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A chronicle of music in colonial Australia from 1811 to 1820

Dr GRAEME SKINNER (University of Sydney)


THIS PAGE IS ALWAYS UNDER CONSTRUCTION


To cite this:

Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney), "A chronicle of music in colonial Australia from 1811 to 1820", Australharmony (an online resource toward the history of music and musicians in colonial and early Federation Australia): http://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/chronicle1811-1820.php; accessed 18 August 2017


Summary

This is page 3 (of 4) of an open access work-in-progress to chronicle, in date order, all of the scarce documentary references to music in Australia, Indigenous and European, from earliest contacts until the end of 1825.

Entries are also included for some occasions in which music must certainly played a part, although there is no actual record of it, such as when it accompanied dancing, and civil, military, and religious ceremonies; and for some other important historical occasions when it is very likely to have done.

Please contact me if you have, or know of, relevant information missing here, and which you are willing to share.


For the other 3 pages:

http://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/chronicle1542-1800.php 

http://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/chronicle1801-1810.php 

http://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/chronicle1821-1825.php 


1811



View of Sydney, c.1811, John Eyre; State Library of New South Wales

View of Sydney, from the east side of the Cove, ca. 1811, John Eyre; State Library of New South Wales

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=839966




18 January 1811 (Queen's Birthday)

Government House, Sydney (NSW)

Queen's Birthday Ball, with decorations of a Corrobori

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, Memoranda and Related Papers. 22 December 1808-14 July 1823; SLNSW ML Ref: A772 30f. [Microfilm Reel CY301 frame 37]

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/lema/1811/1811jan.html (modern edition online)

Friday 18th. Jany. - This being the Queen's Birth-Day, I recd the Complimts. of the Gentlemen Civil & Mily. - and gave a Ball & Supper to the Ladies & Gentlemen of the Settlement at Night - Persons having sat down to Supper. -

"SYDNEY", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 January 1811), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628170 

Yesteday, being the Birth-Day of OUR MOST GRACIOUS QUEEN, was observed as a Holiday throughout the Colony. The usual salutes were fired, and Presents made to the Non-commissioned Officers and Privates of the 73d Regiment, of half-a-pint of spirits and a pound of fresh beef a man; which latter complement was also extended to the prisoners, who were excused from attending to their usual avocations in honor of the day. At 12 His EXCELLENCY appeared on the Parade, and inspected the 73d Regiment, who fired three vollies in honor of the day; His Excellency expressing the highest satisfaction at their appearance, and the precision with which the evolutions were performed; and afterwards returned to Government House. At one o'clock His Excellency the GOVERNOR in CHIEF received the Compliments of the Officers Civil and Military, and other Gentlemen on the return of the auspicious season. An Ode for the occasion (which we have the pleasure to offer to our Readers), was presented to His EXCELLENCY by Mr. Michael Robinson; who, at His Excellency's desire, recited it in the presence and much to the gratification of the Assembly, who joined, in the warmest language of encomium, to compliment the Author on the excellence of his performance. The Anniversary Ball given by His EXCELLENCY was very numerously attended. Government House was brilliantly lighted, and the apartments decorated in an exquisite style of taste and novelty. In the center of the ballroom were the Royal Initials in chrystal, beautifully worked, suspended betweea festoons of leaves and flowers extending across the room, the north end of which was covered with a transparent painting (executed by Mr. Lewin in a highly finished style), the subject local, and the design peculiarly appropriate, being the representation of our Native Race in their happy moments of festivity, contrasting in silent admiration their amusements to the recitations of a polished Circle; and instead of expressing dissatisfaction at the humility of their condition, earnestly anticipating the blessing of civilization, while a striking full-sized figure, drawn in one of the most animated attitudes of the corrobori, pointed with his waddy at the Church of St. Philip, of which an accurate perspective view was given, as symbolical of the Christian Religion inviting them to happiness. Each of the portraits bore so accurate a resemblance to some familiar native as scarcely to leave a doubt that the representation was taken from the life, in whatever attitude the Artist considered best adapted to his subject; the whole of the scene receiving a warmth of colouring from the judicious representation of their fires and the softness of expression produced by the reflected rays of the using moon. As this part of the preparation was unexpected the admiration was the more nervous, and none forebore the meed of praise to the performance. About nine commenced the "airy dance"; which submitted not to interruption until the Company were requested to withdraw to the Supper Room, which furnished a new subject of delight to the admiring eye. The spacious new apartment prepared for the occasion resembled in its interior the center of a grove, with its boughs formed into bowers regularly arched, and ornamented with variegated lamps between the pillars; the fascinating effect of which could not do less than charm. The tables were formed into an oblong square, with an open end, and about one hundred persons sat down, among whom were all the principal Officers and Ladies of the Colony. After supper the dance resumed, and continued till a late hour, when His EXCELLENCY the Governor and MRS. MACQUARIE received the farewell compliments of the Company, much gratified in the testimonial of happiness that had universally been given on the Celebration of the happy Event.


Bibliography:

-





31 January 1811

Government House, Sydney, NSW


Mrs. M. giving a Concert in the Evening

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, Memoranda and related papers, 22 December 1808-14 July 1823; SLNSW, ML Ref: A772 30f. [Microfilm Reel CY301 Frame #37]

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/lema/1812/1812jan.html (modern edition online)

Thursday 31st Jany. 1811! The 73d. Regt. was reviewed by me in the morning and I gave a Public Dinner to the Officers of the Regt. and their Ladies; Mrs. M. giving a Concert in the Evening, at which some other Ladies attended; this being the anniversary of my Birth-Day.


Bibliography:

-





26 June 1811

Isaac Nichols's Sydney Hotel, Sydney, NSW

The Batchelor's Ball

Documentation:

"SYDNEY", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (29 June 1811), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628273 

The Batchelor's Ball. This annual Fete was given on Wednesday evening at Mr. Nichols's. The principal Officers, Ladies, and Gentlemen of the Colony attended the Meeting, which was honoured with the presence of His Excellency the Governor and Mrs. Macquarie. The Company was numerous, yet select; and the Festivities were conducted in a masterly style of elegance. Between eleven and twelve the Company sat down to a handsome collation; after which "the merry dance" resumed, and continued to a late hour.


Bibliography:

-





23 and 27 November 1811

Hobart and New Norfolk,

Singing and dancing around their Bonfires

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, journal

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/journeys/1811/1811.html (modern edition online)

[23 November] ... at 11 a.m. we landed at Hobart Town, close under the Government House, after a very pleasant Rowe [sic] of ten miles from Ralph's Bay and up the River Derwent; ... I issued General Orders to announce my arrival to inspect this Settlement and also my intention of visiting & inspecting the several Farms in it in the course of the ensuing week. I then dressed and went out to take a walk with Mrs. Macquarie through the Town before Dinner. We walked in the Government Garden, and afterwards on the Hill intended to build the new Barracks on. Capt. Murray, Lieuts. Gunning & Campbell, & Asst. Surgeon Dermott of the 73d. Regt. besides our own family, dined with us today, and in the Evening the Town was very handsomely illuminated, and large Bone-fires were made by the Troops, the free Inhabitants, and Convicts, in compliment to my arrival at this Settlement. Some of the Houses were very fancifully and prettily illuminated, and the Inhabitants & Troops & Convicts continued singing and dancing around their Bone-fires to a late hour. The Favorite Brig was also very beautifully illuminated.

[27 November] At 6 o'clock this morning Mrs. M. and myself, on Horseback, accompanied by the Gentlemen of our Family and Lieut. Gunning, set out from Hobart Town on purpose to visit and inspect the Farms in the District of New Norfolk ... After a delightful walk at Elizabeth Town, we re-crossed the River to Mr. Mc.Carty's, where we had a most excellent Dinner. A great number of the Settlers received us with many Cheers and Huzzas on our first landing at Mc. Carty's Farm, where they continued drinking, singing, and making Bone-fires the greater part of the Night. We went in the Boat to see the 1st. Fall after Dinner.


Bibliography:

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1811

London, England


MOOWATTIN, Daniel (singer)

Daniel Moowattin's song in London

His articulation seemed indistinct, the sounds having great similarity to each other as, ra-ra tah, wha-rah rah, bab-hah tah-rah hah. The tune was occasionally changed; the ditty was divided into three parts or verses; the latter was particularly hurried and exulting.


Documentation:

"MOO-WAT-TIN", Chambers's Edinburgh Journal 2/77 (20 July 1833), 199-200

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=yvsnAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA199 (DIGITISED)

... Notwithstanding the seeming facilities for obtaining food, the natives are frequently driven to such extremities as to satisfy their hunger with a species of worm or grub, fern roots, and berries of various plants. They have no idea of providing for the morrow, but eat so long as there remains any food, and then stretching themselves in the sun, sleep till hunger calls them again into action. A branch of a species of fir is always to be found burning with every party, because they have great difficulty in recovering fire, should the fir stick be extinguished. Their amusements are few; amongst them dancing holds no distinguished place, for they have no regulated steps, no expression, no character, unless the imitation of the kangaroo maybe called a kangaroo dance, in which a their actions appear to be the result of hilarity alone. When a number of the natives are assembled an individual will start from among the others, leaping, bounding, and throwing his arms about in violent gesticulution and antic positions, till, from fatigue, he can stand no longer. Meanwhile, others have been singing songs, commencing at the top of the voice, the modulations lowering as long as the breath will permit. The lungs are their inflated with considerable noise, and the modulations repeated till hoarseness renders farther articulation impossible. On these occasions, the natives ornament themselves with red and white clay, by stripes on the forehead, circles round the eyes, waving lines on the breast a arms, and spots on various parts of the body. When a number of the natives are assembled an individual will start from among the others, leaping, bounding, and throwing his arms about in violent gesticulation and antic positions, till, from fatigue, he can stand no longer. Meanwhile, others have been singing songs, commencing at the top of the voice, the modulations lowering as long as the breath will permit. The lungs are their inflated with considerable noise, and the modulations repeated till hoarseness renders farther articulation impossible. On these occasions, the natives ornament themselves with red and white clay, by stripes on the forehead circles round the eyes, waving lines on the breast a arms, and spots on various parts of the body ...

... Two instances have occurred of the aborigines of New South Wales having been brought by a gentleman to England: one, whose name was Be-ne-long, in 1793, another in 1811, whose name was Moo-wat-tin. The general conduct of these men was so similar that the particulars relating to the last mentioned individual may be sufficient to show the character and disposition of both, perhaps of all. Moo-wat-tin was a chief, and, though acting occasionally as a servant while in England, never forgot a seeming consciousness of importance. Moo-wat-tin spoke English so well as to excite surprise at the power with which he would use the monosyllables. He became an object of great curiosity to many, and was closely observed during several visits he made with the gentleman who brought him to England. On some occasions ladies were of the party, who were pleased with the decorum, or, it may be said, the politeness, with which the savage chief from New South Wales behaved. At the dinner table he was desirous to oblige others by passing what might be required; was never confused, but acted as though he had been accustomed to mixed society. He ate and drank very moderately, preferring sherry to any other wine, of which he never took more than three glasses. It was supposed he had received directions for his conduct, or that he was merely an imitator of others; however this might be, his behaviour was such as to command approbation. He was particularly pleased at hearing a lady sing "No, my love, no." He sat with strongly marked expressions of attention and delight, and when asked to sing, consented with a smile. His articulation seemed indistinct, the sounds having great similarity to each other as, ra-ra tah, wha-rah rah, bab-hah tah-rah hah. The tune was occasionally changed; the ditty was divided into three parts or verses; the latter was particularly hurried and exulting. On being requested to put this song into English, he replied, "Not well to do; but first we take fish, next take kangaroo, then take wife:" the particulars he declined translating . . .

"MOO-WAT-TIN", Graham's Illustrated Magazine of Literature, Romance, Art, and Fashion [Philadelphia] 10 (October 1835), 570-71

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=uFIyAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA570 (DIGITISED)

"AUSTRALIAN NATIVES. - MOO-WAT-TIN AND BE-NE-LONG", Australasian Chronicle (23 July 1842), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31736634 (DIGITISED)


Bibliography:

Smith 2011





1812



18 January 1812 (The Queen's Birthday)

Parramatta, NSW

Highland Reels


Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, Memoranda and related papers, 22 December 1808-14 July 1823; SLNSW, ML Ref: A772 39-41 ff. [Microfilm Reel CY301 Frames #46-48]

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/lema/1812/1812jan.html (modern edition online)

Saturday 18th. Jany. 1812 ! At 10, OClock this morning anchored in Sydney Cove the Guildford Convict Transport Ship Commanded by Capt. Johnson, with a Detachment of the 73d. Regt. Commanded by Capt. Coane, as a Guard, having 199 Male Convicts from England on board - all in good health. - The Guildford sailed from England on the 3d. of Septr. and touched at Rio Janeiro in Novr. - Recd. Public Dispatches from the Secry. of State for the Colonies by the Guildford dated 26. July 1811; and some Private Letters from Friends at home. -

I had Addresses from Sydney, Windsor, Parramatta and George's River presented to me this Day at the Public Levee held in honor of the Queen's Birth-Day. - Gave a Ball & Supper in the Evening to the Ladies & Gentlemen of the Settlement.

"SYDNEY", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 January 1812), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628414 

His Excellency the Governor and Mrs, Macquarie made a visit to Parramatta on Thursday last, and returned to Town this morning. On Saturday last a Ball and Supper in Honor of Her Majesty's Birth Day were given at Government House, to a party consisting of nearly 100 Ladies and Gentlemen. The various decorations of the Ball and Supper Rooms, and the general style of elegance which shone so conspicuous throughout the whole Entertainment, far surpass our powers of description. In consequence of the Birth-Day occurring on a Saturday, it was so arranged that the Company assembled and the Ball opened at an earlier hour than usual, and it was kept up with great vivacity until Supper was announced. After Supper some Highland Reels were danced, and the Company separated before 12 o'clock, highly gratified with the polite attentions and elegant entertainment from whence the approach of Sunday warned them to take their leave.


Bibliography:

-





31 January 1812

Government House, Sydney, NSW

A Concert in the Evening

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, Memoranda and related papers (22 December 1808-14 July 1823); SLNSW, ML A772 39-41 ff. [Microfilm Reel CY301]

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/lema/1812/1812jan.html (modern edition online)

Fridy. 31st. Jany. - This being the anniversary of my Birth, Completing this day my Fiftieth Year! we entertained a large Party of Friends - and had a Concert in the Evening. -


Bibliography:

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24-25 Ferbuary 1812

Castlereagh Street, Sydney, NSW

Songs and dancing before a murder

Documentation:

[Trial transcript], R. vs John Gould, C.C.J., 6 March 1811, evidence of John Limeburner, in Byrne 1993, 247

She began to play with the prisoner and pull him about. She sat upon his knee. My wife made answer "Mrs. Finney do not make so free with that man for he will not stand it." She got up from his kneww but did not say anything ... After this Catherine Devereaux sung a song, after that my wife sung one. After that the decesased said she never saw two old women so comfortable in her life "Now old Betty, I'll give you a jig first to please." The deceased was quite sober. This was her usual mode of behaviour.

"SYDNEY", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (7 March 1812), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628435 

TRAIL FOR MURDER - At the Court of Criminal Jurisdiction yesterday assembled, the trial of John Gould for the wilful murder of Margaret Finnie occupied the entire business of the day. The substance of the evidence on this case of extreme depravity was as follows:

Samuel Gordon, a private soldier of the 73d Regiment, deposed, that on the morning of Tuesday the 25th ultimo, he had occasion to call at the house of the deceased, which was in Castlereagh Street, and going thither at half past five o'clock, found her lifeless body at the back of the premises, in a mangled state; in consequence whereof he gave the alarm, and finding on enquiry that the prisoner at the bar had been late with her the previous night, he took measures to have him apprehended.

John Limeburner deposed, that his residence was nearly opposite that of the deceased; that he was acquainted with the deceased and her husband, who was a private in the 73d Regiment, and that he always considered they lived happily and peaceably; that the prisoner at the bar went into deponent's house about 8 at night, and was shortly after followed by the deceased; from whom some familiar behaviour passed; that deponent's wife and another woman were also present, and in company drank three half pints of spirits; that the prisoner and others sung, and the deceased danced, her manners being usually vivacious: That the prisoner and the deceased left the house nearly together; the deceased then appearing perfectly sober, and the prisoner almost equally so, which was between 11 and 12 ...


Bibliography:

Paula J. Byrne, Criminal law and colonial subject: New South Wales 1810-1830 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), 247





9 May 1812

Sydney, NSW

An elegant Piano Forte, a large handsome Barrel Organ, which plays thirty tunes

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 May 1812), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628466

On SALE, the valuable investment of Captain David Lauchlin, of the ship Mary, comprising a general Assortment of Cutlery, Hardware, Jewelery, Plate Goods, an elegant Piano Forte, a large handsome Barrel Organ, which plays thirty tunes, Gold and Silver Watches, &c. &c. Apply to the Captain on board, or to Mr. Robert Jenkins at Captain Brook's, Pitt-street.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 May 1812), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628478 

Captain David Lauchlin of the ship Mary imported "an elegant Piano Forte, a large handsome Barrel Organ, which plays thirty tunes"


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

Barrel organ, Longman, England, 1806, Powerhouse Museum, Sydney

http://www.powerhousemuseum.com/collection/database/?irn=256533 

http://from.ph/256533 

Marc Nobel, "Notes on the restoration of the Astor barrel organ", OHTA News (January 2003)

http://www.ohta.org.au/organs/organs/Private.html 

Barrel organ, ? USA, 1810, with DRUM and TRIANGLE, owned and operated by Walter Grace of Limekiln (Oley Line), PA; the wooden barrel contains 10 selections; that being played was labelled "Sailor's Song", recognisable as "Rule Britannia."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKNWHXlWRig 

Parry's Barrel Organ

http://www.wyastone.co.uk/sir-william-edward-parry-s-barrel-organ.html 

http://www.allmusic.com/album/parrys-barrel-organ-mw0000735428 





24 October 1812

Sydney, NSW

A fine toned double barrelled Organ

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 October 1812), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628561 

SALES BY AUCTION. BY MR. BEVAN, On Wednesday the 4th of November next, at 96, Pitt street (if not previously Disposed of by Private Contract). ALL the Neat Houshold Furniture and other Effects the Property of Mrs. Clark, consisting of Chairs, Tables, Sofas, side Board, China, Plate, &c. a fine toned double barrelled Organ, an elegant Timepiece, and sundry other Articles . . . Terms of Sale by Private Contract will be made known by applying to Mrs. Clark, on the Premises.


Bibliography:

-





18 and 20 August 1812

Sydney Hotel, Sydney, NSW

Race Balls

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (15 August 1812), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628529 

A CARD. THE first Subscription Race Ball in the ensuing Week will be held on Tuesday Evening, the 18th instant; and the second Ball on Thursday Evening, the 20th Instant, at the Sydney Hotel in George-street. To open at 7 o'Clock each Evening. Tickets to be had at the Sydney Hotel. STEWARDS CAPTAIN GLENHOLME, LIEUT. RAYMOND.

SYDNEY HOTEL. SUCH Gentlemen as wish to attend at the Race Dinners on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday next, are respectfully informed that the Tickets will be ready for Delivery each previous Day.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (21 November 1812), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628574 

A CARD. THE Proprietor of the Sydney Hotel having opened his House at the particular Request and for the Accommodation of several Gentlemen in this Colony, now begs leave to inform the Public in general, that finding it does not answer his purpose to continue it so any longer, no Person of any Description whatsoever can be accommodated in that way, and consequently the House formerly known as the Sydney Hotel, is now to be considered as "private." The Proprietor further begs, that all Gentlemen standing indebted to the said House for the Race Balls and Dinners, will come forward and settle their respective Accounts without Delay. (signed) Isaac Nichols.


Bibliography:

-




1813



5 January 1813

Sydney, NSW

Twelfth Night

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (16 January 1813), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628607 

The deference paid to the good Old English Customs has perhaps been seldom better evinced than in the celebration of the last Twelfth Night in the house of a private family in George-street. The party, consisting of none but acquaintances who were much respected, received their honorary Titles from the Cap of Fortunatus, and the Slattern and the Queen, the Prince and Pyeman, impervious to the impressions which the caprice of fortune frequently inflicts upon the mind, were only emulous in contributing to the general harmony that prevailed. A cake, whose size and excellence would have done credit to an exhibition in Corn Hill, was at a proper season introduced; and each endeavoured to support the character the chances had bestowed. The merry dance, and circling planet of the board, gave equal gout to the festivity, which abated not until Aurora with reluctant pace announced the near approach of Phoebus to the eastern horizon.


Bibliography:

-





18 January 1813

Sydney, NSW

Queen's Birthday

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarue, Memoranda and related papers (22 December 1808-14 July 1823)l SLNSW, ML A772 53-55 ff. [Microfilm Reel CY301]

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/lema/1813/1813jan.html (modern edition online)

Mondy. 18. Jany. 1813 - Kept as usual Ball & Supper - 115 Persons entertained at Supr.

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 January 1813), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628610 

Monday last, the 18th, being the BIRTH-DAY of HER MAJESTY, was celebrated with the fullest demonstrations of duteous loyalty and respect. As Usual, the Royal Standard was displayed from Fort Phillip, whence it was an object of interesting admiration. The Union was hoisted at Dawes's Battery: At twelve o'clock a Royal Salute was fired from the latter; and shortly afterwards three vollies proceeded from the 73d Regiment, who were paraded in Hyde Park, in honor of the Day. At one o'clock the GOVERNOR, having returned from the Park, received the congratulations off the Civil, Naval, and Military Officers, and of the Gentlemen, Residents of the Colony; as a proof of the general feelings of respect for HER MAJESTY we have to observe, that the Levee was most numerous. All seemed alike disposed to mark their loyalty, and we did not miss a single person who could express his zeal by his attendance at the Levee. During the Levee, an Ode (the production of a Gentleman whose poetic talents we have had repeatedly the pleasure to bear our small tribute of praise to) was recited by the Author, Mr. M. ROBINSON. We refer our Readers to our present columns for the satisfaction which we anticipate their deriving from the perusal of the Poem itself. The Ball and Supper Room in the evening at Government House surpassed by far any thing of the kind yet attempted in this Colony, and excited general admiration. The decorations of the Ball Room were composed of native shrubs and flowers, formed into festoons, and suspended from pillars erected for the purpose, which were lighted by transparent, lamps, representing the native inhabitants of the Colony in their different occupations and scenes of life, and the whole produced a novel and pleasing effect. The Company consisted of 120 persons. At ten o'clock the Supper Room was opened; to which succeeded a renewal of the sprightly Dance that continued till three o'clock in the morning when the Company retired highly gratified with the Entertainment of the Evening.


Bibliography:

-






29 January 1813

Sydney, NSW

Commemoration Dinner, the band, toasts followed by well adapted airs

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 January 1813), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628621 

THE COMMEMORATION DINNER, In Celebration of His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR'S assuming the Command in the Colony, yesterday took place in George-street, and was attended by nearly 150 persons, among whom were many Gentlemen of the first respectability, who were highly gratified in the opportunity thus afforded of joining in the duties of respect to His EXCELLENCY the COMMANDER in CHIEF. The number of persons expected to assemble on the agreeable occasion suggesting the apprehension that a fête champêtre would be the better adapted to the warmth of the season, a spacious tent was erected in the front garden of Mr. Robert Jenkins, one of the Stewards, and fancifully decorated with various ensigns, together with a variety of shrubs and boughs, formed into wreaths, festoons, and other neat devices. The tables were formed in an oblong with an open end, and on the outside of the tent the British Colours were displayed. At six the Company sat down to an excellent Dinner; during which the full Band of the 73d Regiment, under favor of the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel O'CONNELL, played a number of appropriate airs. William GORE, Esq. President, and William Cox, Esq. Vice-President, were each supported by a Clergyman on the right; the Stewards were seated at equal distances from each other; and the rest of the Company placed themselves promiscuously without respect to rank or difference of condition; and the challenge to "hob or nob" was proffered and accepted with a cordiality that was truly gratifying to the feelings of all present. After dinner succeeded the Toasts, all of which were followed by well adapted airs. First. - The King! Second. - The Prince Regent, Third. - The Queen, and the Rest of the Royal Family. Fourth - Success to the British Aims, by Sea and Land. Fifth. - (A bumper) - Governor Macquarie! May the Anniversary of his asuming the Command of this Territory be commemorated and reverenced by our latest Posterity ! (with three times three). Sixth. - Governr Phillip, the Founder of the Colony. Seventh. - Earl Bathurst, the Minister for the Colonies. Eighth. - Mr. Wilberforce, the Friend of the Colony, and of Mankind in general. Ninth. - May Religion and Virtue be the Foundation whereon the Superstructure of our Colony will be reared. Tenth. - Unanimity! May all Hearts be united for mutual Benefit and general Good! Eleventh. - Prosperity to the Commerce and Agriculture of New South Wales ! Twelfth. - The speedy Establishment of an Export Trade! (with three times three). Thirteenth. - The intended Library. May every Inhabitant of our Colony unite in promoting the general diffusion of useful Knowledge! Fourteenth. - (a Toast proposed by a Gentleman) Lieutenant Colonel O'Connell, and the 73d Regiment. Fifteenth. - Good Night ! It was near eleven when the last toast was drunk, and in ten minutes after the room which had been the scene of festive harmony was entirely clear, the whole of the company retiring highly gratified in having participated in the conviviality of a Meeting which was rendered peculiary interesting by its object, and the first of a series which it was the universal wish may commemorially be repeated.


Bibliography:

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13 February 1813

Sydney, NSW

Country-dancing

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (27 February 1813), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628637 

One of the most pleasing entertainments that we have for some time witnessed was given by Mr. Nichols on the evening of Thursday, the 13th instant. It was a ball and supper; the Company consisting of upwards of fifty persons, most of whom were assembled by seven o'clock; soon after which country-dancing commenced, and was supported with unusual spirit until one, when supper was announced. This part of the entertainment cannot sufficiently be praised: It was a cold collation, elegant and sumptuous - the wines were exquisite, and the vivacity that occupied the festive scene, animating and agreeable. A number of loyal toasts were drank with a true spirit of enthusiasm; and about four the majority of the company retired, perfectly satisfied with the exertions of their host and hostess in giving every possible effect to the harmony of the meeting, in which profuse liberality and the kindest attention had conjoined their efforts.


Bibliography:

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13 March 1813

Windsor, NSW


KABLE, Henry

A Piano-forte

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (13 March 1813), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628645

Pursuant to a Writ of Fieri Facias from the Court of Civil Jurisprudence, and also a degree from the High Court of Appeal, At Windsor, on Saturday the 20th Instant, at Twelve o'Clock at Noon preciseIy, THE PROVOST MARSHAL will Cause to be set up for Sale, by Public Auction, the following Goods and Chattels, the Property of Mr. Henry Kable (unless the respective Debts and all incidental Expences be previously liquidated), viz: Sixty-six Head of Horned Cattle of the English Breed, a Horse, 3 Carts, and 2 Sets of Harness; a Quantity of Casks and Staves, do. line and sawed Timber, 2 Boats, a Wire Screen, a Quantity of Wheat, and a few small Pigs; a House, Bakehouse, and Baking utensils; a Variety of Household Furniture, consisting of Feather Beds and Bedding, Chairs, Tables, Sofas, Cupboards, &c. &c. a Piano-forte, and a Pair of large Beam Scales and Weights.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (27 March 1813), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628653


Bibliography:

-





17 July 1813

Sydney, NSW

New Town Cryer

Documentation:

"CIVIL DEPARTMENT", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (17 July 1813), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628727

John Smith, and Francis Wild, are appointed Constables in the Town of Sydney, in the Room of John Harris, deceased, and John Bingham, dismissed John Pendergrass is appointed Town Cryer in the Town of Sydney, in the Room of John Bingham, dismissed from that office for ...





17 and 19 August 1813

Sydney, NSW

Race balls ...

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (7 August 1813), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628749 

A CARD. THE STEWARDS of the SYDNEY RACE CLUB feel much Pleasure in announcing to the Ladies of the Colony (to whose liberal Subscriptions the Races are highly indebted for the valuable Annual Cup), that they have now got completed and ready for their Accommodation at the ensuing Races (commencing on the 16th Instant) a strong well-secured Stand, roofed and weather-boarded, immediately adjoining their own Stand opposite the Winning Post, and commanding a most extensive View of the Course.

The Stewards have also the Honor to inform the Ladies, that the Race Balls will be held this Season in the Rooms of the new Government Building adjoining the Dock Yard, in George-street, which have been most obligingly given for that Purpose by HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVENOR.

The Balls will be held on the Evenings of Tuesday the 17th, and Thursday the 19th Instant, to open precisely at Seven o'Clock each Evening. Tickets for Ball and Supper (Fifteen Shillings each) are to be had of the Stewards, at the House of Mr. Chisholme, in George-street. Sydney, 7th August 1813

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (21 August 1813), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628758 

HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR attended each day's Races; but we are extremely sorry to state, that owing to indisposition the sports were not honoured with the presence of Mrs. MACQUARIE.

The Race Balls on the evening of Tuesday and Thursday were very well attended, and went off much to the satisfaction of the company.


Bibliography:

-





18 September 1813

Woolloomooloo, NSW


A handsome piano-forte

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (18 September 1813), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628771 

SALES by AUCTION. BY MR. BEVAN, At Woolloomoolla, on Friday next, the 24th Instant, at Ten o'clock precisely, A Quantity of Houshold furniture, comprising 12 arm chairs, with cushions and cane bottoms and settee to match; a handsome piano-forte, large pier glasses and swing ditto; sets of dining tables, card, pembroke, and dressing ditto ...


Bibliography:

-





23 October 1813

Sydney, NSW

A self-acting Harp, three barrels . . .

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 October 1813), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628789 

NOW on SALE, the valuable INVESTMENT imported in the Ship Earl Spencer, Captain Mitchel, consisting of the following Articles: Fine old Port Wine, in Pipes and half Chests. Fine old Sherry, ditto ditto; Claret of first growth, ditto ditto; White Claret, in Hogsheads . . . Europe Cordage and Canvas; English Soap; Vinegar, Salad Oil, Mustard, &c.; Liquid Blacking; Russia Glass and Duck; fine Pickled Herrings in Kegs; a self-acting-Harp, three Barrels; a Finger Organ Table; a few good Fowling Pieces, Shot, &c. Gunpowder in Canisters and Papers; and a small service of Sheffield Plate. To be Sold only by the Package, for ready Money only. - Application to be made to Mr. Richard Jones, at Mr. Bevan's, George-street.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

-


References:

"INTELLIGENCE, LITERARY, SCIENTIFIC, &c.", The Repository of Arts, Literature, Fashions, Manufactures, &c. 1/3 (1 March 1816), 173-74

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=PgNHAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA173 

Mr. Longman, of Cheapside, has invented a self acting harp, in [174] the form and size of a cabinet piano-forte. Its motions are produced solely by weight, which obliges a more regular performance than is attainable by the application of springs. The mechanism includes several accompanying instruments, and the combined effect is sonorous, animating, and particularly calculated for dancing. The winding up, or renovation of its powers, does not occupy more than a minute; and its unwearied performance is sufficiently long for any single dance. The plan upon which this instrument is constructed, admits of its being furnished with keys for the accommodation of those who chuse the amusement of accompanying the dancers; and, by the perpetual admissibility of new barrels, possesses the advantage of multiplying, to any extent, its number and variety of tunes.




30 October 1813

Sydney, NSW


JENKINS, Robert (auctioneer)

A capital Piano Forte, with the additional Keys, by Bolton

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 October 1813), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628792 

For Sale, a capital PIANO FORTE, with the additional Keys, made by Bolton. Apply to Mr. R. Jenkins, licensed Auctioneer, Macquarie street.


Bibliography:

-





1813 (year of publication)

London, England


? BLIGH, William (? informant)

CLARK, John Heaviside (reporter; never visited NSW)

Dance

The Dance (published London, 1813)

Image:

DUBOURG, Matthew, after CLARK, John Heaviside, ? after unidentified original

"The Dance" (London: Published & sold by Edwd. Orme, 1 October 1813)

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/34759823 


Source and documentation:

Clark 1813

http://library.sl.nsw.gov.au/record=b2002084~S2 

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/album/ItemViewer.aspx?itemid=887907&suppress=N&imgindex=14 (text)

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/album/ItemViewer.aspx?itemid=887907&suppress=N&imgindex=25 (image)

Except in the Kangaroo Dance, which is an imitation of the actions of that animal, the natives do not appear to be regulated by steps appropriate to any particular expression, but the activity of their motions seems rather the result of hilarity, and the singing is similarly produced. Their songs are commenced at the top of the voice, the modulations lowering as long as the breath will permit; the lungs are then inflated with considerable noise, the song continuing during the respiration, after which the voice rises again to its utmost height; and, with some variation of tone, again descends, and is repeated till the subject is ended. When a number of the natives are assembled, on some particular ceremonies, an individual will start from the circle, leaping, and bounding, and throwing his arms about, in a variety of antic positions, till he is completely tired; meanwhile others have been singing, and beating time with sticks; indeed, the hoarseness of the singer, and the fatigue of the dancer, seem to produce the concluding movement. On these occasions the natives ornament themselves with red and white clay, in stripes, on the forehead, circles round the eyes, waving or straight lines on the breasts and arms; and, at times, the figure to the waist will be covered with white. The fashion of these decorations is, doubtless, regulated by the taste of the individual, although some of them, when ornamented in a manner that must have required a considerable portion of their time and abilities, will look perfectly horrible. A principal ornament is a bone, or reed, thrust through the septum of the nose, which was humorously called, by Cook's sailors, their spritsail yard.


Bibliography:

Renard 2003

Renard suggests that the dedicatee, William Bligh, might have been Clark's informant and source of word and image "sketches", worked up by Clark for publication; Clark himself never visited Australia.




1814



8 January 1814

Sydney, NSW


Dancing

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (8 January 1814), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628837 

A SCHOOL for young Ladies is opened by Mrs. Perfect, 35 Phillip-street, Sydney, where they are taught Needle work, Reading, Writing, and Accompts, & Drawing and Dancing, if required. Young Ladies may be dieted, and the strictest attention will be paid to their morals. Mrs. P. will attend any one who may require private Tuition.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

Mrs. S. Pefect had advertised her school previously in 1806, 1809, and 1812


References:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 April 1809), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article627728 




12 March 1814

Sydney, NSW


LORD, Simeon (importer, vendor)

A capital new Patent PIANO FORTE, made by Clementi

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (12 March 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628875 

TO be Sold by Private contract, a capital new Patent PIANO FORTE, made by Clementi. May be purchased at the House of Mr. S. Lord, Macquarie Place; and seen on Wednesday next Price 40 Guineas. Also, a new Barometer and Thermometer, made by Watkins, Charing Cross, Price Twelve Guineas.


Bibliography:

Fahy 1992, 123





28 March 1814

Sydney, NSW

Appropriate airs in masterly style by the Band of the 46th

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 April 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628888 

On Monday last, the 28th ultimo, Lieutenant Colonel GEORGE MOLLE of His Majesty's 46th Regiment, was sworn in at Government House as LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR of this Territory; his Commission having been previously read. The ceremony was attended by the Civil, Naval, and Military Officers at Head Quarter's, and by Several Gentlemen of the Colony. HIS EXCELLENCY took occasion to congratulate His Honor, the LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR in very appropriate terms, on his accession to a situation of such distinguished Rank and Importance, and not only expressed the feelings of private friendship, but declared his high sense of the valuable acquisition his Government would receive from the assistance of a Gentleman of COLONEL MOLLE's approved abilities and experience. In the evening a grand Dinner was given at Government House, in honour of the Occasion, at which Lieutenant Colonel O'CONNELL (the late Lieutenant Governor) and the principal Civil, Naval, and Military Officers, and Gentlemen of the Colony were present. Many loyal and constitutional Toasts were drank, followed by appropriate Airs performed in a masterly style by the Band of the 46th Regiment, the whole, producing that flow of harmony and conviviality which could not fail to be interesting to a Company assembled on such an Occasion.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

The 46th Regiment arrived in New South Wales to replace the 73rd Regiment in February 1814, and when they left for Madras in 1817 were relieved by the 48th Regiment of Foot.


References:

"SYDNEY", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 February 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628865 

The 46th Regiment was landed on Tuesday; on which occasion Colonel MOLLE was saluted from the battery at Dawe's Point.




31 March 1814

St. Philip's Church, Sydney, NSW


BAND OF THE 73rd REGIMENT

DETRICK, Francis

For performing sacred music at the Church at Sydney

Documentation:

Letter from Governor Macquarie to D'Arcy Wentworth; D'Arcy Wentworth papers, SLNSW, A 4073; see Richardson 1964, Mansfield 1988

http://www.acmssearch.sl.nsw.gov.au/search/itemDetailPaged.cgi?itemID=825636 

Sir - please pay to the bearer, M. Francis Dietrich, Master of the band of the 73d Regiment, the sum of 2 pound, 11 shillings, 0 pence in lieu of six pairs of shoes due to him as remuneration for conducting the band in performing sacred music at church at Sydney from October 1, 1812 to March 31 inclusive, charging the same to the Police Fund.

"GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 April 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628903 

Francis Detrick, Master of the Band of H. M. 73d Regiment, and seven other Musicians belonging to ditto, for performing sacred Music at the Church at Sydney, from the 1st of October, 1812, to 31st March, 1814. [£] 11. 9. 6.


Bibliography:

-





19 May 1814

Sydney, NSW

Fatal dispute over a song

Documentation:

[Trial transcript], R. vs. Eleanor Irwin and Ormsby Irwim, C.C.J., 23 June 1814, evidence of Honar Fahey, in Byrne 1993, 246

Corporal Connell ... began to sing a song the deceased objected to the song. I do not know the reason he objected to it. It was what they called a croppies song. The prisoner Eleanor Irwin made answer that he insisted the song be sung over again, Mrs. Irwin and Sergeant Connelkl then both joined in the same song. The deceased objected to it again. She (Eleanor Irwin) said she was a free women, and not lately came from being transported at the coal river; although she was not a croppies wife she was a croppies sister. The deceased then said you are no society for me, take yourself away and walk.

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 June 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628935

Thursday. - Ormsby and Eleanor Irwin were put to the bar and indicted for the wilful murder of Serjt. Robert Morrow, of His Majesty's 73 Regt. at a public house in York-street, Sydney, on the evening of Thursday the 19th of May ultimo, by throwing down, kicking, and beating him with so much violence, that he lingered in excessive bodily pain until the 25th, and then died.

Without going into the tedious and unacceptable length of evidence that appeared on this trial, which would be little more than a recapitulation of circumstances, with trivial differences by the various witnesses, we state the facts succinctly, as deduced from the general testimony; without unnecessary prolixity or inconvenient brevity.

On the evening stated, the prisoners at the bar were at the house of M. Casey, in York street, drinking in an outer room, when the deceased, accompanied by Honor Fahie (with whom he co habited), and several non-commissioned officers of his acquaintance, went into the house, and going into the inner parlour, invited them to join their company, which they did. After drinking socially together for some time, singing was proposed; and after several songs had been sung, one of the party began one, but was interrupted by the deceased, who objected to it as unloyal, whereupon the prisoner Ormsby Irwin, and another, joined in re-commencing the same, and singing it throughout. The deceased was by this time much intoxicated, the others less so. This was about 7 o'clock. The difference occasioned by the song objected to had subsided, and they drank together as before; when suddenly a quarrel arose between the prisoner Eleanor Irwin and Honor Fahie, who abused and reviled each other with much asperity, and at length commenced a mutual assault. The deceased got up, and interfered, and Ormsby Irwin did the same, and demanding of the deceased whether he meant to strike his (Irwin's) wife, struck him a blow on the face. Honor Fahie ran out to call assistance, leaving the deceased engaged with Irwin and his wife. The deceased fell in the scuffle, and falling dragged Ormsby Irwin upon him, his knee coming in contact with the lower part of his belly. A corporal Connor took Irwin off the deceased; Eleanor Irwin struck him with her fist, and both used considerable violence to him when on the ground; and afterwards, when raised on a sofa, it was declared on oath by Corpl. Connor, that the assault was continued by the prisoners. In this position the deceased had Mrs. Irwin's left thumb between his teeth, which he held some time. In his limbs he was utterly helpless, & as soon as the affray terminated, having lasted about 20 minutes, he complained of his belly, and pronounced himself a dying man ... The Court doth adjudge, that you Ormsby Irwin, for this offence, be sent to His Majesty's Settlement of Newcastle, and there kept to hard labour for the space of two years; and that you, Eleanor lrwin, be confined in His Majesty's Gaol at Parramatta, for the like term of two years.


Bibliography:

Paula J. Byrne, Criminal law and colonial subject: New South Wales 1810-1830 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993), 246-47


Resources:

-


Commentary:

Ormsby Irwin had been tried in Cork, Ireland, in April 1806, and sentenced to transportation for life. He arrived in Sydney on 14 August 1809, convict per Boyd, accompanied by his wife Eleanor (free).

In the late 1790s, Irish nationalists were identified as "croppies" (identified by their actual or matphorically closely-cropped hair, in the anti-artistocratic fashion of French revolutionaries).

A famous nationalist song, The croppy boy, with words by "Carroll Malone" (W. B. Burney) is much later, appearing in print first in 1845 (there is a second song of the same name). A song that may, just possibly, have been new to Sydney in May 1814 was Thomas Moore's The minstrel boy (to the Irish tune The Moreen), which had first appeared in print in Dublin and London barely 6 months earlier in December 1813.

But a song sung in Sydney in May 1814 well enough known to appeal to nationalists and offend loyalists may well have come from one of the earlier numbers of Moore's series, though the general popularity of the Irish melodies dates from somewhat later. Perhaps the most likely place where the melodies at least of such a song might still be found today is Edward Bunting's A general collection of the ancient Irish music (1796), a source for Moore, as probably too for those nationalists who wrote new nationalist songs to old tunes both before and after 1798.

 

Image:

Thomas Campbell, Erin go bragh (tune - Savournah deelish)

Samuel Larkin, Nightingale: a collection of the most popular ancient & modern songs set to music by Samuel Larkin

(Portsmouth, NH: William and Daniel Treadwell, 1804), 162-63; Isaiah Thomas Broadside Ballad Project

http://www.americanantiquarian.org/thomasballads/items/show/554 

http://www.americanantiquarian.org/thomasballads/items/show/555 


One important new nationalist song dating from around 1800 is Thomas Campbell's Erin go bragh! ("The Exile of Erin"; not to be confused with the later Scots parody Erin go bragh). Campbell, a Scot, had met his subject Anthony McCann, in exile in Hamburg in 1800, and the song was first published the following year. It was sung to the tune then known as Savournah deelish, the same melody as Savourneen deelish. later repopularised in Australia by Catherine Hayes.

The loyalists, meanwhile, had responded quickly to the 1798 rebellion with the march-song Croppies lie down, which was already in print in 1799.


References:

James Gordon, History of the Civil War in Ireland ... from the year 1782 ... first American edition, volumes first (Baltimore: Samuel Butler & Pechin & Frailey, 1805), 122

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=0gMwAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA122

"The Croppy Boy", Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Croppy_Boy 

A selection of Irish melodies, with symphonies and accompaniments by Sir John Stevenson, Mus. Doc. and characteristic words by Thomas Moore, Esq., 5th number (London and Dublin: J. Power and W. Power, December 1813)

[Review], The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal (June 1814), 186

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=psga76RkQH0C&pg=PA186 

"The Moreen", Hannam's selection of celebrated Irish melodies ... No 3 (London: H. Hannam, [c.1810]) 7

http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/pageturner.cfm?id=87765951 

Edward Bunting, A general collection of the ancient Irish music, containing a variety of admired airs never before published and also the compositions of Conolan and Carolan, collected from the harpers &c. in the different provinces of Ireland, and adapted for the piano-forte (Dublin: W. Power & Co., 1796)

http://imslp.org/wiki/The_Ancient_Music_of_Ireland_(Bunting,_Edward)

Andrew Carpenter, Verse in English from eighteenth-century Ireland (Cork: Cork University Press, 1998), see espeically "Nationalist verse of the 1790s", 557-75

John Gamble (ed. Breandán MacSuibhne), Society and manners in early nineteenth-century Ireland (Dublin: Field Day, 2011), 151, and note 3

Erin go bragh: a celebrated Irish air (New York: J. Hewitt's, [n.d.])

http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/29513 

Exile of Erin or Erin go bragh; written by Campbell (New York: E. Riley, [c.1810])

http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/10006 

Erin go bragh: a favorite Irish air with variations for the piano forte composed by John Ross (Edinburgh: J. Hamilton, [c.1820])

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000291287#page/1/mode/1up 

"Erin go brah: together with St. Patrick's day in the morning", Isaiah Thomas Broadside Ballad Project

http://thomasballads.org/items/show/56 

Paddy's resource; or, The harp of Erin (attuned to freedom): a collection of patriotic songs; selected form Paddy's amusement (Dublin: 1798; also 1803)

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000207413 

"Croppies lie down", Preston's twenty four country dances for the year 1799 with proper tunes and directions to each dance (London: Preston & Son, 1799), 157

http://www.vwml.org/browse/browse-collections-dance-tune-books/browse-prestons1799 




28 May 1814

Sydney, NSW

Young ladies instructed in Music, Drawing, &c.

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (28 May 1814), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628919 

A CARD. A lady residing in Sydney, wishes to undertake the Care and Management of six young Ladies, who will be instructed in the polite Branches of Literature, including Music, Drawing, &c. &c. Letters addressed to A.B. at Mr. Nichols's George street, will meet with immediate attention.


Bibliography:

-





4 June 1814

Sydney, NSW

King's Birthday . . . Cards & Music

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, journal, 4 June 1814

http://www.library.mq.edu.au/digital/lema/1814/1814june.html 

I entertained 84 Officers Civil & Military, & other Gentlemen of the Colony at Dinr. at Government House on this occasion in honor of the Day. - Mrs. Macquarie also entertained the principal Ladies at Sydney, in the Evening at Govt. House, with Tea & Coffee, Cards & Music



4 June 1814

Sydney, NSW


LAURIE, J. (vendor)

A handsome Piano Forte in excellent order

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 June 1814), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628925 

BENGAL WHITE BALL SOAP. - The Soap imported by the Brigs Amelia and Hibernia, is the best that has for some time been received from Calcutta, and equal to the English mottled soap for all family uses; on Sale by J. Laurie, 18, Hunter street, in bags of 50lbs. and 100 lbs. each, at 1s sterling per lb. or for currency with the usual discount. - Three months credit and the trade allowance made to wholesale purchasers. - Good soft sugar 6d. per lb. by the bag, a few very handsome hearth carpets, 20s. each, blue and white nankeen 12s.6d. sterling per piece, some fresh curry powder in canisters, and a handsome Piano Forte in excellent order, for Sale at the moderate price of 35l. sterling. - May be seen as above.


Bibliography:

-





14 July 1814

Sydney, NSW

Hymn singing on the scaffold

Documentation:

"EXECUTIONS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (16 July 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628950 

On Thursday Bartholomew Foley, condemned for sheep stealing at Port Dalrymple, was also executed. He came a prisoner to this Colony about 13 years ago, a boy not exceeding 12 or 13 years of age; but depravity had grounded in his youthful principles, and he very soon exhibited occasions for pitying the miseries to which a propensity to error had doomed him in his youth. He was for the entire space of four or five years employed in the gaol gang; for as he approached to manhood he seemed only desirous of confirming himself in obdurate and determined vice. His crimes were very numerous, and his punishments frequent, till at length he unhappily became no further useful in society, than by a melancholy, example to warn others against prosecuting a line of conduct so terrible, as his had been. From the moment of his condemnation, however, he became the repentant sinner - the prodigal restored to hope. His temporal destiny he acknowledged to be just, and hoped forgiveness of his crimes in Heaven, as his penitence was sincere and full. At the place of execution he appeared with that firmness which the hope of mercy can alone bestow upon a suffering criminal.

He sung two hymns, loudly, distinctly, and with such animated fervour as to give peculiar melody to his accents; and when about to be launched into eternity addressed the spectators in a speech, in which he reviewed his past life, declaring that from the age of infancy his crimes had involved him in pains and sufferings; for that Providence had constantly persecuted him for his offences, and left him no shelter from the penalties of his iniquities.

To the Reverend Mr. COWPER, who attended him with the kindest attention from the time of his condemnation, he behaved with the most reverential respect, and declared that to his pious attention he was indebted for the peace of mind which he then felt. About nine o'clock he was launched into eternity, leaving the world - in the firm hope of an eternal life, and mercy in the world to come.


Bibliography:

-





12 August 1814

Sydney, NSW

Prince Regent's Birthday

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (13 August 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article628962 

The BIRTH DAY of HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS the PRINCE REGENT was yesterday celebrated with all the demonstrations of joy usual on that auspicious Event. The Royal Standard at Fort Phillip, and the Union Flag at Dawes's Battery, were hoisted at sun rise. At 12, the 46th Regiment, and the Detachment of the 73d Regiment fired three vollies in honor of the day, in Hyde Park, in presence of His Excellency the Governor; and at one o'clock a Royal Salute was fired from Dawes's Battery. HIS EXCELLENCY then held a Levee, which was numerously attended by the Officers Civil, Naval, and Military, and the other Gentlemen of the Colony. The Magistrates, and Principal Officers in the Civil, Naval, and Military Departments, and several private Gentlemen, were entertained at Dinner, in honor of the day, at Government House. In the evening Mrs. Macquarie had a numerous Party of Ladies and Gentlemen, whom the Dinner Party joined in high spirits, after having partaken chearfully in the wonted convivialities of the table, heightened by the importance of the occasion. Music and Dancing formed the principal amusements of the evening; and those of the Supper Table at length closed the day at about 12 o'Clock. The Party on breaking up appeared highly gratified by the polite attentions they had received, and the variety of elegant entertainments in which they had participated during the course of the evening.


Bibliography:

-





? October 1814

St. Philip's Church, Sydney, NSW

Restoring the established psalms

Documentation:

-


Bibliography:

Cowper ADB


Resources:

-


Commentary:

Colonial chaplain William Cowper's extreme Evangelical attitude did not win favour with governor Lachlan Macquarie who, in October 1814, observed that at St. Philip's the established version of the Psalms was disregarded and some from Dr Goode's new version were sung. He instructed Cowper to cease using the new version.

See also: [DATE] William Cowper persuaded Macquarie to forbid Sunday performances by the Military Bands.


References:

-






24 December 1814

Sydney, NSW

Musical and dancing clocks

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 December 1814), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629026 

ADVERTSEMENT. - Mr. Henry Lane informs the Public that either of the following Orders will be received at the Prices specified. A plain eight-day Clock, with a heart shaped case, 49 guineas; ditto with a ship, moon, sawyers, or any other common figure in the face, 50 guineas; ditto with musical quarters, 80 guineas; ditto with chimes and musical quarters according to the number of tunes and other fancies from 100l. to 200l; with organs, 250l with a lady playing a harpsichord or spinnet, 5 parts, 500l. and upwards; a representation of the Heathen Gods or Tantalus doomed by Jupiter to perpetuid hunger and thirst in a periodical motion, constantly deceived by delicious fruits, lions, and other wild beasts with their eye rolling, and their mouths chopping at him, 130l; a country wake, back-sword; or cudgel playing 120l. These 2 in one, 150l. dog and duck hunting; Maurice dancing; bird-catching, &c. by timely application. If is not his intention to accomplish more than one order of moment while he remains in this Colony ...


Bibliography:

-





28 December 1814

The Marketplace, Parramatta, NSW

Inaugural native conference ... corroborree?

Documentation:

"GOVERNMENT and GENERAL ORDERS. Head Quarters, Sydney, Saturday, 10th December, 1814", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 December 1814), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629022 (DIGITISED)

Order for the establishment of the Native Institution

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 December 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629028 (DIGITISED)

On Wednesday His Excellency the GOVERNOR went to Parramatta, for the purpose of seeing and conferring with the Natives, agreeably to the benevolent design intimated in the General Orders of the 10th instant. At one o'clock His Excellency, accompanied by the Lieutenant Governor, and a number of Officers Civil and Military, went to the Market-place, where the interview had been appointed to be held, and conversed with them for an hour ... he whole number assembled, of all ages and sexes, did not exceed sixty, owing, as it was conjectured, to some false impressions which the more distant tribes had given way to, relative to the design of the convocation, suspiciously imagining that they were to be forcibly deprived of their children, & themselves sent to labour. Those who did attend gave information that numbers were in the neighbourhood, but unwilling to come forward, owing to their doubts, which they had in vain endeavoured to appease and satisfy - After a length of conversation, three children were yielded up to the benevolent purposes of the Institution: and after HIS EXCELLENCY, His Honor the LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, and the accompanying Officers had bestowed every possible pains in producing a confidence necessary to the proposed ends, the natives were seated in a circle, and served with a fine dinner of roast beef, and a cheering jug of ale. At two o'clock His Excellency took leave of them, and returned to Sydney, accompanied by Mrs. MACQUARIE. During the afternoon their number increased, and the strangers were welcomed by Mr. Shelly, who continued the same hospitable treatment to all that arrived, from the remaining stock, which had been provided for a much greater number ...


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

Trove, public tag "Native Conference"

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Native+Conference


Commentary:

On 28 December 1814 at Parramatta governor Lachlan Macquarie held a conference with local and distant Natives to try to convince them to send their children to the new Native Institution, or school. From 1816 onward similar conferences were held annually on or close to the same date in the Parramatta marketplace. In later years the event itself was referred to as the the "Corrobory, or Annual Feast" or "annual corroboree", and though there are only a few documentary references to singing and dancing at the event itself, actual corroborees were almost certainly held by attending bands on the night preceding and following it. It was also probably at later meetings that Indigenous elders had the opportunity to hear their children singing hymns they had been taught (see event on 28 December 1816 below). Though only the meetings of 1814, 1816, 1825 (held on 17 January 1826), 1826, and 1827 (held on 2 January 1828) are listed in the Chronological checklist, documentation of all these annual events can be found at

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Native+Conference


References:

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31 December 1814

Sydney, NSW


One of the best-toned Piano Fortes in the Colony

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 December 1814), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629030 

NOW on Sale, at 68, George street, corner of Market street wholesale and retail, Fine Hyson tea, souchong do. chocolate, sugar, Brazil tobacco, good Bengal soap, salt and saltpetre, Madras prints, calicoes, Bandanna handkerchiefs, a great variety of men, women, and children's shoes, children's capes, coat and breast buttons, lavendar water, tooth brushes, silk and twist, threads and tapes, writing paper and quills, wheat and flour, sieves, nails of sorts, tether ropes, and various other articles. Also to be disposed of, one of the best-toned Piano Fortes in the Colony.


Bibliography:

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1815



14 January 1815

Sydney, NSW


CHARTRES, George (vendor)

A handsome (but hard to move) Piano Forte by Beck

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (14 January 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629038

NOW on Sale, at 68, George street, Corner of Market Street, some choice Newcastle Cedar, in inch, three quarter inch, and half inch board.
N. B. - A very handsome Piano Forte by Beck, in perfect order, to be disposed of.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 February 1815), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629057

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (15 April 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629093

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (13 May 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629111

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (20 May 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629114

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 June 1815), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629119

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (8 November 1817), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177559

Also:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Monitor (6 June 1838), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article32160293


Bibliography:

Geoffrey Scott, Sydney's highways of history (1958), 158

George Chartres was a police office clerk on £30 a year when he went into retail trade, selling anything from rum to pianos.





18 January 1815

Sydney, NSW

Queen's birthday levee and ball

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (21 January 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629043 

Wednesday last, being the Anniversary of the Birth Day of Our Most Gracious Queen, was celebrated as a Holiday throughout the Territory, with all those heartfelt demonstrations of joy which have been manifested on that occasion through a series of years past, with increasing sentiments of veneration, by British Subjects through every part of His Majesty's dominion's. During the auspicious Day the Royal Standard was displayed at Fort Phillip, and the Union at Dawes's Point; at noon at Royal Salute was fired from Dawes's Battery, and a feu-de-joie from the Troops, drawn out in Hyde Park, and inspected by the Governor.

At one o'clock His Excellency held a Levee al Government House, where he received the Compliments and Congratulations of the Officers in the several Departments, and of the Gentlemen of the Colony.

During the Levee, which presented a most repectable and numerous Assemblage, an Ode, written for the Occasion by Mr. Robinson (to whose classical and ingenious pen we have been often indebted on like occasions), was recited by the Author with peculiar energy, and produced the warmest admiration and, applause. Whilst we commend in the highest terms the happy allusions to the portentous events of Europe at this crisis, we feel no hesitation in yielding our unqualified tribute of praise to the poetic merits of the piece; and are happy to have an opportunity of presenting it to our Readers in our present columns.

In the evening a splendid Ball was given at Government House, to the Ladies and Gentlemen of the Colony; which displayed a brilliant picture of the beauty and grace of the country. We were much delighted with the taste and fancy exhibited in the decorations of the Ball and Supper Rooms: ín the former the happy arrangement of the native shrubs and flowers, which were gracefully disposed in gay festoons, produced a most fascinating coup-d'oeil; and among the various ornaments of the latter, we were partícularly struck with a most interesting and lively exhibition of the French army during its disastrous campaign in Russia, in four different transparencies, which were so constructed as to form a hollow square, and being placed on a pedestal of considerable height, in the center of the Supper Tables, and illuminated from within, commanded a general view from every part of the room, and produced the happiest effect. We understand that these transparencies are copies made by Mr. Lewin, from prints executed in Russia, and brought hither by the Gentlemen of the ship Suwarrow. Uncertain as to the Author of them, here, as transparencies, we have no hesitation in pronouncing them admirably well executed, and as such reflecting much credit on the Artist.

One hundred and eight Ladies and Gentlemen sat down to an elegant Repast, where they enjoyed the festivities of the social board until summoned to resume the sprightly dance, which continued to a late hour the next morning; when they departed, highly gratified with the refined hospitalities and polite attentions they had experienced during the course of this distinguished Entertainment.


Bibliography:

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4-11 February 1815

Sydney, NSW


RILEY, Aledxander (merchant)

BEVAN, David (auctioneer)

Musical instruments, music in sheets, works of Handel

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 February 1815), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629057

THE valuable investment, imported on the Marquis of Wellington, will be disposed of by Wholesale in the ensuing Week, at Mr RILEY's Stores; consisting of Port Wine in Bottles, Porter and Ale in Casks and Bottles, Jamaica Rum, Hollands' Gin, Rio Rum, Madeira Wine, Butter and Cheese, Printed Cotton and Cambricks, Hosiery, Haberdashery, Stationary, Boots and Shoes, Glass and Earthenware of sorts, Tin Ware, Ironmongery, Cutlery, Nails, Paints, Coopers and Carpenters' Tools, Telescopes, Spruce, Corks, and Brazil Tobacco. Some Ladies and Gentlemen's very elegant Watches; an Assortment of Musical Instruments, and of lately published Music; and a valuable Selection of Books will also be sold.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (11 February 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629062 

SALES BY AUCTION. BY MR. BEVAN, At his Rooms in George street, on Wednesday next, the 15th Instant, at Eleven precisely. A FEW Casks of English Porter, Punjuns, Calicoes, Slops Cutlery, and sundry other Europe and Bengal Goods.
Prompt Payment in Sterling Money.

SAME Day, immediately after the above. Just Landed from the Ship Marquis of Wellington,
A valuable & extensive selection of Musical Instruments;
consisting of French Horns, Military Cymbals, Clarionets, Tamborines, German Flutes and Violins;
also, an extensive Assortment of Music in Sheets, just published, and a Copy of the Works of Handel ...

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (18 February 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629065

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 February 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629069

SALES BY AUCTION BY MR. BEVAN, At his Rooms in George street, on Wednesday next, the 22d Instant, at Eleven precisely, A QUANTITY of books of different sorts, a number of valuable late publications, violins and strings, German flutes, tamborines, and books of music, containing the finest airs; cutlery, carpenters' tools, wearing apparel ...


Bibliography:

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23 February 1815

Sydney, NSW

A splendid ball

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 February 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629070 

On Thursday Evening a splendid Ball and Supper were given by the Officers of the 46th Regiment, to the principal Officers and Ladies of the Colony, at their Mess-Rooms, which were very handsomely decorated for the occasion, and received a considerable addition from an embellishment of the floor with various well-adapted devices by a skilful crayonneur. At 12, the company withdrew to the supper room, where every delicacy that the Colony could afford, in a well ordered profusion decorated the sumptuous board. After supper the sprightly dance resumed, and continued to a late hour, when the interchange of parting compliments conveyed to the Founders of the Fete, a sense of the entire satisfaction which the company had derived from their splendid hospitality and polite attentions.


Bibliography:

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13 May 1815

Sydney, NSW

A fine toned double barrel organ

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (13 May 1815), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629110 

SALES BY AUCTION. BY MR. BEVAN, At his Rooms in Georgr-street, on Wednesday Next, the l7th Instant, at Eleven precisely, AN Investment brought out in the Indefatigable, consisting of gentlemen's wearing apparel, slops of all sorts, green and white paint, fish hooks, sail needles, palms for sail makers, about twenty lots of ladies' kid, silk, nankeen, and other shoes, in lots of 3 pair each, a lady's riding habit, needles, a five barrelled organ, a handsome escruitore, etc. Prompt Payment will be required in Sterling Money.


Bibliography:

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17 May 1815

Near Springwood, NSW


ANTILL, Henry Colden (reporter)

Some very good songs

Documentation:

Henry Colden Antill - journals, 1809, 1815; written in 1849; SLNSW

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=447128 

Journal of an excursion over the Blue or Western Mountains of New South Wales to visit a tract of new discovered country, in company with his Excellency Governor and Mrs. Macquarie, and a party of Gentlemen.

Tuesday, April 25, 1815. -This being the day fixed on by his Excellency the Governor for commencing his tour over the Blue Mountains to visit a new tract of country lately discovered, to the westward of them, left Sydney at half-past 6 o'clock in the morning, in company with Dr. Redfern (one of the Governor's suite going with him), and arrived at Parramatta at half-past 8 ...

Wednesday, May 17 [1815] As this was to be a [page] tedious march of 16 miles rose early, and after breakfasting, sent off the baggage. We did not, however, find the road so difficult returning for although it was rocky, it wag mostly down hill, the carts, therefore, arrived at Spring Wood in very good time. Lent my horbe to one of the servants as I was inclined to walk, turned off the road at the King's Tableland, and went down to visit a waterfall. The height of the fall was great, but there being very little water, the stream was very inconsiderable. The whole of the tableland next to the chasm appeared as if it had undergone a violent volcanic eruption, the stones seemed to have been in a state of fusion, forming all manner of shapes, and having the resemblance of melted [page] sand and ironstone, and the place altogether formed a wild and picturesque scene of nature. I remained here with most of the party for nearly three hours, and then returned to the road and pursued my walk to the camp, where I arrived at 3 o'clock. I partook of a good dinner and went early to bed. As this was the last night of our being together, served out an extra allowance of grog to the men, and had some very good songs from them, and all around us appeared contented and happy.

Early history of New South Wales: two old journals, being the diaries of Major H. C. Antill on the voyage to New South Wales in 1809, and on a trip across the Blue Mountains in 1815 (Sydney: William Applegate Gullick, Govt. Printer, 1914), 42

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/12486636 

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-39566140 (DIGITISED)


Bibliography:

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5 June 1815

Sydney, NSW

The King's Birthday

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 June 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629126 

Monday last being appointed for the Celebration of the Anniversary of HIS MAJESTY'S Birthday, who had seen completed his 77th year, was observed as a Holiday throughout the Colony, with the usual demonstrations of loyalty and joy. At day-break the Royal Standard was displayed at Fort Phillip, and the Union at Dawes's Battery. At twelve at noon three vollies were fired in Hyde Park, by His Majesty's 46th regiment, commanded by Colonel MOLLE, in the presence of HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR. At One o'Clock HIS EXCELLENCY held a Levee at Government House, which was numerously attended, the Civil and Military Officers and Gentlemen all earnestly evincing a desire to testify their high respect and veneration for Our August and Beloved MONARCH, on an occasion so interesting to the public feeling. Immediately previous to the Levee, His Majesty's Colonial Brig Emu fired a Royal Salute, which was followed by the like mark of respect from some merchant vessels in the harbour. The auspicious Event drew from Mr. Robinson, our laureat Bard, his accustomed tribute of an Ode, which he recited with great energy, and was received with the strongest expressions of approbation, as one of his happiest and most appropriate productions. We are glad to have an opportunity of introducing it to our Readers. The annual Dinner, given in Honor of the Day by His Excellency the GOVERNOR, to which all the respectable Inhabitants of the Colony were as usual invited, was upon this occasion attended by ninety persons; which party, on retiring from dinner, was augmented by the Ladies resident in Sydney. The Band of the 46th Regiment attended, and the music which was selected for the occasion was admirably performed, & added much to the amusements of the evening, which was passed in a most agreeable and social manner.


Bibliography:

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15 July 1815

Sydney, NSW


New song on the war by Walter Scott

Tune - For a' that an' a' that


Documentation:

"POETRY", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (15 July 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629148 

The following new Song, by Mr. Walter Scott, to the tune of a celebrated Scotch ballad, we feel pleasure in the opportunity of presenting to our Readers:

THOUGH right be aft put down by strength,
As many a day we saw [a'] that,
The true and leilfu' cause at length
Shall bear the grie for a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that.
Guns, guillotines, and a' that:
The Fleur-de-lis, that lost her right,
Is Queen again for a' that! ...


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Music concordances (tune and words):

"For a' that an' a' that"

The Scots musical museum ... (Edinburgh: Printed & sold by Johnson & Co., [1787-1803]), volume 3, 300

http://digital.nls.uk/special-collections-of-printed-music/pageturner.cfm?id=87796326 


"FOR A' THAT AN A' THAT. A new Song to an old Tune. Sung at the first Meeting of the Pitt Club. WRITTEN BY WALTER SCOTT ESQ."

The Scots Magazine and Edinburgh Literary Miscellany 76/2 (July 1814), 535

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=lCAbAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA535 

Commentary:

-


References:

-




19 August 1815

Sydney, NSW

Two Grand Piano Fortes, with additional Keys, by first London makers

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 August 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629170

SEEDS. A fine Assortment just imported per Hebe, and on SALE at 53, Corner of Philip street in Hunter street, among which are the following valuable species: -The silver fir, acorns in variety, cedar of lebanon cones, weeping birch, pivetts, beach mast, holly bernes, maple and sycamore, cornelian cherries, red and white clover, rye and sweet vernal grass, lucerne, Knight's marrow pease, green marrow ditto, blue Prussian and French diito, white blossom beans, large redfield turnips,and yellow do. &c. &c. &c. Also, Two Grand Piano Fortes, with additional Keys, by first London makers.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (16 September 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629185


Bibliography:

-





2 September 1815

Sydney, NSW


MARR,

A variety of musical instruments for sale

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 September 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629178

FOR SALE, at Mr. MARR's, a Variety of MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, consisting of Flutes, Flageolets, Clarionets, Violins, Union Pipes, an Organ playing 30 tunes, having Gothic front, drum and triangle; an Assortment of Medecines; BOOKS, comprising the most recent periodical and esteemed literary Productions of the British Press; a few capital Pistols and Fowling Pieces; plated Candlesticks, &c. Particulars will be known, and the above Articles seen as above.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 September 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629181


Bibliography:

-





16 September 1815

Sydney, NSW

A Piano Forte, at a very moderate price

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (16 September 1815), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629184 

TO be SOLD at Mesrs. LOANE and HALL's, NO 9 George Street, for Sterling Money, a small LIBRARY of BOOKS, imported in the Baring, elegantly bound to the same Pattern ...
Also, a Piano Forte, at a very moderate price; and some Bibles and Testaments under the English crest, being for Sale on account of the British and Foreign Bible Society; Also, an assortment of Prayer Books.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 September 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629189 


Bibliography:

-





23 September 1815

Sydney, NSW

Barrel organ

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 September 1815), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629188

TO be RAFFLED for, onTuesday the 3d of October next, an ORGAN, playing thirty tunes, having three barrels, drum, and triangle; made by a first London maker, and may be considered a very handsome piece of parlour furniture. Persons wishing to become Members are requested to leave their names at Mr. Marr's, Castlereagh street, or at 96, George street, as early as possible, as the number of candidates will not exceed 32. The Instrument may be viewed any time al Mr. Marr's.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 September 1815), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629192 


Bibliography:

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23 September 1815

Sydney, NSW

Violin strings

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 September 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629189

ON SALE, at Captain BROOK'S Warehouse, Pitt street, the RESIDUE of the INVESTMENT advertised last week ... Violin strings ...

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 September 1815), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629192


Bibliography:

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30 September 1815

Sydney, NSW

Best toned Flutes, with Books of Instruction for the Learner, and Airs for the Adept

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 September 1815), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629192

AT the Commission Rooms in Castlereagh Street, an excellent PROPERTY remains unsold, and will continue open to Inspection and Sale for a few days longer; chiefly comprising some of the best chosen Family Medicines . . . a Collection of the best assorted Books; a Choice of Musical Instruments of various kinds, among which are some of the best toned Flutes, with Books of Instruction for the Learner, and the best and most fashiomble Airs for the Adept . . . all of which will be sold at very reduced Prices.


Bibliography:

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16 December 1815

Sydney, NSW

A Fine toned Piano Forte imported

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (16 December 1815), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629250

A Fine toned PIANO FORTE is imported for Sale on the Amelia. Terms may be known by application at the Office of RILEY and JONES.


Bibliography:

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1816



From 1816

Parramatta, NSW

Hymn singing at the Native Institution

Documentation:

[Government orders], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 November 1815), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629215

"GOVERNMENT and GENERAL ORDERS. Head Quarters, Sydney, Saturday, 10th December, 1814", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 December 1814), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article629022 

With a View ... to effect the Civilization of the Aborigines of New South Wales, and to render their Habits more domesticated and industrious, His Excellency the Governor, as well from Motives of Humanity as of that Policy which affords a reasonable Hope of producing such an improvement in their Condition as may eventually contribute to render them not only more happy in themselves, but also in some Degree useful to the Community, has determined to institute a School for the Education of the Native Children of both Sexes, and to assign a Portion of land for the Occupancy and Cultivation of adult Natives, under such Rules and Regulations as appear to him likely to answer the desired Objects; and which are now published for general Information ...

[Editorial], The Sydney Monitor (29 November 1828), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31761032

... after Macquarie established a Christmas feast and a conference with the blacks, of proximate and distant tribes, at Parramatta [1814], and the parents had witnessed the progress of certain of their children in reading, writing, and singing hymns to the God of the Christians, they began voluntarily to place their children in the school ...


Bibliography:

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1816 (or April 1822)

Parramatta, NSW


HASSALL, Rowland (editor)

Hymns for Parramatta Sunday School

Source:

Hymns for the eighth anniversary of the Parramatta Sunday School

([Parramatta, NSW: Mission Press, 1816])

Copy at SL-NSW

MS note: "1816, Printed at Parramatta at house of Mr R Hassall at the Mission Press Parramatta"

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/42927353

http://library.sl.nsw.gov.au/record=b2495908~S2

Leaflet with words of hymns for the anniversary service:
1 Happy the child whose tender years;
2 Father of Mercies! still to thee;
3 Come let our voices join;
4 From all that dwell below the skies


Bibliography:

"New South Wales Sunday School Institution", The Sunday School Repository 2/17 (December 1818), 183-86

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=ekkVAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA183 

Hall 1951 (HMA 2), 335


Resources:

-


Commentary:

Another primary source dates the establishment of the Sunday school to 1814 (http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=872463, in which case, the MS note on the copy notwithstanding, a date of publication in 1822 would seem more likely. See also below:


References:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 May 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177244 

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (12 April 1822), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2180928 

The Anniversary of the Parramatta Church Sunday School was held on Tuesday last. A Sermon was preached on the pleasing occasion by the Reverend Mr. CARTWRIGHT, in the Church of St. John. The children, between 80 and 90 in number, were then examined, by the Reverend Messrs Cartwright and Hassall, as to their proficiency in scriptural acquirement during the past year; and the result was such as afforded ample satisfaction to all present. The children were conducted from the church to the residence of the Reverend Mr. Hassall, only lately returned from England, and who has the undisputed honor of being the first Sunday school teacher in this Colony, as also the founder (we believe) of the above Institution. The afternoon was wet; but the children, notwithstanding, were made comfortable and happy. Medals, books, tracts, and other appropriate rewards, many of which were brought by Mr. Hassall from England for the express purpose, were profusely distributed amongst all ranks and classes of the children.




18 January 1816

Sydney, NSW

The Queen's Birthday Ball, victory at Waterloo

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (20 January 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176514 

Thursday last being the Anniversary of the auspicious Birth of Our Gracious QUEEN, was celebrated with the fullest demonstrations of loyalty and joy. At sun-rise the Royal Standard and Union Flag were displayed as usual. At 12 at noon a Royal Salute was fired from the Battery, and the 46th Regiment and Royal Veteran Company were inspected by His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR and COMMAN DER of the FORCES, in Hyde Park, where they fired three vollies in honor of the day. At one o'clock His Majesty's armed brig Emu fired a Royal Salute; and His EXCELLENCY held a Levee at Government House, and received the Congratulations of the Civil and Military Officers, and other Gentlemen of the Colony. The LAUREAT BARD (for so we may venture to call him, from the frequency of his tributes on such occasions) presented his offering of an Ode, which, at the instance of His EXCELLENCY, he recited in an emphatic and appropriate style; the distinguished appronation of those who had the satisfaction to hear it, will best convey the high opinion entertained of the merits of this production. We have the pleasure of introducing it to our Readers in our present columns. In the evening an interesting and gay assemblage of Ladies graced the Room fitted up on this occasion for a Ball and Supper, at the New General Hospital, in consequence of those at Government House not being sufficiently spacious. The enchanting effect produced by the decorations of the Ball Room (which we understand had been executed under the tasteful direction of an Officer of the 46th Regiment) animated every countenance with delight, and excited a general expression of admiration. The floor was painted with emblems of martial glory, and various other devices, but we were particularly attracted by the figure of Fame, in the center of the floor, sounding her trumpet, and holding in her right hand a scroll, whereon were inscribed "WATERLOO, WELLINGTON, and VICTORY" most peculiarly appropriate, on account of the important and gratifying intelligence which had only that morning arrived, of the recent successes of our Arms under Field Marshal the Duke of WELLINGTON. From the arches and pillars with which the Room was ornamented, the Stars, Insignias, and Mottos of the several British Orders of Knighthood were displayed, whilst the Royal Arms appeared at the upper end of the Room through an elegant transparency. Native shrubs, ever-greens, and flowers, collected from the rich stores of abundant Nature, hung in graceful festoons around, and formed upon the whole a scene almost rivalling those Arcadian bowers so celebrated in the pages of poetry. Upwards of one hundred and twenty Ladies and Gentlemen sat down to an elegant Supper in the adjoining Room, and enjojed the festivities of the social board until again summoned to resume the sprightly dance, which continued to a late hour in the morning, when the Company retired, highly delighted with an entertainment, in point of taste, conviviality, and harmony, even surpassing any of those we have heretofore so frequently endeavoured to convey some idea of to our Readers.


Bibliography:

-





20 January 1816

Sydney, NSW

A second-hand piano-forte

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (20 January 1816), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176510

ON Tuesday next, the 23d Instant, will be OPENED for SALE, at the Store of Mr. RICHARD BROOKS, Pitt street, the INVESTMENTS of Ships lately arrived from England, for ready money only, consisting of tobacco, porter, ale, wine, cheese, hams, hats, shoes, candles, Jamaica and Rio rum, Hollands, slop-clothing, tar, butter in firkins, canvas and twine, earthenware, &c. &c. - N.B. A second-hand piano-forte on sale, to be seen at Mr. Hall's, George-street.


Bibliography:

-





3 February 1816

Sydney, NSW

Gentleman to instruct the Piano Forte and Singing, with thorough Bass Accompaniment as taught by Mr. Clementi in London

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 February 1816), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176538

GENTLEMAN wisites to give LESSONS in the French, Spanish, and Italian Languages; the Mathematics, Theoretical Narration, Engineering, and the general System of Military Education. - Also, to instruct the Piano Forte and Singing, with thorough Bass Accompaniment as taught by Mr. Clementi in London. 13, Phillip-street.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

This was the shop and house of Thomas CAPON; and the house in which DR HALLORAN later lived (convict arrived 1819)


References:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 October 1818, 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178258

"To the FULL MOON", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 July 1819), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178798




17 February 1816

Sydney, NSW

Drum-major Odin

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (17 February 1816), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176551

The Kangaroo has brought hither from Colombo several convicts, some of whom are prisoners who had escaped from this Colony, and who, from the strict attention of the Police throughout all the British ports in India, could not possibly escape the vigilance of the Government. One of the prisoners brought by the Kangaroo is a Malayan, who was drum major of the 1st Ceylon regiment in the memorable Kandyan war in 1802-3; & having gone over to the enemy, was upon the late capture of the Kandyan country taken prisoner, and condemned to be shot; which sentence was commuted to transportation for life to this territory; whither he is accompanied by his wife and three fine children. The man, who appears to be intelligent, gives an account of the death of several officers who were made prisoners by the Kandyan Monarch; among whose unfortunate number were Major Davey, of the 1st Ceylon, and Captain Romley, of the 73d Regt. He is dark complexioned, approaching to a black, and is about 5 feet 10 inches in height. His wife, who is a Cingalese, being a true descendant of the aboriginal inhabitants of the island, is of a small stature, handsomely formed, of a dark olive complexion, and agreeable features, as are also her three children, of whom the two youngest are boys. The appearance of this little family is truly interesting; and the more so, when the feeling mind considers that misfortune has brought them to a part of the world in which it is scarcely conceivable they can find any means of contributing to their own support. Their native country abounds in fruits, and all the natural luxuries of the East, which are attainable almost, without the necessity of human exertion.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

-

[Odin (native of Colombo), Kangaroo 1816 HM Brig, Colombo Court Martial 4 Jun 1815 life]


References:

-




4 June 1816

Sydney, NSW

The King's Birthday, floods, a sprightly dance

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, journal, 4 June 1816

http://www.library.mq.edu.au/digital/lema/1816/1816june.html 

This being the anniversary of the Birth of our most gracious sovereign, who this day complets the 78th. year of his age, the same was observed as a Holiday throughout the Territory, and kept with the usual Demonstration of joy and respect. - I held a Levee at Government House at 1 O'Clock, and entertained the Gentlemen of the Colony and a few of the Ladies at Dinner - to which 78 Persons sat down; - 21 having excused themselves from the Country Districts on account of the badness of the Weather. Mrs. Macquarie entertained the Ladies of Sydney in the Evening with Tea, Coffee, Cards, Music, and a little Dance: - all which went very well off.


"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (8 June 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176692 

Tuesday last bring the auspicious Anniversary of the Birth of Our beloved SOVEREIGN, who on that day completed his seventy-eighth year was observed as a Holiday throughout the Colony, and commemorated with the usual demonstations of loyalty and joy. At sun-rise the Royal Standard was displayed at Fort Philip, and the Union at Dawes's Battery; from whence a Royal Salute was fired at noon; and the GOVERNOR inspected the 46th Regiment in Hyde Park, when three vollies were fired in honor of the day. At one o'clock salutes were also fired from the several ships in the cove; and HIS EXCELLENCY held a Levee at Government House, when he re ceived the Compliments of the Officers, Civil and Military, and the Geutlemen of the Colony. During the Levee an Ode, of much interest and true poetic merit, was recited in his usual emphatic and impressive manner by the Author, our well known and admired Laureat, Mr. ROBINSON. At six o'clock a large party sat down to partake of a sumptuous and elegant dinner, where the utmost harmony and festivity prevailed, and many loyal and appropriate toasts accompanied the circulation of the cheerful glass. The calamitous visitation of a Flood from the Rivers Hawkesbury and Nepean, which at that time was at a most alarming crisis, necessarily so far interested the humanity of all the Gentlemen residing in those districts as to induce them to forego any idea of pleasure, to the more imperious duty of remaining on their stations, with the laudable view of rendering assistance to the unfortunate sufferers; to which circumstance may be ascribed the absence of several of the usual visitors at this festival. In the evening the Gentlemen retired to the Drawing Room, which they found graced with the presence of several Ladies, where the further amusements proceeded and closed with the sprightly dance, and in parties of social conversation.


Bibliography:

-





13 June 1816

Sydney, NSW

Launch of the Elizabeth Henrietta

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (15 June 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176696

On Thursday the 13th instant, at noon, a Government Vessel, of about 150 tons burthen, was launched from His Majesty's Dock yard at Sydney, amidst a numerous assemblage of all classes of the inhabitants, who had resorted there to witness a scene altogether so novel on the Coast of New South Wales. The style in which this fine brig left the stocks was peculiarly graceful, and enhanced the effect of the ceremony of consigning her to her new element, with the name of the "Elizabeth Henrietta" which HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR was pleased to give her in the usual form of breaking a bottle of wine on her bow. The Band of the 46th Regt, attended and played several favorite tunes, commencing at the moment of her starting with "God save the King!" followed by "Rule Britannia!" "Hearts of Oak!" and several other cheerful and appropriate airs; until at length the scene closed with the Elizabeth Henrietta riding safe at anchor in Sydney Cove . . .


Bibliography:

-





3 August 1816

Woolloomooloo, Sydney, NSW


PALMER, John (vendor)

Two excellent piano fortes

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 August 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176755 

SALE OF FURNITURE. THE FAMILY at WOOLOMOOLO HOUSE intending in future to reside in Sydney, a SALE of the WHOLE and ENTIRE FURNITURE, PLATE, CHINA, &c. will take place on the Premises, on MONDAY the 1st of September next, commencing at Eleven o'Clock in the Forenoon; and will Continue on the Following, until ALL is Sold.

The FURNITURE comprises ... card tables, wash hand stands, dressing tables, gentlemen's cylindrical writing desk, two excellent piano fortes, a very good 8 day clock ...

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 August 1816), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176761 

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 August 1816), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176778 

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 August 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176787 


Bibliography:

Fahy 1992, 122-23





24 August 1816

Sydney, NSW

Also, a Quantity of bound Music

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 August 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176780 

BOOKS. A Set of Johnstons Encyclopaedia, a new work in 4 vols, price 15 guineas; that usesul Work The Farmer's Guide, or Gentleman Sportsman's Dictionary, in which is contained the compleat Art of Farming, price 10l 10s. Burn's Justice, 4 vols; Blackstone's Commentaries, 3 vols; English Dictionaries; French, Italian, and Latin Grammars; the Juvenile Geography; and various Books for young Persons. Also, a Quantity of bound Music, to be had at 20, George-street.


Bibliography:

-





2 November 1816

Point Piper, NSW


BAND OF THE 46th REGIMENT

McINTOSH, Robert (master of the band)

PIPER, John

Laying the foundation stone, Henrietta Villa

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 November 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176892

On Saturday last a large party of Officers and other Gentlemen, accompanied by a number of Ladies, proceeded by water to Elizabeth Point, near to South Head, at the invitation of Captain Piper, who gave an elegant fete champêtre on the occasion of laying the foundation of his intended building on that beautiful and commanding point; to which the Gentlemen proceeded in Masonic order. The company took water at the Governor's Wharf, about 12 o'clock, in barges and other boats handsomely decorated; - the full Band of the 46th Regiment leading, with agreeable and appropriate airs. At half past one they landed on Elizabeth Point, when the procession commenced, and the ceremony of laying the foundation stone being performed, an elegant cold collation was presented to the company; which separated at a late hour in the evening.

Communication of Lodge No. 227 to the Grand Lodge of Ireland, 14 February 1817; in Cramp and Mackaness 1938


Bibliography:

Karl R. Cramp and George Mackaness, A history of the United Grand Lodge of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of New South Wales (Sydney: Angus & Robertson, 1938), vol. 1, 22-23; 28-30

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/20954927

From this the full colour of the day is apparent, the boats bearing Piper's guests and Masonic brethren making their way up the harbour, passing the merchant ship Willerly, commanded by a fellow Mason who fired seven guns as a salute, and the members retiring to a secluded spot upon landing and opening the lodge. The Masonic procession was led by Brother Hetherington as Junior Tyler and closed by Brother Drummond as Senior Tyler. Each of the thirty-two Masons present carried a symbol of Masonry, including the corn, oil and wine that were ceremoniously poured over the foundation stone. The band played Pleyel's "German Hymn", "The Hallelujah Hymn" and "God Save The King". The Bible used at the ceremony is reputed to have been the West Bible on which George Washington was obligated.

James Jervis (and Vince Kelly ed.), The history of Woollahra: a record of events from 1788-1960 ([Woollahra: Municipal Council of Woollahra, 1960]), 31

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/21621775 

Jessica L. Harland-Jacobs, Builders of empire: freemasons and British imperialism, 1717-1927 (University of North Carolina Press, 2007)

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=P2bQ5KrN3cUC&pg=PT225 (PREVIEW)


Resources:

-

http://www.sydneyarchitecture.com/GON/GON131.htm


Music concordances:

Ignace Pleyel, slow movement (Andante), String Quartet in G, Op. 20 No. 4 (Paris: Imbault, 1788) [B 349]; modern edition, Kitty and Theo Wyatt (London: Merton Music, 2010)

http://imslp.org/wiki/6_String_Quartets,_B.346-351_(Pleyel,_Ignaz)

Hymn XV (Children of the heavenly king), Select hymns for the voice and harpsichord (London: J. Carr, 1790), 16

No. 188, Hymn 1 [The spacious firmament on high], Samuel Arnold, The Psalms of David for use in parish churches (London: John Stockdale and George Goulding, 1791), 204


Pleyel's German Hymn harmonised for three voices, with variations for the harpsichord or piano forte (Dublin: Published by Hime, [n.d.])

http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/pleyel/id/4184/rec/1 


Pleyel's german Hymn with Variations (New York: Published by P. Erben, organist of St. Georges Chapel, [n.d.])

http://jhir.library.jhu.edu/handle/1774.2/2766 


"MUSIC", The British encyclopedia: or, dictionary of arts and sciences ... Vol. 4., I-N (London: For Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1809), n.p.

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=nDYPAQAAIAAJ&pg=PT625

In former times, when music was less understood as a science, than it is at this day, the rules, or rather the licences, for accompaniment were very limited, and confined the harmony to such a paucity of permutations, as would, among modern theorists, be considered bald and puerile. We should not tolerate such music; for the habits acquired, by frequently hearing compositions in which every possible change has been introduced, would render the inexpressive, tame, and monotonous accompaniments of those musicians, who were contemporaries with the celebrated Guido, (to whom the art is highly indebted), little more gratifying than a peal on an octave of bells. We are not, however, to suppose, that plain, simple melodies are beneath the composer's notice; far otherwise, we could quote many little strains, in which every note is attractive, and which, when duly accompanied, give the greatest delight. Perhaps Pleyel's German Hymn may, in that respect be considered as neat a specimen as could be quoted; in it we have all the suavity of religion, without any of the dull, tedious, or tautological circumstances which characterize a large portion of church music. The variations annexed to that pleasing air are proofs of the composer's taste; while the presto which follows, and is upon the same subject as the hymn, gives a most agreeable termination, and is so managed as completely to change the character of the music.



Commentary:

The "Hallelujah hymn" referred to cannot be positively identified.


References:

William Robin, Pleyel's hymns across the Atlantic: migration, travel, and American psalmody reform in the early nineteenth century (MA dissertation, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, 2013)

http://dc.lib.unc.edu/u?/etd,5021 

Reminiscences of Piper's entertainments, in Jane Maria Cox (Brooks) (1806-1888), Reminiscences, 1813-80, ML A1603; also in NLA

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/18043066




30 November 1816

Sydney, NSW


BENT, Ellis (deceased estate)

A very superior toned fashionable Piano Forte, made by Broadwood, particularly suited for a hot climate

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (30 November 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176921

To be SOLD by AUCTION, by Mr. Bevan, at the residence.of the late JUDGE ADVOCATE, at Thursday the 10th of December, at Eleven precisely, the very valuable HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE, elegant Chariot and Harness comlete Horses, Sadlery, &c &c. Also, a very superior toned fashionable Piano Forte, made by Broadwood, particularly suited for a hot climate. Likewise, a Quantity of Books. Prompt payment in sterling money.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (14 December 1816), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176948  


Bibliography:

Fahy 1992, 122

In 1810, Ellis Bent had written to ask that a small pianoforte be despatched to him from Broadwood's of London, "packed in tin, soldered down, and then put in a strong Iron bound wooded Case" as done with "a charming grand Piano" for Mrs. Macquarie.


Resources:

Ellis Bent, c.1800, NLA

Portrait of Ellis Bent, M.A. (c.1800) (detai); NLA

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-134281667 


Commentary:

-


References:

-




28 December 1816

Sydney, NSW


BAND OF THE 46th REGIMENT

McINTOSH, Robert (master of the band)

Summer promendades

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (28 December 1816), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176976

NOTICE. IN Consequence of the Heat of the Weather, the PROMENADES in HYDE PARK, will commence at Half past Six, instead of Five o'Clock as heretofore, on the Evening of Sundays. - The Band of the 46th Regiment will attend as usual.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 January 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176984 


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

-


References:

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (6 April 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176613 

The Asiatic Minor of the 22d of November, The Asiatic Mirror of the 22d of November, contains the following highly gratifying eulogium on the science of the band of his Majesty's 72d Regiment: - "The Lovers of Music must greatly regret the departure of the Band of His Majesty's 72d Regiment for the Cape of Good Hope. The Amateurs in particular, and the Public at large, have been very much delighted by the professional abilities and exertions of **** a Doctor of Music and Master of this well instructed Band. - After toiling through an Indian day, annoyed by business, pestered by sircars and native servants, and oppressed by the climate, what tends more to exhilarate or sooth the mind than harmony? When we see the Parade on music nights crowded, and attended by the most respectable people in the settlement, it justifies our observations, and we again say the departure of this most scientific Band is very much regretted, and the more especially, as they cordially attended to the wishes of the Public, by playing any tune called for - and this no doubt by the kind permission of their Officers."




28 December 1816

The Marketplace, Parramatta, NSW

Annual native conference ... corroborree, hymn singing?

Documentation:

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 January 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2176987 (DIGITISED)

On Saturday last the 28th ult. the Town of Parramatta exhibited a novel and very interesting spectacle by the assembling of the Native Tribes there, pursuant to the GOVERNOR'S gracious invitation. - At 10 in the morning the Market-place was thrown open, and some Gentlemen who were appointed on the occasion took the management of the ceremonials. - The natives having seated themselves on the ground in a large circle, the chiefs were placed on chairs a little advanced in front, and to the right of their respective tribes. - in the centre of the circle thus formed, were placed large tables groaning under the weight of roast beef, potatoes, bread, &c. and a large cask of grog lent its exhilirating aid to promote the general festivity and good humour which so conspicuously shone through the sable visages of this delighted congress ... Mrs. MACQUARIE arrived, and the children belonging to, and under the care of the Native Institution, 15 in number, preceded by their teacher, entered the circle and walked round it; the children appearing very clean, well clothed, and happy. - The chiefs were then again called together to observe the examination of the children as to their progress in learning, and to civilized habits of life. - Several of the little ones read, and it was grateful to the bosom of sensibility to trace the degrees of pleasure which the chiefs manifested on this occasion ...

Edward Smith Hall [editor] [open letter to Secretary for the Colonies, London], The Sydney Monitor (29 November 1828), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3176103 (DIGITISED)

... after Macquarie established a Christmas feast and a conference with the blacks, of proximate and distant tribes, at Parramatta [1814], and the parents had witnessed the progress of certain of their children in reading, writing, and singing hymns to the God of the Christians, they began voluntarily to place their children in the school ...


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

"Aboriginal Feast Day 28 December 1816", The Lachlan & Elizabeth Macquarie Archive (LEMA) Project

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/lema/1816/congress28dec1816.html 

Trove, public tag "Native Conference"

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Native+Conference


Commentary:

For the first such meeting, see the event listed at 28 December 1814 above. After this event in 1816, they were held annually on or close to the same date in the Parramatta marketplace. It was probably at early meetings that Indigenous elders had the opportunity to hear their children singing hymns they had been taught (as see Edward Smith Hall 1828 above). Though only the meetings of 1814, 1816, 1825 (held on 17 January 1826), 1826, and 1827 (held on 2 January 1828) are listed in the Chronological checklist, documentation of all these annual events can be found at

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=Native+Conference


References:

-




1817



New Year 1817

Port Dalrymple, VDL (TAS)

Dancing and cricketing at Port Dalrymple

Image:

Scene at Port Dalrymple, c.1810-14 (detail); SLNSW

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=845513 


Documentation:

[News], The Hobart Town Gazette and Southern Reporter (4 January 1817), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article651835 

The Christmas Holidays throughout the Colony have been spent with the utmost conviviality by the young folks. Dancing and cricketing was in full perfection at Port Dalrymple; no accident occurred there, excepting a tea board making its exit, and the village lawyer being deprived of following his profession for a few days, by an unfortunate catastrophe which darkened his eye sight.


Bibliography:

-





27 January 1817 (first performance)

Residence of Isaac Nichols, Sydney, NSW


JENKINS, Robert (songwriter)

When first Australia rose to fame

Song; to the Tune of Rule Britannia (When first Australia rose to fame)



Source:

"SONG", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 February 1817), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177044 (DIGITISED)

SONG

To the Tune of Rule Britannia.

When first AUSTRALIA rose to fame,
And Seamen brave explored her shore;
Neptune with joy, with joy beheld their aim.
And thus express'd the wish he bore:
Rise, Australia! with peace and plenty crown'd,
Thy name shall one day be renown'd.

Bright Ceres shall adorn thy land,
And gild thy fields with waving grain,
While roving herds shall o'er thy meads expand.
And range the riches of the plain.
Rise, Australia! &c. &c. &c.

Then Commerce, too, shall on thee smile.
Advent'rous barks thy ports shall croud; [crowd]
While pleas'd, well pleas'd, the Parent Isle,
Shall of her distant Sons be proud.
Rise, Australia! &c. &c. &c.


Documentation:

[News], The Sydney Gazette (1 February 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177051 (DIGITISED)

On Monday the 27th ult. a dinner party met at the house of Mr. Isaac Nichols, for the purpose of celebrating the Anniversary of the Institution of this Colony under Governor Philip, which took place on the 26th of Jan. 1788, but this year happening upon a Sunday, the commemoration dinner was reserved for the day following. The party assembled were select, and about 40 in number. At 5 in the afternoon dinner was on the table, and a more agreeable entertainment could not have been anticipated. After dinner a number of loyal toasts were drank, and a number of festive songs given; and about 10 the company parted, well gratified with the pleasures that the meeting had afforded. In this account it would be unjust to pass over a pleasant novelty, for which the company were indebted to the muse of Mr. Jenkins (who was one of the stewards, and took the chair by an unanimous wish), in complimenting the party with a few appropriate verses on the occasion; which were sung by a Gentleman to the tune of Rule Britannia, with considerable effect, and produced a well deserved encomium as well to the singer as the composer. Hearing it highly spoken of, we have applied for and been complimented with a copy of the verses, which appear at the head of the next column.


Bibliography:

Clark 1962 (1), 317 

Rose 1987


Resources:

-


Music concordances (tune):

-


Commentary:

This was the first documented public dinner to commemorate the anniversary of the foundation of the colony (much later known as Australia Day).


References:

-




31 March 1817

St. Philip's Church, Sydney, NSW


BAND OF THE 46th REGIMENT

McINTOSH, Robert (master of the band)

For services rendered by the Band, in performing Church Music

Image:

Edward Charles Close, St. Philip's Church Sydney, c.1817; State Library of New South Wales

http://acmssearch.sl.nsw.gov.au/search/itemDetailPaged.cgi?itemID=861125 


Documentation:

"GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (16 August 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177403

Serjt. M'lntosh, in Remuneration for Services rendered by the Band, in performing Church Music, from 1st April, 1816, to 31st March, 1817. - 8 10 0

"DOMESTIC INTELLIGENCE", The Monitor (28 June 1828), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31760288

The choir of St. James's attempted the psalm of Jubilate Deo, on Sunday morning. This anthem used to be performed remarkably well by the band of the 46th regiment some years ago at St. Phillip's Church. It is, when well performed, one of the sweetest pieces of sacred music that can edify a plain congregation. The choir of St. James's appeared to us, however, to fail in their performance of this anthem, as compared with the singers of the hand of the 46th. The effect was not half so good, although the organ must be considered a greater assistant than four or five ordinary in struments. The 46th used to sing this psalm nearly as quick again, as it was sung on Sunday last. We think the heavy dragging effect of Sunday was owing to the slow time in which the anthem was sung. The counter singer, finding himself unsupported by the treble, lost courage, and at length sang out of tune. He was also too loud, though with proper support, this would have been no fault. The only remedy we can suggest at present is, that the anthem, the next time it is attempted, should be sung nearly as quick again, and that the organ should play under the voices. With these alterations, we feel confident Jublilate Deo [sic] will be as well performed at St. James's, as it used to be at St. Phillip's. Nunc dimittis is very well sung in,the evening by the St. James's choir.


Bibliography:

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19 April 1817

Sydney, NSW

Cat and fiddle

Documentation:

"GOVERNMENT PUBLIC NOTICE", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 April 1817), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177180

FOR the Information of Travellers and the Public at large, and for the particular Guidance of the Officers of the Police Establishment, HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR has been pleased to order and direct that the following List of Publicans, who are duly licensed for Keeping of Public Houses, and Vending of Wines, Spirits, and Beer, and of those Persons licensed to brew Beer within the several Towns and Districts of Sydney, Parramatta, Windsor, Liverpool, and Castlereagh, for the present year, shall be published in the Sydney Gazette; viz.

AT SYDNEY.
No. NAME. SIGN.
1. John Tindall ... Green Man;
2. Thomas Collicott ... Rose;
3. Isaac Moss ... Cherry Tree;
4. Edward McDermott ... Saint Patrick;
5. John Jones ... Red Lion;
6. Daniel Cubitt ... Cat and Fiddle; ...

"GOVERNMENT PUBLIC NOTICE", The Hobart Town Gazette and Southern Reporter (3 October 1818), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article654963

For the Information of the Public and the particular Guidance of the Officers of the Police Establishment, His HONOR the Lieutenant GOVERNOR has been pleased to order and direct that the following List of Publicans, who are duly licensed for Keeping of Public Houses and Vending of Wines, Spirits, and Beer, in the several Districts of the County of Buckinghamshire, be published in the Hobart Town Gazette.

AT HOBART TOWN
NAME. | SIGN.
Thos. Wm. Stocker | Derwent Hotel
George Armytage | Plough
Thomas Ransom | Carpenter's Arms
J. Lord and J. Clark | Dusty Miller
Charles Connolly | Bricklayer's Arms
Francis Barnes | Hope
John Eddington | Bird in Hand
Maria Sergeant | Calcutta
Joshua Fergusson
Thos. L. Richardson | New Inn
Richard Wallis | Cat and Fiddle
George Hopwood | City of London Arms ...

[Editorial], Tasmanian and Port Dalrymple Advertiser (2 February 1825), p. 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article84675673 

We have just received the Hobart Town Gazette of the 28th ultimo, in which we find we are again assailed by its pedantic Editor ... On perusing his wretchedy feeble attack upon us, instead of anger kindling in our breasts, we laughed most heartily; and have ever since been singing this quondam Lollipop Merchant's favourite song, of - "Hey diddle diddle, the CAT and the FIDDLE!"


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Music concordances:

James Hook, A Christmas box containing the following bagatelles ... Hey diddle diddle, the cat and the fiddle ... set to musick by Mr. Hook (London: Printed and sold at A. Bland & Weller's, [1798])

http://imslp.org/wiki/A_Christmas_Box_(Hook,_James)

See also the later colonial setting by Isaac Nathan (Sydney: I. Nathan, [1861])

http://trove.nla.gov.au/version/19361027 


Commentary:

The Cat and Fiddle hotel in Hobart lent its name to Cat and Fiddle Alley, which in turn survived to become the Cat and Fiddle Square.


References:

-




21 April 1817

? Hobart Town, VDL (TAS)


JONES, James (vocalist)

A few whimsical songs

Documentation:

"Hobart Town", The Hobart Town Gazette and Southern Reporter (26 April 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article652603 

On Monday last a most splendid and elegant entertainment was given by the Commanders and Owners of the Ships Harriet, and Cochin and the Brigs Spring and Jupiter at Waterloo Hill, where our former Lieutenant Governor DAVEY used to celebrate the remembrance of the immortal victory gained by the DUKE of WELLINGTON. It was for the purpose of congratulating His Honor Lieutenant Governor SORELL on his late arrival in this Island, and to express the general feeling of hope, that Providence may guide in safety through the trackless deep to his native land our late Lieutenant Governor, that this feast took place. At 3 o'clock dinner was served up; at which were present 64 Gentlemen of the Settlement. Guns were continually firing the merry glass went round. When night approached His Honor the Lieutenant Governor and Colonel Davey retired; but the whole of the company did not leave till 11, all highly gratified with the conviviality which attended the meeting; and were all much indebted to Captain JONES of the Harriet, for a few whimsical songs with which he favored the company.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

The Harriet sailed from London on 16 November 1816, under Captain Jones, for Australia carrying 45 passengers, 4 of them missionaries bound for Tahiti. Lancelot Threlkeld joined the voyage at Rio, also bound first for Tahiti (he would settle in NSW in 1824). The Harriet arrived at Hobart on 21 March 1817 and five weeks sailed for Sydney, arriving there on 12 May.


References:

Diary, Lachlan Macquarie, 11 May 1817; modern edition online

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/lema/1817/1817may.html 

Sunday 11th. May 1817! The Ship Harriet, commanded by Capt. Jas. Jones, and of which Mr. Joseph Underwood is Owner, anchored this Night within the Heads of Port Jackson from England which She left on the 18th. of Novr. last, touching on her Passage in Van Diemen's Land - at which last place She remained Six Weeks. - The Harriet has brought out a valuable Cargo of Goods & Merchandize for the use of the Colony. Mr. Underwood, the Owner of the Harriet, with his Family; and also Mr. Whitaker, Mr. Harry Thrupp, and Mr. Emmett, Free Settlers; Lieut. Rolfe of the R. Navy and Five Missionaries with their Families, have come out as Passengers on board the Harriet.

Letter, Lachlan Macquarie to Lord Bathurst, modern edition HRA, series 1, volume 9, 403

Exclusive of the two foregoing Male Convict Ships, I do Arrival of the myself the Honor to report to Your Lordship that the private Merchant Ship Harriet, Commanded by Captain James Jones, and of which Mr. Joseph Underwood, Merchant of this place, is owner, arrived here from England on the 12th Inst., having sailed thence on the 18th of November last, touching on her Passage at Rio de Janeiro and at the Derwent in Van Diemen's Land, and laden with a very Valuable Cargo of various Goods and Merchandize for the Use of this Colony. In this Ship, Messrs. M. J. Whitaker, H. Thrupp and - Emmett, Free Settlers, Five Missionaries for the Society Islands, and several other private persons have Come out as Passengers.




4 June 1817

Sydney, NSW

King's birthday . . . Band of the 46th Regiment

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, journal

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/lema/1817/1817june.html#4 

This being the anniversary of the Birth Day of our beloved good Sovereign, on which he completes the 79th. year of his age, the same was observed as a Holiday throughout the Territory of N. S. Wales and Celebrated with the usual Demonstrations of Joy and respect. After the usual Salutes from the Batteries and Troops, I held a Levee at Government House, which was attended by all the Principal Civil Naval & Military Gentlemen in the Colony who were also entertained at Dinner in the Evening 85 Persons having sat down to Dinner; the 46th. Band attending on this joyful occasion.





August 1817

Sydney, NSW

Departure of the Band of the 46th Regiment, arrival of the Band of the 48th Regiment

Documentation:

"GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 August 1817), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177394 

HEAD QUARTERS, SYDNEY, Monday, August 4th, 1817. The first Division of His Majesty's 48th Regiment, under the Command of Lieutenant Colonel ERSKINE, having arrived yesterday from Ireland on board the Matilda Transport, are to be disembarked on Thursday next, the 7th Instant, at Two o'Clock in the Afternoon, at the King's Wharf; and to be from thence marched to the Barracks; where the Acting Engineer and Barrack-Master are directed to make the necessary Arrangements for their Accommodations. His Honor Lieutenant Governor ERSKINE is to be saluted with thirteen Guns from Dawes's Battery, on his landing at Sydney, from the Matilda Transport, on Thursday next. By Command of His Excellency The Governor, H. C. ANTILL, Major of Brigade.

"GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 August 1817), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177397 

HEAD QUARTERS, SYDNEY, Thursday, 7th August, 1817. HIS MAJESTY'S 46th Regiment, under the Command of Colonel MOLLE, are to hold themselves in Readiness to embark on the shortest Notice for Madras, on board the same Transports which bring the 48th Regiment to relieve them in this Colony. By Command of His Excellency The Governor, H. C. ANTILL, Major of Brigade.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

http://freepages.history.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~garter1/48thfoot.htm 


Commentary:

Musical personal of the regiment included Sergeant Benjamin Hodghon, drum major (discharged 1823); John Simpson, later drum major; and bandsman Thomas Hewitt (fife, clarinet, hautboy, trombone, trumpet, fiddle). William Blizzard (1784-1832), master of the band, joined as a 9-year-old boy in 1793, his father then the master of the band; Blizzard was discharged 25 June 1824. Andrew Tibbs (not an original bandsman on the voyage out) on 14 June 1818 was given 14 days solitary for "Refusing to go to Practice when ordered by the Drum Major".


References:

-




September 1817

Eliza Point, Sydney, NSW

Fête champêtre given at Eliza Point

Bibliography:

"SYDNEY", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (20 September 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177478

We last week omitted to notice the elegant fête champêtre given at Eliza Point, on the grounds of Captain PIPER, to a very numerous company of Officers and other Gentlemen, and Ladies. The major part of the company were wafted to the festive spot by the brig Alert, the whole assemblage amounting to upwards of 120 persons. - A cold collation was served up between two and three, and the remainder of the afternoon was occupied, a l'Arcade, in merry roundelays upon a pleasant green, whose smooth and level verdure owes no present obligation to the improving hand of man. Several marquées, which had been provided as a shelter had any change of atmosphere intervened, were so disposed as to give animation to the surrounding scenery; which from its romantic beauties recalled to mind the poetic representations of Thessalian retirements. The entertainment continued until dark; when the company returned to Sydney.

"IMPORTANT DISCOVERIES IN NEW SOUTH WALES", Literary Panorama and National Register ( ), columns 830-31

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=4CUFAAAAQAAJ&pg=RA1-PT397

Precis of the above.


Bibliography:

-





20 September 1817

Sydney, NSW

Stolen ... manuscript music pricked for the Clarionet

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (20 September 1817, 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177474 

STOLEN from the GAZETTE OFFICE, about 3 weeks since, a small MOROCCO BOOK, containing manuscript Music pricked for the Clarionet. - Any one discovering the Offender will receive Twenty Shillings for their Trouble.


Bibliography:

-





8 November 1817

Sydney, NSW

Piano-forte by Beck

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (8 November 1817), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177559

At the Residence of Mr. Chartres, George-street, Sydney, on Thursday next, the 13th Instant, at Eleven in the Forenoon, and on every succeeding Thursday at same hour (until the whole shall be disposed of), THE Remaining STOCK in TRADE, consisting of men and women's cotton hose, English prints, haberdashery, &c. &c. Likewise, the Houshold Furniture ; comprising an elegant rose-wood four-post bedstead, fluted and carved, running on brass castors, with English chintz hangings, rose-wood secretary, chest of drawers, parlour and drawing room chairs, sofas, dining and other tables, ladies and gentlemen's portable writing desks, &c. &c. &c. - Also, a very excellent toned piano forte by Beck . . .

Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

Perhaps this was the piano he advertised for sale in 1815 (see above), now among his personal effects.


References:

-




29 November 1817

Sydney, NSW

A most choice assortment of music of the latest productions ... blank music books and paper

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (29 November 1817), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177591

TO BE SOLD, at the Residence of J. Hankinson, No. 4, O'Connell street, the following GOODS, at the most moderate Prices ... fenders and fire irons, banister and scrubbing brushes, some very elegant copperplate engravings, &c. &c. Some very elegant jewellery, and a most choice assortment of music of the latest productions, imported in the Larkens; also, blank music books and paper, foolscap and other writing paper.


Bibliography:

-





27 December 1817

Sydney, NSW


RILEY, Alexander

A piano forte by Thurston

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (27 December 1817), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177658 

FOR SALE by PUBLIC AUCTION, by Mr. BEVAN, on the PREMISES, on TUESDAY the 6th January, and following Days, the valuable and elegant PROPERTY of ALEXANDER RILEY, Esq. who has embarked for Europe. FURNITURE MADE IN INDIA; consisting of dining, breakfast, tea, pembroke, card, drawing-room, writing, dressing, and work tables; sideboards, sofas, Cleopatra, verandah, and other couches; chairs, bedsteads, with furniture complete; beaureaus, secretaries, book cases, and chests of drawers, liquor cases, wash-hand stands, clothes horses, trays and waiters, &c. &c. &c. - A piano forte by Thurston, a pier glass 48 by 27, a swing dressing glass 40 by 22 ... a chariot and harness, a buggy with horse and harness, a poney with saddle and bridle, a cart and harness; also, a fast sailing copper-fastened boat, with mast, sails, oars and rudder, &c. late the Property of Lieut. DAWES, of H. M. 46th Regt, and various other articles too numerous to detail. To be viewed on the Monday previous, and Morning of Sale ...


Bibliography:

Jeanette Holcomb, Early merchant families of Sydney: speculation and risk management on the fringes of empire (North Melbourne: Australian Scholarly Publishing, 2013; London: 2014)

http://trove.nla.gov.au/work/189668368 

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=NjsiBAAAQBAJ (PREVIEW)


Resources:

-


Commentary:

Riley was an early free settler, arriving in NSW in June 1804. A leading Sydney trader and merchant, he left the colony on 22 December 1817 to return to England, aboard the ship Harriet (see above), which he had recently purchased, leaving his business interests in NSW in the care of his brother Edward Riley.


References:

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1818



3 January 1818

Sydney, NSW


FLORANCE, Thomas

Extra Charges for ... Dancing, Music, and Drawing

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 January 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177670 

T. FLORANCE most respectfully begs leave to inform the Inhabitants of Sydney and its Dependencies, that he intends opening a BOARDlNG SCHOOL, wherein (with proper Assistants) young Gentlemen will be carefully and accurately inducted in the English, Latin, and Greek Languages, Reading, Writing, Arithmetic, Book-keeping by single and double entry, Geography, use of the Globes, Geometry, Algebra, Surveying, Navigation, and Nautical Astronomy, at Forty Pounds per annum, and two do. Entrance. - Extra Charges for the French and Italian Languages, Fencing, Dancing, Music, and Drawing. Strict Attention will be paid to cleanliness in dress, to salubrity and sufficiency of Food. - Every young Gentleman to be furnished with two pair of sheets, six towels, knife and fork, and a silver spoon. - Three months notice is required previous to quitting the School: he also purposes taking a limited number of Day Pupils. - Applications addressed to No. 74, Pitt- street, will be duly attended to.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 January 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177685

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (17 January 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177695


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

Florance's advertised school never opened, and in May he left Sydney for Hobart Town.


References:

-




19 January 1818

Sydney, NSW

The Queen's Birthday

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 January 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177708 

HER MAJESTY'S Birth Day falling this year on a Sunday, the usual honours and ceremonies were deferred until the following day, Monday the 19th instant. The display of the Royal Standard from Fort Phillip, a Royal Salute from the battery at Dawes' Point, and a jeu de joie from the 48th Regiment in presence of His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR in Hyde Park, manifested the genuine loyally and zeal of British Subjects on the auspicious occasion, undiminished and unabated by time or distance. At one o'clock His EXCELLENCY held his accustomed levee, to receive the complimenta and congratulations of the Civil and Military Officers and Gentleman of the Colony, on the return of a day which must ever be in the highest degree venerated, so long as the illustrious HOUSE of BRUNSWICK is looked up to as the standard of British liberty, property, and independence. An Ode, from the prolific Muse of the volunteer Laureat, Mr. ROBINSON, whose loyal and poetic effusions we have for many years had the pleasure to yield our tribute of commendation to, was recited by the Author with solemn and impressive effect, and contributed largely, by its elegant and refined sentiments, to the enthusiastic feelings of all who heard it. We are happy to present it to our Readers in our fourth page. In the evening a Ball and Supper were given at Government House, to the most numerous assemblage of Ladies and Gentlemen that ever graced a public festival in this Colony; and we regret that the limits of our columns do not allow us to do justice by description to the general display of taste and fancy which at once rivetted the attention and excited the admiration of every beholder. The ball room was decorated with elegant festoons and variegated wreaths of natural and artificial shrubs and flowers. Chinese transparent lamps, with emblematical devices, were suspended from the centre of each window in front of the rooms; whilst on the opposite side appeared two handsome female figures in bronze, erected on pedestals, each holding two lamps. At either extremity of the ball room, within the pillars, which were disposed with singular taste and judgment, four splendid mirrors were suspended, producing the effect of lengthened distance, and of doubling in appearance the number of dancers - the whole combining in one point of view rural elegance with happy and graceful embellishment. About eleven o'clock the party, exceeding 160 Ladies and Gentlemen, sat down to a superb and elegant repast; after which they resumed the sprightly dance, and continued the favorite and gratifying entertainment to a late hour in the evening.


Bibliography:

-





31 January 1818

Sydney, NSW

Band master turned music teacher ... also Music furnished for Balls

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 January 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177724

TO THE GENTRY OF THE COLONY, AND THE PUBLIC AT LARGE. Robert M'Intosh respectfully begs to inform, that he has commenced teaching Music at his House in York-street, and hopes that an early experience of his assiduity and attention to Pupils on the various Instruments will recommend him to public Favor. Terms 2s. 6d. per lesson on the Piano Forte, & 2s. per lesson for the Violin, Clarionet, Hautboy, and other wind Instruments. Instruments tuned and put in order when they require it. Also, Music furnished for Balls and private Entertainments at a short Notice, and at a moderate Rate of Charge.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (7 February 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177743


Bibliography:

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14 February 1818

St. Philip's Church, Sydney, NSW

Sacred music

Documentation:

For performance of sacred Music in the Church of Sydney. [£] 3. 10. 0.

"GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS", The Sydney Gazette (14 February 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177762


Bibliography:

-





3-5 April 1818

St. Philip's Church, Sydney, NSW

On receiving news from London of the death of princess Charlotte of Wales

Image:

Charlotte of Wales, 1817, engraved after painting by Thomas Lawrence


Documentation:

"London, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 1817", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 April 1818), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177872 

DEATH OF THE PRINCESS CHARLOTTE OF WALES, AFTER THE BIRTH OF A SON, STILL-BORN. The hopes of the Country are dashed to the earth. Instead of tidings of great joy, instead of proclaiming the birth of a future Sovereign of these Realms, "of England's future hope and glory," we have to perform the painful task of announcing that her Royal Highness, after having been delivered of a still-born male child, expired in a few hours afterwards ...

"SYDNEY - GAZETTE EXTRAORDINARY, THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1818", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 April 1818), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177869 

GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS. GOVERNMENT HOUSE, SYDNEY, Thursday, 2d April 1818. It is with Sensations of the deepest Distress that His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR has received by the Ship Guildford, which arrived yesterday, the melancholy Intelligence of the Death of HER ROYAL HIGH NESS the PRINCESS CHARLOTTE of WALES, as announced in a LONDON GAZETTE EXTRAORDINARY, dated "WHITEHALL, NOVEMBER 6, 1817," ...

In making a Communication of this heart-rending and severe National Calamity, His EXCELLENCY feels that he will obtain the fullest Sympathy in the Bosom of every British Subject in New South Wales ... It rests, therefore, under this Dispensation of the Divine Will, only for His EXCELLENCY, to call the Attention of ALL to the Performance of those melancholy and solemn Rites, which, though late, are still due to the Memory of the August PRINCESS CHARLOTTE, heretofore the Hope and the Pride of the British People.

1. It is therefore ordered and directed, that, at Half-past Two o'Clock this day, Twenty-two minute Guns be fired from the Battery on Dawes's Point, in Commemoration of the Years which the PRINCESS had nearly completed when, she was prematurely snatched from this World.

2. That the Royal Standard be at the same Time hoisted at Fort Philip, and the Union at Dawes's Point; each only half-mast high, and continued until Sun-set.

3. That the Royal Standard and Union continue to be so hoisted, half-mast high, from Sun-rise to Sun-set, daily, until Monday next; and that the Bells of St. Philip's Church be tolled twice each Day, one Hour at each Time, namely, at Sun-rise and Sun-set.

4. That the Colours on board all the Ships in the Harbour be in like Manner displayed half-mast high.

5. That the Bells commence tolling at Half-past Two o'Clock this Day, and continue for one Hour; and be in like Manner tolled at Sun-set this Evening.

6. That all Places of Public Amusement, be forth-with shut up; and that all Shops (Butchers and Bakers only excepted) be closed.

...

9. His EXCELLENCY further desires to be supported under this weighty general Affliction, by the Attendance at Government House, at the Hour of Ten on Sunday Morning next, of all the Civil and Military Officers of this Government, in appropriate Mourning, to proceed from thence with His EXCELLENCY to the Church of St. Philip, there to humble themselves before the THRONE of DIVINE MERCY, on this sad and afflicting Event.

By His Excellency's Command, JOHN THOMAS CAMPBELL, Secretary.

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (11 April 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177879 

In compliance with the request made by His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR and Commander in Chief, in the General Orders of last week, the Officers Civil and Military assembled at Government House on Sunday morning last, at the hour of ten; and accompanied His Excellency to the Church of St Philip; where an affecting and most impressive sermon was preached by the Rev. Mr. Cowper, on the melancholy occasion which had claimed the tribute of sorrow, and condolance from every subject of the British Nation. The procession moved from Government House at half-past ten; and passed through a lane formed by His Majesty's 48th Regiment, extending from thence to the church; dropping their colours as the procession passed.

A hymn and an anthem were introduced into the service; and these, from their very appropriate selection, tended considerably to heighten the general feeling.

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 May 1818), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2177937 

It is impossible to conceive a more universal state of real and sincere mourning and respect, than the Death of the ever to be lamented PRINCESS CHARLOTTE occasioned in England. We have been favoured with the perusal of the Times & other London Newspapers and from them it would appear that the public mind was totally absorbed in that single subject of sorrow - every other was, for the time, forgotten ...

The Theatres in London opened in a manner most strongly impressive of the general sensation. The performances were selections from sacred music, perhaps the only appropriate manner in which places of public amusement could be again visited. The PRINCESS possessed a private box at each Theatre. At Drury Lane, it was on the first tier, immediately over the Kind's stage-box. It was elegantly decorated with black cloth and white ribbands, in festoons. A superb hatchment, in which HER ROYAL HIGHNESS and her NOBLE CONSORT'S Arms were fully emblazoned, was placed in the front; and the silver pillars, which supported it were tastefully and elegantly adorned with allevate black and white cloth. The whole house was refitted with black decorations; and when the curtain rose it cannot but have produced a most striking effect to have witnessed an assemblage so large as that superb Theatre contains, dressed without exception in deep mourning ; rising with one emotion to pay the last Tribute to their departed PRINCESS; in listening to the solemn strains of the finest and best Artists in the World. The performance opened with Mozart's Requiem; and it is said, that, at the close, the whole audience were in tears ...

[News], The Hobart Town Gazette and Southern Reporter (20 June 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article654719 


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

"Princess Charlotte of Wales", Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Princess_Charlotte_of_Wales 


Commentary:

-


References:

-




14 June 1818

The Barracks, Sydney, NSW


TIBBS, Andrew (bandsman)

HODGHON, Benjamin (drum major)

BAND OF THE 48th REGIMENT

Refusing to go to Practice when ordered by the Drum Major

Documentation:

From Sargent 1996



Bibliography:

Sargent 1996

On 14 June 1818 bandsman Andrew Tibbs was given 14 days solitary for "Refusing to go to Practice when ordered by the Drum Major"





29 July 1818

Newcastle, NSW

Band aboard the governor's boat at Newcastle

Documentation:

Lachlan Macquarie, journal, 29 July 1818

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/journeys/1818/1818.html (modern edition online)

Wishing to explore some parts of the Interior, and the three principal Branches of Hunter's River, arrangements were made for that purpose, and at 11 a.m. I set out in my own Barge attended by Capt. Wallis, Capt. Antill, Mr. Meehan, Lt. Macquarie & Ensn. Roberts, accompanied by 5 other Boats having our Provisions Tents & Baggage on board, with 52 attendants of all descriptions - four of whom were musicians and formed our little Band. Mrs. Macquarie not feeling herself sufficiently strong for undertaking so fatiguing a Tour, remained at the settlement with our dear Boy Lachlan - and the Revd. Mr. Cowper. The sight of our six Boats so well manned with the Band Playing, and the Brigs Eliz:-Henrietta and Lady Nelson saluting had a very fine and gratifying effect.


Bibliography:

-





6 August 1818 (event)

c.1818 (image)

Newcastle, NSW


BURIGON (leader)

INDIGENOUS (performers)

MACQUARIE, Lachlan (reporter)


LYCETT, Joseph (? artist)

WALLIS, James (? artist)

Carauberie at Newcastle

Corroboree at Newcastle (c.1818, Joseph Lycett)

Source (image):

Detail from Corroboree at Newcastle, attributed to Joseph Lycett; SL-NSW DG 228, digitally lightened copy

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/album/ItemViewer.aspx?itemid=823499&suppress=N&imgindex=4 (DIGITISED)

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=404695 (CATALOGUE RECORD)


Documentation (event):

Lachlan Macquarie, journal, 6 August 1818

http://www.mq.edu.au/macquarie-archive/journeys/1818/1818.html (modern edition online)

[6 August 1818] At Night Jack, als. "Burigon", King of the Newcastle Native Tribe, with about 40 men, women & children of his Tribe, came by Capt. Wallis's desire to the Govt. House between 7 & 8 o'clock at Night, and entertained with a Carauberie [Corroboree] in high stile [sic] for Half an Hour in the Grounds in rear of Govt. House. I ordered them to be Treated with some Grog and an allowance of Maize.


Bibliography:

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15 August 1818

St. Philip's Church, Sydney, NSW


PARSONS, Harry

Serjeant Parsons, for Sacred Music

"GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (15 August 1818), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178136 

HIS EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR is pleased to direct the following STATEMENTS of the COLONIAL POLICE, and FEMALE ORPHAN INSTITUTION FUNDS, for the Quarter ending the 30th of June last, to be published for general Information ...

[To] Serjeant Parsons, for Musician's Performance of Sacred Music in St. Philip's Church, at Sydney. [£] 5. 5. 0.


Bibliography:

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22 August 1818

Sydney, NSW


WOOD, Isaac

WOOD, Elizabeth Felicia

Instruction in Dancing

Documentation:

Petition of Isaac Wood, to Lachlan Macquarie, 7 October 1816; State Records, NSW

To His excellency Lachlin Macquarie Esquire Captain General Govenor Commander in chief in and over His Majesty's Territory of New South Wales and it's dependencies. The Petition of Isaac Wood a school master. That humbly herewith. That your petitioner arrived in this colony on the ship "Archduke Charles" in the month of February 1813 under sentence of transportation for 7 years. Five of which is now nearly expired. That your Excellency was pleased at the last general musters to order petitioners name to be entered as ticket-of-leave, but he not wishing to be troublesome, did not make any application to that effect since. Petitioner being desirous to appear at the ensuing muster, in that manner his Excellency has been pleased to direct in his late general orders, humbly solicits from his Excellency such indulgence as in duty bound will ever pray. Sydney Academy October 7th 1816. [signed] Isaac Wood.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (22 August 1818), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178150

DANCING. - AT the Desire of some respectable Personages, Mr. WOOD, of the Sydney Academy, has been induced to engage a Person perfectly qualified to instruct Pupils in that graceful Accomplishment, which is considered so necessary to the Acquirement of a becoming Demeanour. - Persons who have been heretofore deprived of the Opportunity, have it now in their power of being improved, as suitable Hours are appointed for their Reception, when they may receive private Lessons. - Terms of Tuition and other Particulars will be made known on Application as above. Mrs. WOOD will receive young Ladies, to whose Instruction she will personally attend.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (12 December 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178420 

SYDNEY ACADEMY. - Mr. ISAAC WOOD begs leave to inform his Friends and the Public in general, that the Christmas Recess will commence on Thursday the 17th Intant, and terminate on Monday the 4th of January, 1819, when the young Gentlemen belonging to this Academy will resume their Studies. The Latin, French, German, Spanish, Italian, and Portuguese Languages continue to be taught by a Person fully competent; likewise, that graceful Accomplishment of Dancing, which is considered so necessary to the acquirement of a becoming demeanour.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (29 December 1821), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2180705 

PROSPECTUS Of the Advantages enjoyed by the Pupils at the Sydney Academy, Macquarie-street, conducted by Isaac Wood.

SITUATION. THE School-house stands on a hill, contiguous to the Government Domain, on a spot the most healthy and picturesque in Sydney, commanding a beautiful View of the Town, the Cove, Harbour, Shipping, &c. &c. This House has been erected at a considerable expence, affording to the Pupils every accommodation, with commodious apartments, &c. &c. Its contiguity to the Domain (where the Pupils have a liberty of walking, and, in the season, bathing, &c.) renders it one of the most delightful situations possible.

Age, Accommodation, and Treatment. - Young Gentlemen, of all ages, are received and educated in the several branches of useful and polite literature, according to their destinations in life. The School-room is very commodious, and the place, appropriated for play, so contiguous thereto, that the Pupils are under the immediate eye of the Master. The Scholars are formed to the habits of Gentlemen, and are consequently treated with becoming mildness ; whilst their health, comfort, and religious concerns, are primary objects of solicitude. Each Pupil has a separate bed, and the whole family breakfast, dine, and tea together.

Instruction. - The English Language (as set forth in the annexed Statement of Terms), plain and ornamental Writing, and Arithmetic, are taught indiscriminately to every Pupil, and on a plan which insures incredible success in a comparatively short time. The Latin, French, Drawing, Dancing, Music, Fencing, &c. (by Persons perfectly qualified), essential embellishments to a good education, are likewise indefatigably pursued, unless the age and views of the Student determine otherwise.

Terms. - Boarders, instructed in any, or all of the following Branches, per annum, with Board and Lodging : - Ten years of age, and upwards ... £40; Under ten years .. 30. Subject to an extra charge of £5 for Washing. Books, Pens, Ink, Paper, &c. in addition. Hours of Study in the Summer Season, from 6 to 8 o'clock in the morning; from 9 to 12; and from 2 to 5 in the afternoon; Winter Season, from 9 to 12 ; from 2 to 5 ; and from 7 to 8 in the evenings. Day Scholars, instructed in Spelling and Reading, for 3 calendar months, 30s. The above, with the addition of Writing, English Grammar, and Arithmetic, 40s. per quarter. The above, with the addition of Geography and Book-keeping, 50s. per ditto. The above, with the addition of Elocution and Elements of the Mathematics, 60s. per ditto. Each Pupil is chargeable with 5s. extra for Fuel, and the usual charge for Books, Pens, Ink, Paper, &c; - Hours of Study throughout the year, for Day Scholars, from 9 to 12, and from 2 to 5 o'clock in the afternoon.

Additional Terms. - Latin and French, each 30s. per quarter. Drawing, 3 guineas per quarter. Dancing and Fencing, 2 guineas each per quarter. Music, according to the Instrument. Agreeably to the above arrangements, there is an opportunity of selecting for the Pupil, according to his capacity, or the wishes of the Parents.

Vacations. - The usual Vacations are, a Fortnight at Christmas; a Week at Easter ; and the same at Whitsuntide; for either of which, if a Boarder continues in the House, the Charge is One Guinea per Week extra. Previous to the Christmas Recess the Pupils are examined in their respective Classes, and, according to Merit, receive Medals, Books, Toys, &c. &c. and for which there is a full explanation given (by way of certificate) on the back of each Christmas Piece. The day following is an Entertainment, at a moderate Charge, to which each Pupil, with his Sister or female Relative, is invited. Should a Boy absent himself on this occasion, he will be chargeable with the same, in consequence of the trouble and expence attending such preparations. No Engagement entered into for Boarders for a less term than twelve months; nor, for Day Scholars, for leis than three months; and the Year entered into by the former, and the Quarter by the latter, must be fully completed and ended. Three Months Notice, in Writing, must be given previous to the Removal of any Boarder; and One Month previous to that of any Day Scholar; otherwise the amount of half-a-year to a Boarder, and a quarter of a year to a Day Scholar, will be the forfeit for such neglect. The young Gentlemen, belonging to this Establishment, will resume their Studies on Monday the 7th of January next.

Petition of Isaac Wood, to Lachlan Macquarie, [? 1821]; State Records, NSW

To his Excellency Lachlin Macquarie Esquire, Captain General and Commander in Chief in and over His Majesty's territory of New South Wales and it's dependencies. The Petition of Isaac Wood. Most Humbly and Respectfully herewith. That your petitioner has resided in this colony for 8 years past was married, and is now left with four small children to deplore the loss of a dutiful, affectionate, and valuable wife, and a tender and anxious mother. From the number of schools in Sydney petitioner his present forte of life to be very fluctuating, so much so, that he is very desirous to relinquish the same, for some other mode of living. Would prefer Agricultural pursuits that may be conductive to good health and the better to enable me to make provision for my little ones. Therefore most humbly solicit from your Excellency proportion of land in addition to the one hundred acres heartily given, or some situation under Government, at any time most convent or when such may be vacant. And your petitioner as in duty bound will ever pray [signed] Isaac Wood.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

Colin Thomas Turton Wood, "Isaac Wood"

http://www.wood.our0genealogy.org/HTML/Isaac_Wood.htm 


Commentary:

See also 7 October 1816 above


References:

"DIED", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 March 1821), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2180165 

DIED - Last night, after a severe but short illness, Mrs. WOOD, wife of Mr. ISAAC WOOD, of the Macquarie-street Academy, much respected, and sincerely lamented.

"DEATHS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (20 February 1823), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2181655 

On-Friday afternoon last, at his residence in Macquarie-street, Sydney, Mr. ISAAC WOOD, the founder of that praise-worthy Seminary - The Sydney Academy. Mr. W. had been in a declining state of health for many months past; he seemed to have allowed the death of an affectionate wife, which occurred about 22 months before, continually to harrass his mind; this, superadded to that intense application the rising youth were ever in the habit of receiving, for years, from a kind and paternal master, combined with the affliction of a gradually decaying leg, hastened the termination of his valuable life. Since the last vacation only, he first became confined to his bed. About three weeks since every symptom of recovery was manifested and the Academy was re-opened; but, alas! on Thursday afternoon last, he was conveyed to his bed much debilitated with the little exertion involuntarily called forth while in the school-room, and the next afternoon, his bed-room became the chamber of death! His affectionate and faithful services the Colony much required, but Providence saw fit to remove him from a scene of sore probation, to reward His servant with the fadeless boon. Mr. Wood leaves four orphans, two sons and two daughters, the eldest of whom is but a mere child. The Academy, it seems, the Executors are desirous of still ably carrying on; we therefore cordially hope, that every support will be given the Institution for the sake of the pretty orphans.




22 August 1818

Sydney, NSW

A very elegant Grand Piano Forte by Wilkinson & Co.

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (12 September 1818), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178188 

TO be RAFFLED, a very elegant Grand PIANO FORTE, with additional Keys, by WILKINSON & Co: to consist of Twenty-five Members, each Three Pounds. - Further Particulars may be known by Application to J. HANKINSON, George-street.


Bibliography:

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12 September 1818

Sydney, NSW


ERSKINE, James (host)

BAND OF THE 48th REGIMENT

Concert and ball, full band, singers in masquerade

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (12 September 1818), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178194 

A few evenings ago a Concert was given by His Honor Lieutenant Governor ERSKINE to a numerout Party of Ladies and Gentlemen, which was succeeded by a splendid Ball. His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR, and Mrs. MACQUARIE, participated in the elegancies of the festival, as did likewise all the principal Officers, Ladies, and Gentlemen in Sydney and its vicinities; the company being in number 80 persons. At about eleven a cold collation was served up in a style of peculiar delicacy. The full Band of the 48th attended upon the amusements of the evening; and several singers, who were introduced in masquerade, added not a little to its harmonies. At the end of the collation dancing resumed; and the sprightly partie did not separate until 3 or 4 in the morning, each Lady aud Gentleman taking leave of their worthy HOST, and returning their acknowledgments for the kindness of his entertainment.


Bibliography:

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15-16 September 1818

Shark Bay, WA


INDIGENOUS (Malgana people)

FREYCINET, Louis

ARAGO, Jacques (reporter)

Castanets and dancing at Shark Bay

Image:

Jacques Arago, Nouvelle Hollande: Baie des Chiens-marins Presque île Peron, entrevue avec les sauvages [New Holland: Shark Bay, Peron Peninsula. Meeting with the savages]; note Arago with his castanets

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-136213281

http://collectionsearch.nma.gov.au/object/56997 

http://nga.gov.au/exhibition/OUTWEST/Default.cfm?IRN=204615&BioArtistIRN=27046&MnuID=3&GalID=0&ViewID=2 


Documentation:

Arago 1822, (260), 265- [Lettre 54]

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=57QBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA260 

[260] LETTRE LIV. Nouvelle-Hollande, presqu'île Péron, Terre d'Endracht, septembre 1818.

[265] Des échanges s'étaient déjà opérés ... Tous ces échanges se faisaient avec une certaine défiance de la part des sauvages: ils nous épiaient comme de dangereux ennemis, et nous montraient constamment la corvette, en nous criant: Ajerkadé, ayerkadé (allez-vous-en, allez-vous-en).

[266] Ils étaient partagés en trois bandes ... Je me rappelai, enfin, que j'avais des castagnettes dans ma poche, et persuadé que ce bruit pourrait leur plaire, en cadençant les mouvemens, j'en jouai avec empressement. Juge de mon plaisir: le vieillard étonné se lève, et, sans quitter ses armes ni son petit animal, il se met à danser d'une manière si grotesque, que nous étouffions de rire. Quelques sauvages de la première bande dansèrent aussi à son exemple, tandis que l'un d'entr'eux s'assit sur ses talons, et avec deux petits casse-têtes, frappait une sagaie sans suivre la mesure et sans se soucier d'y manquer. Je présentai mes castagnettes au vieillard, et, surpris sans doute qu'un si petit instrument fît tant de bruit, il me montra, comme pour m'engager à un échange, l'animal qu'il paraissait si fort affectionner, en me faisant entendre qu'il laisserait son cadeau sur la colline, auprès d'un arbuste qu'il m'indiquait, après que j'y aurais déposé le mien. Mais je ne fus pas dupe de son offre, et je savais déjà à quoi m'en tenir sur leur exactitude dans les engagemens qu'ils avaient l'air de contracter ...

[268] ... Dès que je l'eus quitté, il poussa un grand cri en [269] élevant sa voix par intervalles, comme un de nos musiciens qui voudrait chanter une gamme par tierces, et tous les sauvages des deux autres bandes se réunirent, et disparurent en nous faisant signe qu'ils reviendraient au lever du soleil. Très-satisfaits de notre première entrevue, nous les attendons avec l'impatience la plus vive; car nous avons résolu d'être assez généreux pour leur ôter toute espèce de crainte ...

Arago 1822, [Letter 55] (270) 271

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=57QBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA271 

[270] LETTRE LV. Presqu'île Péron (Nouvelle-Hollande). Le 16 [septembre], à 7 heures du matin ...

[271] ... Après une heure de marche, je vis quelques naturels armés toujours de sagaies et de casse-têtes, qui descendaient avec une rapidité incroyable une dune fort élevée, et qui se dirigeaient vers moi en poussant de grands cris. Je fis bonne contenance , et les attendis de pied-ferme. L'un d'eux, sans doute l'orateur de la troupe, car il me parla long-temps comme si je devais le comprendre, se détacha des autres; et, après une exhortation véhémente , me montra le navire et les deux embarcations, en terminant toujours sa période par le mot ajerkadé et un geste menaçant.

Craignant qu'ils ne profitassent de l'avantage qu'ils avaient sur moi, et désirant les éloigner sans leur faire le moindre mal, je prévins le matelot qui m'accompagnait de la petite ruse que j'allais employer, et lui criai à haute voix de s'en aller, en me servant de l'expression des sauvages. A ce mot ajerkadé, je les vis se regarder avec étonnement, le répéter à voix basse, et délibérer sur ce qu'ils avaient à faire. Cependant, je m'acheminais toujours vers les canots, et mon compagnon me suivait à quelques pas de distance. Mais comme les naturels me parurent disposés à entreprendre un coup-de-main, je vis qu'il fallait les effrayer en leur faisant connaître le terrible pouvoir de nos armes. Je pris donc un air menacant en me retournant vers le matelot, et lui criai de nouveau ajerkadé; et comme, selon nos conventions, il ne devait pas m'obéir, je le mis en joue et fis feu au-dessus de sa tête ...

Arago 1822, 453

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=57QBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA453 

Arago 1823, part 1 [Letter 54] (167), 170-73

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=rLENAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA170

[167] LETTER LIV. New Holland, Peninsula of Peron, Endracht's-land, September, 1818 ...

[170] ... Exchanges had already taken place, and the prudence of M. Pellion had prevented the fatal result, to which a first interview might have led. The savages had been presented with necklaces of glass beads, looking-glasses, and little knives: they had sent clubs and assagays; and this species of barter appeared to please them much. One of my friends, M. Adam, made them a present of a pair of drawers: these they tore to pieces, and shared the fragments. They obstinately refused to drink some wine and water which was put into a bottle; and rubbed [171] their bodies with a piece of bacon, which a sailor had bartered for a small club. But what they appeared most to admire was a plate of tin, which they handed from one to another, and which was ultimately kept by the oldest of the troop. All these exchanges were made with a certain mistrust on the part of the savages: they watched us as dangerous enemies, and were continually pointing to the ship, exclaiming, ayerkade, ayerkade, (go away, go away).

Desirous, however, of knowing whether they were destitute of fresh water, as we supposed, I fixed their attention by some gestures, and pretended to drink some sea-water out of the hollow of my hand. They did not appear to be surprised at it, and showed no signs of aversion, though 1 am certain they understood me.

They were divided into three bands. The first (I mean the boldest) had come down on the shore, and by degrees had approached within a few paces of us: two of these only had long curly beards; the others appeared very young. The second remained on a hillock of white sand, better than a quarter of a mile from us; and the third, in which we perceived a woman, was on the summit of the hill above our heads. The savages on the shore scarcely allowed us to approach them pretty near, except for a few moments: they fled with astonishing rapidity when we attempted to go close to them; yet I wished to ascertain the character of their physiognomy, and of the different marks on their bodies, to be enabled to impart more truth to my drawings. I thought, therefore, I should succeed better by endeavouring to accost those who were above our heads; and a still more cogent reason determined me to take this step. I had already remarked, that previous to their making certain movements, the savages, who seemed disposed to attack us, frequently turned their eyes toward an old man, painted with stripes [172] of various colours, who seemed to give them orders, and was distinguished from the rest by a shell hanging to his girdle, and covering his navel. This old man, towards whom I directed my steps, making friendly signs, and crying tayo, held under his arm an animal resembling a little lion-dog, painted red. The woman was near him, and carried an infant seated on her hips, supporting him with her hand, or with a girdle of hair. When I was pretty near, she retired behind some shrubs, not out of modesty, or to avoid my looks (she was perfectly naked), but because she appeared to be afraid. In vain did I show the old man a white handkerchief, and make motions as if I would throw it, in order to give it him; he still preserved the most immovable stillness. At last I recollected that I had a pair of castanets in my pocket, and presuming that the sound might please them, by playing a sort of tune on them, I began to rattle them briskly. Judge of my pleasure: the old man rose with astonishment, and, without quitting his weapons or his little animal, fell to dancing in such a grotesque manner that we were ready to die with laughing. Some of the savages of the first band, following his example, danced also; while one of them, sitting on his heels, beat on an assagay with two little clubs, without keeping time, or seeming to regard it. I held out my castanets to the old man, and surprised, no doubt, that so small an instrument should make so much noise, he showed me, as if to induce me to barter, the animal of which he appeared so fond; giving me to understand, that he would leave his present on the hill, near a shrub which he pointed out, after I should have deposited mine there. But I was not to be duped by his offer; I knew already how little dependence was to be placed on the engagements which they appeared to contract. Several of our people had been deceived by their empty promises, and had found nothing in the places where they had led us to expect they would leave some article. Nevertheless, to satisfy [173] him it was not from mistrust I did not accept his proposal, I climbed a little higher up the hill, but giving him to understand, that it was impossible for me to reach the spot he pointed out. In vain would he have induced me to make a long circuit to it: I pretended not to understand him, and again descended to my companions, after having thoroughly examined the lines of his race, and those of two or three others who were with him.

As soon as I left him, he set up a loud shout, raising his voice at intervals, like one of our musicians singing the gamut by thirds; at which all the savages of the other two bands joined them, and they departed, making signs that they would come again at sunrise. Highly satisfied with our first interview, we are expecting them with the greatest impatience; for we have resolved to be sufficiently generous to remove from them every cause of apprehension ...

Arago 1823, part 1 [Letter 55] (173) 174

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=rLENAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA174

LETTER LV. Peninsula of Peron (New Holland). THE 16th, at seven in the morning, we had been to collect our store of oysters; the reefs are studded with them ...

After an hour's walking, I saw a few of the natives, armed as before with assagays and clubs, who were descending a high down with incredible swiftness, and coming toward me with loud shouts. I put a good face on the matter, and firmly awaited their arrival. One of them, no doubt the orator of the band, for he spoke to me a long time as if I could understand him, came forward alone; and, after a vehement harangue, pointed to the ship and the two boats, concluding each period of his speech with the word ayerkade, and a threatening gesture. Fearing they might avail themselves of the advantage their numbers gave them, and wishing to get rid of them without doing them any harm, I apprised the sailor of the little stratagem to which I meant to have recourse; and called to him in a loud voice to go away, employing the term of the savages. At the word ayerkade, I saw them look at each other with astonishment, repeat it in a low voice, and deliberate on what they should do. However, I still proceeded toward the boats, and my companion followed me at a little distance. But as the natives appeared to me disposed to attempt a sudden attack, I saw it was necessary to frighten them, by letting them know the terrible power of our weapons. Accordingly I assumed a threatening air, turning toward the sailor, and calling to him again ayerkade; and, as according to our agreement he was to disobey me, I pointed my gun toward him, and fired over his head. Instantly he fell: and the savages, terrified at the noise and the fall of my comrade, took to their heels; while the sailor, who had seconded my design, rose and doubled a little advanced point, which prevented his being observed. I followed him, and we joined our commander, to whom I imparted what I thought of the character and manners of these poor wretches, who appeared to be more alarmed than pleased at our arrival ...


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

Aboriginal Occupation of Shark Bay, Shark Bay's history

http://www.sharkbay.org.au/shark-bays-history-aboriginal-culture-historic-occupation.aspx 


Commentary:

-


References:

-




17 September 1818

Tia River (Crimp's Creek, Croker's River) Northern Tablelands, NSW


OXLEY, John (reporter)

A singular succession of sounds, resembling snatches of a song

Documentation:

Oxley 1820, 302

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=N0YbAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA302 

[302] ... [17 September 1818] We proceeded on an easterly course during this day's journey; and seven miles from Croker's River crossed a smaller stream running to the north-east. For the first ten miles the country was very poor and badly timbered, with barren Stony hills; but from the last mentioned stream to our halting-place, at the end of twelve miles, though the land was hilly the soil was excellent, consisting of a rich, dark mould. The hills were particularly rich and thickly clothed with fine timber, blue gum, and stringy bark. We halted on the side of a hill, from the top of which we could see a great distance to the north and east ... We this day saw a solitary native, but I believe we were indebted for the sight rather to the circumstance of his being deprived of the use of his limbs than to his boldness or curiosity. Two or three families had been encamped on the spot where we found him, but they had all departed. He seemed more astonished than alarmed at the sight of our cavalcade, and expressed his wonder in a singular succession of sounds, resembling snatches of a song. His countenance was mild and pleasing, and was entirely divested of the ferocity we had seen expressed in the visages of some of his countrymen ...


Bibliography:

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19 September 1818

Sydney, NSW


LEVINGSTONE, William James

Arrived ... William Levingstone, formerly Master of the Band in the 102nd

Documentation:

"Ship News", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 September 1818), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178204

On Monday last arrived the Glory, Captain Pounder, from England, with 170-male prisoners, having lost none during the voyage, and sustaining no other casualty than in the death, from a lingering illness, of Michael Fitzgerald, a private of the 87th Regt. who was one of the guard; of which 28 are arrived under the orders of Lieut. Ervine, of the same Regiment. Dr. Stuart, R.N. arrives also, charged with the medical duties of the voyage, and the Super intendance of the prisoners, the whole of whom delivered to his care, it is highly gratifying to repeat, are safely arrived at their distant place of destination. Passenger, Mr. Wm. Levingstone, formerly Master of the Band in the 102d, since the 100th Regiment

"SHIP NEWS ... PORT JACKSON", The Hobart Town Gazette and Southern Reporter (17 October 1818), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article654986 


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

His son Henry Pounder Glory Leviston had been born on 7 September 1818 on the Glory, and duly named after the ship and its captain


References:

-




26 December 1818

Sydney, NSW

An elegant Grand Piano Forte, with additional keys, by Wilkinson and Wornum

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (26 December 1818), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178445

TO be positively SOLD by AUCTION, at Mr. BEVAN'S Sale Rooms, on Friday the 9th of January, an elegant GRAND PIANO FORTE, with additional Keys, made by Wilkinson and Wornum, No. 315, Oxford-street, and No. 11, Princes-street, Hanover Square, London.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 January 1819), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178457


Bibliography:

-





Before January 1819 (c.1817-18)

"Taken from life", ? Newcastle area, NSW


INDIGENOUS (performers)

WALLIS, James (? artist)

PRESTON, Walter (engraver)

LYCETT, Joseph (? artist)

Corrobborree, or Dance of the Natives of New South Wales, New Holland

Corrobborree (c.1817-1819)

Image:

Detail from source below


Source:

[James Wallis and] William Preston 1817/1819, plate "Corrobborree, or Dance of the Natives of New South Wales, New Holland"

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/album/ItemViewer.aspx?itemid=823526&suppress=N&imgindex=7 (DIGITISED)

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=118293 (CATALOGUE RECORD)

[from SL-NSW catalogue record] These engravings were made in Australia under the direction of Captain James Wallis, of the 46th Regiment. They were first advertised in the Sydney Gazette of 9 January 1819 as a "Series of original Views of New South Wales". When Wallis returned to England in February 1819 he took the plates with him, where the set was published in London in September 1820 as "Australian Views" (without a letterpress) and in 1821 as "An historical account of the colony of New South Wales" (with a letterpress) by R. Ackermann. These English sets can be distinguished by Ackermann's imprint which was engraved at the bottom of each plate. This set of engravings appears to have been printed entirely in Australia, and were probably given to the Macquaries by Wallis. [Plate] 15 is inscribed to is inscribed to Mrs Macquarie and is dated December 1817.


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 January 1819), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178468 (DIGITISED)

NOW first published, and on Sale at the Gazette Office, 96, George-street, a Series of Original Views in New South Wales; consisting of two Sets, six in each Set, viz : - FIRST SET. - A Corrobora, or Native Dance, taken from Life ...


Bibliography:

Wallis 1821, plate "Corrobborree, or Dance of the Natives of New South Wales, New Holland"

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/album/ItemViewer.aspx?itemid=957996&suppress=N&imgindex=67 (DIGITSED)





1819



18 January 1819

Sydney, NSW

The Queen's Birthday ... Pandean Pipes, flutes, claronets, and violins

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (23 January 1819), 2-3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178500

Monday last being the auspicious Day for celebrating the Anniversary of the Birth of Our revered and Gracious Queen, was observed as a Holiday throughout the Colony; and was hailed, as usual, with all those cordial demonstrations of loyalty and affection due to the distinguished occasion. At sunrise the Royal Standard was hoisted at Fort Phillip, and the Union at Dawes' Battery; from whence a Royal Salute was fired at 12 at noon; on the conclusion of which, the Troops in garrison, consisting of the head-quarters of the 48th Regiment, and detachments of nine other Regiments, which had been drawn out in Hyde Park in Presence of His Excellency the Governor, under the Command of His Honor Lieutenant Governor ERSKINE, Lieutenant Colonel of the 48th Regiment, fired a feu-de-joie, in honor of the day; they afterwards passed in review order before His Excellency, who, we understand, was much pleased with their military appearance, and the steady soldier-like manner in which they performed their evolutions. His Excellency afterwards held a Levee at Government House, and received the compliments and congratulations of the Civil and Military Officers, Clergy, and Gentlemen of the Colony, whose appearance in rank and numbers very far surpassed any as- semblage of that kind than could ever before have taken place in this Country. An Ode, the production of our long and justly admired Laureat Bard, Mr. ROBINSON, was presented to His Excellency and recited at His desire by the Author, in a most impressive and interesting style and manner. The variety and brilliancy of allusion it contained, so happily and appropriately selected; the classic taste and poetic imagery which distinguished this chaste tribute of his muse, did not fail to produce most unqualified admiration and universal applause from every auditor. We have great pleasure in introducing it to our Readers in our present columns. In the evening a splendid Ball and Supper were given at Government House, which displayed all the beauty and grace of the Colony. The room appropriated for dancing was decorated in a manner at once so fanciful and elegant, and presented such enchanting emblems of taste and judgment, that the eye found new delight, and discovered fresh beauties as it wandered to every surrounding object; besides the variegated lamps and wreath-encircled columns, graced with the simple hand of rural nature, the walls on all sides were happily enlivened with masterly sketches in chalks taken from subjects of oriental design and origin. The transparencies appeared, we think, to considerable advantage, probably owing to the judicious manner in which the light and shades were arranged with a view to give a more natural effect to the objects represented. At 11 o'clock the supper apartments were thrown open, and presented a splendid repast, at which about 170 Ladies and Gentlemen were entertained with all the elegant varieties of the season. Re-summoned to the sprightly dance by the novel and attractive sound of the Pandean Pipes, whose shrill tones were mellowed by the softer cadences of flutes, claronets, and violins; the company returned to the Ball-room, where the dancing continued with uncommon vivacity and spirit until four o'clock in the morning, when the party retired highly gratified with the superior and truly fascinating amusements of the evening.


Bibliography:

-





22 March 1819

Sydney, NSW


ERSKINE, James (host)

BAND OF THE 48th REGIMENT

Vocal and instrumental harmony ... an airy Ball

Documentation:

1819 'Sydney.', The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842), 27 March, p. 3, viewed 31 May, 2015, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178622

On Monday evening last His Honor Lieutenant Governor ERSKINE gave an entertainment to a large party of Ladies and Gentlemen, who were honoured with the presence of His Excellency the GOVERNOR and LADY; they retired at an early hour. The entertainment commenced with vocal and instrumental harmony; and beauty and fashion coevally contending the pre-eminence, it cannot be determined upon which side the balance turned. The full Regimental Band attended the fête; and between nine and ten commenced the airy Ball; the intervals of which were occupied by loyal and sentimental airs, executed with the most agreeable effect. At eleven an elegant collation called the Company from the Ball-room; which with all its brilliancy and splendor, seemed in the sullen dulness of a vacuum to regret its loss; yet smiled again upon the re-welcome of the gay fugitives: who did not separate ...

... until the revolving orb of day
had chased pale Cynthia's milder beams away,
and in the infant dawn had meekly shed
a doubtful light from Neptune's liquid bed.
Fain would Apollo join the sportive throng;
Apollo, patron of the lyre and song;
dull clouds, abash'd, before his beams retire,
lest they should boil before his ardent lire.
Mistaken deity, 'twas only thee, that put an end to festive harmony.
In such assemblies if you'd wish to mix,
first dout thy torch within the waves of Styx,
O'er these festivities shall Cynthia reign;
'tis thine alone to wish and to complain.


Bibliography:

-





25 March 1819

Government House, Sydney, NSW


MACQUARIE, Lachlan

Request for an Organ and Organist for the proposed new church at Sydney

Documentation:

Macquarie to Earl Bathurst (Despatch marked "No. 23 of 1819," per ship Shipley), HRA volume 10, 136-37

Government House, Sydney, N. S. Wales, My Lord, 25th March, 1819.

1. 1 avail myself of the present Conveyance of forwarding for Your Lordship's information and approval, the undermentioned [137] Plans and Elevations of Government Public Building's either now in progress, or intended to be erected in the Town of Sydney, namely: - Plans and 1st. Elevation of the Church, intended to be Erected in Sydney, and to be Commenced upon forthwith on a large and handsome Scale. 2nd. Elevation and Ground Plan of the New Convict Barrack, fit to accommodate between Five and Six Hundred Men; this noble Building being now very nearly Completed ...

2. The elevation of the intended New Church, now forwarded Plan of the to Your Lordship may, perhaps, be considered as on too grand new ehurch - and Magnificent a Scale for this Infant Colony; but, as the whole of the Work is to be executed by the Government Artificers and Labourers, and the whole of the Materials used in erecting it (with the exception of the Glass and Lead) are also procured by the same description of Persons, the Expence of this fine and noble Edifice will be very little more than a very Plain Building of the same size would cost. I therefore hope the proposed Plan will be honored with Your Lordship's entire Sanction ...

As nothing more strongly adds to the Solemnity and Pomp of Divine Worship than Sacred Music, I now most respectfully and earnestly solicit, that Your Lordship will be kindly pleased service in to direct a handsome and good Sized Organ to be built and sent out, on the part of Government, for the New Church at Sydney, which will prove not only an elegant and useful Ornament to that Edifice, but a highly gratifying and most acceptable Donation and Act of Munificence on the part of the Crown to the Clergy and the Public in general of this Colony. I therefore once more beg to express my earnest hope that Your Lordship will be pleased to grant my present request, adding thereto a Good Organist, whose Salary can be defrayed from the Colonial Revenue.


Bibliography:

-





1 May 1819

Sydney, NSW


PARSONS, Harry

Death of Harry Parsons

Documentation:

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (8 May 1819), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178693

The death of Serjeant Harry Parsons who arrived here in the Marines a mere youth thirty years ago, took place three weeks since at Sydney. He went from the Marines into the Colonial Corps, afterwards the 102d Regiment of the Line; was Master of the Band; and remained in each succeeding Regiment on account of his very great utility to the Colony as Instructor of Sacred Music to the little female Orphans, and their constant leader at divine worship. He was a much respected man; and at his funeral received the parting honours of his military profession, accompanied by the deepest regret from all who knew him.

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (22 May 1819), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178722


Bibliography:

-





12 June 1819

St. Philip's Church, Sydney

Ten Musicians, for performing Sacred Music in St. Philip's

Documentation:

"GOVERNMENT AND GENERAL ORDERS", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (12 June 1819), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178758 

The Trustees of the Police Fund in Account with D'Arcy Wentworth, Esq. Treasurer, for the Quarter ending 31st March, 1819 ...

Ten Musicians, for performing Sacred Music in St. Philip's Church, Sydney. - [£] 9 0 0


Bibliography:

-





19 June 1819

Sydney, NSW


DUNK, George (convict)

Psalm singing convicts

Documentation:

Kent ASSIZES, Maidstone, Tuesday, March 24. CROWN SIDE. - Before Mr. Baron Wood", The Times (London, England) (26 March 1818), 3

Walter WATCHURST and George DUNK were indicated for having, at Gillingham, on the 4th of February, feloniously uttered as true, a forged Bank-note, well knowing the same to be a counterfeit, for the payment of 1l. to James REED, with intent to defraud the Governor and Company of the Bank of England ... The jury found a verdict - Guilty. Sentence of death was immediately passed upon the criminals

"FORGERY. Providential Deliverance from Death of GEORGE DUNK, condemned and left for Execution at the last Maidstone Assizes", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (19 June 1819), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178766

... Dunk addressed another letter of thanks to his deliverer, the following extract from which is highly interesting. " I was very much surprised when I came on board this ship to find such good regulations carried on; for I have never heard a blasphemous expression come out of any man's mouth since Í have been here. We have psalm singing and prayers every night and morning; and preaching once in the week, and twice on the Sunday. We have the best advice from the minister, such as to make our lives happy in this world, and in the next, and he tells us that we shall have every indulgence on our passage to New South Wales, if we behave well." He adds, "I have no doubt but I shall do well when I get there, as I can work at several trades; and if I could but have my wife and child with me, I should again be a happy man."

Petition, George Dunk, to Lachlan Macquarie, undated [Macquarie's recommendation that the petition be granted, 1 February 1819), 1 ; HRA, vol. 10, 135-136

https://archive.org/details/historicalrecord00v10aust

The Humble Petition of George Dunk To His Excellency Lachlan Macquarie Esq., Sheweth, That your petitioner came to this colony in the transport ship Morley (2nd), Brown Master, in the year 1818, having been tried at Maidstone (in Kent) in March 1818 and received sentence of transportation for Life. That your petitioner has a wife, named Mary Ann and two infant children, residing at Hurst Green, County Sussex, who is very anxious to come out to this colony to join your petitioner. That your petitioner has borne an irreproachable character since his arrival, and been equally anxious to have his wife and children with him, they at present having no means in life for their support, most earnestly solicits Your Excellency will in your usual kindness and humanity be graciously pleased to grant him Your Excellency's sanction and recommendation to the Principal Secretary of State for the Colonies. Your petitioner is by trade a Basket Maker, and perfectly able to support his family in this colony, if the prayer of the his petition is granted; and petitioner as in duty bound will every pray, [signed] George Dunk.

The author of A sinner's friend [J. Vine Hall], Newman Hall (ed.), An autobiography (London: James Nisbet & Co., 1865), 105-117

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=t9pYKtRtKQgC&pg=PA105


Bibliography:

-





10 July 1819

Sydney, NSW

Mozart and Haydn in The Sydney Gazette

Documentation:

"BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (10 July 1817), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178812

Mozart.- The overture of Mozart's celebrated opera of Don Juan, which all who have heard it admit it to be a master-piece of genius and science, was begun and finished in one night ! Mozart wrote the opera for the theatre at Prague (1787). The songs, finales, in short all the vocal pieces of the work, had been finished, studied by the singers, and rehearsed: nay, the last grand rehearsal took place, without the overture even being begun by the composer, although the public performance was fixed for the next day. Mozart's friends, his wife, and above all the manager, were in a state of alarm easily to be conceived. They represented to him the ruinous consequences to the theatre as well as to himself which must result from an eventual disappointment and conjured him not to blast his greatest work by so wanton a procrastination. "I shall write the overture this afternoon - I have it all in my head," was the answer given to them. The afternoon came; but Mozart, seduced by the fineness of the weather, took a trip into the country, and made merry, returned in the evening, and sat down to a bowl of punch with some friends, who trembled at the idea of his situation. It was midnight before he left this jovial party, in a state so little calculated for men- tal exertion, that he determined to lie down for an hour, at the same time charging Mrs. Mozart to call him at the expiration of that time. The fond wife, seeing him in the sweetest slumber, and conscious of his powers, suffered him to lie two hours, called him up, made a bowl of punch, his favorite beverage, put pen, ink, and staves, before him, and while filling the glass, entertained the composer with a number of laughable stories, in the telling of which she possessed a peculiar talent. Mozart listened with the greatest glee, and laughed till the tears trickled down his eyes. All at once the divine spark within him brightened into radiant flame: he felt "full of the god" and exclaimed, "Now is the time, Constantia: now we are in trim for it." Showers of crotchets and quavers now gushed from the rapid pen. At times, however, and in the midst of writing, nature would assert her sway, and cause the composer to relapse into a nod or two. To these, it is generally pretended, the leading passage in the overture, turned, repeated, and modulated into a hundred varied shapes, owed its origin. The somnolent fits, however, soon gave in to the cheerful converse of Constantia, and the excellent punch which formed its accompaniment. The overture was completed before breakfast, and the copyists scarcely had time to write out the score. A. rehearsal being thus out of the question, the orchestra played it at the public representation in the evening without previous trial; and it is no small eulogium on their talents to say, that the execution electrified the audience, who with thunders of applause called for a repetition.


Haydn.- When this great musical composer was in England, one of our Princes commissioned Sir Joshua Reynolds to take his portrait. Haydn went to the painter's house, and sat to him, but soon grew tired. Sir Joshua, careful of his reputation, would not paint a man of acknowledged genius with a stupid countenance; and deferred the sitting till another day. The same weariness and want of expression occurring at the next attempt, Reynolds went to His Royal Highness and informed him of the circumstance ; who contrived a stratagem. He sent to the painter's house a pretty German girl, in the service of the Queen. Haydn took his seat for the third time, and as soon as the conversation began to flag, a curtain rose, and the fair German addressed him in his native language, with a most elegant compliment. Haydn, delighted, overwhelmed the enchantress with questions; his countenance recovered its animation, and Sir Joshua rapidly seized its traits.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

-


References (Mozart):

"KING'S THEATRE - ITALIAN OPERA. MOZART'S DON JUAN", The Literary Gazette, and Journal of Belles Lettres (5 April 1817), 165

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=Otv_ITA33_EC&pg=PA165 

"MOZART", Encyclopaedia Londinensis 16 (London: [John Wilkes], 1819), 156

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=z6XHGGuzduAC&pg=PA156 


References (Haydn):

The lives of Haydn and Mozart ... translated from the French of L. A. C. Bombet, with notes by the author of the Sacred Melodies (London: John Murray, 1817), 195 (Haydn passage);

Second edition ((London: John Murray, 1818), 195

https://archive.org/stream/livesofhaydnmoza00sten#page/195/mode/2up 

"MISCELLANEOUS ANECDOTES ... Haydn", The Edinburgh Observer: Or, Town and Country Magazine (27 September 1817), 31

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=Kr8fAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA31 

[Review], The Quarterly Review 18 (October 1817), 73-99, 80 (Haydn passage quoted)

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=2C-WDjJB6vEC&pg=PA80 




17 July 1819

Sydney, NSW


ANTILL, Henry Colden

A Grand Piano Forte by Broadwood

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (17 July 1819), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178822

TO be SOLD, a GRAND PIANO FORTE by Broadwood, of a very superior Quality, and in the most perfect State of Preservation. - Application to be made to Captain Antill.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 July 1819), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178835 

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (31 July 1819), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178850 


Bibliography:

Lang 1990

This is in fact a reprint of "Music a terror", from Lang 1859; the editoral introduction suggests that the story's Captain Romer was based on Antill, but this advertisement would suggest that is unlikely.





14 August 1819

Hobart Town, VDL (TAS)

Account from London of a New Musical Instrument called the Apollonican

Documentation:

[News], The Hobart Town Gazette and Southern Reporter (14 August 1819), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article656486 

Account of a New Musical Instrument called the Apollonican, constructed by Messrs. FLIGHT and ROBSON of London, - This magnificent instrument is on the principle of the Organ, is 24 feet in height, 20 feet wide, and about 12 feet deep; and contains in the whole about 4000 pipes; the largest of which, of wood, is 16 feet long, by 18 and 22 inches wide. - By certain qualities and combinations of the different pipes, the effect of flutes, oboes, clarinonets, bassoons, horns, &c. is produced in a superior slyle, the whole power of which with the variety of changes they are capable of are acted upon by three immense cylinders or barrels each 6 feet in circumference, impelled by a mechanical power, on which barrels are set to present the celebrated overtures Anacreon and Clemenzo di Tito. The extraordinary precision, expression, brilliancy of execution, and the rapidity with which the instrument performs the different changes in these two pieces have astonifhed and delighted the scientific and musical world.


Bibliography:

-





19 November to 25 December 1819

Sydney area, 19 November to 25 December 1819


INDIGENOUS (unidentified informants, singers)

FREYCINET, Louis de (reporter, ? transcriber)

1. Kangaroo dance-song

Danse du Kanguroo

Music only

Probably transcribed by, or on behalf of, Louis de Freycinet, Sydney area, between 19 November and 25 December 1819

First published Paris, 1839



2. Fishing song

Air de péche

Music and words (no translation)

Probably transcribed by, or on behalf of, Louis de Freycinet, Sydney area, from unidentified female informant/s, between 19 November and 25 December 1819

First published Paris, 1839


No 4. Air de pêche. E-ya Wan-dje-ous. Tchi-an-go Wen-de-go [Je n'ai pu avoir les dernières paroles de cet air.]


3. Korroberis

No music or text; report only (partly based on later sources, c.1830s)



GO to main entry:

Checklist of colonial musical transcriptions of Indigenous songs 5





19 November to 25 December 1819

Sydney, NSW


FREYCINET, Louis (reporter)

ARAGO, Jacques (reporter)

BAND OF THE 48th REGIMENT

Feasts, balls, and other parties of pleasure

Documentation:

"Ship News", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (20 November 1819), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179095 

The French corvette l'Uranie, Captain FRECINET, arrived on Thursday, engaged in a voyage of discovery, with many Officers in the various departments essential to a voyage of this general utility to the world at large. The Officers accompanying Captain Frecinet, who 17 years ago visited this Colony, as we are given to understand with Commodore Baudin, on his voyage of discovery into these seas with the Geographe and Naturaliste, are Gentlemen of the most kind and polished manners; which mention may be considered as a redundancy of expression as affects the Gentlemen of any Nation; but the descriptive writer cannot avoid observations which are so pleasing to the polished circle, and accord so sensibly with the feelings of a refined and liberal Nation.

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 December 1819), 2-3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179117 

On Thursday last, the 2d inst. a fete champetre was given by Captain PIPER at Elizabeth Henrietta Point, that name on that day being substituted in the room of Eliza Point, under a discharge of thirteen guns. This fete was attended by a number of the Officers of the French ship l'Uranie, on discovery; the Honorable Commissioner (BIGGE) and Secretary (SCOTT), who were saluted by a discharge of eleven guns on landing; His Honor the LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, and the Officers of His Majesty's 48th Regiment, and their Ladies; the Honorable Judges of the Courts; and the greatest part of the Civil and Military Officers of the Establishment. The day proved favourable; and [3] the scene of boats in the water, accompanied by the Band of the 48th Regiment, had a delightful effect. About one hundred Ladies and Gentlemen sat down to dinner; after which, the "merry dance" commenced, which was kept up with great spirit; and on the party leaving Henrietta Villa, they were saluted by a discharge of fifteen guns.

"MR. RILEY'S PARTY", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 December 1819), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179161 

We do not recollect since the establishment of the Colony a more pleasant or agreeable party than the dinner, ball, and supper last Monday at Mr. Riley's. The urbanity and unwearied attention of the host, together with the sumptuous and superabundant delicacies of the entertainment, have we believe been seldom if ever exceeded. At about six o'clock the party, consisting of 69 persons, sat down to the festive board: the walls of the dining room were decorated with inscriptions indicative of the feelings of the inhabitants of Sydney respecting their French visitors; and in the toasts and sentiments given after dinner, the greatness of soul of two rival nations was fully evinced; in fact, the officers of the corvette L'Uranie seemed really affected by the flattering kindness and attention that had been shewn them during their sojourn here. At about nine o'clock the company recollected that their presence was expected by their fair visitors, and that moment fully evinced the triumph of Venus over Bacchus; and nothing could deter the company from repairing to those in whose society alone true delight reposes. They retired to the dancing room, where the Guardian Genius of Sydney seemed to have culled its choicest sweets to grace the "mazy dance." We have in vain endeavoured to collect from the author of this paragraph the particular excellencies of the female band; sufficient be it to say, that where all were amiable, to form distinctions would be invidious. We regret to observe, that the presence of the amiable hostess was wanting; indisposition, we understand, was the cause of her absence; but we are sure that every person who can appreciate real merit will wish for a speedy re-establishmeont of her health.

"Ship News", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 December 1819), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179163 

Sailed this day to resume her voyage of discovery, the French corvette l'Uranie, commanded by Monsieur Freycinet. On getting under weigh, she saluted the fort, which was returned by the battery from Dawes' Point.

Arago 1822, volume 2, 255-385 [Lettres 136-151]

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=CLUBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA255 

Arago 1822, volume 2, 355-58

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=CLUBAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA355 

LETTRE CLI. De Sidney. DOIS-JE te parler des fêtes, des bals et des autres parties de plaisir dont nous sommes l'objet, et ne trouveras-tu pas étonnant que moi, qui t'ai entretenu de MM. les Anglais avec une franchise si peu bienveillante pour eux, j'en reçoive aujourd'hui des civilités et des caresses?...

Arago 1823, part 2, 160-231 [Letters 136-151]

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=rLENAAAAQAAJ&pg=RA1-PA160 

Arago 1823, part 2, 217

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=rLENAAAAQAAJ&pg=RA1-PA217 

LETTER CL. Sydney [23 December 1819] OUGHT I to say any thing to you of feasts, balls, and other parties of pleasure, made on our account? And will not you be astonished, that I, who have occasionally spoken of the English with a freedom so little in their favour, should be now receiving their civilities and attentions?

I can assure you, that the word Englishman is never painful to my ear; and the best proof I can give of my not being actuated by absurd prejudices, is, that I accept with lively gratitude all the friendly offers made me. I have found merchants, who are men of integrity and well informed; soldiers, brave and fond of gaiety; ladies, extremely agreeable and modest; who allow me to join in their sports and amusements: I fly to them eagerly; and I feel here above all places, that he, who is at the distance of the earth's diameter from his native land, is neither Russian, nor Englishman, nor Spaniard, nor Frenchman; here all are Europeans, and all are countrymen.

Certainly the Governor of Diely welcomed us with peculiar kindness; the Governor of Guam loaded us with civilities; and at the Isles of France and Bourbon we were treated as brothers: but no where did we meet with such splendid entertainments as at Sydney; and the captains of the ships emulated the inhabitants of the town, in making us regret a rendezvous that was to be one of the last of our toilsome expedition.

It is pleasing to me to inform you, that not the slightest dispute ever took place, that the frankest urbanity prevailed in all our meetings; and that we departed with the greatest [218] regret, that we could make no return to such friendly and honourable attentions, but our grateful acknowledgments.

There would be no ingratitude in not naming any of the persons who received us with most kindness, since it would be to enumerate the most respectable persons in the settlement. But after Governor Macquarie, and Messrs. Field, Wylde, Piper, and Bligh, who are the principal civil officers, Messrs. Forbes, Wollstonecraft but let me stop, I am running on with a long list of names. If we quit this with regret, at least we enjoy the certainty, that our friendship was felt and appreciated.

P.S. - I say nothing of Parramatta, of which I had but a glimpse; or of other settlements ...

Freycinet 1839, 629-30

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=pWNNAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA629 

... notre départ pour Parramatta avoit été arrêté pour le 25 [November]; nous montâmes donc ce jour-là à midi dans un canot fort joli et très-vaste qui avoit été mis à nos ordres: MM. Lamarche, de Quélen, Gaimard et Railliard furent de la partie. A peine entrions-nous dans le bras de mer qui conduit de Sydney à Parramatta, que nous aperçûmes une embarcation qui sembloit poursuivre la nôtre; c'étoit

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=pWNNAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA630 

une galanterie du gouverneur, qui envoyoit la musique du régiment, afin de nous rendre le trajet plus agréable. Les sons mâles de cette harmonie guerrière, répétés de temps en temps par les échos de la rive, vinrent en effet doubler le plaisir que nous prenions à contempler le paysage vraiment romantique qui se dérouloit à nos regards, et où de jolies habitations des champs, qui attestoient les soins assidus du laborieux cultivateur, succédoient par intervalle à de vastes terrains sur lesquels la nature encore brute étaloit ses sauvages beautés ...

Freycinet 1839, 632-33

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=pWNNAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA632 

Comblé d'attentions et de politesses par une foule de personnes de la haute société de Sydney, je voulus à mon tour les réunir à bord de l'Uranie, et faire preuve au moins de bonne volonté pour leur témoigner ma gratitude. A la suite d'une aussi longue navigation, dépourvu de beaucoup de choses indispensables pour traiter dignement mes honorables convives, j'osai compter sur leur indulgence. J'avois espéré que M. et Mme. Macquarie m'honoreroient de leur présence; mais le mauvais état de la santé du premier le retenant encore à Parramatta, nous fûmes privés de cette faveur. Le 13 décembre, jour fixé pour mon modeste festin, le gaillard d'arrière de la corvette se trouva décoré avec élégance par les soins de MM. Requin, notre commis aux revues, [633] et Jque. Arago, dessinateur de l'expédition. La réunion, dont mon état-major fit partie, fut nombreuse et très-animée: on se mit à table à quatre heures. La musique du régiment de la colonie joua des fanfares, et au dessert on porta plusieurs toats; ceux des souverains respectifs de l'Angleterre et de la France furent accompagnés chacun d'une salve de vingtun coups de canon. Des danses qui eurent lieu après le repas, embellirent et remplirent la soirée.


Bibliography:

-





2 December 1819

Point Piper, Sydney, NSW

A fête champêtre with the Band of the 48th

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 December 1819), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179117

On Thursday last, the 2d inst. a fête champetre was given by Captain PIPER at Elizabeth Henrietta Point, that name on that day being substituted in the room of Eliza Point, under a discharge of thirteen guns. This fete was attended by a number of the Officers of the French ship l'Uranie, on discovery; the Honorable Commissioner (BIGGE) and Secretary (SCOTT), who were saluted by a discharge of eleven guns on landing; His Honor the LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR, and the, Officers of His Majesty's 48th Regiment, and their Ladies; the Honorable Judges of the Courts; and the greatest part of the Civil and Military Officers of the Establishment. The day proved favourable; and the scene of boats in the water, accompanied by the Band of the 48th Regiment, had a delightful effect. About one hundred Ladies and Gentlemen sat down to dinner; after which, the "merry dance" commenced, which was kept up with great spirit; and on the party leaving Henrietta Villa, they were saluted by a discharge of fifteen guns.


Bibliography:

-





20 December 1819

Sydney, NSW


RILEY, Edward (host)

Mr. Riley's Party

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (21 August 1819), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178904 

JONES and RILEY ... FOR PUBLIC SALE, about the Middle of October, on the Premises, in Hunter-street, the HOUSHOLD FURNITURE, Plate, China Ware, Library, Musical Instruments, &c. &c. &c; the Property of Mr. EDWARD RILEY. Catalogues will be distributed previous to the Sale.

[Advertising], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (4 September 1819), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2178936 

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (25 December 1819), p. 2: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179161

Mr. Riley's Party. - We do not recollect since the establishment of the Colony a more pleasant or agreeable party than the dinner, ball, and supper last Monday at Mr. Riley's. The urbanity and unwearied attention of the host, together with the sumptuous and superabundant delicacies of the entertainment, have we believe been seldom if ever exceeded. At about six o'clock the party, consisting of 69 persons, sat down to the festive board: the walls of the dining room were decorated with inscriptions indicative of the feelings of the inhabitants of Sydney respecting their French visitors; and in the toasts and sentiments given after dinner, the greatness of soul of two rival nations was fully evinced; in fact, the officers of the corvette L'Uranie seemed really affected by the flattering kindness and attention that had been shewn them during their sojourn here. At about nine o'clock the company recollected that their presence was expected by their fair visitors, and that moment fully evinced the triumph of Venus over Bacchus; and nothing could deter the company from repairing to those in whose society alone true delight reposes. They retired to the dancing room, where the Guardian Genius of Sydney seemed to have culled its choicest sweets to grace the "mazy dance." We have in vain endeavoured to collect from the author of this paragraph the particular excellencies of the female band; sufficient be it to say, that where all were amiable, to form distinctions would be invidious. We regret to observe, that the presence of the amiable hostess was wanting; indisposition, we understand, was the cause of her absence; but we are sure that every person who can appreciate real merit will wish for a speedy re-establishmeont of her health.


Bibliography:

-





25 December 1819

Hobart Town, VDL (TAS)

This day being Christmas Day, divine service was performed in the New Church

Image:

Hobart Town, 1819, by George William Evans (detail); Dixson Library, Sl-NSW


Documentation:

[News], The Hobart Town Gazette and Southern Reporter (25 December 1819), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article657186 

This day being Christmas Day, divine service was permormed at the New Church in this town ...

CHRISTMAS. The anniversary of this great day, so much and justly revered by the religious world, and which calls forth the gratitude of all denomination of Christians to the great Disposer of Events in sending to the world the Saviour of Mankind, we trust will be kept with that solemnity becoming the solemn occasion. The holidays in former times were a round of innocent amusements among the old, the young, the Prince, and the peasant; and we would in this different part of the world recal to the minds of our Readers the mirth which distinguished the days of other times in our parent Country.

Of the customs most peculiar to Christmas, and now nearly obsolete, may be specified the adorning the inside and outside of the houses with evergreens, the bringing in and burning the first great log of wood, with vocal and instrumental music, the carols, the telling stories round the fire-side before going to bed, the wassel-bowl, and the New Year's gifts among friends or to patrons.

This was the custom of our ancestors at the greatest as well the most cheerful period of English history. Every day, from Christmas to Twelfth-day, and often till Candlemas, was more or less a repetition of the same enjoyments. An English gentleman in former times, had all his inmates, tenants, and visitors, of a morning in the great hall to breakfast; various sports and gambols took place among high and low between that meal and dinner; the dinner was in the highest style of hospitality, with music and other houshold pompes, so was the supper, before and after which there were revels, dances, or masks interspersed with singing, almost every decent person in those days being something of a singer, and able to take his part in a catch or glee. The strong beer was broached, and the black jacks went plentifully about with (toast), sugar, nutmeg, and good Cheshire cheese. The Hackin (the great sausage) must be boiled by daybreak, or else two young men must take the maiden (ie. the cook) by the arms and run her round the market-place till she is ashamed of her laziness ...


Bibliography:

-





30 December 1819

St. Philip's Church, Sydney, NSW


BOWDEN, Thomas (singing master)

A psalm sung by the boys who have been received into the Male Orphan Institution

Documentation:

[Correspondence], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 January 1820), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179179

Sir, I was at the Church of St. Philip last Thursday evening, when the Reverend Gentlemen, Mr. Cowper and Mr. Hill, performed the service. Mr Hill preceded Mr. Cowper in the delivery of the prayers for the expiring year; which was followed by a psalm sung by the boys who have been received into the Male Orphan Institution ... Mr. Bowden, the Master of the School, led the little vocal band; and the performance of the juvenile choir was so excessively well applied to the heart that it was scarcely distinguishable whether a desire of future bliss, or of present pleasure in its attainment by our little colonial generation, most prevailed. Indeed the ear must have been closed that did not participate in the harmony which those voices displayed in giving attraction to the softest harmonies of the heart; and the singing was exceedingly well performed ...


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

Goodin 1966 (ADB)

http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/bowden-thomas-1809 

... In 1818, when the Female Orphan School was moved to a new building near Parramatta, Bowden was asked to draw up rules for a male orphan school in the vacated premises. His scheme was sensible and included most essentials, even apprenticeship for the senior boys. He was appointed master and opened the school in January 1819 at a salary of £100. Both scheme and master worked with great efficiency, and this was officially recognized by a bonus payment in 1820 ...





31 December 1819

Sydney, NSW

A Bachelors Ball

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 January 1820), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179179 

A Bachelors Ball was given by those Gentlemen of the Colony who happen unfortunately to be in that state of solitude on Friday evening at the house of Mrs. Nichols, in George-street. Upon this occasion, Mr. Woolstonecraft bestowed gentlemanly attention in conducting the ceremonial, and was assisted by several Gentlemen of the party. The company was more than a hundred and twenty, nearly one half Ladies; and taste and beauty were at issue; nor can the magic controversy ever be determined. The ball-room was decorated with the colours of various nations; the lighting up of the room was brilliant, and the supper elegant; the cheering flow of spirits of that engaging kind which fascinates the mind, and brings the grave and the gay into a mutual susceptibility of the delights which a refined harmony imparts to the mental soft composure. The nights being short, the amusements commenced late in the evening, and did not terminate until Phoebus had announced his radiant glories, and given notice by his presence of his intention to commence his daily tour. That dancing upon laurels and trophies should become common to a kingdom, animated by the love of the trophies they tread upon, would appear a solecism; and the floor which the gay, the sprightly, the beautiful and blooming, were tripping it gracefully over on "the light fantastic toe," was crayoned out with peculiar nicety by Mr. Reid, whose talents as a painter are too sufficiently known to call forth a panegyric. The subject, considering the decorations of the room, was curiously brought into action. Atlas, emblematical of Britain, sustaining the weight of the globe upon his shoulders, surrounded by the emblamatiques of Europe, Asia, Africa, and America; the great Columbus pointing oot the path to new discovery; Time instructing History in the perpetuation of great and noble subjects of record; and numerous small introductions of intersticial pieces to fill up the groups of ornamental decoration. The party was much gratified with the elegance of the entertainment, and very much delighted at the Bachelor's Ball.


Bibliography:

-





1819 (year of report)

Sydney region, NSW


INDIGENOUS

WENTWORTH, William Charles (reporter)

The small pox ... traditionary songs

Documentation:

Wentworth 1819, 44

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=_q64y3rL2J0C&pg=PA44 

There are no infantile diseases whatever. The measles, hooping cough, and small pox, are entirely unknown. Some few years, indeed, before the foundation of this colony, the small pox committed the most dreadful ravages among the aborigines. This exterminating scourge is said to have been introduced by Captain Cook, and many of the contemporaries of those who fell victims to it, are still living; and the deep furrows which remain in some of their countenances, shew how narrowly they escaped the same premature destiny. The recollection of this dreadful malady will long survive in the traditionary songs of this simple people. The consternation which it excited is still as fresh in their minds as if it had been but an occurrence of yesterday, although the generation which witnessed its horrors, has almost past away.

Wentworth 1820, 56

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=dyAQAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA56 

Wentorth 1824, I, 311

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=ZiwQAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA311


Bibliography:

Dawson 1881, 60

https://archive.org/stream/australianabori00dawsgoog#page/n75/mode/2up 

The very small remnant of old aborigines now alive who escaped the first of these epidemics describe it as an irruptive fever resembling small-pox. They called it Meed warann - 'chopped root'. They still have a very vivid recollection of its ravages, and of the great numbers cut off by it in the Western District. In remembrance of it they still chant a wail called Mallae mallaeae, which was composed in New South Wales, where the desease first brokw out, and is known to all tribes between Sydney, Melbourne, and Adelaide.

Dawson 1881, 80-81

https://archive.org/stream/australianabori00dawsgoog#page/n95/mode/2up 

Many songs having appropriate airs are universally known. Very often complimentary or descriptive songs are composed on the instant, and are sung to well-known airs, the whole company joining in the chorus. A lament called 'Mallae mallaeae', composed in New South Wales in commemoration of the ravages of small-pox, is known all over the Australian colonies, and is sung in a doleful strain, accompanied with groans and imitations of a dying person. The following is a song in the Chaap wuurong language, with its translation. It is said to have been composed in the neighbourhood of Sydney by one of the aborigines of that country, and to have been translated into the different languages as it became known. In singing it the last two lines are repeated three times.

CHUUL'YUU WILL'YUU.
Chuul'yuu Will'yuu
Wallaa gnonaeae.
Chillae binnae aa gna
Kinuuaa gnuuraa jeeaa,
Chiaebaa gnuutaa.
Kirraegirrae, kirraegirrae, kirraegirrae,
Leeaa gnaa.

THE PORCUPINE.
Porcupine spikes
Burn like heat to fire
Someone pinching me
When I am up high
With affection like a sister.
Grinning, grinning, grinning,
Teeth mine.

Critchett 1990, 77

Foley 2001, 27




1820

Image:

View of Government domain and part of Sydney, taken from Bunkers Hill (the Rocks) N.S.Wales, by Richard Read, c1820, [detail]; National Library of Australia

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-135199740





26 January 1820 (first performance)

Hankinson's Rooms, George Street, Sydney, NSW

5 February 1820 (first published)


ROBINSON, Michael Massey (songwriter, singer)

Song for the Commemoration Dinner, January 26, 1820

Alive to the strain that gay fancy inspires ...

Words only; no tune indicated


VIEW DIGITISED SOURCE (words)


Source and documentation:

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (29 January 1820), 3

On Wednesday, being the 26th of the month, a public anniversary dinner was held in George-street, in commemoration of the institution of the Colony. It was attended by a great many respectable persons, of between 60 and 70 in number, and went off with a degree of mirth and hilarity well suited to the occasion.

[News], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (5 February 1820), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179245

We regret, that by an unforeseen circumstance, we had not the pleasure of introducing to our Readers the following Song, which was given with great effect by the Author on the last Anniversary of the Commemoration of the Establishment of this Colony, held at Hankinson's Rooms in George street, the 26th ult. and which our Readers will perceive is the production of no common pen.

SONG, FOR THE COMMEMORATION DINNER, JANUARY 26, 1820.

Presented by Mr. Robinson.

ALIVE to the strain that gay fancy inspires,
We cherish its impulse, and glow with its fires;
Whilst wit, mirth, and harmony, blended together,
Resound with the toast, Boys - "OLD ENGLAND FOR EVER!"

AUSTRALIA! in tracing thy triumph of years,
The source of this festival brighter appears, -
Where the harvest of mercy has blessed the endeavour,
Let gratitude echo, "OUR KING, BOYS, FOR EVER!"

To the Scions of Brunswick's illustrious Line,
Let the goblets, surcharg'd, flow with rivers of wine;
Whilst the toast we select still enhances its flavour,
And hallows the cup, "THE PRINCE REGENT FOR EVER."

To sanction our birth-rights - a Briton's first boast,
May the sun-shine of loyalty brighten our coast;
And health, peace, and plenty, in union together,
High swell the full chorus - "AUSTRALIA FOR EVER!"

To her CHIEF, whose paternal and patriot hand
Diffuses prosperity's smile thro' the land,
Let this toast be reserv'd, which no party will sever,
For it springs from one feeling - "MACQUARIE FOR EVER!"


Bibliography:

-


Music concordance (? likely tune):

-





11 March 1820

Sydney, NSWS

Musical instruments by the Claudine at Campbell's Wharf

Image:

[Detail], A View of the Cove and Part of Sydney [with Campbell's Wharf], "Engrav'd by W. Preston from an Original Drawing by Cap.t Wallis. 46th Reg.t", c.1818; note, on the horizon at right, the hospital, but the Hyde Park Barracks and St. James's Church are yet to be built.

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/item/itemDetailPaged.aspx?itemID=118296 


Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (11 March 1820), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179315

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. - To be SOLD, at Mr. CAMPBELL'S, Barrel, Bird, and Flute Organs, a grand Six Octavo Cabinet Piano Forte with patent Actions, Musical Snuff Boxes, &c. imported by the Claudine. Campbell's Wharf, Sydney. 11th March, 1820


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

-


Commentary:

-


References:

"Serinette", Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serinette 




24 March 1820

Sydney, NSW

Ball for the Russians

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 April 1820), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179351 

On Friday evening, the 24th ultimo, a splendid Ball and Supper was given by Subscription by the Officers Civil, Naval, and Military, Merchants, and Gentlemen of Sydney, to Commodore Wasiljeff, and the Officers of the Emperor of Russia's Ships on Discovery. This Ball, although the night was rainy and boisterous, was numerously attended; and the company were much honoured and highly gratified by the presence of His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR and Mrs. MACQUARIE, whose arrival was announced at half-past nine o'clock under a salute of 17 guns: they condescended to remain with the Party until 1 o'clock. During Supper, the Health of our august Ally, and the Anniversary of his Coronation, which happened to be that day 19 years, was drank under a salute of 21 guns. The Dance was kept up with great spirit till 5 o'clock in the morning, when the Company retired, highly gratified with their evening's amusement.


Bibliography:

-





24 March - 30 September 1820

On board the Morley, between London, and Hobart and Sydney


REID, Thomas (reporter)

Convict women singing

Documentation:

Reid 1822, 118-19

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=geVfAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA118 

26th [March] ... It affords me great gratification to be able to state that considerable progress already appears to have been made in the moral system. The first three or four nights after the women began to increase in number, I was mortified to hear among them, after they had been locked up for the night, songs of a licentious and wicked nature: but in every case of such occurrence, when taking the female the next day to task for the part she had performed, and representing to her in the kindest manner the impropriety of such practices, they have been discontinued, and during the last two mights there has occurred in the prison nothing of which the best regulated family need be ashamed.

Reid 1822, 160, 163

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=geVfAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA160 

[16th June] ... about 4 in the evening, Sidney Williams, whose conduct in Newgate was so extravagantly wicked as to induce the Surgeon of that establishment to propose her removal to Bethlehem Hospital, came to me with a hymn, which I had given her some time before to learn, with a promise of some mark of approbation in case of attention, and recited the whole with feeling and correctness ...

Some time after the women had been sent below this evening, which is a proceeding always observed at a certain hour, and attended to by them with the utmost decorum, Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Reddall walking on deck to enjoy the delightful cool, which was made more pleasing by moonlight and a gentle breeze, their ears were struck with agreeable sounds coming from the prison. On approaching cautiously, not to disturb any person below, they found the sounds were produced by several of the women singing hymns in symphony in a very low key. The stillness of the hour, and the contrast of a religious exercise of that pleasing character among women heretofore the objects of pity, punishment, or contempt, were calculated to produce a combined effect of the most satisfactory kind.

Reid 1822, 169

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=geVfAAAAcAAJ&pg=PA169 

13th [July]. Throughout the last few days the weather has continued boisterous, cold, and wet, proving extremely uncomfortable to the prisoners; for which reason they mostly remain below, exercising themselves in such work as they can, cleaning the prison and making every thing dry and snug about them. The greater number were engaged at times to-day in learning hymns, or reciting, and afterwards singing them with grave attention. It having blown a violent gale during the night, they were all greatly harassed, and many of them are still seriously alarmed by the extraordinary rolling of the ship.

At the accustomed hour I read to them a short discourse, and followed it up with some observations applicable to the state of their fears on the preceding night, with which they were much affected. As a mark of approbation for their care in studying the hymns, and so laudably singing them, one copy of Watts's Collection of Hymns was given to each mess, accom-[170]-panied by such remarks as were likely to confirm their pious purposes ...


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

Jen Willetts, Convict ship Morley 1820, Free Settler or Felon?

http://www.jenwilletts.com/morley_1820.htm 


Commentary:

-


References:

-




31 March 1820

NSW

Divine service

Image:

Vue de l'eglise de Parramatta en 1819, from Freycinet (Arago and Pellion) 1825, plate 95

http://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k99356f.r (DIGITISED)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.pic-an8101215-2 (examplar pictured)


Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (1 April 1820), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179351 

Yesterday being Good Friday, Divine Service was performed in the various Churches and Chapels through out the Colony.


Bibliography:

-





April-May, September-November 1820

Sydney and Parramatta areas, NSW


INDIGENOUS

SIMONOV, Ivan Mikhailovich

Corroboree and hymn singing

Reports only


Documentation:

Simonov, in Barratt 1988, 158, 159


Bibliography:

Barratt 1988, 158, 159

[158] Once at least, Simonov passed a night in a Cammeraigal encampment and witnessed a nighttime corroboree ... "Music consisted of the sound of two small sticks, which the single musician beat time with, and of his loud voice as he sand a dissonant song. The dancers stood before him in a single line. They jumped at each blow of his sticks, and hummed: prrs, prrs, prrs." ... [159] Simonov was shown the Parramatta school for native girls and left with very mixed emotions. "Clean white dresses", "moral teaching", and "harmonious singing of hymns" were well enough ... Yet it was sad to see the shame with which the children viewed their relatives' "wild customs", and apparent that, it general, the Aboriginals were loth to leave their children at the school.

Aleksandr Massov, "Lachlan Macquarie in Russia", Australian Slavonic and East European Studies 22/1-2 (2009), 45-59

http://miskinhill.com.au/journals/asees/22:1-2/lachlan-macquarie-in-russia (DIGITISED)


Resources:

"Ivan Mikhailovich Simonov", Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_Mikhailovich_Simonov 


Commentary:

-


References:

-




26 May 1820

Sydney, NSW

William Dawes's clarionet stolen

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (3 June 1820), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179516

FIVE GUINEAS REWARD. - Whereas a House in Princes-street, opposite the Avenue leading to the Military Hospital, was on Friday the 26th Instant broke into, and the following Articles stolen out of a Box; viz - 4 linen shirts, 3 silk handkerchiefs, 2 pair of unbleached cotton stockings, and a clarionet contained in a black leather bag, marked W D on the inside. The clarionet had eight keys, bone ferule broke short on the second joint; maker's name Cramer, London; the mouth-piece marked Key's, London; and also 2 bound books of music for the clarionet, with William Dawes on the inside cover of each. The above Reward will be given for the Detection of the Offender or Offenders; but as the Clarionet may have been purchased innocently, Two Guineas will be given to the Person restoring it to Mr. Hodges, Bunch of Grapes, Pitt-street.


Bibliography:

-





24 June 1820

Sydney, NSW


McINTOSH, Robert

Band master turned felon

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (24 June 1820), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179556

Robert McIntosh, for robbing the King's Stores, was found Guilty, and sentenced to four years transportation to Newcastle.


Bibliography:

-





28 October 1820

Mr. Nott's Academy, 44, Castlereagh-street, Sydney, NSW


GIRARD, Francis

Instruction in quadrilles, waltzes, &c

Documentation:

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (28 October 1820), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179848 

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND DANCING. - M. GIRARD, of Paris, presenting Compliments to the Families of Sydney, most respectfully informs them that he gives Instruction in his native language, and also in quadrilles, waltzes, &c. All kind of elegant dances, at Mr. Nott's Academy, 44, Castlereagh street ; and those Families, who desire it, may be waited on at their own houses.

[Advertisement], The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (2 December 1820), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179917 


Bibliography:

-





9 November 1820

Henrietta Villa, Point Piper, NSW

Ball at Point Piper with the Band of the 48th

Documentation:

"Sydney", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (11 November 1820), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179879 

On Thursday last, the 9th instant, a large Party of Ladies and Gentlemen were entertained at Point Piper. His Honor Lieutenant Governor ERSKINE, the Honorable the COMMISSIONER of ENQUIRY, the Honorable the JUDGES, and many Strangers; amongst whom were Commodore BILLINGHAUSEN, of the Russian discovery ships, and as many of the Russian Officers as could be spared from duty. Although the day proved stormy with rain, yet the Company escaped the weather favorably, by the Prince Regent schooner assisting in conveying the Party down and up the harbour; the Band of the 48th Regiment playing delightfully from that beautiful residence now called Point Piper, which His EXCELLENCY the GOVERNOR has been pleased to name it in the very handsome grant given to the Proprietor.


Bibliography:

-





29 December 1820

Sydney, NSW


"E" - "AN INCOGNITO" (recte Thomas MOORE)

To those we've left behind us

Documentation:

"SONG", The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (9 December 1820), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2179924

Air - " The Girl I left behind me."

As slow our ship her foamy track
Against the wind was cleaving,
Her trembling pendant still look'd back,
On that dear Isle 'twas leaving: So loath we part from those we love,
From all the links that bind us;
So turn our hearts, when'er we rove,
To those we've left behind us.

When o'er the bowl, of vanish'd years
We talk with joyous seeming,
And smiles that might as well be tears,
So faint-so sad their gleaming:
While mem'ry brings us back again
Each early tie that twin'd us;
Oh! sweet's the cup that circles then,
To those we've left behind us.

If, in a foreign clime, we meet
Some isle or vale enchanting,
Where all looks flow'ry, wild and sweet,
And nought but love is wanting:
We think how sfreat had been our bliss,
If Heav'n had but assign'd us,
To live and die in scenes like this,
With some we've left behind us.

As trav'lers oft look back at eve,
When eastward darkly going,
To gaze upon the light they leave,
Still faint behind them glowing:
So, when the close of pleasure's day
To gloom hath near consign'd us,
We turn to catch one fading ray
Of joy that's left behind us!

E.


Bibliography:

-


Resources:

Sarah McCleave, "The Thomas Moore Project",

http://cdm15979.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/landingpage/collection/p15979coll12 

http://www.qub.ac.uk/schools/CentreforEighteenth-CenturyStudies/ThomasMooreatQueens 


Words and music concordances:

"Brighton camp", Twenty four new country dances for the year 1799 with proper directions to each dance (London: T. Skillern, 1799)

http://www.vwml.org/browse/browse-collections-dance-tune-books/browse-skillerns1799 

A selection of Irish melodies, with symphonies and accompaniments by Sir John Stevenson, Mus. Doc. and characteristic words by Thomas Moore, Esq., 7th number (Dublin: J. Power, 1 October 1818)

A selection of Irish melodies, with symphonies and accompaniments by Sir John Stevenson, Mus. Doc. and characteristic words by Thomas Moore, Esq., 7th number (Dublin: W. Power, 9 December 1818)

Moore's Irish melodies, with symphonies and accompaniments by Sir John Stevenson; and characteristic words by Thomas Moore (Boston: Oliver Ditson, [1852]), 172-73

https://archive.org/stream/mooresirishmelod00stev_0#page/172/mode/2up 


Music concordances:

The girl I left behind me: a much admired new song (Dublin: Hime, [c.1799/1800]

http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/810960271 

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000375858 

Andrew Kuntz, "Brighton Camp", "The girl I left behind me", The traditional tune archive

http://tunearch.org/wiki/Brighton_Camp 

http://tunearch.org/wiki/Annotation:Girl_I_Left_Behind_Me_(1)_(The)

The girl I left behind me, US Marine Fife and Drum Corps, Edison cylinder, 1904

https://archive.org/details/thegirl1904 


Commentary:

The words and music first appeared together in the seventh number of Moore's Irish Melodies, published in London by J. Power on 1 October 1818, and in Dublin by W. Power on 9 December 1818.

William Ellard paraphrased the melody in the last of his Australian quadrilles of 1835, "La Engehurst" (Dublin, Sydney: Ellard, 1835):

http://archival-classic.sl.nsw.gov.au/album/ItemViewer.aspx?itemid=921288&suppress=N&imgindex=5 


References:

[Review of Moore and Stevenson's Irish Melodies, 6th and 7th numbers], The Monthly Review (December 1818), 419-33; especially 425-26

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=FgMwAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA425 




1820 (year of publication)

Preservation Island, Bass Strait, VDL


JEFFREYS, Charles (reporter)

EVANS, George William (reporter)

Hymn or song of the native women during the absence of the sealers

Report only


Documentation:

Jeffreys 1820

Evans 1822, 20

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=2MgRAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA20 (DIGITISED)

[Quoting Jeffreys 1820] [23] It frequently happens that the sealers, in the pursuit of their occupation, are compelled to leave their women for several days together. On these occasions, these affectionate creatures have a kind of song which they chaunt to their imaginary deity, of whom, however, they have but a very indistinct notion, and who, they say, presides over the day; an evil spirit, or demon, making his appearance in the night. This deity they believe to be the giver of every thing that is good; nor do they appear to acknowledge any more than one God.

The hymn, or song, which they address to Him during the absence of their husbands, or protectors, is intended to secure His divine care over them, and especially to bring them back with speed and safety. The song is accompanied with considerable gracefulness of action, and is poured forth in strains by no means inharmonious: on the contrary, the voice of the singer, and, in many parts, the sweetness of the notes, which are delivered in pretty just cadence, and excellent time, afford a species of harmony to which the most refined ear might listen with pleasure.

Bonwick 1870, 172-73

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=bWoBAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA173 (DIGITISED)

In the Van Diemen's Land narrative of Lieut. Jeffreys there is a sentimental and a highly imaginative story about the Natives, worthy of the most devout disciple of Rousseau; which, while showing the author's benevolent disposition, declares rather too much for the gentleness, intelligence, and piety of aboriginal gins stolen by rough sealers of the straits. "It frequently happens," says the writer, "that the sealers, in the pursuit of their occupation ...


Bibliography:

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Resources:

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Commentary:

Compare Backhouse's report of 8 October 1832


References:

"A PORT PHILLIP PIONEER", The Mercury (30 August 1876), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8947545 






© Graeme Skinner 2014 - 2017