News

Students love Science in the City



15 August 2008

A show where air crushes steel, a chance to make lightening and extract DNA from strawberries, plus Dr Karl's show 'Great Moments in Science'... it could only mean one thing - Science in the City in 2008!

Science in the City launch: Mr Frank Howarth, Director of Australian Museum; Mr Brian Sherman, President of the Australian Museum Trust; Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir, Chancellor of the University of Sydney and Professor David Day, Dean of Science.
Science in the City launch: Mr Frank Howarth, Director of Australian Museum; Mr Brian Sherman, President of the Australian Museum Trust; Her Excellency Professor Marie Bashir, Chancellor of the University of Sydney and Professor David Day, Dean of Science.

Science in the City is an annual event run as part of National Science Week by the Australian Museum and the University of Sydney.

Looking down a microscope with Microscopes on the Move at Science in the City.
Looking down a microscope with Microscopes on the Move at Science in the City.

This year, Science in the City ran for high school students on 5 - 7 August and primary school students on 12 - 14 August, giving students a chance to attend science talks, shows, workshops and activities.

Science in the City was launched by Professor Marie Bashir, Chancellor of the University of Sydney, Professor David Day, Dean of Science, and Frank Howarth, Director of the Australian Museum on 5 August.

The University of Sydney offered activities from different disciplines of science including Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences, Mathematics and Statistics, Physics, Psychology, Centre for Ultrahigh-bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems, ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology, Microscopes on the Move, and information from the Faculty of Science, Faculty of Engineering and IT, and Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources. Plus two very popular shows presented by Dr Karl Kruszelnicki - 'Great Moments in Science' - and Associate Professor Tony Masters - 'Great Chemical Disasters'.

"Science in the City is a fantastic opportunity for school students to engage with science, engineering, technology and innovation first hand," said Louise Freys, Assistant Marketing Manager, Faculty of Science, University of Sydney.

"Students have fun whilst they learn, and are introduced to new concepts and equipment not necessarily available in their schools," said Louise.

'Electricity, Magnetism and Electromagnetism', a workshop run by Dr Phil Dooley from the School of Physics, had high school students making their own lightning, charging themselves up to ten thousand volts, firing an electromagnetic gun and building a superfast communication network with a stream of water.

Students extract DNA with the University of Sydney's ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology.
Students extract DNA with the University of Sydney's ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology.

'Great Chemical Disasters', an entertaining talk and demonstration given by Associate Professor Tony Masters, from the School of Chemistry, showed high school students how the stupidity of human error and the unpredictability of nature have contributed to the world's greatest chemical disasters.

The ARC Centre of Excellence in Plant Energy Biology ran its popular 'Plant Powerstation' workshops presented by Katynna Gill, where high school students got to extract DNA from strawberries, run a gel electrophoresis, see photosynthesis in action and learn about the molecules that colour plants.

The 'Chem-E Car Challenge', run by the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, got high school students to build their own small motor vehicle powered with hydrogen split from water in a special fuel cell and race them.

High school students did hands-on chemistry in the School of Chemistry's workshop, where they worked with liquid nitrogen, acids, bases and fluorescence.

The School of Biological Sciences run 'Monsters Beneath Our Feet', a workshop run by Carla Avolio where primary and secondary students came face-to-face with mini monsters - fascinating terrestrial invertebrates such as insects and spiders - by finding them in soil samples and looking at them under microscopes.

Primary school students enjoyed the 'Airmazing: the Amazing Powers of Air' show, presented by Dr Phil Dooley and Lara Davis from the School of Physics. The show demonstrated the power of air as it broke wood, crushed steel and lifted heavy objects.

The Science in the City program has been running since 2001 and caters for schools in Sydney and surrounding areas. Science in the City is supported by the City of Sydney.

Making tornados in a bottle with the Faculty of Science.
Making tornados in a bottle with the Faculty of Science.


Contact: Katynna Gill

Phone: 02 9351 6997

Email: 001846000f2d3b01080e012f193f033a2b6c030b40584a45