All future 2014 events

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January
Seminar - Mitotic cell rounding: dissecting molecular pathways and biophysical parameters   View Summary
30 January 2014

Speaker
Martin P. Stewart, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Koch Institute,
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge MA, USA

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

February
Seminar - Exploring mechanisms of CD8 T cell exhaustion in chronic HBV infection   View Summary
3 February 2014

Speaker
Dr Anna Schurich, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Division of Infection and Immunity, University College London, UK

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Church-Based Social Marketing for Fall Prevention   View Summary
4 February 2014

Speaker
Carolyn DiGuiseppi, MD, MPH, PhD, Professor of Epidemiology and Community & Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver.

RSVP
Rebecca Strath
Email: rstrath@georgeinstitute.org.au
Phone: (02) 9657 0361

Brief description
Dr DiGuiseppi and colleagues have recently completed a cluster randomized controlled trial demonstrating that social marketing through churches, by addressing product, price, place and promotion with more convenient, lower cost classes and messages about staying independent and building social relationships, can successfully reach older adults through churches and motivate them to enrol in balance and strength classes for fall prevention. This presentation will describe the development, implementation and evaluation of the social marketing program.

Speaker bio
Carolyn DiGuiseppi, MD, MPH, PhD, is Professor of Epidemiology and Community & Behavioral Health, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado Denver (UCD), and served as Deputy Director of the Colorado Injury Control Research Center until August 2013. Before joining the UCD faculty in 2000, she was a senior research fellow at the Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK, where she received her doctorate in epidemiology. A primary focus of her research has been the evaluation of community-based injury prevention interventions, including smoke alarms in low income housing, bicycle helmets and booster seats for children, balance classes to prevent older adult falls, and seat belt use among rural drivers. She has also conducted a number of epidemiological studies on health and safety among Hispanic immigrant families. Her current research focuses on fall prevention and driving safety in older adults and suicide prevention in younger adults.

Seminar - Behavioural weight management interventions in primary care    View Summary
6 February 2014

Speaker
Presented by Ms Claire Madigan from the University of Birmingham, United Kingdom

About the speaker

Claire Madigan MSc, is a final year doctoral student at the University of Birmingham, England. After her study visit to Australia she will be working as a research fellow on a randomised controlled trial, examining the effect of self-weighing for weight maintenance. Her research interests include investigating behavioural weight management programmes, particularly those that can be utilised in primary care. Prior to commencing her academic career, she worked as a public health practitioner commissioning services related to weight management and working strategically on local weight management services for children. She has utilised these experiences in her academic work, ensuring the focus is on interventions that are effective, but that they can also be implemented in a healthcare setting.

Seminar - Nanostructured energy materials   View Summary
19 February 2014

Speaker
Presented by Professor Ullrich Steiner, Professor of Physics of Materials from the University of Cambridge, UK

Symposium in honour of Professor David Sillence and dinner in the Great Hall   View Summary
20 February 2014

Genetic Medicine — Future Hopes and Challenges

The symposium will showcase the contributions and collaborations of the members and former fellows of the Department of Medical Genetics and Discipline of Genetic Medicine in the University of Sydney 1980-2014.

The symposium will be followed by a dinner in the Great Hall, The University of Sydney. Partners cordially invited. Those who can attend just the dinner are also welcome.

Symposium information and registration

Lecture - How nature makes materials   View Summary
20 February 2014

Speaker
Presented by Professor Ullrich Steiner, Professor of Physics of Materials from the University of Cambridge, UK

Seminar - Cancer and ageing: Rival demons?   View Summary
20 February 2014

Speaker
Professor Judy Campisi from the University of California, Berkeley.

Presentation at the BMRI: Professor Michael Merzenich   View Summary
25 February 2014

Professor Merzenich is globally recognised as having discovered brain plasticity.

He and his team are principally interested in 1) defining the neural bases of learning, recognition and memory; 2) defining mechanisms underlying the origins of functional brain illnesses and disabilities; and 3) developing training strategies for remediating learning-disabled and movement-disabled adults and children.

Seminar - Next generation sequencing: basics and applications   View Summary
25 February 2014

Speaker

Professor Elaine Mardis, Co-Director, The Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, USA

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Sydney Medical Program - Medical Education Research Symposium   View Summary
26 February 2014

Forthe first meeting Dr Karen Scott and Dr Amanda Harrison will be presenting their research investigating The influence of the "hidden curriculum" on student use of mobile devices in the clinical setting

March
Seminar - New insights into the formation and function of caveolae   View Summary
4 March 2014

Speaker

Professor Rob Parton, Group Leader/NHMRC SPRF, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Alcohol, baclofen and the liver   View Summary
7 March 2014

Speaker

ProfessorPaul Haber, Head,Discipline of Addiction Medicine, Central Clinical School and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Forum - Displaced women, double challenge   View Summary
8 March 2014

Displaced Women, Double Challenge, will address the health needs of women refugees from their country of birth or origin through to their arrival and settlement in Australia

Further information
Workshop - Take control of your worry   View Summary
11 March 2014
Dr Lisa Lampe from Discipline of Psychiatry will teach how to apply effective strategies to manage excessive worry and anxiety and to boost productivity in this 3-week evening workshop series. 10% discount is available to staff members.
Seminar - What can we learn about human health from nutritional ecology?   View Summary
11 March 2014

Speaker

Professor David Raubenheimer, Leonard P Ullmann Chair in Nutritional Ecology, Charles Perkins Centre

Nutritional ecology is the field of biology that applies ecological and evolutionary theory to the study of animal nutrition. The guiding framework views animal performance (health, reproduction, longevity etc.) as an outcome of the interactions between evolved traits (anatomical, physiological, behavioural etc.) and the ecological environment.

Find out more
Seminar - Connexin and pannexin large-pore channels in disease and melanomas   View Summary
11 March 2014

Speaker

Professor Dale W Laird, Canada Research Chair in Gap Junctions and Disease, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Western Ontario, Canada

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - A deeper look at sleep pathology: Cardiopulmonary coupling   View Summary
11 March 2014

Presenter:Dr Kelly Olson, Clinical Director of Research and Development at SleepImage

Bio
Kelly Olson's background as a neuropharmacologist began with a Masters in Science from the University of North Dakota in 1999. She received her Ph.D. in 2007 from the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada in Pharmacology and Therapeutics. She accepted a position as Director of Research and Development with a biotech company based out of Wisconsin where she led a team of scientists toward a better understanding of how the nervous, endocrine and immune systems work together in both sickness and health.
Currently, Kelly works as the Clinical Director of Research and Development at SleepImage in Denver, CO., examining molecular aspects of sleep neurocircuitry, developing patents, investigating clinical data, giving presentations to the medical community and coordinating global research for a sleep monitoring medical device.

Hosted bythe NHMRC Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (CIRUS)

Workshop - Recent developments in rare diseases research, health services and policy   View Summary
14 March 2014 to 15 March 2014
The workshop will cover genetic testing - when to test and who to test; how latest research is improving clinical practice; health services needs for families and young people transitioning from paediatrics to adult services; psychosocial needs for families and how to find support for them.
Seminar - Newton's red herring? (Physiology and psychology of colour vision)   View Summary
14 March 2014

Speaker

ProfessorPaul Martin, Save Sight Institute

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Inaugural Future of Experimental Medicine Conference - Inflammation in Disease and Ageing   View Summary
16 March 2014 to 19 March 2014
The conference brings together world experts in the area of inflammation and how this is linked to nutrition, ageing, immune function and disease pathogenesis in order to allow its, and other Australian researchers, to refine the focus of their research in this area and to set up collaborative interactions that will continue to be generative.
Forum - Good Food, Good Health: Delivering the benefits of food security in Australia and beyond   View Summary
17 March 2014

Food and nutrition security is one of the major challenges facing our global community. Our modern food system is causing worldwide ill health on two fronts with chronic shortages of nutritious food causing malnutrition on one hand, and excessive consumption leading to chronic obesity on the other.

Invitation

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Tony Basten Oration - New genetic technologies for disease modelling and therapy development   View Summary
19 March 2014

The oration will be delivered by Professor Josef Penninger, Scientific Director, Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences.

Invitation

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre and the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Glucocorticoid metabolising enzymes in ageing and inflammation   View Summary
21 March 2014

Speaker

Professor Mark Cooper, ANZAC Research Institute

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Seminar - Lights, camera, and action: Secret life of leukocytes revealed by 2-photon microscopy   View Summary
21 March 2014

Speaker

Lai Guan Ng, PI, Singapore Immunology Network (A*STAR)

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

I-CAN v5 Facilitator Training   View Summary
25 March 2014 to 26 March 2014
The Instrument for the Classification and Assessment of Support Needs (I-CAN) v5 is a support needs assessment, planning and resource allocation tool designed to assess and guide support delivery for people with disabilities including people with mental health concerns. Version 5 of I-CAN has improved user friendliness, flexibility and wider applicability. Research shows I-CAN is a valid, reliable tool.
Seminar - Regulating innate immunity: Case study of controls in type I interferon signaling   View Summary
25 March 2014

Speaker

Professor Paul Hertzog, Director, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Diseases, Monash Institute of Medical Research

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Sleep disordered breathing in children- an ENT perspective   View Summary
25 March 2014

Presenter:Associate Professor Johan LS Hellgren, Department of ENT, Head & Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden

Bio
Associate Professor Johan LS Hellgren MDPhD is a senior consultant at the Department of ENT, Head & Neck Surgery, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Since 2010 he is the Head of the Academic Department of ENT at the Institute of Clinical Sciences at the University of Gothenburg. JH defended his thesis "Non-infectious rhinitis-epidemiology and clinic" in 2001 and he did a post-doc fellowship at the Woolcock Institute in 2006. His research is mainly within rhinitis, asthma and upper airway obstruction. JH takes a special interest in nasal surgery, upper airway inflammation and facial fracture surgery. JH is the former President of the Swedish Rhinologic Society and President of the national Swedish Association for Otorhinolaryngology, Head & Neck Surgery since 2011.

Hosted bythe NHMRC Centre for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep (CIRUS)

Seminar - Inflammation, gliapses and progression of Parkinson's   View Summary
26 March 2014

Speaker

Professor María Trinidad Herrero, Head, Clinical & Experimental Neuroscience (NiCE-CIBERNED), University Jaume I / University of Murcia, Spain

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Making your name - Talking strategies to promote your research   View Summary
27 March 2014

This forum will focus on strategies to promote and market your research using social media and social networks, open access and an introduction to Altmetrics.

Lunch will be provided.

RSVP by 17 March to library.rsvp@sydney.edu.au

Seminar - Behavioural, electrophysiological and molecular correlates of ageing   View Summary
28 March 2014

Full title

Behavioural, electrophysiological and molecular correlates of ageing in the mouse balance system

Speaker

Dr Aaron Camp, Discipline of Biomedical Science, School of Medical Sciences

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Conference - New directions in leukaemia research   View Summary
30 March 2014 to 2 April 2014

The conference will bring together scientists and clinicians to discuss and debate current concepts in our understanding of the molecular basis of leukaemia, emerging paradigms and breakthroughs at the forefronts of leukaemia research, and new therapies emerging in the clinic.

April
Conference - New directions in leukaemia research   View Summary
30 March 2014 to 2 April 2014

The conference will bring together scientists and clinicians to discuss and debate current concepts in our understanding of the molecular basis of leukaemia, emerging paradigms and breakthroughs at the forefronts of leukaemia research, and new therapies emerging in the clinic.

Seminar - Monocyte whispering   View Summary
1 April 2014

Full title
Monocyte whispering: Controlling inflammatory monocyte infiltration with immune-modifying microparticles

Speaker
Professor Nick King, Head, Discipline of Pathology, School of Medical Sciences



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - The Sydney Heart Bank: Its role in understanding human heart failure   View Summary
4 April 2014

Speaker

Professor Cris dos Remedios, Discipline of Anatomy and Histology, School of Medical Sciences

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Seminar: Identification of risk factors for PTSD - the intricate mesh of genes and environment   View Summary
4 April 2014
Speaker
Dr Divya Mehta, University of Queensland and Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Germany

Further information
Dementia and disability symposium   View Summary
7 April 2014
The symposium will feature presentations that cover the latest research about people with a disability who acquire dementia, and hear from a range of organisations across the aged care and disability services sector about how they are responding to their goals and needs.
Advocacy and ageing: Enriching the lives of older people with intellectual disabilities   View Summary
8 April 2014
Speaker
Professor Matthew P. Janicki, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Chicago

Seminar - Unveiling the reprogramming process   View Summary
8 April 2014

Speaker
Associate Professor Jose Polo, Group Leader, Department of Anatomy and Developmental Biology, Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute, Monash University



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Lecture - A role for oxytocin signalling in the aetiology of autism?   View Summary
8 April 2014

Speaker
Associate Professor Adam Guastella, Brain and Mind Research Institute



Hosted by the Brain and Mind Research Institute



Find out more
Seminar - Imaging with the TriMScope: A training seminar for advanced esers   View Summary
8 April 2014

Speaker
Dr Markus Wewer, Manager Application and Support, LaVision BioTec GmbH



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Lecture - Towards the discovery of novel pathways in cardiometabolic diseases   View Summary
10 April 2014

Speaker
Dr John O'Sullivan, Postdoctoral Fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School



Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre



Find out more
Seminar - Interaction of thalamic and cortical signals in the visual system?   View Summary
11 April 2014

Speaker

Dr Alexander Pietersen, Save Sight Institute

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Lecture - Gene-brain-behaviour interactions in clinical practice   View Summary
11 April 2014

Speaker
Professor Allan Reiss, Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Brain Sciences Research (CIBSR) at Stanford University School of Medicine



Hosted by the Brain and Mind Research Institute



Find out more
Concept development workshop for trials and translational research studies   View Summary
15 April 2014
This one day workshop will help clinical and scientific investigators refine their concept into a proposal for a clinical trial and/or translational research study. It will provide information, advice and guidance on how to develop a concept outline from an initial idea or clinical/scientific question by specifying a suitable aim, objectives, population, interventions, study design, outcome measures, sample size, analysis plan and funding strategy, as well as further tips and hints on developing your proposal into a funding application, letter of intent (LOI) or a full study protocol.
Lecture - Neuroimaging studies in multiple sclerosis, prenatal stress and Alzheimer's disease   View Summary
15 April 2014
Speaker
Dr Arnaud Charil, Imaging Group Leader at ANSTO LifeSciences

Find out more
Seminar - Regulation of carbohydrate metabolism by amino acids   View Summary
15 April 2014

Speaker
Professor Stefan Broer, Head, Division of Biomedical Science & Biochemistry, Research School of Biology, College of Medicine, Biology & Environment, The Australian National University



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar: Positive computing - technologies for wellbeing and human potential   View Summary
15 April 2014
Speaker
Associate Professor Rafael Calvo, The University of Sydney

Find out more
Seminar - A novel algorithm for feature ranking with application to genome-wide association studies   View Summary
17 April 2014

Speakers
Dr Enes Makalic and Dr Daniel Schmidt from the University of Melbourne

Lecture - Sleep, respiratory chemoreflexes and cerebral blood flow   View Summary
29 April 2014

Speaker

Professor James Duffin, Toronto University

Bio
Professor James Duffin is a world leading expert in ventilatory control research, including ventilatory chemoreflexes/modeling, ventilatory and cerebral blood flow responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia etc. He has more than 200 journal publications, mostly in respiratory control field. Many world famous ventilatory control researchers were his students or worked with him at some stage. He also has strong Biomedical-Engineer background. He set up a few methods of testing ventilatory chemoreflexes. He is a Senior Editor of J Physiol, and Reviewing Editor of J Physiol, J App Physiol, and Resp Physiol & Neuro.

There will be coffee/muffin available after his talk.

Hosted bythe Woolcock Institute

May
Seminar - Developmental origins of health and disease   View Summary
1 May 2014

Speaker

Dr Kyra Sim, Charles Perkins Centre



Find out more

Hosted by theBoden Institute

Seminar - Glycinergic synapses in the spinal cord: their relevance to chronic pain and its treatment   View Summary
2 May 2014

Speaker

Professor Joseph Lynch, University of Queensland

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Seminar - Cancer predisposition syndromes associated with defective DNA repair   View Summary
6 May 2014

Speaker
Dr Andrew Deans, Head, Genome Stability Unit, St Vincent's Institute, Victoria



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Medicine and Dentistry information evening   View Summary
7 May 2014

Register now

Thinking of applying to study graduate medicine or dentistry at Sydney Medical School or Faculty of Dentistry?

The evening will provide an overview of the graduate entry medicine (MD) and dentistry (DMD) programs, as well as up to date information on the application process and advice on preparing for the (much feared) Multiple Mini Interviews.

Lecture - Treating Syria's war-wounded in Israel   View Summary
8 May 2014

Presented by Dr Michael Harari, Emergency Medicine Specialist, Ziv Medical Centre, Northern Israel.

Seminar - Age-related dementia: the brain is destroyed by the pulse   View Summary
9 May 2014

Speaker

Professor Jonathan Stone, Discipline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences and the Bosch Institute

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Seminar - Mitochondrial dynamics in health and disease   View Summary
13 May 2014

Speaker
Professor Mike Ryan, Head, Department of Biochemistry, La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Global competition: Local benefit   View Summary
16 May 2014

Speaker

Professor John Hearn, Discipline of Physiology, School of Medical Sciences

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Paediatric Refugee Health Conference 2014   View Summary
16 May 2014

Celebrating the Health Assessment for Refugee Kids (HARK's) 10th year

Lecture - Pre-clinical development of novel nutraceuticals for the treatment of intestinal disease   View Summary
16 May 2014

Speaker

Professor Gordon Howarth, SAHMRI Cancer Council Senior Research Fellow
Associate Head (Research) and Postgraduate Coordinator, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, The University of Adelaide

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

OZWAC Disco Fever Charity Ball   View Summary
17 May 2014
Dr Lisa Lampe from Discipline of Psychiatry will teach how to apply effective strategies to manage excessive worry and anxiety and to boost productivity in this 3-week evening workshop series. 10% discount is available to staff members.
Lecture - Sleep to remember, sleep to forget   View Summary
20 May 2014

Speaker

Dr Asya Rolls, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology


Bio
Dr Rolls completed her undergraduate studies (majored in Biology) at the Technion, Israel institute of Technology. She then undertook her PhD at the Weizmann institute of science on Neuroimmunology with Prof. Michal Schwartz studying how the immune system controls brain plasticity followed by a Postdoc at Stanford University with Prof. Luis de Lecea and Prof. Craig Heller on the role of sleep in memory consolidation and the potential of using sleep to disrupt memories. Since October 2012 I am an assistant Prof at the Technion's School of Medicine, working on the role of sleep in the regulation of cognitive and immunological memory.

Dr Rolls and her colleague, A/Prof Kahn are both visiting Australia as an Technion Australia Theeman Scholars. They are both keen to discuss opportunities and ideas for future research and possible collaborations. Morning tea will be served after the presentation so please come and talk to our guests.

Hosted bythe Woolcock Institute

Seminar - New targets in cancer immunotherapy   View Summary
20 May 2014

Speaker
Professor Mark Smyth, Senior Scientist, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Diet, metabolites, and 'western lifestyle' inflammatory diseases   View Summary
20 May 2014

Speaker
Honorary Professor Charles Mackay, Charles Perkins Centre

More information


Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar - Renin, genes and finding the cause of hypertension   View Summary
22 May 2014

Speaker

Emeritus Professor Brian Morris, School of Medical Sciences

Seminar - Let's increase value and reduce waste in research   View Summary
22 May 2014

Speaker

Professor Rustam Al-Shahi Salman, MRC Senior Clinical Fellow, University of Edinburgh

Available via WebEx - email info@bt4k.com.au for details

Seminar - Gene therapy for brain white matter diseases   View Summary
23 May 2014

Speaker

Associate ProfessorMatthias Klugmann, University ofNew South Wales

Hosted by theBosch Institute

Seminar - Imaging the innate immunity   View Summary
27 May 2014

Speaker
Dr Connie Wong, ARC DECRA Research Fellow, Monash University



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Presentations - Global response on outbreaks and public health and MALDI-TOF ID of filamentous fungi   View Summary
27 May 2014

Speakers
Dr Elizabeth Johnson and Sue Sleiman

RSVP

By Wednesday 21 May toSharon Chenfor catering purposes.

Light lunch will be provided at 12pm

Seminar - Sporting injuries   View Summary
29 May 2014

Speaker

Professor David Hunter and Professor Chris Little, Northern Clinical School
Joined by Channel Nine's Dr John D'Arcy and former rugby player, Damian Smith.

This seminar will review the progress in sport injury and OA research, how results are contributing to reducing the impact of joint injury andprevention methods and treatments for sport injuries and OA.

RSVP required as places are limited.

Seminar - Providing an integrative perspective of biological systems using computer simulations   View Summary
30 May 2014

Speaker

Dr Mark Read, Charles Perkins Centre

Hosted by theBosch Institute

June
Seminar - Potential of adjunct therapies to prevent cardiovascular disease in type 1 diabetes   View Summary
2 June 2014

Presenter

Professor John Petrie, University of Glasgow

Hosted by the NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre

Seminar - One of the great mysteries of global health   View Summary
3 June 2014

Presenter

Dr Mushtaque Chowdbury, Vice Chair and Interim Executive Director of BRAC

Hosted by the Sydney School of Public Health

Seminar - Genome-wide identification of miR-200 targets   View Summary
3 June 2014

Full title

Genome-wide identification of miR-200 targets reveals a regulatory network controlling cell invasion

Speaker
Professor Greg Goodall, Laboratory Head, Centre for Cancer Biology - an alliance between SA Pathology and the University of South Australia



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Maternal influences on the fetal immune system   View Summary
3 June 2014

Speaker
Professor Ralph Nanan, Paediatrics, Sydney Medical School Nepean

Register here



Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Workshop - Clinical trials: the essentials    View Summary
11 June 2014

This workshop will develop participants' skills in: reading clinical trials; interpreting results of clinical trials; designing and setting up simple clinical trials; managing the practicalities of clinical trials; understanding design features important for minimising bias; writing up clinical trials for publication.

Breast reconstruction lecture    View Summary
13 June 2014

Presenter

Dr Zoe Winters, University of Bristol and University Hospitals of Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, UK

Hosted by the Cancer Research Network

CeMPED shared decision making hub session   View Summary
16 June 2014

A planning session to help prepare for the for International Shared Decision-Making and International Society for Evidence-Based Healthcare conferencefrom 19 to 22 July2015 to be held at the University of Sydney.

Seminar - Quantitative top-down proteomics   View Summary
17 June 2014

Full title

Quantitative top-down proteomics: A high resolution 2D gel-based approach for the analysis of biomolecular mechanisms

Speaker
Professor Jens R Coorssen, Foundation Professor of Molecular Physiology, Head of the UWS Molecular Medicine Research Group, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Presentation - Intermittent fasting diets: do they work and can they be improved?   View Summary
17 June 2014

Speaker

Associate Professor Amanda Salis, Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders

Abstract

About time: effects of timing and intensity of energy restriction on weight and cardio-metabolic risk

Studies in humans and animals increasingly suggest that intermittent energy restriction is on a par with, or sometimes even superior to, continuous energy restriction with regards to various health benefits. These include improved glucose homeostasis, improved cardiovascular and cerebrovascular health, reduced tumour growth, and delayed age-related neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments. Against this background, weight-reducing diets involving intermittent energy restriction have recently gained popularity amongst health professionals and members of the public alike. Such diets are often referred to as 'intermittent fasting' because they frequently involve severely restricting energy intake to ~0-50% of energy requirements for one or more consecutive or non-consecutive days per week, and eating ad libitum (or to meet energy requirements or predefined limits on fat or carbohydrate intake) at all other times.

Intermittent energy restriction has been examined in several studies, but very few have made head-to-head comparisons of the effects of continuous versus intermittent energy restriction on weight or fat loss in rodents or humans. While most but not all of these intermittent energy restriction interventions resulted in significant fat and or weight loss compared to baseline, none showed evidence of improved weight loss or fat loss efficiency when compared to continuous energy restriction. This may be because such studies used severe energy restriction in the intermittent but not in the continuous arm, and severe energy restriction has been shown to reduce weight loss efficiency.

Our studies in mice and men suggest that the use of moderate energy restriction as part of intermittent dieting strategies can improve the efficiency of weight loss (i.e. increase the amount of weight or fat lost, and metabolic improvements achieved, per unit of energy restriction), thereby offering a promising angle of investigation for future human obesity interventions.


Bio
With a BSc (Hons) from the University of Western Australia and a PhD from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, Amanda Sainsbury-Salis leads a research team at The Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, Exercise & Eating Disorders that aims to help people to attain and maintain an optimum body weight and composition. Adept in translating novel research findings into human benefits, Amanda's NHMRC-funded research into hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis spans studies with conditional transgenic mice to randomized controlled clinical trials in humans.

Hosted bythe Woolcock Institute

Neural Knitworks: craft a healthy brain   View Summary
19 June 2014

Neural Knitworks is a collaborative art/science project about mind and brain health. Whether you're a whiz with yarn, or just discovering the joy of craft, now you can crochet, wrap, knit or knot - and find out about neuroscience.

Registration essential.

More information and to register

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Workshop - Systematic reviews   View Summary
20 June 2014

The objectives of this workshop are to enable clinicians to: identify and find good quality systematic reviews; interpret the results of systematic reviews; understand the process involved in completing a systematic review; start the process of learning how to do their own systematic review

Symposium: Laboratory diagnosis & surveillance of drug resistant infections   View Summary
20 June 2014

The symposium will critically review current approaches to epidemiology and laboratory diagnosis of antibiotic resistance in major pathogens of clinical and public health importance.

Seminar - Somatic retrotransposition: shuffling the genetic deck in stem cells, cancer and neurons   View Summary
24 June 2014

Speaker
Associate Professor Geoffrey Faulkner, Principal Research Fellow, Mater Research Institute, University of Queensland



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

I-CAN v5 Facilitator Training   View Summary
25 June 2014
The Instrument for the Classification and Assessment of Support Needs (I-CAN) v5 is a support needs assessment, planning and resource allocation tool designed to assess and guide support delivery for people with disabilities including people with mental health concerns. Version 5 of I-CAN has improved user friendliness, flexibility and wider applicability. Research shows I-CAN is a valid, reliable tool.
Westmead international update on advances in perinatal care   View Summary
26 June 2014 to 28 June 2014

A key theme of the meeting is early life programming and long term health.

Presentation - Making a Golgi   View Summary
26 June 2014

Speaker

Professor Graham Warren, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, Vienna

More information

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

July
Presentation - Protein leverage in humans   View Summary
1 July 2014

Speaker

Dr Alison Gosby from the Charles Perkins Centre and School of Biological Sciences, University of Sydney

Abstract

The modern diet is driving increased energy intakes, playing a substantial role in the development of obesity and metabolic disease. Evidence from experimental work and a recent meta-analysis shows a powerful appetite for protein that drives increased energy intake when the proportion of protein in the diet is reduced. And, dilution of protein by fat versus carbohydrate may drive further increases in energy intake. The work has important implications in the modern nutritional environment where many factors are causing a decline in the proportion of protein in the diet.


Bio

Dr Alison Gosby is a postdocotral researcher at Charles Perkins Centre and School of Biological Sciences, The University of Sydney. She is a nutritionist (Masters Nutritional Science, The University of Sydney) with a background in metabolic biochemistry gained through her PhD studies at The University of Sydney and her early postdoctoral work at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research. Her interest is in the modern nutritonal environment and its role in increased rates of obesity and metabolic disease. She uses the geometric framework developed by Simpson and Raubenheimer to examine nutritional physiology in humans and its role in regulation of energy intake and metabolic health.

Hosted bythe Woolcock Institute

Seminar - Massively parallel sequencing identifies new genes and new mechanisms   View Summary
1 July 2014

Full title

Massively parallel sequencing identifies new genes and new mechanisms in mitochondrial energy generation diseases

Speaker
Professor David Thorburn, Genetics Theme Director, Murdoch Children's Research Institute



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Forum on improving the standard of education for future health workers in Indonesia   View Summary
3 July 2014

The Office for Global Health (OGH) and the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre (SSEAC) invite you to a forum on the Health Professional Education Quality Project (HPEQ).

No RSVP required.

The Centenary of The Medical Journal of Australia   View Summary
4 July 2014

The Medical Journal of Australia will mark its 100th birthday with a Symposium, Reception and Celebratory dinner at the University of Sydney on 4 July.

Former editor of the British Medical Journal, Professor Richard Smith will chair the symposium - 'Future directions in medical publishing' - which will feature guest speakers including Dr Virginia Barbour (Public Library of Science) and Professor Karen Woolley (ProScribe).

Event info
Animal Ethics IRMA Training Workshop   View Summary
8 July 2014

Would you like to upload your Animal Ethics forms in IRMA fully complete and in a timely manner? Do you currently feel that the online application process has created more work and frustration?

The workshop is scheduled for 90 minutes, which will include ample time to address individual issues or questions for further clarification.

Please register your interest by e‐mail to marie.partridge@sydney.edu.au by Friday 4 June.

If the demand for places at this workshop is high, an additional date will be scheduled.

Seminar - Seeing how mammalian life starts: quantitative imaging in living mouse embryos   View Summary
8 July 2014

Speaker
Associate Profesoor Nicolas Plachta, EMBL Australia Group Leader, AMRI, Monash University



Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - New technology as an enabler of new science   View Summary
10 July 2014

Full title

New technology as an enabler of new science: How Pacific Biosciences Long SMRT sequencing reads are causing a paradigm shift in genomics

Speaker
Dr Stephen Turner, Founder and Chief Technology Officer,
Pacific Biosciences, CA, USA

Abstract

Second Generation Sequencing has opened the field of genomics by making vast quantities of short-read data available to biological researchers. However, the emphasis on throughput and lower cost has come at a high price: De Novo Assemblies have suffered with contig N50s as low as 10,000 bases, coverage bias has dropped crucial genomic regions from studies in both human and non-human studies. The second generation sequencing technologies are suffering from systematic errors and require orthogonal technologies to validate data. With the trend of increasing read length of Pacific Biosciences SMRT sequencing to ever longer and longer reads, with zero bias, we can probe any genomic region irrespective of sequence content with reads length over 8,500 bases. The long reads have enabled an explosion of growth in De Novo genome assembly, providing 50x better contig N50 values and accuracy 10-100x better than second generation sequencing methods. Metagenomics and 16s biodiversity analysis are areas where our long reads are being applied to resolve complexity. Novel PacBio sequencing has caused a paradigm shift in genomics including HLA haplotype, alternative splicing, methylation and metagenomes. We have arrived at a point where virtually every branch of genomic science is marked by PacBio applications with long reads but with no other sequencing technique available.

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

16th International Amine Oxidase Conference   View Summary
15 July 2014 to 17 July 2014

This conference will focus on the physiological and pathophysiological roles of flavin-dependent and copper-dependent amine oxidases, with a particular focus on the clinical relevance of inhibitors of these enzymes. Amine oxidases play critical roles in CNS physiological processes, inflammation, fibrosis, cancer and metabolic disorders, and the meeting will be structured to facilitate the advancement of knowledge in these areas.

Workshops - Person centredness in employment settings   View Summary
15 July 2014

Two one-day workshops (15 and 29 July 2014)

Presentation - Sleep regulation: the role of high homeostatic pressure and the circadian process   View Summary
15 July 2014

Speaker

Dr Gemma Paech from the Centre for Sleep Research at the University of South Australia

Bio

Dr Paech is currently a research associate at the Centre for Sleep Research, University of South Australia in Adelaide, Australia. She completed her PhD from the University of South Australia in March of this year with a thesis titled "the circadian and homeostatic influences on sleep quantity and quality". Dr Paech has won several awards during her PhD including the Adelaide Sleep Retreat Young Investigator Award in 2011 and a Sleep Research Society Honourable Mention Award also in 2011. Dr Paech has six publications, three first authored. Of particular note is a publication in the journal SLEEP (2012, v.35, 7 p941-948) which is the first to demonstrate the impact of severe sleep restriction on the regulation of sleep by the homeostatic and circadian processes. She has presented at multiple national and international conferences such as the recent SLEEP conference held in Minneapolis, USA. Her current research concentrates on the circadian and homeostatic regulation of sleep, and the impact of sleep loss on sleep and performance.

Hosted bythe Woolcock Institute

Seminar - Understanding thoracic aortic aneurysm   View Summary
15 July 2014

Speaker
Professor Malcolm West, Mayne Professor of Medicine, University of Queensland / Prince Charles Hospital

Bio
Malcolm West is Mayne Professor of Medicine at the Prince Charles Hospital/University of Queensland. He obtained his degrees in Medicine and Science at the University of Sydney, and has worked at Oxford (UK) and National Heart and Lung Institute (USA). He is a trained cardiologist with principle research interested in genetic factors associated with susceptibility to cardiovascular diseases and aortic aneurysm disease. Currently, he is involved in clinical trials investigating genetic factors underlying hypertension and hyperlipidaemia and the role of periodontal disease in coronary heart disease and atherosclerosis. His talk will focus on the cell biology of aortic aneurysm disease associated with Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve and abdominal aortic aneurysm.


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Open Refine Training Courses - Camperdown   View Summary
16 July 2014

This three hour workshop introduces Open Refine which is a powerful tool for cleaning, normalisation and exploration of datasets.

More information and to register
Open Refine Training Courses - Westmead   View Summary
17 July 2014

This three hour workshop introduces Open Refine which is a powerful tool for cleaning, normalisation and exploration of datasets.

More information and to register
Open Refine Training Courses - Northern   View Summary
18 July 2014

This three hour workshop introduces Open Refine which is a powerful tool for cleaning, normalisation and exploration of datasets.

More information and to register
Seminar - Exercise as medicine: where sports medicine meets cardiology   View Summary
21 July 2014

This seminar will present an overview of sport & exercise medicine and the "Exercise is Medicine" movement and their associated public health benefits. It will question which - if any - populations need pre-participation (especially cardiac) assessments to avoid the risks associated with exercise, outlining the benefits and downsides of screening.

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Seminar - Functional genomic approaches to study major human diseases   View Summary
22 July 2014

Speaker
Dr Greg Neely, Laboratory Head / PRF, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

Bio
Dr Greg Neely completed his PhD in immunology at the University of Calgary, Canada and went on to train in high throughput in vivo screening using fruit flies at IMBA in Vienna, Austria. Greg is now head of the Functional Genomics Laboratory at the Garvan Institute where he performs tissue-specific functional annotation of the conserved genome with a focus on rapid validation of human GWAS and exome sequencing data for major diseases and lifespan. With his lab's novel functional genomics strategies, he has identified hundreds of new genes involved in basic organ function such as the first ever gene involved in synaesthesia and long QT syndrome.

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Sydney Medical Program - Medical Education Research Symposium   View Summary
23 July 2014

The forums are for anyone interested in and working on medical education research to come together, listen and respond to work being done by Sydney researchers and connect with other researchers. The aim is to help researchers get one step closer to publishing their work and ultimately to build our institutional profile in this area.

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Seminar - The gut microbiota of termites: evolutionary origin and functional adaptations   View Summary
25 July 2014

Presenter

Professor Andreas Brune, Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg, Germany

More information

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Workshops - Person centredness in employment settings   View Summary
29 July 2014

Two one-day workshops (15 and 29 July 2014)

Seminar - Is there an evolutionary framework for biomedical research?   View Summary
29 July 2014

Presenter

Professor Paul Griffiths, Professor of Philosophy and Associate Academic Director, Humanities and Social Sciences, Charles Perkins Centre

More information
Symposium - Rapid generation of mouse models for neurodevelopmental disorders using genome editing   View Summary
29 July 2014

Presenter

Professor Paul Thomas, Department of Biochemistry, University of Adelaide

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Conference - Frontiers 2014   View Summary
30 July 2014 to 1 August 2014

Theme

The Art, Science and Future of Otorhinolaryngology

Seminar - Classification and physical treatment of neural tissue pain disorders   View Summary
31 July 2014

Speaker

Adjunct Associate Professor Toby Hall, Curtin University and Senior Teaching Fellow at the University of Western Australia

Hosted by the Pain Management Research Institute

August
Conference - Frontiers 2014   View Summary
30 July 2014 to 1 August 2014

Theme

The Art, Science and Future of Otorhinolaryngology

Seminar - Protecting the pancreatic islet in islet transplantation for type-1 diabetes   View Summary
12 August 2014

Speaker
Professor Toby Coates, Head of Medical Transplantation, Royal Adelaide Hospital and University of Adelaide

Bio
Professor Toby Coates is Head of the Center for Clinical and Experimental Transplantation Laboratory at the Royal Adelaide Hospital/University of Adelaide. His research focuses on the isolation and transplantation of healthy pancreatic islets as a treatment and potential cure for type 1 diabetes. His lab's interest lies in identifying and combating the causes of islet cell death, understanding basic islet biology, and how function can be protected and/or quickly resorted following transplantation. Toby's talk will be a combination of basic biology and clinical data.

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Presentation - Sleep disordered breathing in interstitial lung disease   View Summary
12 August 2014

Speaker

DrLauren Troy, Staff Specialist, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital

Hosted bythe Woolcock Institute

Bosch Institute ASM - The Legacy of Victor Chang   View Summary
14 August 2014

Theme
The Human Heart: First Organ to Function, Last to Fail

Abstract submission closing date 11 July 2014.

ANZAC Research Institute 13th Annual Symposium   View Summary
14 August 2014

Theme
Contemporary issues in atherosclerosis, thrombosis and coronary disease

More information

Hosted by the ANZAC Research Institute

Seminar - Molecular biomechanics and mechanbiology   View Summary
14 August 2014

Presenter

Professor Cheng Zhu, Regents Professor and J. Erskine Love Chair in Engineering, Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering and Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology.

More information

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar: Birth weight and cardiovascular risk - a role for omega 3 PUFA in prevention?   View Summary
14 August 2014

Presenter

Dr Michael Skilton from the Boden Institute

More information

Hosted by the Boden Institute

Sydney Medical School Pain Management Symposia   View Summary
16 August 2014

This is an opportunity to learn how to help prevent acute and sub-acute pain from progressing to chronic and disabling pain, and to understand how to work with other health professionals to achieve this goal.

2nd international conference on Epidemiology and Evolutionary Genetics   View Summary
18 August 2014 to 19 August 2014

Theme
Research and Development in Global Health Care

Workshop - Writing original research papers for biomedical journals   View Summary
19 August 2014

This hands-on practical workshop is best suited to those who already have a set of analysed original research results that are ready to be written up as a paper, or an early draft of an original manuscript (not a review).

Seminar - Integrative approach to metabolic health   View Summary
19 August 2014

Speaker
Professor Ville-Petteri Mäkinen, EMBL Group Leader in Biomedical Informatics, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute

Bio
Professor Ville-Petteri Makinen's research investigates the link between complications seen in patients with Type 1 diabetes and kidney disease, and their metabolic characteristics. With collaborators from Finland, he has helped develop high throughput metabolomics methods for analysis large numbers of blood samples using NMR spectroscopy to characterise lipoprotein particles. Using this metabolic profiling and comparing it to clinical data may provide clues linking metabolic characteristics with observed clinical phenotype. His talk will cover both experimental and computational systems biology.


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Clinical, causations and infectious diseases   View Summary
20 August 2014

Presenter

Professor Edward Breitschwerdt from North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine.

More information

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre, Marie Bashir Institute, Faculty of Veterinary Science and Sydney Medical School

Seminar: Whither preventive health - the of ANPHA (The Australian National Preventive Health Agency)   View Summary
20 August 2014

This seminar discusses the legacy of ANPHA in preventive health - its achievements during 2011-2014 and the challenges for preventive health since the Agency was closed.

More information

Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Workshops - Do-it-yourself mobile phone apps for programs and data collection   View Summary
25 August 2014 to 27 August 2014

Are you thinking of developing a mobile phone intervention? Do you want to collect data in field studies with mobile devices?

Seminar - Studies of ageing and the nervous system in C. elegans   View Summary
26 August 2014

Speaker
Dr Hannah Nicholas, Senior Lecturer in Molecular Biology, School of Molecular Bioscience, University of Sydney


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Presentation - Measuring the impact of age and body mass index on circadian activity patterns   View Summary
26 August 2014

Full title

Measuring the impact of age and body mass index on circadian activity patterns using functional linear modelling of actigraphy data

Speaker

Dr Nahid Banihashemi, Charles Perkins Centre

Abstract

The functional data analysis (FDA) as an statistical method is applied for testing differences in activity patterns measured by actigraphy across subgroups. This method is used to statistically assess the impact of body mass index (BMI) and age on circadian activity patterns measured using actigraphy in 148 affective disorder participants from 14 to 81 years old.

Bio

Nahid has a background in applied mathematics with specialism in control and optimization theory as applied to complex systems. Nahid's research in the CPC is focussed on the relationships between environment, diet and the brain to determine potential resilience thresholds of a healthy system. Designing mathematical models to describe relative pathways in some neurological disorders is her target. One of Nahid's current projects is to understand the mechanism underlying Alzheimer's disease as one cause of cognitive decline. The underlying mechanisms leading to cognitive decline are numerous but remain unclear. In this regard, she is employing a computational systems biology approach to integrate multiple potential factors.

Hosted bythe Woolcock Institute

Sydney Medical School Pain Management Symposia   View Summary
30 August 2014

This is an opportunity to learn how to help prevent acute and sub-acute pain from progressing to chronic and disabling pain, and to understand how to work with other health professionals to achieve this goal.

September
Presentation - No fear, endocannabinoids are here: a new player in psychiatric disorders   View Summary
1 September 2014

Speaker

Professor F Markus Leweke, Head of the Centre of Excellence for Research on Psychiatry and Psychotherapy and the Associate Director of the Deptartment of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the Central Institute of Mental Health Mannheim of the Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, Germany

More information

Hosted bythe Brain and Mind Research Institute

Presentation - Skin temperature, sleep and vigilance connections   View Summary
2 September 2014

Speaker

Dr Chris Gordon, Sydney Nursing School and Woolcock Institute of Medical Research

Bio

Christopher Gordon has been a registered nurse since 1990, working mainly in acute and intensive care in metropolitan and rural hospitals. He has a broad range of university and clinical teaching involving nursing, allied health and exercise science students. His teaching interests entail physiology, pathophysiology and advanced clinical assessment. He has a particular interest in simulation research and the interplay of stress and performance. His research focusses sleep and body temperature in normal and sleep disorders, and the use of body temperature as a biomarker of alertness and phenotyping.

Hosted bythe Woolcock Institute

Presentation - The role of genetic factors on anxiety and depression across the lifespan   View Summary
2 September 2014

Speaker

Associate Professor Christine Middeldorp, Department of Biological Psychology at the VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Hosted bythe Brain and Mind Research Institute

2014 Coles colloqium with grand rounds   View Summary
3 September 2014

Keynote speaker

Professor Bruce Robinson, Dean, Sydney Medical School.

RSVP by Friday 22nd August online at https://coles2014.eventbrite.com.au or email kristy.hobbs@sydney.edu.au

Presented by the Save Sight Institute

CHERI 2014 Conference   View Summary
4 September 2014 to 5 September 2014

Effective Strategies for Improving Students Motivation and Behaviour

Seminar - Guillain-BarreÌ and Miller Fisher syndromes: new diagnostic classification   View Summary
5 September 2014

Speaker

Professor Nobuhiro Yuki, National University of Singapore

Hosted bythe Brain and Mind Research Institute

Lambie-Dew Oration 2014 - Community values and the challenges of change   View Summary
10 September 2014

Speaker

Dr John Yu, former Chief Executive Officer of Westmead Children's Hospital.

Hosted by the Sydney University Medical Society

Australia India Collaborative Cancer Research Symposium   View Summary
16 September 2014

Ajoint forum to discuss opportunities to collaborate on the clinical, laboratory and public health aspects of cancer prevention and treatment with the Majarashtra University of Health Sciences (MUHS).

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Presentation - Strategic investment in health care: a major cost or a course of savings?   View Summary
16 September 2014

Speaker

Professor Deborah Schofield

More information

Hosted bythe Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar - Systems analysis of intracellular signalling   View Summary
16 September 2014

Speaker
Professor David James, Leonard P. Ullman Chair of Metabolic Systems Biology, School of Molecular Bioscience and Sydney Medical School, Charles Perkins Centre

Abstract

Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post translation modifications used to modulate the activity of proteins involved in almost all biological actions. One of the major challenges of biology is to map all protein phosphorylation sites in the proteome and to map the kinases responsible for each event. This will lead to a comprehensive understanding of how various perturbations modify biology and in some cases lead to disease. During this talk I will show our attempts at mapping the insulin responsive phosphoprotein in the adipocyte and the exercise regulated phosphoproteome in muscle. These data sets reveal the immense complexity of this system. I will show our preliminary evidence to tease apart the complexity of these systems and how to visualise them in a user friendly manner.

Bio

Professor David James is the Leonard P. Ullmann Chair of Metabolic Systems Biology at the Charles Perkins Centre and Professor in the School of Molecular Bioscience and the Sydney Medical School at the University of Sydney. David undertook his PhD at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research and his undergraduate degree and Honours at University of New South Wales. David has made major contributions to our understanding of insulin action and was the first to identify and characterise the insulin responsive glucose transporter GLUT4. His work is focused on unveiling the cellular and molecular control of insulin-stimulated glucose transport. He has also made contributions in the area of SNARE proteins, signal transduction and more recently in systems biology.


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Tissue engineering of a blood producing organ   View Summary
19 September 2014

Full title

Tissue engineering of a blood producing organ: Human blood on demand for clinical & experimental applications

Speaker

Professor Dietmar Hutmacher, QUT Chair in Regenerative Medicine

More information

Hosted bythe Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar - Defining the role of innate immunity and nerve signalling   View Summary
23 September 2014

Full topic title

Defining the role of innate immunity and nerve signalling in the regulation of adult salamander limb and heart regeneration

Speaker
Dr James Godwin, Research Fellow Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences, Monash University

Abstract

Adult mammals possess a limited capacity to regenerate and restore complete function to damaged tissue and organs. In contrast, adult salamanders display a remarkable capability to resolve injury, and can regenerate complex structures such as amputated limbs or damaged hearts. Using the axolotl (Ambystomamexicanum) as a model to study vertebrate regeneration, we have previously demonstrated a temporally defined requirement for macrophages during the limb regeneration process and identified nerve dependent signals capable of rescuing regeneration in the absence of nerve. We have isolated specific cell populations during the early phase of axolotl limb regeneration and have performed gene expression analysis to identify candidate molecules involved in the regeneration specific response. These studies provide the foundation to identify and investigate novel genetic programs that promote scar-free wound healing or regeneration and define important aspects of the neuroimmunological axis of regeneration. By understanding scar-free healing and regeneration in amphibians it is hoped that we can improve repair outcomes in adult human tissues.

Bio

Dr. James Godwin is at the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute (ARMI) where his lab's main focus is to understand the underlying mechanisms that promote adult tissue regeneration, using the Axolotls (salamander) as a model system. He is the recipient of the Newcomb Cleveland Prize for his paper investigating the molecular basis of nerve dependence in salamander regeneration. Prior to his return to Australia, he completed his postdoctoral studies at University College in London (UCL) in the lab of Prof. Jeremy Brockes, investigating the mechanisms of salamander regeneration in both the limb, heart and the eye. His current research program examines the immunological pathways in salamanders that promote regeneration and limit the scarring response.


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

2014 APRU Global Health Program Workshop    View Summary
24 September 2014 to 27 September 2014

The themes this year are: global health education and technology; non-communicable diseases; health systems, trade and governance; and environmental health/other.

PC4 concept development workshop   View Summary
24 September 2014

An opportunity to have nationally-recognised experts (and potential grant application reviewers) provide feedback on your research

ClinTeach 2014: The experience of assessment   View Summary
28 September 2014

The focus will be on assessment and evaluation in the clinic, exploring and expanding our understanding of the research evidence and scholarly practice to improve the assessment experience for clinical educators and students.

Symposium - Wireless wellbeing and personalised health   View Summary
29 September 2014

The aim of this symposium is to showcase examples of electronic and mobile-technologies in diet and physical activity promotion, to explore how we might be able to use personal data to predict and change behaviour, and to examine the role of social media in promotion and discouragement of healthy lifestyles. Advances in personal monitoring of lifestyle will be included and potential for new research partnerships formulated.

More information
A practical intermediate/advanced masterclass in time to event analysis   View Summary
29 September 2014

The aim of this symposium is to showcase examples of electronic and mobile-technologies in diet and physical activity promotion, to explore how we might be able to use personal data to predict and change behaviour, and to examine the role of social media in promotion and discouragement of healthy lifestyles. Advances in personal monitoring of lifestyle will be included and potential for new research partnerships formulated.

More information
Inter-university Neuroscience and Mental Health Conference   View Summary
29 September 2014 to 30 September 2014

Ajoint conference between The University of Sydney, Macquarie University, The University of New South Wales and the University of Western Sydney.

Call for abstracts: deadline COB Wednesday 20 August 2014.

Seminar - Bioresponsive materials for diagnostics. Personalised medicine and drug delivery   View Summary
30 September 2014

Speaker
Professor Justin Gooding, Scientia Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University

Abstract

This presentation will overview some of our work on surface modification for diagnostics and drug delivery applications. It will outline our approach of using self-assembled monolayers to give surfaces that interact with biological systems in highly defined ways. Three technologies will be presented. The first is a portable biosensor for detecting the levels of glycosylated haeomoglobin (HbA1c) will be presented. HbA1c is an important biomarker for the effectiveness of a diabetic patients treatment state and is recommended to be measured quarterly but noncompliance is a challenge. Our technology is compatible with at home use with the same glucose meter a diabetic patient normally uses. Secondly, we will present new surfaces for the selective capture and release of circulating tumour cells. This technology will have the capability to release a single captured cell of interest from the surface. Finally diagnostic devices for the detection of ultralow levels of protease enzymes will be presented. These porous silicon photonic crystals are compatible with monitoring the release of enzymes from live cells, and possibly single cells, and also been shown to be able to detect the protease enzymes level in vivo in animal models.

Bio

Scientia Professor Justin Gooding graduated with a B.Sc. (Hons) from Melbourne University before spending two years working for ICI Research on explosives. He then returned to University obtaining a D.Phil. from the University of Oxford and received post-doctoral training at the Institute of Biotechnology in Cambridge University. He is a founding co-director of the Australian Centre for NanoMedicine and the NSW Node leader of the ARC Centre of Excellence in BioNanotechnology. He leads a research team of 35 people interested in surface modification and nanotechnology for biosensors, biomaterials, electron transfer and medical applications.


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

October
Emerging Health Policy Research Conference   View Summary
2 October 2014

The conference will showcase the work in progress of current masters, doctoral and early career research workers, as well as those new to the field of health policy research.

Seminar - Evolution of the human microbiome: Diet, disease and death   View Summary
7 October 2014

Speaker
Professor Alan Cooper, Future Fellow, School of Earth & Environmental Sciences and Director, Australian Centre for Ancient DNA, University of Adelaide

Abstract

Human diet and health have undergone fundamental changes since the advent of farming in the Neolithic. The transition to agriculture is thought to have altered the composition of human-associated microbiota, which represents ~90% of cells in our body. The importance of commensal bacteria in disease causation is increasingly recognised, and these alterations are likely to have had a diverse range of impacts. We have found that preserved oral bacterial DNA within calcified plaque (dental calculus) present on teeth of archaeological humans, provides a new genetic record of past health changes. Calculus records from Neanderthals, to hunter-gatherer populations, to early farming communities and through to the modern day has revealed how a core hominid microbiome has been altered in Western societies, and evidence of long term pathogen co-evolution. These results provide a range of evidence for the disruption of co-evolved mutualism between humans and their microbiota caused by human ecological changes. These findings have multiple health implications, as the development of treatments for diseases caused by microbiota requires an accurate understanding of their shared evolutionary history with humans.

Bio

Professor Cooper specialises in using ancient DNA to record and study evolutionary processes in real time. His work ranges over timescales of hundreds of years old, to material well beyond the ca. 60,000 year range of carbon-dating, such as permafrost-preserved bones of mammals and sediments dating >300,000 years.He uses a multidisciplinary approach in his research, involving geology, archaeology, anthropology and even forensics to provide novel views of evolution, population genetics and palaeoecology.


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Mini symposium - New developments in metabolic phenotyping   View Summary
14 October 2014 to 15 October 2014

Speaker

Dr John Lighton of Sable Systems International.

Seminar - Pathways to autoimmunity in mice and humans   View Summary
14 October 2014

Speaker
Professor Carola Vinuesa, Head, Department of Pathogens and Immunity,
Elizabeth Blackburn NHMRC Research Fellow, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Applying advanced imaging technique to chronic diseases   View Summary
14 October 2014

Speaker
Professor Stuart Grieve, Parker Hughes Professor of Diagnostic Radiology, Sydney Medical School


Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Shared Decision Making Symposium: Developing tools and skills for clinical practice   View Summary
16 October 2014

International speakers

Professor Dawn Stacey (University of Ottawa) and Professor Richard Thomson (Newcastle University, UK)

More information
Seminar - New life from dead cells-and other DNA vaccine strategies   View Summary
21 October 2014

Speaker
Professor Eric Gowans, NHMRC Senior Research Fellow, Basil Hetzel Institute, The University of Adelaide


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

7th COGNO Annual Scientific Meeting   View Summary
24 October 2014 to 25 October 2014

Theme

Translating science to patient centred trials

Sydney Medical School Pain Management Symposia   View Summary
24 October 2014

This is an opportunity to learn how to help prevent acute and sub-acute pain from progressing to chronic and disabling pain, and to understand how to work with other health professionals to achieve this goal.

Conference - Medicine for the rural curious   View Summary
24 October 2014 to 26 October 2014

An event devoted to the practice of internal medicine in rural Australia.

More information
Global Community Engaged Medical Education Muster   View Summary
27 October 2014 to 30 October 2014
'The Muster' will bring together internationally recognised leaders in community engaged medical education and will continue to stimulate important discussions about key concepts and practices at the forefront of medical education: Longitudinal Learning, Community Engagement, Social Accountability and Aboriginal Health.
Seminar - Functional decoration: protein post-translational modifications and their crosstalk   View Summary
28 October 2014

Full topic title

Functional decoration: protein post-translational modifications and their crosstalk in myocardial ischemia / reperfusion injury

Speaker
Associate Professor Stuart Cordwell, School of Molecular Bioscience and the Charles Perkins Centre


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - The role of the parents in infant sleep development and sleep problems   View Summary
28 October 2014

Presenter

Professor Avi Sadeh, Tel Aviv University

Biography
Avi Sadeh is a clinical psychologist, with expertise in children and families. He is an Professor at the School of Psychological Sciences, and the Director of the Laboratory for Children's Sleep-Wake Disorders. Prof. Sadeh is also the Director of the Adler Center for Research in Child Development and Psychopathology at Tel Aviv University.

Prof. Sadeh completed his B.A and M.A. studies at the Department of Psychology, Haifa University, and then completed his D.Sc degree at the School of Medicine, The Technion, Haifa. Sadeh completed his post-doctoral training at Brown University, Providence, RI. Prof. Sadeh is the author of "Sleeping Like a Baby", published in English by Yale University Press, and in Hebrew by "Yediot Acharonot. Prof. Sadeh published extensively on sleep disorders in infants and children, and on the relationship between sleep and development and psychopathology in children.

Fields of Interest
•Sleep development and sleep disorders
•Developmental Psychopathology
•Treatment and interventions for infants, children and families

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute

Charles Perkins Centre Education Innovations   View Summary
28 October 2014

Presenters

Professors Peter Goodyear (Faculty of Education) and Philip Poronnik (School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Science)

More information
Diana Temple Memorial Lecture - What next for institutions that support Australian science?   View Summary
30 October 2014

Presenter

Professor Margaret Sheil, Provost, University of Melbourne

This annual lecture honours the memory of Dr Diana Temple AM.

November
Symposium - Women at Sydney: share, connect, change   View Summary
1 November 2014

An inspiring symposium of talks, panel discussions and thought-provoking content presented by a group of remarkable leaders from across the University to showcase, support and empower career success for women.

2014 Lifespan Research Day    View Summary
3 November 2014

Showcasing research activities within the Sydney Medical School encompassing the fields of reproduction, maternal and child health and healthy ageing.

ST Lee Lecture - Health policy in East Asia: Responding to demographic and epidemiologic transition   View Summary
3 November 2014

Presented by Karen Eggleston, Stanford University, Faculty Director, Asia Health Policy Program, Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center' Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

Seminar - Current challenges in developing an off-the-shelf cell therapy   View Summary
4 November 2014

Speaker
Dr Jef Pinxteren, Manager and Head R&D, ReGenesys

About the talk

ReGenesys is a biotechnology company focused on research, development and commericalisation of stem cell-based therapies and technologies. MultiStem® cells from ReGenesys is an FDA approved adherent stem cell product developed from bone marrow. It is currently being used in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of ulcerative colitis, ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarct. A Phase II study for graft versus host disease prophylaxis in allogeneic bone marrow transplant is underway. ReGenesys has also received permission in Germany to open a Phase I/II trial for support in liver transplantation after alcoholic cirrhosis.


Standard cell culture techniques to reach the number of cells required for clinical applications are expensive and labour intensive. We have explored the Quantum Cell Expansion System for larger scale cell culture. This instrument was developed for ex vivo expansion of stem cells using a bioreactor. We have tested this system to optimize the complete workflow of MultiStem culture, including stem cell isolation from bone marrow and expansion up to the scale of clinical dose. We showed that this system can provide clinical doses of cells with a strong reduction of human labour and, hopefully, without the need of GMP-grade clean rooms in the future.


About the speaker

Dr Jef Pinxteren obtained his PhD in Biochemistry from the University of Antwerp. With a long-term EMBO fellowship he moved to the UK to study the role of G-proteins in secretion from granulocytes at the University College London. After his fellowship he obtained further funding to work in the US using a mouse embryonic stem cell model to establish a role for phosphoinositol transfer protein (PITP) in secretion from granulocytes. He is now Head R&D of ReGenesys, where the focus of the team is to develop xeno-free version of stem cell products and alternatives for their use in clinical applications.


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Driving and health, how much do we know and how can we know better?   View Summary
4 November 2014

Presenter

Dr Melody Ding, Sydney School of Public Health

Biography
Dr Melody Ding completed her MPH at San Diego State University in 2008 and her PhD in Public Health at the University of California San Diego in 2012. She is currently working as a Research Fellow at the Sydney School of Public Health, the University of Sydney. Dr. Ding has published more than 50 peer-reviewed papers on a range of topics within the areas of behavioural epidemiology and preventive medicine. She is passionate about understanding the role of the environment in the epidemic of physical inactivity and obesity around the world, and to use research evidence to inform policy and planning decisions to design activity-friendly and low-carbon urban living environments. Within this context, her most recent interest is on driving and health. In her presentation, she will summarise current research evidence on driving and health-related outcomes, present her studies on driving, and lead discussion on how to quantify the potential effects driving has on a range of health behaviours and outcomes, including sleep.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute

Seminar - Obesity, sexuality and intimate relationships   View Summary
5 November 2014

Presenter

Professor Berit Heitmann, Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Denmark

Conference - Physics of the mind   View Summary
6 November 2014
Understanding the mind could boost knowledge-based industries via productivity gains or neural enhancements. Understanding the nature of thought and consciousness may one day lead the way to creating machines able to excel in science and art the way they currently populate production lines
Seminar - How safe and effective are severe and intermittent fasting diets?   View Summary
6 November 2014

Full title

How safe and effective are severe and intermittent fasting diets? Are they a passing and dangerous fad or a valid solution for a growing proportion of us?

Presenter

Associate Professor Amanda Salis, Boden Institute

Hosted by the Boden Institute

Seminar - Targeting the epigenome to treat cancer   View Summary
11 November 2014

Speaker
Professor Ricky Johnstone, Assistant Director of Research, Co-Head, Cancer Therapeutics Program, Gene Regulation Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Presentation - Can we stop non-communicable diseases from undermining human and economic development   View Summary
13 November 2014

Katie Dain, Executive Director of the global NCD Alliance and Marc Purcell, CEO of the Australian Council for International Development along with a panel of experts will examine the global socio-political implications of NCDs for sustainable human and economic development and how to best manage existing and foreseeable obstacles and opportunities for global policy and action to mitigate them.

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Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar - Parsing prostacyclin and platelets   View Summary
13 November 2014

Speaker
Associate Professor John Hwa, Director of Cardiovascular Pharmacogenetics Program, Yale Cardiovascular Research Center, USA


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Forum - Easing the burden of obesity in the Nepean region   View Summary
14 November 2014

A strategic day of information sharing and networking at Charles Perkins Centre Nepean to hear the latest ideas in research, service provision and clinical practice for obesity in our region.

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Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre Nepean

Colloquium - Centre for Research Excellence in Critical Infection   View Summary
17 November 2014 to 21 November 2014
The CRE Colloquium will begin with the annual Short Course in Critical Infection.
Lecture - Responding to Ebola   View Summary
19 November 2014

In this public lecture, the World Health Organisation's Director of Ebola Response, Dr Rick Brennan, discusses the regional and global implications of the Ebola outbreak.

Seminar - Enhancing the efficacy of cognitive behavioural treatments for chronic pain: Where to now?   View Summary
20 November 2014

Presented by Professor Louise Sharpe from the School of Psychology, University of Sydney.

Hosted by the Pain Management Research Institute

The Third Annual Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre Symposium   View Summary
21 November 2014

The 2014 Symposium will include sessions on cancer nursing and allied health research, molecular tumour testing and biomarkers, advanced technology in radiation oncology practice, surgical oncology and multi-disciplinary decision making in end of life care.

Presentation - NanoCosmos: Extracellular vesicles as nano-sized extracellular organelles   View Summary
24 November 2014

Speaker

Professor Yong Song Gho is a biochemist at Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH) in Pohang, South Korea.

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Hosted by the Charles Perkins Centre

Seminar - Dual orexin receptor antagonism: preclinical versus clinical aspects   View Summary
25 November 2014

Presenter

Professor Daniel Hoyer, University of Melbourne

Biography
Professor Hoyer's research career can be traced from his PhD in Pharmacology (1981), DSc (1986 Strasbourg), post-doctoral work (University of Pennsylvania, Medical School, Pharmacology), via Cardiovascular Research at Sandoz (Basel, 1983) to the CNS division (1989). At Novartis, Hoyer worked on both drug development and basic science projeects, e.g. genomics of depression and schizophrenia (MPRC, Baltimore; Scripps & GNF, La Jolla), peptide receptors and their chemistry (European Consortium). His recent interests were in Epilepsy, Sleep disorders, RNAi and epigenetics.

Professor Hoyer has published over 300 papers, and is/was member of British and German Pharmacological Societies, European College of Neuropsychopharmacology, Society for Neurosciences, served at the scientific council of Institut Pasteur and on the Council and a Director of the BPS. Professor Hoyer has served as editor of European Journal of Pharmacology, Neuropharmacology, Current Opinions in Pharmacology, Current Drugs, Drug Discovery Today, Journal of Receptors & Signal Transduction, Pharmacology & Therapy. He is currently a senior editor of Psychopharmacology, Naunyn Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology, Encyclopedia of Psychopharmacology, British Journal of Pharmacology. Prof. Hoyer chaired the somatostatin and 5-HT receptor subcommittees (NC IUPHAR) and was President of the European Neuropeptide Club and of the International Society for Serotonin Research.

Professor Hoyer was in the top 10 most cited researchers in Pharmacology, Novartis Leading Scientist (1998), Manfred Zimmerman Award (2003), Professor adjunct at the Molecular and Integrative Neurosciences Department, Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla (2004), Fellow of the British Pharmacological Society (2005); since November 2012, Professor, Chair and Head, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, The University of Melbourne.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute

Seminar - SOFX transcription factors from the developmental biology to drug discovery   View Summary
25 November 2014

Presenter

Dr Mathias Francois, Lab Head, Institute for Molecular Biology, The University of Queensland

Abstract

Classic genetic approaches have established that SOXF (-7, -17 and -18) transcription factors play a central role to promote arterio-venous specification and lymphangiogenesis during development. Genetic ablation of these transcription factors in adult also prevent aberrant angio- and lymphangiogenesis that occur during cancer metastasis, establishing a proof of concept that SOXF are potential molecular target. Here we report that SOX-F transcriptional activity can be disrupted pharmaceutically and halt blood vascular development in vivo. This finding is based on a pipeline of screening tools that range from homogenous in vitro assays to angiogenic zebrafish model system. Our discovery provides a basis for innovative pharmacological manipulation of SOX-F proteins function and challenge prevailing dogma that transcription factors are not suitable drug targets.

Biography
Dr. Mathias Francois' PhD focused on the role of nuclear receptors PPARs in the control of the inflammatory reaction during osteoarthritis. In 2005, Mat moved to the Koopman Laboratory at IMB Queensland to study the role of SOX transcription factor in the control of lymphatic vessel development. During his post doc, Mat discovered the role of SOX18 as a molecular switch at the origin of the lymphatic vasculature. Part of his work focuses on the initial step of endothelial cell specification and the molecular hierarchy that governs this differentiation program during embryogenesis.

Hosted by theCentenary Institute

Lecture: Cancer research - where to from here?   View Summary
26 November 2014

Speaker

Professor Ian Frazer AC, Chief Executive Officer and Director of Research at the Translational Research Institute, Brisbane

Hosted by The University of Sydney Cancer Research Network

Symposium - Australian Society for Performing Arts Healthcare   View Summary
26 November 2014

The event will feature keynote speaker Victor Popov, a sports physiotherapist with
extensive experience in the treatment of musician and dancers' injuries.

December
Seminar - An energy balance approach to reducing obesity   View Summary
2 December 2014

Speaker

Professor James Hill from the University of Colorado.

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Lecture - Challenges of establishing a cervical cancer screening program in rural India   View Summary
2 December 2014

Speaker

Professor Rita Isaac (Head of the Rural Unit for Health and Social Affairs (RUHSA) Department at Christian Medical College, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India)

Professor Isaac has hosted and supervised several medical students from the University of Sydney since 2011, who have undertaken their elective term at RUHSA. Professor Isaac has collaborated with Associate Professor Lyndal Trevena on an AusAID funded Public Sector Linkages Program (PSLP) entitled "Building capacity to reduce cervical cancer mortality in rural women of Tamil Nadu", which concluded in June 2014.

Seminar - Snoring and sadness: examining the link between OSA and depression   View Summary
2 December 2014

Presenter

Dr Melinda Jackson, University of Melbourne

Biography
Dr Melinda Jackson is a newly appointed VC Senior Research Fellow in the School of Health Sciences at RMIT University, Melbourne. Dr Jackson is a registered Psychologist, specialising in the treatment of sleep disorders, and she is also a Research Fellow at the Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health. She completed her PhD in Neuropsychology and Sleep at Swinburne University in 2009, before moving to the Sleep and Performance Research Centre, Washington State University, USA as a postdoctoral researcher from 2009-2011. In 2012 she was awarded an NHMRC Early Career Fellowship to research the effects of sleep on mood. Her main research interest is in memory function and mood in obstructive sleep apnoea and other sleep disorders, and the role of treatment for sleep for improving mental health outcomes.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute

Oration - Innate immune sensors and what they have become   View Summary
8 December 2014

Speaker

Professor Bruce Beutler, Director of the Center for Genetics of Host Defense at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

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Seminar - OSA and the perioperative patient: post-operative effects   View Summary
9 December 2014

Full title

OSA and the perioperative patient: Post-operative effects of two different general anaesthetic medication

Presenter

Dr Viraj Siriwardana, Westmead Hospital

Biography
I am a staff specialist in anaesthesia at Westmead hospital. I have a special interest in acute pain management and OSA related morbidity and mortality in the perioperative period. At present I am completing an MMed in Clinical epidemiology at the University of Sydney. The main objective of this presentation is to obtain some feedback on two study proposals I have to explore the effects of anaesthetic agents in OSA patients in the peri-operative setting. I am hoping incorporate this study in to a PhD I am planning.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute

Seminar - A role for Inhibitor of DNA binding genes in circadian timing   View Summary
10 December 2014

Presenter

Dr Giles Duffield, University of Notre Dame

Biography
My research program has focused on mammalian and insect circadian systems, at the levels of the circadian pacemaker (the 'cogs'), its light input pathway (the 'pin') and its output regulatory mechanism (the 'hands'). The research has specifically focused on the neuroendocrine signaling and development of the circadian system (graduate student work); characterization of canonical clock genes in peripheral tissues and cell lines; application of DNA microarray analysis and other transcriptional profiling methods to understand what is under circadian clock control and how this is specifically regulated on a tissue and cellular level; and a focused exploration on the role of Inhibitor of DNA binding genes (in particular mouse Id2 and Id4), transcription factors we identified in a screen for rhythmic genes. We have begun to establish their role in regulation of the core circadian clock components, clock output and metabolic function (lipid and glucose), and in the light input pathway that synchronizes the clock. The research employs multiple experimental approaches, including molecular biology, genomics, protein biochemistry, cell biology, histology, animal behavior and pupillometry, genetics, and the development and utilization of transgenic animals. In recent years we have initiated a study of the circadian and diel regulation of Anopheles gambiae, the mosquito vector of disease. Gene expression profiling of the mosquito have revealed as much as 20% of the transcriptome exhibits 24 hr rhythms that are under either or both diel and circadian clock control. The work has revealed novel aspects of mosquito biology, some not anticipated by Drosophila work. We have begun to use molecular, physiological and behavioral approaches to understand the importance of these rhythms in the daily adaptation of the mosquito in relation to metabolism/detoxification and its association with insecticide resistance, and host-seeking sensory systems of vision and olfaction.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute

Team-based learning (TBL) seminar and workshops   View Summary
11 December 2014 to 12 December 2014

Speaker

Larry Michaelsen, Professor of Management, University of Central Missouri

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Seminar - Developing in vitro model systems for investigations of motor neurone disease   View Summary
12 December 2014

Speaker

Jeremy Toma, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada

Summary

Motor neurone disease (MND) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder whereby the cells that control muscles - the motor neurones - degenerate and die, resulting in paralysis and death. As there is no effectivetreatment or cure for MND, there is a great need for developingtherapeutics. The focus of my work has been to generate motor neurones from different cellular sources, including induced pluripotent stem cells and skin cells, and to assess the ability of these sources to generate functional motor neurones capable of being used for MND therapeutics. The suitability of this approach for developing effective MND therapeutics will be discussed.

Seminar - Decoding global animal states using the nematode C. elegans   View Summary
16 December 2014

Presenter

Dr Mario de Bono, Group Leader, MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, University of Cambridge

Abstract

Animals adopt different states in response to threats or opportunities, e.g. a potential mate or a predator. In these states coordinated changes in physiology and neurochemistry optimize the animal's response to the situation at hand. Hallmarks of global animal states include arousal, reconfiguration of the relative importance given to different sensory cues, and altered physiology due to endocrine feedback. The exact nature of a global organismic state is poorly understood, but a state switch is thought to involve recruitment of many brain circuits whose activities are dynamically assembled to address the circumstances faced by the animal. In my talk I will describe how we are exploiting a simple animal, the nematode C. elegans, to dissect the molecular and circuit mechanisms that mediate a switch in global animal state.

Biography
Dr. Mario de Bono obtained his PhD from the Unveristy of Cambridge under Prof. Jonathan Hodgkin. Following postdoctoral training at the Howard Hughes Medicial Institute in San Franscisco, USA, Dr. de Bono returned to the UK and is Programme Leader at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology at the University of Cambridge, UK. His lab uses the nematode as a tool to understand how neural networks are assembled, function, and evolve. He is on the editorial boards of EMBO Reports, Neural Systems and Circuits, and Worm.

Hosted by theCentenary Institute

Seminar - Adult OSA surgery: Current role and future directions   View Summary
16 December 2014

Presenter

Dr Stuart Mackay, Illawarra ENT Head and Neck Clinic

Biography
Dr MacKay completed his training in Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery in 2006 and then undertook 12 months of training in Contemporary Airway Reconstruction techniques for OSA with Dr Sam Robinson and Professor Simon Carney in Adelaide. Since returning to Wollongong in 2008, he has established a Sleep Multidisciplinary Team which meets for regular patient reviews in the Illawarra.

He has delivered national and international lectures on Surgery for OSA, including invited keynote addresses as far afield as India, published papers on new techniques and philosophies and co-authored multiple peer reviewed papers on different aspects of sleep medicine. He is currently the only surgeon on the Australasian Sleep Association Clinical and Conference committees.

Hosted by the Woolcock Institute