained a commitment topublic dialogue on criminal justice matters throughout the past 50 years.This event showcases the Institute of Criminology's contribution to supporting critical criminological research and theoretical innovation.


Please emaillaw.events@sydney.edu.au to register.

JSI Seminar Series: How Should We Think About Law?    View Summary
27 October 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

How Should We Think About Law? Is Constructive Interpretation Necessary and Can it Generate Truths?

Speaker: Alex Horne, University of Sydney

One of Ronald Dworkin’s most important contributions to legal theory is the claim that anyone wishing to make sense of legal practice must interpret it. He also claims that to interpret legal practice is to evaluate it. Dworkin calls his model of morally evaluative interpretation ‘constructive interpretation’. From Law’s Empire on, Dworkin provided arguments designed to establish the necessity of constructive interpretation (NCI). Though it started, and is best known, as a claim about legal practice, Dworkin came to defend NCI as a claim about the evaluative domain generally.

In this seminar, Alex Horne will argue that Dworkin’s original argument for NCI, presented in the opening chapters of Law’s Empire is, by itself, insufficient. He will then suggest that some of Dworkin’s later arguments can plausibly be understood as providing the sort of supplementation the deficiencies of his early arguments for NCI seem to require. He will outline some problems with those later arguments and sketch out why he thinks Dworkin’s legal philosophy cannot be quarantined from them.

Whether or not Dworkin can establish that constructive interpretation is necessary, he needs a story about how it can generate truths. In the final part of this paper, Mr Horne will suggest that the story Dworkin provides is confused. He will conclude by sketching some reasons for thinking that this may undermine the viability of the constructive interpretive enterprise, whether in law or evaluative theorising generally.

Alex Horne is about (he hopes) to submit his LLM by research at Sydney Law School.

CPD Points: 2

 

Public Perceptions of Crime: Concepts, Surveys and Future Directions in Research   View Summary
28 October 2016

Registration

CLICK HERE to register
_____________________________________________________________________

Public Perceptions of Crime: Concepts, Surveys and Future Directions in Research

Worries and anxieties associated with the fear of crime are believed to erode quality of life and well-being, erode confidence in the police, restrict social movement, motivate costly - but not necessarily beneficial - precautions, and encourage ‘flight’ from deprived areas. Considerable resources are allocated to crime prevention strategies in an effort to reduce fear of crime, and public institutions such as the police and local councils develop Key Performance Indicators based on reducing such fears.

This seminar explores perceptions of crime and fear of crime drawing on the latest research models and new empirical research. Experts involved in perceptions of crime research will explore key concepts which best measure and unpack such public fear and perceptions, highlighting the pitfalls and key debates in fear of crime research. Guidance about how to conduct perceptions of crime research will be provided. The session will also propose a framework for an integrated approach to understanding perceptions of fear of crime across Australia.

This seminar is aimed at practitioners in the fields of crime prevention and community safety as well as police, criminal justice practitioners and policy makers more broadly.

Hosted by Professor Murray Lee, Sydney Law School

CPD Points: 2.5

2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology. Founded in 1966, the Institute has maintained a commitment to critical dialogue on criminal justice matters throughout the past 50 years. This event celebrates the relationship the Institute of Criminology has with external criminal justice stakeholders, and its ongoing commitment to criminal justice research, policy and debate.

Please RSVP to law.criminology@sydney.edu.au.

November
Food Governance Conference   View Summary
1 November 2016 to 3 November 2016

Food Governance: The Role of Law, Regulation, and Policy in Meeting 21st Century Challenges to the Food Supply

Food is fundamental to human existence, and plays an important role in social, economic, and cultural life. Yet population growth, climate change, and marketization challenge the ability of the global food system to deliver safe, adequate, nutritious, and sustainable food to the world's population.

Co-hosted by Sydney Law School and the Charles Perkins Centre, Food Governance explores the role of law, regulation, and policy in promoting food security and safety, as well as in improving nutrition and preventing obesity and non-communicable diseases.

While food-specific law and regulation are a key focus of Food Governance, the conference will consider how other legislative and policy regimes impede or facilitate access to a nutritious, equitable, and sustainable food supply, including economic, trade, and intellectual property regimes. The conference will engage with issues around food system governance at local, national, regional, and global levels.


Click here to access the main conference webpage.


KEY DATES
Opening Night Public Oration (free)1 November 
Conference 2-3 November

OPENING NIGHT PUBLIC ORATION (Free)

Tuesday 1 November, 6.00-7.30pm
What are the three biggest challenges facing the food system - and how do we fix them?

Keynote speaker: Professor Corinna Hawkes (City University London)
Professor Hawkes is the Director of the Centre for Food Policy at City University London. She also serves as Co-Chair of the Independent Expert Group of the Global Nutrition Report, an international report tracking progress in malnutrition in all its forms across the globe. Corinna has worked internationally for over 15 years analysing and promoting food system and food policy solutions for better nutrition, healthier eating and improved public health. She has been active in research, advocacy, and in advising governments and international agencies. Corinna has worked at the World Health Organization, the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), the School of Public Health at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and World Cancer Research Fund International. At IFPRI between 2004 and 2007 she led a global research program on diet change and food policy and helped establish the agriculture and health program of the CGIAR. As Head of Policy and Public Affairs at World Cancer Research Fund International between 2012 and 2015, she established the NOURISHING Framework and directed a program encouraging governments to adopt policies to promote healthier eating to reduce the risk of non-communicable diseases. Corinna is a member of the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems (IPES-Food) and sits on the Lancet Commission on Obesity.

VENUE
Charles Perkins Centre
Auditorium
Building D17
Johns Hopkins Drive (off Missenden Road)
The University of Sydney, Camperdown

Complimentary, however registration is essential.

ORATION ONLY REGISTRATION: CLICK HERE


CONFERENCE

Wednesday 2 - Thursday 3 November
REGISTRATION FEES
Conference fees (GST inclusive)
Full fee: $150
Sydney Law School alumni/students: $100
Day rates: $80 per day

VENUE

Sydney Law School
New Law Building (F10)
Eastern Ave
University of Sydney, Camperdown

ORATION AND CONFERENCE REGISTRATION: CLICK HERE



 

SPONSORS

The George Institute
The George Institute

 

Cancer Research Network
Cancer Research Network

JSI Seminar Series: The Phenomenological Presupposition of Law   View Summary
10 November 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

The Phenomenological Presupposition of Law

Speaker: Marc De Leeuw, UNSW

The Phenomenology of Law (Rechtsphänomenologie) seems an entirely forgotten branch of legal philosophy. Dr De Leeuw’s paper aims to revive this tradition by showing that law as a normative regulatory structure presupposes a logical foundation, simultaneously law also - as an institution representing the social bond - presupposes a particular a priori ontology of the intersubjective experience of our “being with others”. He will particularly engage with the work of Husserl, Ricoeur and Levinas.

Marc De Leeuw is Senior Lecturer in legal philosophy at UNSW. His work engages both with the so-called continental and analytical traditions while focusing on questions of human agency, epistemological practices and ethics. He is the founding member and coordinator of the UNSW Law Initiative for Bio-Legalities.

CPD Points: 2

Sydney Ideas - Beyond Accommodation: Muslims and the law in Australia   View Summary
14 November 2016

Registration

Please click here for online registration. ________________________________________________________


Beyond Accommodation: Muslims and the law in Australia

Co-presented with the University of Sydney Law School and Department of Arabic Language and Cultures

Associate Professor Dr Salim Farrar and Dr Ghena Krayem will consider the controversial question of recognition of Shari'ah and Muslim cultural identities under Australian law in the contexts of fears of Islamist terrorism as well as the increasing securitisation of Muslims.

They will argue that, notwithstanding Australian law and society's concerns with equality, neutrality and human rights, simultaneous attempts to address Islamist extremism and excess are unlikely to succeed unless Muslims are motivated to believe they are an integral part of the society they live in. Acknowledgement by judiciaries of the relevance of their religious and cultural identity, they argue, will be a sufficient step in that direction and without any need for a parallel justice system.

They maintain this will not only be consistent with Australia's liberal democratic tradition, it will also be symbolic of a modern and inclusive society in Australia - in stark contrast to what we are now seeing in Europe.

Speakers:

Dr Salim Farrar is an Associate Professor, and Associate Director of the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law at the Faculty of Law, the University of Sydney, teaching and researching areas of Islamic Law, Malaysian Law, International Law, Criminal Justice, Comparative Law and Law and Development. Before moving to the Sydney Law School in 2009, he taught at the University of Manchester and for six years at the International Islamic University, Malaysia. He has published and presented widely and is the co-author of Accommodating Muslims under Common Law: A Comparative Analysis (2016).

Dr Ghena Krayem is a Senior Lecturer at the Faculty of Law, the University of Sydney, teaching and researching in the areas of constitutional and public law, legal ethics, dispute resolution, the application of sharia in Australia, Muslim women and Islamic family law. She is the author of Islamic Family Law in Australia: To Recognise or not To Recognise (2014) and co-author of Accommodating Muslims under Common Law: A Comparative Analysis (2016). Dr Krayem was recently awarded an ARC grant to explore The Response of Australian Family law to Islamic community processes, which she is currently working on colleagues from Melbourne University. She is also a family dispute resolution practitioner.

Supreme Court Annual Commercial and Corporate Law Conference    View Summary
15 November 2016

Registration


Click here to register and for program details


___________________________________________________________


You are invited to attend the Supreme Court Annual Commercial and Corporate Law Conference, co-sponsored by The Law Society of New South Wales and the Ross Parsons Centre of Commercial, Corporate and Taxation Law at the University of Sydney Law School.

This year's theme is:The burgeoning use of trusts in real estate and infrastructure.


About the Conference


While the corporation has proven itself an indispensable engine of economic success in every developed country, Australia is unique in the widespread use of trusts in commerce, despite the lack of legal personality and the absence of a balanced, policy-based, statutory regulatory regime like the Corporations Act 2001. We use trusts (including managed investment schemes) that so closely resemble the incorporated entity in form, function and entrepreneurial predisposition that they might even be described as surrogate companies.

There are good and valid reasons for this, including tax advantages and structural flexibility.So successful is the trust in this context that most large-scale commercial, industrial, office and retail real estate, as well as infrastructure assets, in Australia are held in or through trusts. Yet this success comes at a cost. Investors, creditors and even trustees are presented with a range of risks that simply do not exist for those who invest in and deal with corporations. There are limits to the ability of the market to mitigate these risks by private means. The courts have been kept busy, particularly post-GFC, resolving disputes and dealing with failures, applying an awkward amalgam of trust and company law.

CPD points = 3.5


ACCEL Distinguished Speaker lecture and Animal/Wildlife Law Event    View Summary
15 November 2016


Registration

Click here for complimentary registration - registration is essential for both events.

____________________________________________________________________________


The Australian Centre for Climate and Environmental Law (ACCEL) will be presenting a premier public event of the year on 15 November.

2016 is an exciting year for international wildlife law with both the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting in September and October. These two international events are both of great importance for Australia, which incorporates wildlife listings directly into its national law.

To reflect this,ACCEL has tailored its 2016 event to making sense of current moves in international wildlife law and the impacts of these on Australian law and policy. The event will comprise an afternoon forum on animal/wildlife law, followed by an evening distinguished speakers lecture, presented by Prof Peter Sands.


Afternoon Forum: Animal/Wildlife Law
Time: 2-5pm

This forum will involve a series of talks on international and national animal and/or wildlife-related topics, including presentations by Prof. Randall Abate (College of Law, Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University) on shark-finning, embedded in the context of the evolution of animal law generally; by Prof. Natalie Klein (Macquarie Law School) giving an international law perspective on the differential treatment currently accorded to whales, sharks and tuna; by Dr Sophie Riley (Faculty of Law, University of Technology, Sydney) on the development of law without ethical considerations and proper consideration of science, in respect of the treatment of animals in the contexts of intensive farming and live export; by A/Prof. Celeste Black (Sydney Law School) onthe role legal regulation may play in the future in improving fish welfare outcomes in fisheries and aquaculture in light of a growing body of scientific evidence regarding the welfare impacts of current industry practices; and by A/Prof. Ed Couzens (Sydney law School) on Australian involvement at both CITES and the IWC, as he will just have attended the Conferences of the Parties for both of these conventions. The afternoon session will include some time for discussion.


ACCEL Distinguished Speaker lecture: Prof Peter Sand (University of Munich)
Time: 6-7pm, followed by a cocktail reception. Registration from 5.30pm


After conclusion of this series of invited speakers, and a short break, ACCEL will present its Distinguished Speaker lecture for 2016 - delivered by Prof. Peter Sand, Lecturer in Environmental Law from the University of Munich. Peter is a very well-known current writer in the international wildlife law field. He is a former Secretary-General of CITES; former Chief of the Environmental Law Unit, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); and a World Bank Legal Adviser for Environmental Affairs. ACCEL is honoured that Peter accepted our invitation and that he has agreed to travel from Germany to present this lecture.

Peter's lecture will be titled "The International Protection of Endangered Species -- Whither Conservation Diplomacy?"

About the lecture
In the field of international conservation law, the 1973 Washington Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) has been labeled "one of the most successful instruments". Global challenges in this field persist, though - especially illegal wildlife trafficking and ivory trade, as highlighted at this year's CITES meeting in Johannesburg, South Africa. On the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the Convention's entry into force in Australia, this lecture will trace its evolution from a classical diplomatic treaty towards a dynamic institutionalized regime, several of whose features have indeed served as a model for other multilateral environmental agreements --including the expanding "law-making" role of the Conference of the Parties, and the executive functions of the secretariat in monitoring compliance. Yet other innovative features of the CITES regime have remained unique in terms of international practice, such as the extensive use of trade sanctions, in the form of collective embargoes as "retorsion" measures against persistent non-compliance bates with treaty obligations.

About the Speaker
Peter Sand is a lecturer in International Environmental Law, University of Munich, Germany. Formerly Secretary-General of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES); Chief of the Environmental Law Unit, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP); and World Bank Legal Adviser for Environmental Affairs

JSI Seminar Series: Keeping Justice in its Place   View Summary
17 November 2016

Registration

Click here to register
___________________________________________________________

Keeping Justice in its Place: On the Division of Labour between Charitable Organisations and the State

Speaker: Dr Daniel Halliday, The University of Melbourne

Most goals pursued by charitable organisations could, in principle, be pursued through the powers of the state. While charities rely on eliciting the voluntary supply of funds to pursue their goals, the state can source funds coercively, through taxation, and then allocate the revenues to similar programs to those conducted by charities. In this paper, Daniel Halliday and Matthew Harding will look into some of the reasons for preferring the state mechanism. They will do this largely by drawing on a positive account of what charity law is for, as an element of the liberal state. On their view, charity law provides protection for a range of activities through which citizens can exercise their autonomy. Relying on charities to pursue justice risks diminishing the extent to which the charitable sector can realize this function. This helps explain why the pursuit of justice should be left primarily to the state, via other branches of law. In this way, Halliday and Harding’s approach contrasts with much work in political philosophy, which lacks any kind of sustained attention for why a charitable sector ought to exist.

Daniel Halliday teaches political philosophy at Melbourne University. He works mainly on questions at the intersection of political philosophy, economics, and legal theory. He is currently completing a book manuscript on inherited wealth, for Oxford University Press, and working on a series of articles about markets in education. Prior to coming to Melbourne, he completed a PhD in philosophy at Stanford University in the United States. He is a native of the UK.

CPD Points: 2

Clayton Utz / University of Sydney International Arbitration Lecture 2016   View Summary
23 November 2016

Registration

Click here to register

____________________________________________________________________________

Clayton Utz / University of Sydney International Arbitration Lecture 2016: International Arbitration and Independence - Off the Beaten Track

The Annual Clayton Utz / University of Sydney International Arbitration Lecture 2016 is designed to promote and support the development and study of international arbitration and international dispute resolution in Australia and the Asia-Pacific region. In the 15th anniversary of the International Arbitration Lecture series, Elliott Geisinger (Schellenberg Wittmer) will speak on 'International Arbitration and Independence - Off the Beaten Track'.

The term 'independence' invariably brings to mind the independence and impartiality required of arbitrators. However, this is a far too narrow viewpoint: What of the duties of independence of the other participants in international arbitration proceedings? Which duties of independence are incumbent on, for example, experts (especially party-appointed experts), arbitral institutions or counsel? What are the roots and contents of these duties of independence, to whom are they owed and which sanctions, if any, are attached to a failure to live up to them? The 2016 lecture will explore these questions and close with some highly provocative - and possibly unpopular - thoughts on the most difficult form of independence there is: independence from one's self.

About the speaker

Elliott Geisinger heads Schellenberg Wittmer's arbitration practice group. Elliott's practice has focused primarily on international commercial arbitration. He has acted as counsel and arbitrator in complex commercial disputes involving international construction contracts, consortia and joint venture agreements, sponsorship contracts, sales and distribution contracts, post-M&A disputes, consultancy contracts and hotel management contracts. He has also participated in drafting arbitration rules for commercial arbitration and for sports arbitration.


Elliott has also represented parties before Swiss courts in arbitration-related court proceedings, such as judicial appointments of arbitrators or challenges of arbitral awards before the Swiss Supreme Court. Several cases in which Elliott represented parties before the Swiss Supreme Court have been reported in the official collection of Swiss Supreme Court cases and in specialised journals.

CPD Points: 1


December
Sydney Institute of Criminology 50th Anniversary Celebration    View Summary
8 December 2016

Registration

Click hereto register

_______________________________________________________________

Sydney Institute of Criminology 50th Anniversary Celebration

The Sydney Institute of Criminology warmly invites you to attend a cocktail event to celebrate our 50th anniversary year, and to acknowledge the important contributions of the Institute, its staff, members, students and alumni to criminal justice research, law, policy and practice.

For 50 years, the Sydney Institute of Criminology has conducted key research specialising in criminology, criminal justice and criminal law. It produces the international research journal Current Issues in Criminal Justice and the Institute of Criminology book series. Institute staff teach undergraduate and postgraduate students at the University, but are committed to public and professional education more broadly, hosting seminars and public lectures to bring critical criminal justice issues to public discussion.

We welcome everyone associated with the Institute to attend this event in celebration of the our rich history, our many great achievements, and our important relationships with Institute members, staff, friends, students, alumni and the wider criminal justice community.

This event is proudly hosted by the Institute of Criminology, Sydney Law School, The University of Sydney. 2016 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Sydney Institute of Criminology, and this event concludes a suite of events throughout the year that have showcased the contributions of the Institute to criminal justice research, practice, policy and debate.

Rights Nights: 5 Nights of Human Rights   View Summary
9 December 2016

Registration

Click here to register

____________________________________________________________________________

Rights Nights: 5 Nights of Human Rights

9 December: Refugee Rights

Rights Nights invites you to the Human Rights speaker series comprising of 5 nights of events in the lead up to Human Rights Day. Each night will focus on a different facet of Human Rights in Australia.

This year, the topics will be:

  • The rights of Indigenous Australians
  • Privacy rights
  • Women’s health rights
  • Disability rights
  • Refugee rights.

Expert panels will discuss and offer ways to improve these topical Human Rights issues. There will also be an opportunity to speak with the panelists and other organisations who work in these areas if you feel inspired and are interested in finding out how you can get involved in advocating for these rights.

Sydney Law School is sponsoring the final night of the series on 9 December, Refugee Rights, with Sydney Law School panellists Professor Barbara McDonald, Nicole Watson and Professor Mary Crock.

____________________________________________________________________________

Friday 9 December - Refugee Rights Night

Refugee rights night will explore the rights of asylum seekers. Our expert Sydney Law School panel comprising Professor Barbara McDonald, Nicole Watson and Professor Mary Crock will unravel the complex and ever changing legal framework in relation to asylum seekers, explain Australia's obligations under International Law and highlight how and where Australia can improve.

About Refugee Rights Night

Fuelled by the rise in civil conflicts, the world is experiencing the highest rate of displaced people on record. We hear daily reports of the destruction that warfare, dictatorships and terrorist organisations create but there are also many other ways that a state may persecute its citizens or fail to offer them protection from persecution for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.

The Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees is clear: people have the right to seek asylum from persecution and Contracting States will not impose penalties despite an asylum seeker's illegal entry. Despite being a Contracting State, Australia has implemented mandatory detention and offshore processing for asylum seekers that come by boat, drawing criticism throughout the international community over its treatment of asylum seekers.

The Refugee Rights Night will explore the rights of aslyum seekers. Our expert panel will unravel the complex and ever changing legal framework in relation to asylum seekers, explain Australia's obligations under International law and highlight how and where Australia can improve.

This event is catered and there will be an opportunity to speak with the panelists and other organisations involved in advocating for refugee rights after the panel has concluded.

Refugee Rights Night is proudly sponsored by Sydney Law School.

____________________________________________________________________________

Other Nights

Monday 5 December - Indigenous Rights Night

Click here to register and for full details.

Tuesday 6 December - Privacy Rights Night

Click here to register and for full details.

Wednesday 7 December - Women's Health Rights Night

Click here to register and for full details.

Thursday 8 December - Disability Rights Night

Click here to register and for full details.