News

Three new Fellows elected to Australian Academy of Science



26 March 2010

Three staff from the Faculty of Science were elected as Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science on 24 March 2010. Dr Marianne Frommer, from the School of Biological Sciences, Professor Jeffrey Reimers, from the School of Chemistry, and Professor Elaine Sadler, from the School of Physics, were honoured as three of Australia's leading scientists.

Dr Marianne Frommer, from the School of Biological Sciences, was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science for her work in molecular genetics, including her invention of bisulphite genomic sequencing.
Dr Marianne Frommer, from the School of Biological Sciences, was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science for her work in molecular genetics, including her invention of bisulphite genomic sequencing.

Chosen from scientists working in Australian universities, CSIRO and medical research institutions, Dr Frommer, Professor Reimers and Professor Sadler were amongst seventeen scientists elected as Fellows this year.

Election to the Australian Academy of Science recognises a career that has significantly advanced and continues to advance the world's scientific knowledge.

Dr Marianne Frommer, an Honorary Research Associate in the School of Biological Sciences, was distinguished for her work in molecular genetics, including her invention of bisulphite genomic sequencing.

"I am rather gobsmacked to be chosen as a Fellow, but thrilled on behalf of women in science. Although I've been very fortunate, female scientists often struggle to build and maintain a research profile when faced with family responsibilities. It's great that both women elected this year to the Academy of Science have come from the University of Sydney. Of course, science is a social activity, and I would like to acknowledge my superb co-workers and collaborators," said Dr Frommer.

Professor Jeffrey Reimers, from the School of Chemistry, was distinguished for his work on the electronic and vibrational structure of complex materials.

"I am honoured to be admitted as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science. As a student I wandered the circular corridor of the Academy's Shine Dome in Canberra and gaped in awe at the achievements on display there and the rich history of Australian innovation depicted," said Professor Reimers.

Professor Jeffrey Reimers, from the School of Chemistry, was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science for his work on the electronic and vibrational structure of complex materials.
Professor Jeffrey Reimers, from the School of Chemistry, was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science for his work on the electronic and vibrational structure of complex materials.

"Back then, I looked at the faces and stories of the people who invented what to me was just everyday business. Inspiration came from my supervisors and mentors, and later through my colleagues and students - the people who made it possible for me to receive this honour.

"Now, my hope is that through the Academy one day new students will look back at what we have done in terms of making first principles calculations of complex chemical systems a tool for experimental design and think of it as just 'everyday business', and that people will be inspired to new dreams and new breakthroughs," said Professor Reimers.

Professor Elaine Sadler, from the School of Physics, was distinguished for her work in high energy astrophysics and galaxy evolution.

Professor Sadler said, "The Academy is a prestigious institution, and to be elected as a Fellow is a great honour for any scientist. I think it's quite exceptional to have three people elected in one year from the Faculty of Science and four altogether from the University of Sydney."

Another University of Sydney scientist, Professor Roger Reddel, Director of the Children's Medical Research Institute at Westmead Hospital and the University of Sydney, was also elected as a Fellow of the Academy, being recognised for his work on cellular immortalisation and the discovery of the alternative lengthening of telomeres and its significance in cancer.

Professor Elaine Sadler, from the School of Physics, was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science for her work in high energy astrophysics and galaxy evolution.
Professor Elaine Sadler, from the School of Physics, was elected as a Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science for her work in high energy astrophysics and galaxy evolution.

The new Fellows of the Academy have been invited to attend Science at the Shine Dome, an event run in Canberra by the Australian Academy of Science from 5 to 7 May 2010. They will be officially welcomed to the Academy at the New Fellows Dinner on 4 May, and formally admitted to the Academy at a ceremony on 6 May. They also have the opportunity to introduce themselves and present a talk on their research to members of the Academy and the general public at the New Fellows Seminar on 5 May.

See all seventeen of the newly elected Fellows of the Australian Academy of Science at: www.science.org.au/news/media/25march2010.html


Contact: Katynna Gill

Phone: 02 9351 6997

Email: 59333b123d03084d33273e0b100b3f5d3d331e4b244b386c5137