All future 2017 events

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January
International Conference - Transforming Lives and Health Care through Technology   View Summary
9 January 2017

This is an international conference held inIndia at JawaharlalNehru Medical College, DMIMS (DU). Find out more.

Sydney Ideas - Networks for Big Biomedical Data   View Summary
31 January 2017

Assistant Professor Genevera Allen, Statistics and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rice University (USA) willhighlight how data science is transforming medical research. Find out more.

February
Seminar - Immune Regulation in Helminth Infection   View Summary
1 February 2017

Presenter

Professor Rick Maizels


Bio

Rick Maizels is at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Molecular Parasitology in the University of Glasgow's Institute of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation. He is interested in how and why parasites manipulate the sophisticated mammalian immune system, and how that system has evolved in the face of parasite immunomodulatory strategies. Rick moved to the University of Glasgow in 2016; between 1995 and 2015 he held the Chair of Zoology at the University of Edinburgh, and was previously Professor of Parasite Immunology at Imperial College London, where he moved in 1983. Prior to this, he held postdoctoral positions at the National Institute for Medical Research (NIMR) in London (1979-1983), as well as UCLA (1977-1979) and California Institute of Technology (1976-1977). He holds a BSc degree from University College London and gained his PhD in Immunology from the NIMR.

Hosted by the Centenary Institute

Lecture - Setting fundable priorities for universal healthcare coverage   View Summary
15 February 2017

Full title

Setting fundable priorities for universal healthcare coverage: global concept, local applications

Lecturers

Kalipso Chalkidou M.D., Ph.D.

Director, Global Health and Development Team, Imperial College London

Yat Teerawattananon M.D., Ph.D.

Founding Leader of Health Intervention and Technology Assessment Program (HITAP) & Senior Researcher Scholar of Thailand's Research Fund


Find out more

March
Ann Woolcock Lecture   View Summary
8 March 2017

Theme:Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) - a disease with many faces.

Speaker: Professor Dirkje Postma

Find out more.

Seminar - Human longevity gene factory   View Summary
13 March 2017

Presenter

Professor Brian Morris

More information

Jointly presented by the Disciplines of Physiology and Anatomy & Histology, School of Medical Sciences as part of the Bosch Institute Seminar Program.

Sydney Ideas Health Forum   View Summary
15 March 2017

Full title

Sydney Ideas Health Forums - Big Sugar: The new health threat?


In Australia, more than two-thirds of adults and a quarter of children under five are overweight. Is sugar to blame? And is a tax on sugar the answer?

Join the expert panels for an interactive forum addressing these questions and the role of government policy, the sugar industry and marketing in the "war on sugar".


Panellists:

  • Dr Kieron Rooney, Senior Lecturer, Exercise and Sport Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney
  • Professor Lisa Bero, Chair Medicines Use and Health Outcomes, Faculty of Pharmacy and Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney
  • Dr Becky Freeman, Lecturer in Public Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney

More information

Seminar - Nutrient sensing and immunity   View Summary
20 March 2017

Full title

Nutrient sensing and immunity in the gastrointestinal tract


Presenter

Professor Margherita Cantorna, Pennsylvania State University, USA

More information.

Jointly presented by the Disciplines of Physiology and Anatomy & Histology, School of Medical Sciences as part of the Bosch Institute Seminar Program.

Seminar - Interactions between brainstem between brainstem neurons, astrocytes and microglia   View Summary
27 March 2017

Full title

Interactions between brainstem neurons, astrocytes and microglia: internal combustion engine of the sympathetic nervous system

Presenter

Professor Paul Pilowski, Discipline of Physiology and Heart Research Institute

More information.

Jointly presented by the Disciplines of Physiology and Anatomy & Histology, School of Medical Sciences as part of the Bosch Institute Seminar Program.

Seminar - Understanding cellular lipid storage   View Summary
28 March 2017

Full title

Understanding cellular lipid storage: implications for human metabolic disorders


Presenter

Professor Hongyuan Robert Yang, School of BABS, UNSW


About the speaker

Professor Hongyuan Robert Yang obtained his Bachelor of Medicine degree from Peking University (Beijing, China) in 1993; and his Ph.D. from Columbia University (New York, USA) in 1998. Soon after, he started his own laboratory as a lecturer at the Department of Biochemistry, National University of Singapore where he was promoted to associate professor with tenure. He joined the University of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia) as a senior lecturer in 2007, and became a professor at the end of 2012. He was an Australian Research Council Future Fellow from 2010 to 2013, and he is currently a Senior Research Fellow of the National Health and Medical Research Council, Australia.

His work focuses on lipid storage and trafficking in eukaryotic cells and animals. He has published over 70 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. His group identified a number of gene products that regulate the growth of lipid droplets. One of those, SEIPIN, is also essential for adipogenesis. His group characterized SEIPIN using a number of model systems including yeast and mice, and discovered a role for SEIPIN in phospholipid metabolism. These findings may lead to novel therapeutic strategies against obesity and congenital generalized lipodystrophy. His group also identified and characterized a number of proteins that regulate cellular cholesterol trafficking and homeostasis.

NSW Stem Cell Network Workshop    View Summary
29 March 2017

Full title

26th NSW Stem Cell Network Workshop - Stem Cells and Gene Editing


The workshop is to provide an opportunity for Australian and international researchers, industry representatives and clinicians to meet and share the latest findings on stem cells and gene editing research.

For more information.

Medicine and Health Education Showcase    View Summary
31 March 2017

The theme for the 2017 Showcase is "Interprofessional learning: building capacity", and the intention is to:

  • Showcase research and best practice ininterprofessional learning across the health professional faculties
  • Stimulate innovation in interprofessional learning
  • Gatherbeginner and expert educators from across the health professional faculties to network

More information

April
Seminar - The role of the actin cytoskeleton   View Summary
4 April 2017

Full title

The role of the actin cytoskeleton in orchestrating neuronal morphogenesis

Presenter

Associate Professor Thomas Fath, UNSW

More information.

Jointly presented by the Disciplines of Physiology and Anatomy & Histology, School of Medical Sciences as part of the Bosch Institute Seminar Program.

Sydney Ideas forum - Hot in the City   View Summary
6 April 2017


Full title

Hot in the City: climate and health in urban environments


The focus of the event is the health implications of the long hot summer we have endured in Sydney, and options to build future resilience.

For more information

Mapping the Liver Interactome   View Summary
11 April 2017

Presenter

Dr Mark Larance,CINSW Fellow, Charles Perkins Centre/School of Life and Environmental Sciences


About the seminar:


Protein-protein interactions (PPI) are a core dimension in biology as few proteins function in isolation. Recently, we and others have advanced the innovative protein correlation profiling (PCP) method for the large scale analysis of protein-protein interactions. In our PCP analysis we have combined data from mouse liver lysate separations using state-of-the-art chromatographic columns for either size exclusion (SEC), strong anion exchange (SAX), or hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). In addition, we have used comprehensive proteome abundance measurements from both liver lysate subcellular fractionation experiments and cell-type specific proteome datasets.
Our data analysis pipeline uses binary comparison scores between each protein profile within each separation including Pearson correlation, cross-correlation and co-apex scores. These scores are used as features for each binary protein pair in our subsequent random forest machine learning approach. From this analysis we selected 116680 binary interactions with a score greater than 0.5 from the machine learning predictor. These binary pairs were integrated into a non-redundant network using the Clustering with Overlapping Neighbourhood Expansion (ClusterOne) package, while optimising the software settings for best precision and recall. This analysis identified 579 distinct liver protein complexes using stringent settings.
This dataset is quite novel as many of the detected protein complexes contain proteins that are only expressed in liver cell types. These interactions have therefore escaped detection in previous large-scale analyses of protein-protein interactions, which have focused on cultured cancer cell types. Follow-up experiments using immunoprecipitation-MS analysis of individual protein complexes is being used to confirm several of the novel interactions observed in liver tissues. The mouse liver interactome reported here will be extremely valuable for future experiments that examine how protein-protein interactions change after a perturbation such as either metabolic stress, or drug treatment.


Macrophages at the interface of host-pathogen-interactions   View Summary
20 April 2017

Presenter

Associate Professor Antje Blumenthal, Group Leader, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute


About the seminar:

Macrophages are essential components of the innate immune defence against microbial invasion. Yet, many successful pathogens exploit macrophages as a niche for survival in the host. Detailed understanding of the determinants of macrophage functions is indispensable in the search for host- directed approaches to supplement current therapies for challenging infectious diseases. This presentation explores the functions of an unconventional Toll-like receptor as well as the WNT signalling network in tailoring macrophage responses to bacterial infection.

Australian Biology of Ageing Conference   View Summary
27 April 2017

This is the secondAustralian Biology of Ageing Conference held on 27-28 April at The Connection in Rhodes, Sydney. Find out more.

Sydney Medical School Early Career Researcher Showcase & Networking Event   View Summary
28 April 2017

You are invited to participate in the Sydney Medical School's Early Career Research (ECR) Showcase. This is a chance for ECRs (up to 10 years post-PhD) to present their research to a general audience and to engage researchers from across the Sydney Medical School.

More information

May
Munc18 and synucleopathies under the nanoscope   View Summary
2 May 2017

About the seminar:


In this talk I will discuss our latest results on the role of Munc18-1 in controlling neuronal communication through its action on the nanoscale organization of the SNARE assembly. I will also show how human somatic mutations in Munc18 leads to early infantile epileptic encephalopathy, a severe form of epilepsy.


About the speaker:

Professor Frederic Meunier obtained his Masters degree in Neurophysiology at the Paris XI University, France in 1992 and completed his Ph.D in Neurobiology at the CNRS in Gif-sur-Yvette, France in 1996. He was the recipient of a European Biotechnology Fellowship and went on to postgraduate work at the Department of Biochemistry at Imperial College (1997-1999) and at Cancer Research UK (2000-2002) in London,UK.After a short sabbatical at the LMB-MRC in Cambridge (UK), he became a group leader at the School of Biomedical Sciences at the University of Queensland (Australia) in 2003. He joined the Queensland Brain Institute of the University of Queensland in 2007 and obtained an NHMRC senior research fellowship in 2009 renewed in 2014 with promotion. He became Professor in 2014 at the Queensland Brain Institute and is currently part of the Centre for Ageing Dementia Research.

Live to die and die to live   View Summary
2 May 2017

About the seminar:


Our research is underpinned by an interest in understanding how host-pathogen interactions impact on host cell signalling / cell death pathways. Recently we have discovered that many pathogens modulate tumour necrosis factor (TNF) signalling to promote activity and cell survival as a mechanism for pathogen persistence and dissemination. Using gene-targeted approaches and drug treatment we have dissected the attributes of TNF signalling and the relative roles that NFkappB activation, apoptosis and necroptosis play in tuberculosis disease pathogenesis. The importance of TNF in mitigating TB disease in humans and mice is undisputed but the pathways that promote pathogen control downstream of TNFR1 are hotly disputed. Using both traditional murine models and human immune system reconstituted mice we have de ned the relative importance of TNF driven macrophage activation, apoptosis and necroptosis in protecting the host from intracellular infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.


About the speaker:

Marc Pellegrini is an infectious diseases physician and Head of the Infection and Immunity Division at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute. His research is focused on understanding host- pathogen interactions.The aim of his work is to manipulate host cell signalling pathways to preferentially promote clearance of infected cells and thereby eradicate chronic infections. He has been awarded several prizes including the Burnet, Fenner, Viertel and two Eureka Prizes for his therapeutic discoveries.

21st Century Medicine Lecture    View Summary
3 May 2017

Full title

Bad Bugs and Bad Drugs: antimicrobial resistance in Southeast Asia


Presenter

Professor Guy Thwaites, Professor of Infectious Diseases, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, Viet Nam


For more information

Seminar - The many faces of obesity   View Summary
9 May 2017

Full title

The many faces of obesity - Lessons fromcross-sectional and longitudinal studies


About the seminar

Insulin resistance is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. However, it is now clear that obesity presents in different faces, and not all individuals with obesity are at increased risk of metabolic disease. When subjected to diet-induced weight loss, some obese individuals resolve prediabetes and some remain non-responders. Similarly, early interventions with metformin and weight loss prevent diabetes in a disappointing proportion of individuals at risk in the long run.


Presenter

Dr Dorit Samocha -Bonet, Group leader,Clinical Insulin Resistance, Garvan Institute ofMedical Research


About the speaker

Dorit completed a BSc degree in Nutritional Sciences at the Hebrew University, Israel and joined the Nutrition and Dietetics Department at Tel Aviv Medical Centre as a clinical dietician (1993-2001). She completed MSc degree in Clinical Biochemistry (1996) and PhD in Physiology and Pharmacology (2006) at Tel Aviv University, Israel. She joined the Diabetes & Metabolism Division at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney (2007) where she is leading the Clinical Insulin Resistance group. Dorit's work is focused on uncovering underlying factors in the transition from health to metabolic disease in humans. Her group performs cross-sectional, longitudinal and interventional studies in humans to uncover metabolic pathways that lead to insulin resistance and those that protect some obese individuals from developing metabolic disease.


Hosted by the Centenary Institute

PC4 Scientific Symposium   View Summary
10 May 2017

The symposium is a multidisciplinary meeting and welcome anyone with an interest in primary care and cancer. It is to bring together an array of experts in the field of Primary Care and Cancer to discuss new initiatives, current research and future challenges.


Key note speaker

Professor Eva Grunfeld, Director, Knowledge Translation Research, Health Services Research Program, Cancer Care Ontario and the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research.

For more information

Sydney Ideas Health Forum - Pain: a symptom or a disease?   View Summary
10 May 2017

In this health forum, University of Sydney experts will highlight new treatments and share insights that are changing people's lives for the better.


Panelists:

  • Professor Paul Clare, Chair in Pain Medicine, Sydney Medical School

  • Professor Chris Peck, Dean, Faculty of Dentistry

  • Professor Fiona Blyth, Associate Dean,Concord Clinical School, Professor of Public Health and Pain Medicine


For more information

Molecular Biomechanics and Mechanobiology   View Summary
11 May 2017

About the seminar:


The cell can be thought of as an organized collection of molecular machines. As such, many biomolecules can have moving parts for conformational motion, and bear and leverage forces. They can also convert chemical energy to mechanical work and vice versa. In this talk I will use several examples to illustrate various roles of mechanics in biology at the molecular scale. These include mechanically measuring biochemical reactions, regulating molecular interactions, visualizing protein conformational changes, and inducing receptor signaling.


About the speaker:

Dr.Zhu is J. Erskine Love Jr. Endowed Chair in Engineering and Regents' ProfessorofBiomedical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology and EmoryUniversity. Dr.Zhu received his B.S. from Zhejiang University, China, in 1982and M.S. and Ph.D. fromColumbia University in 1985 and 1988,respectively. He was Postgraduate Bioengineer andAssistant Bioengineer ofthe University of California, San Diego in 1988 and 1989,respectively. Hejoined the faculty of Georgia Tech in 1990. Dr. Zhu's research interest is inthe molecular biophysics of the immune and vascular systems, with focuses inthemechanobiology of T cells and platelets. He pioneered the analysis ofinteractions at thejunctional interface between molecules anchored to twoapposing surfaces, i.e., the so-calledtwo-dimensional interaction. His labconceptualized and/or demonstrated several types ofmechanical regulation ofprotein unbinding and unfolding (catch bonds, force-history, cyclicmechanicalreinforcement, and dynamic catch) in a variety of receptor-ligand systems. Dr.Zhu received the Harold Lamport Award from the Biomedical Engineering Societyin 1991,Yuan-Cheng Fung Award from American Mechanical Engineer Society in1992,Presidential Faculty Fellows Award from National Science Foundation in1993, and Awardin Hemarheology and Microcirculation from InternationalClinical Society ofHemarheology in 2005. Dr. Zhu is a fellow of the AmericanInstitute for Medical andBiological Engineering and a fellow of the BiomedicalEngineering Society.

Hypermutation of antibody genes and hypermutation of viral genomes   View Summary
16 May 2017

Full title

Hypermutation of antibody genes and hypermutation of viral genomes: two sides of the same anti-viral pill


Presenter

Dr Chris Jolly, Head, DNA Repair Group, Centenary Institute


About the speaker:

I carried out my PhD research from 1988-1991 in the CSIRO Division of Plant Industry, cloning a family of lipid-binding proteins important for wheat grain quality(now called "friabilins"). I found that friabilins were toxic in bacteria and that they were part of the "2S" super-family of proteins, which have a conserved cysteinebackbone. We now call these proteins "defensins"; they are closely related to vertebrate chemokines. The huge diversity of 2S proteins led me to a fascinationwith the generation of receptor diversity in T cells and B cells in the mammalian immune system. After a period studying receptor diversity in mouse T cells at theANU, I moved to the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK in 1995 to work with Dr Michael Neuberger and Prof César Milstein on the mechanism of antibody hypermutation in germinal centre B cells, whose mechanism was then completely unknown. I developed new tools to quantifyhypermutation in gene-knockout mice and in sera, demonstrating that the p53 DNA damage response protein was dispensable for antibody hypermutation andthat serum antibodies become increasingly hypermutated as animals age.


I returned to Australia in 1998 to establish my own research program in the Centenary Institute. Following the discovery in 2001 by Michael Neuberger's groupthat Activation-Induced Deaminase (AID) initiates antibody hypermutation and class switching by deaminating DNA, my lab's research goal has been tounderstand why deamination of antibody genes (and of B cell oncogenes) induced by AID is "repaired" with low fidelity while spontaneous deamination isgenerally repaired faithfully. We have focussed on the role of cell cycle in DNA repair. After inventing a new technology to restrict the activity of any enzyme ofinterest to tightly-defined cell cycle phases, we showed in 2012 that in vivo "repair" of AID-induced deaminations by the base excision repair (BER) pathway isrestricted to G1-phase in B cells. I will present unpublished data that explains why G1-phase deamination repair can be mutagenic, and will argue that featuresof DNA repair that evolved to limit viral replication in infected cells were co-opted to target antibody genes in B cells; perhaps selected by the capacity ofantibody hypermutation's to modify antibody specificity in real-time as viruses themselves hypermutate.

Imaging of oxidative stress and metal ions in biological systems   View Summary
23 May 2017

About the speaker:

Liz completed her BSc and MSc at the University of Sydney before completing her PhD in 2010 at the University of Durham (UK). After 2 years as post-doctoral research fellow at the University of California, Berkeley, she returned to the University of Sydney in 2012. She held an ARC DECRA and is currently a Westpac Research Fellow. Her research awards include the Premier's Prize for NSW Early Career Researcher of the Year (2016). Liz currently serves on the executive for the Early-Mid Career Researcher Forum. She is also passionate about teaching, receiving awards including RACI Chemistry Educator of the Year (2016).


About the seminar:

While there are now many sophisticated imaging techniques to study biological systems, chemists hold the key to understanding what is happening in the cell, on a molecular level. We are interested in designing small molecule fluorescent sensors to probe sub-cellular molecular species, and we are particularly interested in studying redox state in cells, and imaging biological metal ions. We have been able to use our new fluorescent probes in a number of confocal microscopy experiments, including the use of spectral imaging and lifetime imaging, to gain important new information about the chemistry of the cell.

Seminar - Maternal Immunisation against Pertussis   View Summary
24 May 2017

Full title

Maternal Immunisation against Pertussis: Latest evidence


Presenter

Professor Peter McIntyre, Director of National Centre for Immunisation Research Surveillance(NCIRS) and Dr Nathan Saul


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Children's Hospital Education Research Institute (CHERI) 21st annual conference   View Summary
25 May 2017

25 May 2017 to 26 May 2017

Conference title:Improving student learning through well-being


Keynote speaker: Professor Adele Diamond is the Canada Research ChairProfessorof Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.

Metabolic reprogramming in zebrafish models of cancer   View Summary
30 May 2017

About the speaker:

Dr Andrew Cox earned his BSc and MSc degrees from the University of Canterbury, New Zealand. In 2009, Dr Cox received his PhD from the University of Otago, New Zealand. He then undertook postdoctoral training with Prof. Wolfram Goessling at Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Dr Cox was promoted to Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School in 2013. In 2016, Dr Cox became a team leader in the Organogenesis and Cancer Progam at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and holds a joint appointment in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Melbourne. His laboratory uses zebrafish as a model system to elucidate pathways involved in liver regeneration and cancer. A central theme of his work is to understand how the Hippo pathway reprograms metabolism to fuel cancer cell growth.


About the seminar:

The liver plays a key role in organismal energy homeostasis, functioning as a metabolic hub to coordinate digestion and nutrient storage. The Hippo signalling pathway has recently emerged as a key regulator of organ size that is often disrupted in cancer. The Hippo pathway effector Yap is regulated by a range of environmental factors, many of which are associated with chronic liver disease. Despite advances in our understanding of how the Hippo pathway is regulated, the downstream mechanisms responsible for the phenomenal impacts on organ size and tumorigenesis remain to be elucidated. In the lab, we use zebrafish as a model system to study pathways regulating growth during liver development, regeneration and cancer. Recently, we have used a combination of metabolomic and transcriptomic approaches to reveal that the Hippo pathway effector Yap reprograms metabolism to stimulate de novo nucleotide biosynthesis, fueling liver growth and cancer. Our ultimate goal is to identify therapies that exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities of liver tumours.

June
The Cancer Epigenome: Concepts, Challenges and Therapeutic Opportunities   View Summary
6 June 2017

About the seminar:

Cancer biology is profoundly in uenced by changes in the epigenome. Because the dynamic plasticity of the epigenome lends itself well to therapeutic manipulation, the past few years have witnessed an unprecedented investment in the development,characterization, and translation of targeted epigenetic therapies. In this seminar, I will provide a broad context for recent developments that offer a greater understanding of how epigenetic regulators facilitate the initiation, maintenance, and evolution of cancer. I will discuss newly developed epigenetic therapies and the cellular and molecular mechanisms that may govern sensitivity and resistance to these agents. I will also review the rationale for future combination therapies involving existing and emerging epigenetic drugs.


About the speaker:

Professor Mark Dawson is a clinician-scientist at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. He is the program head of the Translational Haematology Program, group leader of the Cancer Epigenetics Laboratory and a consultant haematologist in the department of Haematology.Professor Dawson's research interests lie in understanding the epigenetic regulation of normal and malignant haematopoiesis. He is a fellow of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. His research has been published in some of the world leading journals including Nature, Cell, Science and New England Journal of Medicine.

Seminar- Post-synaptic tau and neurodegeneration   View Summary
13 June 2017

About the seminar:

Alzheimer's disease presents with deposition of the microtubule-associated protein tau in neurofibrillary tangles, and amyloid- (A) in extracellular plaques. Tau plays a role in neuronal dysfunction prior to its deposition, and we have previously shown that tau mediates A toxicity at the post-synapse. Here, we investigated the molecular pathways regulated by tau during onset and progression of neurodegeneration.

Using genomic and proteomic approaches together with different mouse models, we have identified specific differentially regulated and tau-dependent candidate pathways during neuronal toxicity. These were confirmed by using biochemical, histological and molecular methods together with a range of specific gene knockout mice. Functional impacts were determined by neurological and behavioral testing, and electroencephalography.

Here, we showed in detail how tau regulates A-mediated and NMDA receptor-dependent toxicity at the neuronal post-synapse, by orchestrating both toxicity-promoting and -limiting signaling pathways. We generated new transgenic mice and adeno-associated virus-mediated gene expression to target these pathways, preventing memory deficits and aberrant neuronal network activity in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

In summary, we revealed that tau is critically involved in mediating specific signaling pathways involved in A toxicity in Alzheimer's disease, providing new targets for therapeutic intervention.



About the speakers:

Professor Lars Ittner graduated in Medicine from the University of Ulm in Germany, and received his M.D. from the University of Zurich in Switzerland in 2002, where he then studied neuronal stem cells and signalling pathways. In 2005, he moved to Australia to focus his work on basic pathomechanisms in Alzheimer's disease. In 2013, he was appointed to the University of New South Wales in Sydney to head the Dementia Research and the Transgenic Animal Units. His major research interests are understanding disease mechanisms in neurodegeneration and the development of novel therapies for Alzheimer's disease, related forms of dementia and stroke. His work is published in leading scientific journals, including Science, Cell, Nature Medicine, Nature Reviews Neuroscience and PNAS. Lars has received several awards for his work, including the ASBMB Merck Research Medal 2017. He is chief investigator on NHMRC and ARC Project grants and the current NHMRC Program forefront, investigating Frontotemporal Dementia and Motor Neuron Disease.

Dr Arne Ittner graduated with a Diploma in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry from Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH Zurich in 2006. He received his PhD from the ETH Zurich in 2010 working on p38 MAP kinase signal transduction. His interest in translating novel insights in basic signal transduction into fields of medical relevance has brought him to join the Dementia Research Unit at University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia to work on signalling mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Dr Ittner's work is published in basic science, neuroscience, biochemistry and medical journals, including Science, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Journal of Neurochemistry, Diabetologia, EMBO Reports and PLOS One besides presentations at notable international meetings. Dr Ittner is chief investigator on NHMRC and ARC grants investigating molecular mechansims in neurons and novel therapeutic strategies to treat dementia.


Hosted by The Centenary Institute

Seminar - Ethical Frameworks in Public Health Policy   View Summary
13 June 2017

Speaker: Professor Angus Dawson

Angus Dawson is Professor of Bioethics and Director of Sydney Health Ethics (formerly, the Centre for Values, Ethics and Law in Medicine) at the University of Sydney. His research has mainly focused on ethical issues in public and global health. He was joint founder and remains joint Editor-in-Chief of the journal Public Health Ethics. He has been involved in ethics and policy work for the World Health Organization, the UK Department of Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Public Health Agency of Canada, Médecins Sans Frontières and the GAVI Alliance. He was one of the editors of the new book Public Health Ethics: Cases Spanning the Globe. The collection contains background material and cases from public health policy and practice with contributions from twenty-three different countries. The whole book is available for free and has been downloaded 48,000 times. You can download it here:http://link.springer.com/book/10.1007/978-3-319-23847-0

2017 ATSE National Technology Challenges Dialogue   View Summary
14 June 2017

Full title

The Crisis in Ageing: Technology to Manage the Challenges in Healthcare


The 2017 Dialogue will examine if health technology can help Australia rise to the challenge of adapting to the ageing face of the nation, in order to mitigate issues of rising and shifting healthcare costs and needs.


For more information

Seminar - Cracking the secret code of Helicobacter pylori-induced stomach cancer   View Summary
20 June 2017

Presenter

Dr Terry Kwok, Senior Lecturer, Head of Microbial Oncogenesis Laboratory, Biomedicine Discovery Institute, Monash University

Bio
Terry Kwok-Schuelein obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Melbourne. Her interest in Helicobacter pylori research started during her postdoctoral work at the Max Planck Institute of Infection Biology in Germany. She continued studying H. pylori infection and its link to gastric cancer at Otto-von-Guericke University in Germany, where she discovered the rst human receptor for a key virulence factor of H. pylori. Terry is currently a senior lecturer and lab head of the Microbial Oncogenesis Laboratory at the Biomedicine Discovery Institute of Monash University. Over the last few years, a major research focus of her group is to understand the molecular mechanism by which H. pylori interacts with host cell factors in causing chronic gastritis and gastric cancer. Other projects in her lab range from elucidation of the structures of H. pylori virulence factors to investigation of their mechanisms of action. Her research has important implications for the discovery of new anti-infective targets and gastric cancer biomarkers. Her work has been published in leading journals including Nature, PNAS, Autophagy and Journal of Infectious Diseases.


Summary

The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of stomach cancer and peptic ulcers. It infects approximately half of the global population, making it one of the most prevalent human pathogens. The protein CagL is an emerging virulence factor of H. pylori and a potent activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF kB) and proin ammatory responses. This seminar will present recent ndings from Terry Kwok-Schuelein's laboratory that pinpoint a tantalizing association between the sequence polymorphism of CagL and human gastric cancer risk. Together with supporting data from mutagenesis and biochemical studies,these ndings shed important new light on the molecular mechanism by which H. pylori causes stomach cancer.

Presented by the Centenary Institute

Personalised Medicine: Empowered patients in the 21st Century?   View Summary
26 June 2017

Presenter

Professor Barbara Prainsack from King's College London.

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Sydney Ideas at Westmead: How can design-led thinking improve health and wellbeing?   View Summary
27 June 2017

Join an expert panel of design technologists to for this conversation about how principles of design are already improving our health, and to explore what more is possible for the future of better health, by design

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Seminar - The endothelium; immunotherapy and arterial diseases   View Summary
27 June 2017

Presenter

Professor Jenny Gamble, Wenkart Chair of the Endothelium Centre for the Endothelium Vascular Biology Program, Centenary Institute

Bio
Professor Jennifer Gamble holds the inaugural, Wenkart Chair of the Endothelium, at the Centenary Institute and the University of Sydney. She completed her undergraduate degrees at the University of Melbourne and the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research and her PhD at the University of Adelaide. She established the Vascular Biology Program at the Centenary Institute in 2007.

Throughout her career, her work has centred on understanding the key role that endothelial cells play in the induction and resolution of in ammation. Her recent studies have been directed to understanding vascular permeability, a hallmark of both acute and chronic in ammatory disease, and in understanding the differentiation and ageing of endothelial cells

Summary

Her seminar will focus on the work now being undertaken within the Centre for the Endothelium in the Vascular Biology Program. In particular, she will discuss the development and use of a rst-in-class drug that targets vascular leak and the novel insights that it gives us into endothelial barrier integrity. She will also discuss a "vascular protective gene" recently identi ed in her laboratory that is essential for vascular homeostasis.

Presented by the Centenary Institute

July
Seminar - Precision Imaging Metrics for Quantitative Cancer Medicine   View Summary
4 July 2017

Presenter

Dr H Charles Manning, Director, Vanderbilt Center for Molecular Probes and Molecular Imaging Research; Professor of Radiology, Chemistry, Biomedical Engineering, Neurosurgery, and Chemical and Physical Biology; Vanderbilt Ingram Professor of Cancer Research and VICC Director of Cancer Imaging Research


Bio
For more than decade, Charles Manning's laboratory at Vanderbilt has focused on the discovery, translation, and validation of molecular imaging biomarkers, primarily for oncology. He is a Professor of Radiology, Chemistry, Biomedical Engineering, Neurosurgery, and Chemical and Physical Biology. He is a Vanderbilt Ingram Professor of Cancer Research and serves the Ingram Cancer Center as the Director of Cancer Imaging Research. He is the Director of the Vanderbilt Center for Molecular Probes and Molecular Imaging Research. In addition to these activities, Dr. Manning is the scientific and administrative director of the VUMC Research Radiochemistry Core and Cyclotron Facility. Dr. Manning's laboratory discovers and translates novel radiopharmaceuticals, primarily for positron emission tomography (PET) imaging to patients that report aspects of cellular metabolism non-invasively, including high-affinity ligands for receptor-based targets and metabolic substrate transporters elevated in cancer cells.

Summary

Cancer diagnosis algorithms routinely use medical imaging of one or more types, but the clinical imaging modalities that are most-heavily relied upon provide primarily anatomical and structural information. These modalities, namely X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), can provide quantitative data. However, a consequence of relying extensively upon these modalities, particularly to predict response to therapy, is that many of the cellular and molecular features of tumors quantifiable by imaging remain unannotated. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a clinical molecular imaging modality with the potential to advance precision medicine in oncology. Employing specialized radiopharmaceuticals referred to as 'probes' or 'tracers' and administered to subjects for imaging, non-invasive PET allows quantification of the cellular and molecular underpinnings of diseases on a patient-by-patient basis. PET provides ways to detect disease at early, potentially curable stages, identify patients likely to respond to certain treatments, and predict response to therapy early. Despite this, a lack of specific and biologically validated tracers limits the breadth of biological and clinical questions addressable with PET. While applicable in many clinical settings, by far, oncology suffers the greatest gap spanning clinically unmet needs and routinely available PET tracers. The most widely used PET tracer in humans, and the only tracer widely distributed and routinely reimbursed in the US, is 2-deoxy-2-(18F)fluoro-D-glucose (FDG). The current lack of clinically utilized PET tracers is a shame because one molecular imaging readout (e.g., glucose metabolism) is truly insufficient to adequately profile the distinguishing features of a patient's tumor. Our vision is that future clinical imaging workflows will include PET imaging with many tracers, typically within the same visit to the PET center. Relevant tracers may include so-called 'theranostics', as well as ligands or substrates that provide biologically orthogonal readouts of signal transduction or metabolism. Such an ambitious approach will necessarily require a major paradigm shift in tracer production, distribution and delivery. Efforts within Vanderbilt's Center for Molecular Probes to address this critical gap will be discussed, as well as future possibilities to combine multi-modality molecular imaging into large integrated data sets that complement contemporary, high information content personalized approaches.

Presented by the Centenary Institute

World Congress Inflammation London 2017   View Summary
8 July 2017

The World Congress in inflammation will come to London for the world's most influential meeting for inflammation researchers.


For more information


10th Sino-Australian research symposium   View Summary
11 July 2017 to 12 July 2017

Topic

Precision medicine in metabolic health and cancer


More information


Seminar - Immunological regulation of cardiac regeneration   View Summary
11 July 2017

Presenter

Dr Kazu Kikuchi, Lab Head, Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute

Bio
Dr Kazu Kikuchi joined the Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute in 2011 and is head of the Cardiac Regeneration laboratory in the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Division. He graduated from the Tohoku University School of Medicine, Japan, and completed his PhD at the Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine in 2003. Upon finishing his thesis, he studied lymphocyte development as a post-doctoral fellow in Motonari Kondo's Lab at Duke University in the US, and later went on to study organ regeneration in Ken Poss' lab, also at Duke University.

The Kikuchi Laboratory uses the zebrafish to study the molecular and cellular regulations of heart muscle regeneration. A previous study led by Kikuchi showed that regenerating a damaged zebrafish heart muscle involves the activation and dividing of the existing heart cells (called cardiomyocytes). The Kikuchi Laboratory is further investigating the molecular mechanisms that induce the growth of new heart cells in the injured zebrafish heart. Another area of interest is to understand how the zebrafish heart is able to regenerate without much scar formation. Inflammatory responses provoked by injury often result in fibrotic scar formation in damaged organs in mammals. As in mammalian hearts, massive inflammation does occur in the zebrafish heart after injury, but the consequences are quite different: the zebrafish heart regenerates without scar tissue formation. The team investigates the role of inflammatory cells during zebrafish heart regeneration. Results from these studies may provide important implications for clinical regenerative medicine, where there is a large unmet need to improve regeneration after injury as well as to prevent progression to heart failure in those with other common forms of heart disease.

Summary

Although the adaptive immune system is highly developed in regenerative vertebrates such as salamanders and fish, little is known about the contributions of T cells to scarless regeneration in these animals. Here, we demonstrate that successful tissue regeneration in the teleost zebrafish requires a T-cell subset that has the capacity to produce tissue-specific growth factors. Using a transgenic reporter strain, we found that T cells infiltrated damaged spinal cords and hearts and closely associated with regenerating neurons and cardiomyocytes. Inducible genetic ablation of T cells was associated with elevated inflammation and severely impaired spinal cord and heart regeneration as well as significantly reduced neurogenesis and cardiomyocyte proliferation. We found that spinal cord-infiltrating T cells specifically synthesised neurogenic factors, whereas heart-infiltrating T cells synthesised cardiomyocyte mitogens. Furthermore, neurogenic and cardiogenic factor administrations restored the neurogenesis and cardiomyocyte proliferation defects associated with T cell depletion. Thus, zebrafish T cells elaborate an organ-specific secretory phenotype and directly enhance spinal cord and cardiac regeneration by promoting neurogenesis and cardiomyocyte proliferation, respectively. These findings extend our understanding of the immunological regulation of organ regeneration and suggest T cell-mediated regenerative therapies for the treatment of spinal cord and cardiac damage in humans.

Presented by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - How endothelial niches regulate normal and malignant cell fate   View Summary
18 July 2017

Presenter

Associate Professor Ingrid Winkler, NHMRC Senior Research Fellow, Mater Research Institute, University of Queensland

Bio
Associate Professor Ingrid Winkler is a NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and leads the Stem Cells and Cancer group at Mater Research Institute - University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

It wasn't always this way, after many years travelling around the world, one day, while watching the sun set over the Sarharan sandunes - she realised research was her calling and returned home.

Dr Winkler's research seeks to understand how normal and malignant Haematopoietic Stem Cells are regulated by their local microenvironments (niches) - basic research recognised as among'Ten of the best research projects in Australia' by NHMRC (2013) and now basis for Phase I/II clinical trials with the goal of manipulating stem cell niches to alleviate side-effects of chemotherapy and to improve ef cacy of therapy for leukaemia.

Summary

We have previously identified a novel role for vascular cell adhesion molecules in promoting the awakening of dormant Haematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs) in the bone marrow (BM). Now we show vascular adhesion can trigger a cascade of intracellular signalling events that can metabolically and transcriptionally reprogram a cell. For bone marrow (BM) Haematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells (HSPC) these newly identi ed roles open new avenues to tailor immune response and recovery during stress.

Malignant cells also take advantage of these pathways. In malignant cells, aberrant glycosylation associated with oncogenic transformation promotes expression of surface ligands that tap into these pro-survival pathways. The discovery of how cellular adhesion acts to prime leukocytes for appropriate in ammatory response and how this evolutionary-ancient signalling network is hijacked by malignant cells for growth and survival,are the subject of this talk. A phase I/II clinical trial based on these unpublished data is underway.

Presented by the Centenary Institute

2017 Bosch Institute Annual Scientific Meeting   View Summary
20 July 2017

Theme
Regenerative medicine: repairing the damaged body


Presented by the Bosch Institute


Workshop - Complex Communication in Healthcare   View Summary
31 July 2017

Complex Communication in Healthcare, a PMC Masterclass, is suitable for all health staff including students, clinicians, nurses, allied health and administration.


Seminar - The connectome of RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons   View Summary
31 July 2017

Full title

The connectome of RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons and their role in respiratory-sympathetic coupling

Presenter

Dr Simon McMullan, Macquarie University


August
CANCELLED Seminar - Nucleosome dynamics, pervasive transcription and genome stability   View Summary
1 August 2017

Presenter

Associate Professor Tamas Fischer, John Curtin School of Medical Research, ANU

Bio
Tamás Fischer is an Associate Professor at The John Curtin School of Medical Research (JCSMR) at The Australian National University. He received his PhD from the University of Heidelberg, Germany in 2005. He then worked as a Postdoctoral scientist at the National Cancer Institute at the NIH in Bethesda, USA, before returning to Germany to establish an independent research group at the Biochemistry Center at the University of Heidelberg in 2010. He has recently moved his laboratory to Canberra to join the Department of Genome Sciences at JCSMR.
The major research focus in the Fischer lab is to understand the connection between chromatin structure, pervasive transcription and RNA surveillance, and their influence on genomic stability and disease development, especially in cancer and aging-related diseases. In addition, the lab is pursuing synthetic biology approaches to develop early detection and novel treatment methods in cancer.

Summary

Nucleosomes are the basic building blocks of the chromatin, and the position, occupancy and turn-over rate of nucleosomes at a given genomic locus ultimately determine the accessibility of the underlying DNA sequence. Defects in nucleosome organization lead to increased levels of pervasive transcription outside of genetically defined transcription units. Despite the central role of nucleosomes in transcription regulation, our knowledge about the effects of different histone modifications and histone variants on nucleosome organization is very limited. We are studying the impact of various histone modifications on the position, occupancy and turn-over rate of nucleosomes and their effect on pervasive transcription. Increased pervasive transcription and the resulting nuclear accumulation of non-coding transcripts can lead to excessive RNA-DNA hybrid formation in the genome and subsequent genomic instability. Interestingly, we have recently identified an additional role for pervasive transcription in the DNA double-strand break repair pathway, thus revealing a surprising, positive role in genomic stability.

Presented by the Centenary Institute

Seminar - Nucleosome dynamics, pervasive transcription and genome stability   View Summary
1 August 2017 to 4 August 2017

Theme

Genomics in Reproduction

Presentation - Digital solutions in cardiovascular disease prevention   View Summary
1 August 2017

Presenter

Professor Clara Chow, Professor of Medicine and Academic Co-Director CPC Westmead

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SSEAC postgraduate seminar: health   View Summary
3 August 2017

Presented by the Office for Global Health and the Sydney Southeast Asia Centre

National Eating Disorders and Obesity Conference   View Summary
7 August 2017 to 8 August 2017

The conference focuses on the specific issues of eating disorders and obesity, the co-relationship within the context of mental health, the challenges surrounding public health in our current and future population and the role of physical health in maintaining our positive wellbeing.


Subject topics to be addressed include dietary approach, understanding attitudes, health promotion, making and breaking habits, psychological strategies, weight management and mental illness in addition to therapies, research, programs, case studies, trends and treatments.


Hosted by the Australian and New Zealand Mental Health Association, the 2017 Program will include presentations from Feature Speakers, multiple specialist sector speakers within concurrent streams, panel discussions and poster presentations.


Find out more information.

Seminar - Changing expectations for the design and reporting of preclinical research   View Summary
7 August 2017

Presenter

AssociateProfessor Bill Phillips,School ofMedical Sciences (Physiology) and Bosch Institute

Seminar - On the trail of vascular diseases   View Summary
8 August 2017

Presenter

Dr Mary Kavurma, Group Leader, Heart Research Institute

Bio
Dr.Mary Kavurma received her PhD in 2003 from the Centre forVascular Research, The University of New South Wales Sydney, Australia. In 2004, she was awarded a CJ Martin Fellowship from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) of Australia, to undertake research at the University of Cambridge UK. Here she developed an interest in the survival actions of TRAIL (tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. In 2007, Mary relocated to the Centre for Vascular Research, and appointed Group Leader in 2012. In 2013 she joined the Heart Research Institute as Head of the Vascular Complications Group. Her current research is addressing critical questions concerning the impact of TRAIL in obesity, diabetes, CVD and chronic kidney disease. She has held a numerous Fellowships and Project. Mary has an active interest in promoting medical research to the lay community. Her achievements in scienti c research, communication and community engagement were acknowledged with a Young Tall Poppy Science Award in 2009.

Summary

Precise control of cell proliferation and apoptosis is critical in many physiological processes including normal development, growth, differentiation, and tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of these processes underlies almost all disease states including cardiovascular disease (CVD). Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)- related apoptosis‐inducing ligand, or 'TRAIL', is a naturally occurring molecule discovered over 20 years ago for its ability to induce programmed cell death - or apoptosis - of cancer cells by binding speci c cell-surface death receptors. Our studies in vascular cells and in mice with TRAIL deletion indicate important new functions for TRAIL mediating survival signals, distinct from its cell death promoting activities. We have shown that TRAIL is protective of atherosclerosis. Importantly, our murine models correlate with human disease where a reduction in circulating TRAIL levels predisposes people to CVD, and TRAIL levels have been shown to independently predict cardiovascular risk and mortality.The underlying mechanisms of TRAIL's function is unclear. Comprehension of TRAIL signals and its role in governing cell fate may ultimately lead to strategies to enhance or prevent cellular processes to improve vascular diseases.

Presented by the Centenary Institute

Distinguished Alumni Event at Woolcock Institute   View Summary
9 August 2017

The Woolcock Institute of Medical Research invites you to attend a ceremony to honour our new distinguished alumni: Professor Judy Black, Professor Iven Young, Professor Sandy Anderson.

RSVP toGabiby 2 August.

Seminar - The fine balancing act of proteome homeostasis in motor neurone disease   View Summary
14 August 2017

Presenter

Dr Justin Yerbury, University of Wollongong

Sydney Teaching Colloquium - The Creative Curriculum   View Summary
16 August 2017

During this event, part ofInnovation Week, colleagues from around the University will share theinnovative ways in which they have brought features of the new curriculum alive in their courses.

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Seminar - Neuropathology of obstructive sleep apnoea - a precursor to Alzheimer's?   View Summary
21 August 2017

Presenter

Professor Stephen Robinson, RMIT University, Melbourne

13th Annual Marie Bashir Address   View Summary
22 August 2017
The keynote address will be given by Dr Emily Granger from St Vincent's Hospital.
Sydney Catalyst PhD opportunities showcase   View Summary
23 August 2017
The 'Scaling New Heights: PhD Opportunities Showcase', presented bySydney Catalyst, allows prospective PhD students to hear about some amazing opportunities available in postgraduate research.
BEAT-CKD two-day annual research forum   View Summary
23 August 2017 to 24 August 2017
This national meeting is for patients, clinicians, and researchers with an interest in conducting and implementing research to improve outcomes for people with chronic kidney disease.
Seminar - Nightclubs, noise and neurons   View Summary
28 August 2017

Presenter

ProfessorDavid McAlpine, MacquarieUniversity

Symposium on future directions for Australian universities   View Summary
28 August 2017

Special symposium on the outlook for research in Australian Universities.

Multidisciplinary management of brain metastases in the age of immunotherapy   View Summary
29 August 2017

Update on the current management of brain metastases and the impact of the new immunotherapies


More information

http://www.sydneyvital.org.au/event/multidisciplinary-management-of-brain-metastases-in-the-age-of-immunotherapy/?event_date=2017-08-29

Seminar - The child health checkpoint study   View Summary
29 August 2017

Presenter

Dr Kate Lycett, NHMRC Early Career and National Heart Foundation Fellow,Murdoch Children's Research Institute, Melbourne


More information

http://whatson.sydney.edu.au/events/published/the-child-health-checkpoint-using-agile-principles-to-embed-physical-health-and-biomarkers-into-a-national-longitudinal-study

Seminar - Tailoring multi-functional nano-catalysts for carbon dioxide capture   View Summary
31 August 2017

Associate Professor Jun Huang presents an update on the development of novel nanocatalysts for CO2 conversion to chemicals and how to enhance the process efficiency to reduce CO2 production.

September
Seminar - The 1967 Nobel Prize: a reflection of the contestation between two philosophical concepts   View Summary
4 September 2017

Full title

The 1967 Nobel Prize: a reflection of the contestation between two philosophical concepts in the history of neuroscience

Presenter

Dr John Carmody, School of Medical Sciences (Physiology)

Seminar - Microvascular breakdown: At the core of Alzheimer plaques and neuronal pathology   View Summary
11 September 2017

Presenter

DrKaren Cullen, School of Medical Sciences (Anatomyand Histology) and Bosch Institute

Health Data Linkage Showcase   View Summary
14 September 2017

The University of Sydney Health Data Linkage Special Interest Group is holding an afternoon event to showcase some of the latest research using linked health data.

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Seminar - Wiretapping the brainstem sensory nuclei using machine learnability   View Summary
18 September 2017

Full title

Wiretapping the brainstem sensory nuclei using machine learnability to close the neuroprosthetic loop

Presenter

Dr Jason Potas, UNSW

9th International Global Virus Network Meeting   View Summary
25 September 2017 to 27 September 2017

Topic

Pandemic, Epidemic and Emerging Viruses in the Asia Pacific Region

Short course in critical infection 2017   View Summary
28 September 2017 to 29 September 2017

The Sydney short course in critical infection is on again this September at Westmead Hospital. We'll be welcoming critical care and infection specialists in medicine, nursing and pharmacy to be part of case discussions and updates of all things relevant to severe and life-threatening infection.

Australia and New Zealand Association of Psychotherapy conference   View Summary
29 September 2017 to 1 October 2017

Theme

ANZAP today

October
Australia and New Zealand Association of Psychotherapy conference   View Summary
29 September 2017 to 1 October 2017

Theme

ANZAP today

Forum - Women and Health: Celebrating 50 Years of ASEAN Women   View Summary
5 October 2017

The forum will feature the contribution of outstanding individuals from the ASEAN community, and will be an opportunity to share the valuable contribution of exceptional individuals make to improving health in ASEAN countries.

Seminar - Tapping into the sense of touch   View Summary
9 October 2017

Presenter

Dr Richard Vickary, UNSW

Diana Temple Memorial Lecture   View Summary
11 October 2017

Presenter

Professor Carol Armour, Executive Director of the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research and Associate Dean (Career Development) in Sydney Medical School

Clinical Trials and Cohort Studies Workshop   View Summary
12 October 2017

Tips on how to write a competitive research grant submission

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6th Annual Conference Westmead Psychotherapy Program for Complex Traumatic Disorders   View Summary
13 October 2017

Theme

Transformational Endings: understanding the opportunity for growth in the experience of the 'good goodbye'

ContactDr Anthony Kornerfor more information and the program.

Seminar - Improving diagnosis of mitochondrial diseases   View Summary
16 October 2017

Presenter

DrRyanDavis, Kolling Institute

Early- and mid-career researcher networking event   View Summary
16 October 2017

Researchers are invited to a networking event themed around mentoring in academia.

2017 APRU Global Health Program Conference   View Summary
16 October 2017 to 19 October 2017

Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking but always compelling,Grace Under Pressureweaves together the experiences of the health professionals that look after us.


CPC Westmead Research and Networking Forum   View Summary
16 October 2017

Theme:Preventing Death Starts in Youth

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Forum - Transforming Health Through Innovative Research   View Summary
18 October 2017

Hosted by Sydney Health Partners

Concept Development Workshop for Trials and Translational Research Studies   View Summary
20 October 2017

This one day workshop will help clinical and scientific investigators refine their concept into a proposal for a clinical trial and/or translational research study.

Conference - Sydney New Horizons 2017   View Summary
20 October 2017 to 21 October 2017

Innovative science with impact: Strengthening alliances between research, practice and industry

Concept Development Workshop for Trials and Translational Research Studies   View Summary
20 October 2017

This one day workshop will help clinical and scientific investigators refine their concept into a proposal for a clinical trial and/or translational research study.

Seminar - Neuronal correlates of sensory prioritisation in the rodent vibrissal cortex   View Summary
23 October 2017

Presenter

Dr Ehsan Arabzadeh, JCSMR, ANU Canberra

Grace under Pressue   View Summary
25 October 2017

Sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking but always compelling,Grace Under Pressureweaves together the experiences of the health professionals that look after us.


Sydney MSK Health Alliance Inaugural Scientific Meeting 2017   View Summary
27 October 2017

Presentations from researchers will include topics spanning basic science, clinical trials, translational research and population health research addressing treatment, management and prevention of musculoskeletal disorders.

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Seminar - Cellular mechanism underlying binocular vision in mice   View Summary
30 October 2017

Presenter

Dr Greg Stuart, JCSMR, ANU Canberra

Seminar - Inhaled oxytocin as an adjunct to treatment in anorexia nervosa   View Summary
31 October 2017

Presenter

Dr Sarah Maguire from NSW Health and the Boden Institute

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November
Poche Centre annual research showcase   View Summary
1 November 2017

The Poche Centre for Indigenous Health is hosting a showcase of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research initiatives from across the University sector and broader community

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10th Health Services and Policy Research Conference   View Summary
1 November 2017 to 3 November 2017

Theme

Shifting priorities: balancing acute and primary care services

NHMRC forum   View Summary
6 November 2017

Researchers are invited to a forum on National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funding. Successful NHMRC grant recipients, as well as representatives from Cancer Council NSW, will provide advice on the strategic and practical aspects of applying to the NHMRC and its funding partners.


The future of health: reimagining healthcare   View Summary
7 November 2017

  • How do we maintain a world class health system?
  • How do we re-imagine a healthcare system for the future?

Venue

The University of Sydney Business School CBD Campus, Lecture Room 1, Stockland building, Level 17, 133 Castlereagh St, Sydney

Seminar - The Unfulfilled Promise of Pay-for-Performance Policies in Health Care   View Summary
7 November 2017

Presenter

Professor Stephen B Soumerai, Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute.

Workshop - Complex Communication in Healthcare   View Summary
8 November 2017

Complex Communication in Healthcare, a PMC Masterclass, is suitable for all health staff including students, clinicians, nurses, allied health and administration.


Precision Sleep Medicine Symposium   View Summary
8 November 2017

The program will cover the opportunities and challenges in the field as well as modern approaches to phenotyping patients to improve patient care.

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Research Symposium: Integrating Technology into Cancer Care   View Summary
10 November 2017

The opportunities and potential pitfalls of integrating technology into cancer care

Forum - ANZPMEF 2017   View Summary
12 November 2017 to 15 November 2017

Full title

Australian and New Zealand Prevocational Medical Education Forum
Theme: Singing from the Same Songsheet: Team work

Find out more information

Australian Society for Medical Research National Scientific Conference   View Summary
14 November 2017 to 15 November 2017

The 56th annual ASMR conference will feature two specialist workshops on the politics of promotion and grants review panels, keynote talks from international guests as well Norman Swan interviewing Nobel Prize Winner Professor Peter Doherty.

CPC Westmead Research and Networking Forum   View Summary
16 November 2017

Theme:Preventing Death Starts in Youth.

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CPC Westmead Research and Networking Forum   View Summary
16 November 2017

Theme:Preventing Death Starts in Youth

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Marie Bashir Institute Colloquium   View Summary
17 November 2017

The MBI annual colloquium is open to anyone with an interest in the areas of emerging/re-emerging infectious diseases and biosecurity, with a particular emphasis on the Asia-Pacific region. This colloquium is a great opportunity for academics, health professionals and students to be updated on current developments.

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Placebo symposium    View Summary
17 November 2017 to 18 November 2017

Harnessing placebo mechanisms to improve clinical outcomes

Obesity Management Workshop for Health Professionals   View Summary
17 November 2017 to 18 November 2017

An evidence- and case-based interactive two day professional training workshop
that will bring health professionals up to speed on the latest practical ways to recognise when weight is a problem for their clients, and what to do about it then.

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Seminar - Which Comes First: Overeating or Obesity?   View Summary
21 November 2017

Presenter

Professor David S Ludwig, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School

Seminar - The Politics of Obesity   View Summary
22 November 2017

Presenter

Professor Tim Lobstein from the World Obesity Federation

Australian Society of Performing Arts Healthcare Symposium   View Summary
25 November 2017

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Symposium - Research Translation in a Complex Health System   View Summary
28 November 2017
Draft program