News

Sydney researchers named in NHMRC top 10


16 December 2010

Two University of Sydney researchers have been ranked in the top 10 recipients of the National Health and Medical Research Council's (NHMRC) Excellence Awards, presented in Canberra on Wednesday 15 December.

Professors Jürgen Götz (left) and Guy Marks have been named among Australia's top 10 researchers.
Professors Jürgen Götz (left) and Guy Marks have been named among Australia's top 10 researchers.

Professor Jürgen Götz was presented with the NHMRC Achievement Award for Highest Ranked Project Grant. His major research interest is in developing transgenic animal models to understand pathogenic mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease and to use these to develop therapies. Professor Götz worked in Germany, the US and Switzerland, before being recruited to the University's Brain and Mind Research Institute in 2005.

Professor Guy Marks won the NHMRC Achievement Award for Top Ranked Practitioner Fellow. His research uses diverse epidemiological tools to understand, monitor and evaluate interventions relevant to major local and global lung health problems, in particular, chronic respiratory disease and tuberculosis. Professor Marks leads the Respiratory and Environmental Epidemiology group at the University's Woolcock Institute of Medical Research.

NHMRC - Australia's peak body for health and medical research - presents the awards each year to recognise the scientific merit, innovation and the research success of 10 of Australia's leading health and medical researchers.

The University of Sydney attracted $70,726,363 in NHMRC funding in 2010, funding 131 grants in total. These grants included project, equipment, partnership grants and a range of fellowship grants.

"The NHMRC established these Excellence Awards to recognise and reward achievement in the highly competitive health and medical research field," Professor Warwick Anderson, Chief Executive Officer of the NHMRC said.

"These award winners are outstanding researchers. As the highest ranking applicants in their funding schemes, these 10 researchers have been assessed by their peers as meeting the highest national and international standards for their research."

Professor Götz and Professor Marks were identified as being in the top 10 of nearly 5000 researchers who applied for NHMRC funding in 2010.

"It is important that their achievements are recognised by all Australians, who will benefit from the results of this research. Australia will have, through the ongoing contribution of these world-class researchers, a self improving health system," Professor Michael Good, Chair of the NHMRC said.

"That is why the NHMRC continues to recognise the best and brightest researchers through our Excellence Awards. We want to ensure that Australia's health and medical research workforce continues to conduct high quality, ethical research that can respond to our health needs in the 21st century."