News

University of Sydney Sleek Geeks Science Eureka Prize


9 September 2015

The 2015 University of Sydney Sleek Geeks Science Eureka Prize finalists with Professor Trevor Hambley, Dean of Science and the Sleek Geeks, Dr Karl and Adam Spencer.
The 2015 University of Sydney Sleek Geeks Science Eureka Prize finalists with Professor Trevor Hambley, Dean of Science and the Sleek Geeks, Dr Karl and Adam Spencer.

One of the most popular parts of the science calendar is the annual University of Sydney Sleek Geeks Science Eureka Prize, where primary and high school students create entertaining three minute videos on a science topic of their choice.

The Sleek Geeks - Adam Spencer, the University of Sydney's Mathematics and Science Ambassador, and Dr Karl Kruszelnicki, the University of Sydney's Julius Sumner Miller Fellow - are passionate about getting students fascinated by science.

The makers of the two primary school and three high school prize-winning films enjoyed a special winners' lunch with Dr Karl and Adam at the University of Sydney on 26 August, where all five films were shown and each winner was interviewed by the Sleek Geeks in front of a live audience and six NSW schools who registered to conference-call in.

Dr Karl told the students at the lunch, "What you need in a good science film is surprise and a bit of humour." Adam added, "We love the inclusion of a good science experiment or demonstration in the films."

Georgia Souyave-Murphy and Ella Woods, from St Margaret's Anglican Girls' School, in Brisbane, Queensland, won the primary school First Prize for their film 'Cry Stoppers', which investigates how cutting onions makes people cry and methods to avoid the effect.

William Martin, from Trinity Grammar Junior School, in Sydney, NSW, won the primary school Second Prize for his film 'Why is Seaweed Brown?', which explores photosynthetic pigments and the process of photosynthesis.

Paige Bebee, from Ivanhoe Girls Grammar School, in Victoria, won the secondary school First Prize for her film 'The Secret of the Appendix', which stars her sister Milla Bebee and grandfather Nobel Prize winner Professor Barry Marshall, and reveals recent research that indicates that the appendix plays an important role in human health.

Luke Cadorin-Taylor, from St Aloysius' College, in Sydney, NSW, won the secondary school Second Prize for his film 'Why are Concussions Bad for You?', which uses clay animation to demonstrate the effects of head injuries on the brain.

Tom Downie and Harry Bebbington, from Warrandyte High School, in Victoria, won the secondary school Third Prize for their film 'Gravity sucks', which explains gravity and its impact on Earth and in space.

Check out all the 2015 University of Sydney Sleek Geeks Science Eureka Prize winner and finalist films: http://www.abc.net.au/science/sleekgeeks/eureka/