News

Dr Tim Schmidt first Australia-based scientist to win the Coblentz Award



9 February 2010

Dr Tim Schmidt, from the School of Chemistry, has won the 2010 Coblentz Award from US vibrational spectroscopy association, the Coblentz Society. Dr Schmidt is the first scientist working in Australia to win the Coblentz Award, which is presented annually to an outstanding young molecular spectroscopist under the age of 36.

Dr Tim Schmidt is the first scientist working in Australia to win the Coblentz Award from US vibrational spectroscopy association, the Coblentz Society. He will receive his award and deliver his Coblentz Award Lecture in June 2010 at the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy.
Dr Tim Schmidt is the first scientist working in Australia to win the Coblentz Award from US vibrational spectroscopy association, the Coblentz Society. He will receive his award and deliver his Coblentz Award Lecture in June 2010 at the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy.

Announced in January 2010, Dr Schmidt will be presented with his award and deliver his Coblentz Award Lecture in June 2010 at the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy in the US.

The international award, which has been presented annually since 1964, includes US $2 000 prize money and a US $500 travel allowance.

"The Coblentz Award is a real feather in my cap and recognition of some very fundamental discoveries made over the past few years," said Dr Schmidt.

"The previous awardees read like a who's who in my field, so it's great to be in such company."

Dr Schmidt will present his Coblentz Award Lecture in Ohio on 'Enhanced Interrogation of Radicals (laser spectroscopy and laboratory astrophysics)' to an audience of around 500 people.

"We are very much looking forward to Tim's lecture in June. He's a rising star in the field of spectroscopy," said Professor Terry Miller, Chair of the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy.

"Tim was selected for the award primarily because of his outstanding work obtaining new spectra of moderately large organic molecules. Such molecules are important in processes on Earth such as combustion, atmospheric pollution, and are of possible astrophysical interest," said Professor Miller.

The Coblentz Society is a non-profit organisation founded in 1954, which fosters the understanding and application of vibrational spectroscopy. One of the Coblentz Society's primary missions is to bestow recognition upon professionals for excellence in the advancement of vibrational spectroscopy.

The society and award are named after William Weber Coblentz (1873-1962), who was a US scientist noted for his contributions to infrared radiometry and spectroscopy. Coblentz founded the radiometry section of the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology) in Washington, DC, in 1905 and headed it for 40 years until his retirement in 1945.

Another Australian - Dr David Cameron - won the Coblentz Award in 1983, while working at the National Research Council of Canada, in Ottawa. Dr Cameron was born and educated in Australia, completing his PhD at La Trobe University in Melbourne, then leaving to work in Canada and the US for most of the rest of his career.

Learn more about the Coblentz Society at: www.coblentz.org

See details of the Ohio State University International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy at: http://molspect.chemistry.ohio-state.edu/symposium/index.html


Contact: Katynna Gill

Phone: 02 9351 6997

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