News

Two Australian Academy of Science awards for Faculty of Science



16 January 2013

The Australian Academy of Science has recognised the research excellence of two University of Sydney scientists: Professor Peter Lay, from the School of Chemistry, won the 2013 David Craig Medal and Professor Sébastien Perrier, also from the School of Chemistry, won the 2013 Le Fevre Memorial Prize.

The prizes were announced by the Australian Academy of Science on 16 January 2013 and will be presented to the winners at different events in 2013.

Professor Peter Lay, from the School of Chemistry, has won the 2013 David Craig Medal from the Australian Academy of Science, recognising his outstanding research career in chemistry.
Professor Peter Lay, from the School of Chemistry, has won the 2013 David Craig Medal from the Australian Academy of Science, recognising his outstanding research career in chemistry.

Professor Peter Lay's outstanding research career in chemistry is recognised with the David Craig Medal, which he will receive on 30 May 2013 at the Australian Academy of Science's 'Science in the Shine Dome' event in Canberra.

The David Craig Medal is awarded annually and rewards contributions of a high order to any branch of chemistry by active researchers.

"I am honoured to be awarded the David Craig Medal. In accepting the award, I gratefully acknowledge and thank the contributions of the many research students, mentors, colleagues and collaborators who have enabled me to continue to pursue cutting-edge multi-disciplinary research," said Professor Lay.

"I also acknowledge the support of the University of Sydney, the Australian Research Council, the National Health and Medical Research Council, the Australian Synchrotron, the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, and various other funding bodies that enabled me to pursue this research."

Professor Lay has performed pioneering research in inorganic chemistry and bioinorganic chemistry that has ranged from fullerene spectroscopy to reaction kinetics, from electrochemistry to solvent effects on the kinetics and thermodynamics of reactions, and from mixed-valence complexes to metal carcinogenicity.

He has worked on metal drugs as anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drugs; on metal complex structure and speciation using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, including 3D structural determinations of reactive intermediates and the active site of heme proteins; and on biospectroscopy of cells, tissues and biological fluids for understanding normal physiological processes, diseases and their treatments and medical diagnostics.

In each of these areas, Professor Lay's research has had or is beginning to have high international recognition as evidenced by citation indices, invitations for invited lectures, book chapters and major critical reviews.

As part of the prize, Professor Lay will deliver a lecture at the 'Science in the Shine Dome' event and also give several public lectures in cities across Australia.

Professor Sébastien Perrier, from the School of Chemistry, has won the 2013 Le Fevre Memorial Prize from the Australian Academy of Science, reconising his outstanding research in chemistry as a scientist under 40 years of age.
Professor Sébastien Perrier, from the School of Chemistry, has won the 2013 Le Fevre Memorial Prize from the Australian Academy of Science, reconising his outstanding research in chemistry as a scientist under 40 years of age.

Professor Sébastien Perrier has won the early career award, the Le Fevre Memorial Prize, which recognises outstanding basic research in chemistry by scientists of no more than 40 years of age in the calendar year of nomination.

He will receive his award and $3000 prize money at the Royal Australian Chemical Institute award dinner in October or November 2013.

"I feel very honoured to be awarded such a prestigious prize and join the list of the previous awardees. It is a great recognition of my whole research group's work - staff, students and postdocs," said Professor Perrier.

"It is great to see the Australian Academy of Science recognising the work of early career scientists, and advertising it to the scientific community and the wider public."

Professor Perrier won the prize for his work in macromolecular chemistry, using the ability to harness chemical synthesis to generate large molecules that form nanostructured materials.

He has designed a wide range of new polymeric materials from initial concept to final product by engineering their molecular structures. These materials have a wealth of applications, from commercial products in the personal-care industry to health and medicine.

Professor Perrier's outstanding fundamental and applied polymer research is crafted to ensure adherence to the important design principles of using sustainable processes for the synthesis of polymers and the choice of 'green' end-product materials that have a low impact on the environment.

Read more about the Australian Academy of Sciences awards at: www.science.org.au/awards/honorific-awards.html'


Contact: Katynna Gill

Phone: 02 9351 6997

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