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Sydney Science Forum: An explosive night of molecular gastronomy



20 October 2011

Come on a culinary adventure of foams, froths and frozen treats when Professor Hervé This, one of the two fathers of molecular gastronomy, presents at the Sydney Science Forum: 'An explosive night of molecular gastronomy' on 25 October 2011.

Celebrating the International Year of Chemistry, this free public event to be held in the Great Hall of the University of Sydney will also feature acclaimed Sydney chef, Martin Benn, of Sepia restaurant showcasing his expertise in creating extraordinary new textures and surprising taste sensations.

Professor Hervé This, one of the two fathers of molecular gastronomy, will take the audience on a culinary adventure of foams, froths and frozen treats when he presents at the Sydney Science Forum: 'An explosive night of molecular gastronomy' on 25 October 2011.
Professor Hervé This, one of the two fathers of molecular gastronomy, will take the audience on a culinary adventure of foams, froths and frozen treats when he presents at the Sydney Science Forum: 'An explosive night of molecular gastronomy' on 25 October 2011.

The International Year of Chemistry recognises the importance of chemistry and its applications in our everyday lives. The chemistry of food affects everyone each day, as we perform our own chemical reactions when we cook, combine and consume food. Chemistry leads to novel applications that are going to shape the future of our food.

As a chemist based at AgroParisTech - the Paris Institute of Technology for Life, Food and Environmental Studies - in France, Professor Hervé This is a world leader in the chemistry of food. He coined the term 'molecular gastronomy' in a paper published in 1988.

Since then, he pioneered 'Note by Note Cuisine' - a new method of preparing food that he published in Scientific American in 1994, which Professor This predicts will be the next big thing after molecular cuisine.

"Molecular Cuisine is a culinary trend whose initial idea was to rationalise the culinary activity, by using new tools, new ingredients and new methods," explained Professor This.

"I have to add that 'new' means what was not present in Paul Bocuse's kitchen in the 1970's! For example, ultrasonic probes can make emulsions, like in a mayonnaise sauce, in some seconds. Molecular cuisine is an application of science to technique," said Professor This.

"There are many amazing effects that can be created in the kitchen using the tools from chemistry laboratories."

Molecular gastronomy has become extremely popular around the world, with many top chefs building their reputations based on their creativity in employing the techniques and processes coming from science in their food preparation.

"Note by Note Cuisine is a way of cooking using compounds to build dishes - just like how musicians of today can use synthesisers instead of traditional instruments to make music," said Professor This.

"Cooks can build any aspect of dishes using Note By Note Cuisine. These dishes are not made using meat, fish, vegetables and fruits, but instead compounds or simple mixtures of compounds, from which the chefs make all aspects of the various dishes: shape, consistency, color, odor taste, trigeminal sensations."

"Note by Note Cuisine is remarkable, as it questions science, technology, technique, art and education. It's a particular application of science, but with consequences which justify that science makes new explorations!"

Martin Benn, of Sydney's Sepia restaurant, will be making his signature Japanese stones at the Sydney Science Forum on 25 October. Named Chef of the Year at the 2011 Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide Awards, Martin Benn uses molecular gastronomy techniques to concoct unique textures and contrasts in his food.

Audience members will get the chance to taste Martin Benn's original Japanese stones, which look like river-smoothed stones on the outside, but have an unexpected centre. See why his spectacular creations using molecular gastronomy have earned Sepia three Chef's Hats in 2012 from the Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide - the highest possible rating, achieved by only four other restaurants in NSW.

After the presentation, the University of Sydney's Main Quadrangle will be filled with hands-on activities revealing the chemistry of food. The audience will also enjoy drinks and canapés in the Main Quadrangle, adding a party vibe to this festival of chemistry.

Chemistry really comes to life at this very special event celebrating the International Year of Chemistry.

Event is now fully booked.

Sydney Science Forum - An explosive night of molecular gastronomy:

Date: Tuesday 25 October 2011
Time: 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Location: The Great Hall, University of Sydney
Cost: Free


Contact: Katynna Gill

Phone: 02 9351 6997

Email: 3f524416010d341b48102f1b30452007260a15582a50196c2c39