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July
Racist Stereotypes, Resistance and Reclaiming Dignity   View Summary
6 July 2017

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This lecture is being held to commemorate NAIDOC Week.

Settler Australians came to know Aboriginal people through demeaning stereotypes that alternated between the noble savage and the violent primitive. By the early twentieth century such stereotypes were ingrained in everyday life, as evidenced by the use of racial slurs and caricatures in the branding of consumer goods. The noble savage also emerged in Australian fiction, and was personified by the much loved character, Detective Inspector Bony. Today, racist stereotypes remain a powerful influence on Australia's public institutions, and in particular, state police forces.

In this lecture, we will discuss how generations of Aboriginal people have resisted demeaning stereotypes. Early activists such as Jack Patten fought against the racist branding of household products. Contemporary Aboriginal writers are speaking back to archetypes such as Bony, and Aboriginal communities are increasingly asserting self-determination in policing. All belong to a tradition of reclaiming dignity in the face of enduring racism.


Speakers

Dr Nicole Watson, The University of Sydney Law School

Dr Fady Aoun, The University of Sydney Law School

Dr Amanda Porter, University of Technology Sydney


MC

Jeff McMullen, Journalist, Author, Filmmaker

Jeff has been a journalist, author and filmmaker for fifty years, including long-running positions as ABC Foreign Correspondent and reporter for Four Corners and Sixty Minutes. Throughout his professional life, Jeff has written, filmed and campaigned around the world to improve the health, education and human rights of Indigenous people.


CPD Points: 1.5


This lecture is being convened by the Wingara Mura Committee of The University of Sydney Law School.

JSI Seminar Series: The Nature of Law and its Implications for Adjudication   View Summary
12 July 2017

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Speaker: Kevin Toh, University College London

It may be that our legal thinking and practice are sufficiently messy and lacking in coherence so that no one theory of the nature of law, or at least no one theory of the sort that is currently available in the literature, is descriptively accurate. Such a state of affairs would provide us with theoretical opportunities as well as disappointments. Instead of trying to come up with a maximally accurate theory of the nature of law, we can instead try to come up with a plausible natural history of law - i.e. an imaginary history modelled on the classic natural histories of the sort that a number of philosophers in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries devised. Some such natural histories were vindicatory of the relevant subject matter (e.g. Hume on justice, Rousseau on republican forms of government), whereas some others were debunking (e.g. Hume on religion, Nietzsche on morality). Instead of trying to come up with a natural history of law that vindicates or debunks law as such, we can have a more modest aim of devising a natural history of law that vindicates a certain theory of legal adjudication or interpretation. This paper is an attempt to come up with an admittedly partial natural history of law that accomplishes that task.

About the Speaker

Kevin Toh is a senior lecturer at the Faculty of Laws, University College London. He previously taught in the philosophy departments of Indiana University and San Francisco State University. He has also held visiting fellowships at University College, Oxford University and the Institute of Advanced Studies in the Humanities at University of Edinburgh. He is the author of a number of articles in philosophy of law and constitutional theory.

CPD Points: 2

JSI Seminar Series: The Evolution of Authority   View Summary
18 July 2017

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Speaker: Professor Alan Brudner, University of Toronto

This paper sets out a perfectionist view of political authority and explores its implications for a state's external sovereignty vis-à-vis foreign states. It begins from the idea that internal sovereignty is a relational concept in that a claim of authority must be capable of a validating recognition by a free subject. Validation, however, comes in different grades depending on how independent of the putative sovereign the subject is. The voluntary recognition of an unlimited despot by a servile subject does not confer the same quality of validation as the recognition of a constitutional ruler by an independent and equal subject. We can thus speak of sovereign authority as evolving through a series of developmental stages. Authority's evolution begins with someone's claiming a right to rule, climbs several plateaus at which the claim is progressively validated through its recognition by a subject whose freedom (in some sense) is reciprocally recognized by the ruler, and ends with its perfect validation by a fully independent subject equal to the ruler.

This theory of internal sovereignty has international law implications. It says that absolute authority is restricted to perfect authorities—those recognized by subjects whose full independence is reciprocally recognized. Rulers at pre-constitutional stages have but a relative internal authority (limited by a permission to resist for the sole purpose of advancing to a higher stage) and, correspondingly, a qualified external sovereignty. Only sovereigns whose internal authority is perfect can have an external sovereignty that is unqualified; for what other sovereigns must recognize is just the internal sovereignty, such as it is. Thus, innovations such as the International Criminal Court's compulsory jurisdiction and the doctrine of humanitarian intervention are not necessarily inconsistent with state sovereignty.

About the Speaker

Alan Brudner is Professor Emeritus of Law and Political Science at the University of Toronto. He has previously published three books elaborating a Hegelian interpretation of public and private law. They are: The Unity of the Common Law: Studies in Hegelian Jurisprudence (1995, rev. ed. with Jennifer Nadler, 2013), Constitutional Goods (2004), and Punishment and Freedom (2009). A book on Hegel's political philosophy titled The Owl and the Rooster: Hegel's Transformative Political Science is forthcoming from CUP. Professor Brudner has held visiting fellowships at Oxford University and the University of Cambridge. In 2011, he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada.

CPD Points: 2

JSI Seminar Series: Justice in Transitional Circumstances   View Summary
25 July 2017

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Speaker: Professor Colleen Murphy, University of Illinois

Societies emerging from periods of conflict or repression and trying to democratize characteristically try to address past wrongs using processes other than criminal punishment. There is, however, deep disagreement as to whether justice is achieved with alternate measures such as amnesty or a truth commission. What are the appropriate standards of justice to use when evaluating various responses to wrongdoing in transitional circumstances? To answer this question, Professor Murphy first articulates the circumstances of justice characterizing transitional societies, and contrasts these with the circumstances of stable democracies. She then argues that justice in transitional circumstances is not aimed at giving perpetrators what they deserve, but rather is aimed at transforming a society in a just manner.

About the Speaker

Colleen Murphy is Professor of Law, Philosophy, and Political Science as well as Director of the Women and Gender in Global Perspectives Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is the author of A Moral Theory of Political Reconciliation (Cambridge University Press, 2010) and The Conceptual Foundations of Transitional Justice (Cambridge University Press, 2017). Murphy is the co-editor of Engineering Ethics for a Globalized World (Springer, 2015), Risk Analysis of Natural Hazards (Springer, 2015), and Climate Change and Its Impacts: Risks and Inequalities (Springer, under contract).

CPD Points: 2

Engaging with Advocates   View Summary
28 July 2017

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We are pleased to invite you to 'Engaging with Advocates', an event to connect early career researchers with leading civil society advocates in order to foster collaboration and increase the impact of research. Representatives of organizations working on the sustainability of food systems, promoting healthier diets, and championing consumer rights will share personal experiences of using research in their efforts to improve policy, and offer insights for academics looking to strengthen the practical relevance of their research.


This event will feature keynote presentations by:

  • CHOICE
  • The Live Lighter Campaign (Heart Foundation Western Australia); and
  • Sustain: The Australian Food Network


This will be followed by a session where participants workshop 'live' policy issues with the aim of generating practical understanding of the needs, working styles and unique strengths of both researchers and advocates, in order to collaborate more effectively for policy impact.

The event will conclude with canapés and informal networking.


Early-career researchers should attend to:

  • Build new connections with leading health, nutrition and food policy advocates;
  • Gain insight into the work advocacy groups do in promoting policy solutions to issues such as unsustainable food systems and unhealthy diets;
  • Learn how to communicate research results effectively to advocates; and
  • Learn how to develop effective relationships with advocates.


Advocates should attend to:

  • Build new connections with up-and-coming researchers in the fields of nutrition, non-communicable disease prevention, health policy, political science, and law;
  • Gain insight into how academic research is designed, conducted and published; and
  • Share knowledge on how researchers can effectively contribute to advocacy objectives. 


Venue 
Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney

Seminar: Level 6 Seminar Room
Networking event: Level 6 staff lounge


Download the program

 


Presented by the Food Governance and Healthy Food Systems project nodes in the Charles Perkins Centre and Sydney Health Law at The University of Sydney Law School.


August
Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) 101: an insider's guide   View Summary
3 August 2017

Thinking about a career in law? Wondering what studying the JD is all about?

Join current JD student Harry Simons and get an insider's view on what life is like as a student of the Juris Doctor.

Open to those from any discipline, these sessions will provide you with an overview of the JD program.

You'll also be given practical examples of readings and tips about how you, as a JD student, would be expected to tackle these.

Find out how you can succeed in the JD program

Law & Business Seminar: The Mixed Progress of Corporate Governance in China   View Summary
14 August 2017

Registration

Click here to register for this seminar.

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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The Mixed Progress of Corporate Governance in China

Speaker: Professor Guo Li, Peking University Law School

This seminar will address the development and predicament for the governance area of Chinese companies in the past years, through a comparative and contextual approach. The issues covered include the independent director, board of supervisors and shareholders' lawsuits, etc.

About the speaker

Guo Li is a Professor of Law and Vice Dean at Peking University Law School, and the chief editor of PKU Journal of Legal Studies. He has also taught and researched at Cornell, Duke, Freiburg, Vanderbilt, Case Western Reserve, and the recipient of the Humboldt Foundation Fellowship. His scholarly interests cover financial laws, social development and comparative studies. He is a graduate of PKU, Southern Methodist, and Harvard Law School.

Commentator: Jim Harrowell AM, Partner, Hunt & Hunt Lawyers

Chair: Professor Vivienne Bath, The University of Sydney Law School

Registration (GST inclusive)
Full Fee: $77
Sydney Law School Alumni: $66
Sydney Law School Full Time Student: $44
Group 3+: $55

CPD Points: 1


This Law & Business Downtown Seminar is co-sponsored by the Centre for Asian and Pacific Law (CAPLUS) at The University of Sydney Law School and the  China Studies Centre at The University of Sydney.

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How Asian Americans Have Succeeded in the Law   View Summary
15 August 2017


Registration

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About the talk


Frank H. Wu, author, law professor, former law school dean, and head of a prestigious non-profit Chinese American membership organization, will talk about how Asian immigrants and their American born descendants have been integral to the development of Constitutional law and common law. He will discuss precedent setting cases they have been party to on issues such as citizenship, racial equality, and due process. He also will offer examples of their progress as attorneys and judges. He will engage in dialogue about how democracy and diversity can work together as ideals.


About the speaker

Frank H Wu is currently a Distinguished Professor at University of California Hastings College of Law. He previously served as Chancellor & Dean after having been voted the most "influential" dean in legal education in a poll by National Jurist magazine.

In April 2016, he was elected by the members of Committee of 100 as their Chair. The Committee of 100 is a non-profit membership organization. It invites Chinese Americans who have achieved the highest levels of success to join, working on twin missions of promoting good relations between the US and China and the civic engagement of Chinese Americans.

He is the author of Yellow: Race in America Beyond Black and White, and co-author of Race, Rights and Reparation: Law and the Japanese American Internment.

CPD points = 1

September
Sydney Juris Doctor (JD) 101: an insider's guide   View Summary
7 September 2017
Thinking about a career in law? Wondering what studying the JD is all about? Join current JD student Harry Simons and get an insider's view on what life is like as a student of the Juris Doctor. Open to those from any discipline, these sessions will provide you with an overview of the JD program. You'll also be given practical examples of readings and tips about how you, as a JD student, would be expected to tackle these. Find out how you can succeed in the JD program
Neuroscience & Society: Ethical, Legal & Clinical Implications of Neuroscience Research    View Summary
14 September 2017 to 15 September 2017

Almost twenty years since the "Decade of the Brain", governments are investing heavily in large global efforts to map the human brain and identify the neurobiological basis of thought and behaviour. These initiatives include the US BRAIN Initiative, the European Human Brain Project, the China Brain Project, andthe Australian Brain Initiative. Developments in neuroscience are promising to improve our ability to treat or prevent mental illness, neurological disorders, and cognitive decline, and mitigate the harms of criminal behaviour.

This burgeoning area of neuroscience research raises critical ethical, legal, and social challenges that have been recognised by the integration of neuroethical and neurolegal research within these initiatives. How might these developments in neuroscience impact Australian society?

Neuroscience & Society will feature leading national and international academics and practitioners in an interdisciplinary program addressing themes including:

  • Ageing and dementia
  • The developing brain
  • Disability and mental health
  • Disorders of self control
  • Moral cognition and moral technologies (e.g. nudges, sensor society)
  • Artificial intelligence and machine learning


Confirmed international speakers include:

  • Prof Katrina Sifferd, Faculty of Philosophy, Elmhurst College (USA)
  • Brian Earp, Oxford Centre for Neuroethics, Oxford University (UK)
  • Dr Katy de Kogel, Ministry of Security and Justice, The Netherlands (via videolink)


Neuroscience &Societywill also officially launch the Australian Neuroethics Network, a collection of leading researchers and practitioners examining the implications of neuroscience for Australia.Become part of this important Australian initiative.

Registration and program details will be released shortly. Watch this space!Enquiries may be emailed to adrian.carter@monash.edu.au or jeanette.kennett@mq.edu.au


Neuroscience and Society is supported by theARC Centre of Excellence for Integrative Brain Function Neuroethics Program, theCentre for Agency Values and Ethics at Macquarie University, and theUniversity of Sydney Brain and Mind Centre.

October
Law & Business Seminar: Whistleblower Protections in ASX 200 Codes of Conduct   View Summary
19 October 2017

Registration

Click here to register for this seminar.

Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Speaker: Dr Olivia Dixon, The University of Sydney Law School

Whistleblowing is considered to be an integral component of corporate governance through exposing and remedying corruption, fraud and other types of wrongdoing in both the public and private sector.

While whistleblowers face a very real threat of retaliation, the current regime which purports to prohibit retaliation against private-sector whistleblowers is fragmented, complex and suffers from significant gaps. In the absence of progress towards comprehensive private-sector whistleblower protection, private commitments contained in corporate codes of conduct may provide an interim regulatory solution by setting a 'best practices' benchmark and diffusing norms that influence organisational behaviour and culture.

This seminar will examine the whistleblower policies of the ASX 200, comparing the private commitments contained therein to those currently available under statute.

About the Speaker

Olivia Dixon  joined Sydney Law School in 2013 as Lecturer in the Regulation of Investment and Financial Markets. Olivia teaches and researches in corporate law, with a particular interest in corporate crime. Prior to entering academia, Olivia practiced as a corporate finance attorney in Sydney and New York. Before becoming an attorney in 2003, Olivia worked as an analyst for a corporate finance company and at the Australian Securities and Investments Commission. Olivia has an LLM and JSD from New York University, where her doctoral dissertation was an empirical study examining the role of mutual funds as corporate governance monitors.

Commentator: Jason Gray, Allen & Overy

 Chair:  Professor Jennifer Hill, The University of Sydney Law School

 

Registration (GST inclusive)
Full Fee: $77
Sydney Law School Alumni: $66
Sydney Law School Full Time Student: $44
Group 3+: $55

 

CPD Points: 1

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November
Law & Business Seminar: Does Conviction Matter?    View Summary
29 November 2017

Registration

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Please note: Individual online registrations MUST be paid by Mastercard or VISA. To pay by cheque or arrange a group registration, please email law.events@sydney.edu.au for an invoice. We apologise for any inconvenience.

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Does Conviction Matter? Do Deferred Prosecution Agreements Affect Reputational Sanction for Corporate Crime


Speaker: Professor Jennifer Arlen, NYU School of Law

Deferred Prosecution Agreements are a hot topic in Australia at the moment. The federal government is considering their introduction to address perceived problems with prosecuting companies accused of, for example, fraud or bribery.

There has been a dramatic rise in the use of such agreements in the United States over the last couple of decades. US prosecutors regularly enter into corporate deferred and non-prosecution agreements (D/NPAs) with firms with detected criminal misconduct. Critics of this practice claim that prosecutors mute the reputational damage costs imposed on firms when they resolve cases through D/NPAs instead of requiring corporations to plead guilty. In their view, formal conviction enhances deterrence by supplementing financial penalties with enhanced reputational penalty for corporate crime.

Professor Arlen's seminar will question this claim. Professor Arlen's seminar, which is based on a joint research with Cindy Alexander of the US Securities and Exchange Commission, will show that D/NPAs do not necessarily impose smaller reputational costs than formal corporate conviction. The joint research project shows that criminal settlements impose reputational cost on firms when news of the settlement leads interested third-parties-suppliers of goods, services of capital; customers; or lenders-to be less willing to deal with a sanctioned firm on favorable terms due to the perceived risk of future harm.


About the Speaker

Jennifer Arlen is the Norma Z. Paige Professor of Law and founder and director of the Program on Corporate Compliance and Enforcement at New York University School of Law (NYU). She has published over 50 articles and book chapters in leading scholarly publications. Jennifer has been a visiting professor at the California Institute of Technology, Harvard Law School, and Yale Law School, and was the Ivadelle and Theodore Johnson Professor of Law and Business at USC School of Law before moving to NYU.


Commentator: Dr Olivia Dixon, The University of Sydney Law School

Chair: Associate Professor Arlie Loughnan, The University of Sydney Law School


Registration (GST inclusive)
Full Fee: $77
Sydney Law School Alumni: $66
Sydney Law School Full Time Student: $44
Group 3+: $55


CPD Points: 1

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Upcoming Intensive Course:

Business Crime

27, 28, 30 November & 1 December

Engage with Professor Arlen in this intensive course which covers the law and effective enforcement policy governing crimes committed by large multinational corporations.

You can apply to study this on a one off basis without assessment.

Click here to apply.

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