News

Bryan Gaensler in Top 100 most influential people



9 December 2010

Professor Bryan Gaensler, from the School of Physics, has been named in the top 100 most influential people in Sydney by the Sydney Morning Herald's the(sydney)magazine.

The list of Sydney's top 100 most influential people was released on 9 December 2010 in a special edition of the(sydney)magazine.

Professor Bryan Gaensler, from the School of Physics, has been named in the top 100 most influential people in Sydney by the Sydney Morning Herald's the(sydney)magazine. Photo: Damian Bennett, the(sydney)magazine.
Professor Bryan Gaensler, from the School of Physics, has been named in the top 100 most influential people in Sydney by the Sydney Morning Herald's the(sydney)magazine. Photo: Damian Bennett, the(sydney)magazine.

Dubbed 'The Spaceman' in the list, Professor Gaensler was selected for his research in wide-field radio and optical astronomy, galaxy evolution and cosmology.

Professor Gaensler being named as 2010 NSW Scientist of the Year in the physics, earth sciences, chemistry and astronomy category was highlighted in the listing, as was his success in gaining funding for the new ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics, where he is the Director. Receiving an Australian Laureate Fellowship for 2011 was also noted in the(sydney)magazine listing, as was Professor Gaensler's decision to become an astronomer at age five.

Professor Bryan Gaensler has developed innovative new spectropolarimetric techniques, and has used them to derive detailed three-dimensional maps of large-scale magnetic fields in the Milky Way, the Magellanic Clouds and in distant galaxies.

As a by-product of studying astrophysical magnetism, Professor Gaensler has also made the stunning discovery that the Milky Way is twice as thick as was previously thought.

"Sydney is a world leader in astronomy and what's amazing is how we do it with so few people," said Professor Gaensler in the(sydney)magazine.

Professor Gaensler has also recently been awarded the highly prestigious Pawsey Medal, which is awarded annually by the Australian Academy of Science for outstanding Australian research in physics by scientists less than 40 years of age.

Professor Gaensler was selected by a panel of ten experts in the Science and Knowledge section of the list, including Michael Anderson (Associate Professor in Teaching and Learning at the University of Sydney), Ben Cubby (Sydney Morning Herald's environment editor), Michael Mobbs (author of Sustainable House), Asher Moses (Sydney Morning Herald's online technology editor), Anna Patty (Sydney Morning Herald's education editor), Julie Robotham (Sydney Morning Herald's medical editor), Deborah Smith (Sydney Morning Herald's science editor), Norman Swan (ABC Radio's presenter of The Health Report), Robyn Williams (ABC Radio's presenter of The Science Show) and George Wright (Fairfax Digital's head of Future Services).


Contact: Katynna Gill

Phone: 02 9351 6997

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