THIS PAGE FIRST POSTED 24 OCTOBER 2017

LAST MODIFIED Monday 6 August 2018 19:45

John Winterbottom and family in Australia

Dr GRAEME SKINNER (University of Sydney)


THIS PAGE IS CURRENTLY UNDER CONSTRUCTION


To cite this:

Graeme Skinner (University of Sydney), "John Winterbottom and family in Australia", Australharmony (an online resource toward the history of music and musicians in colonial and early Federation Australia): http://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/winterbottom-family.php; accessed 18 August 2018







WINTERBOTTOM FAMILY MEMBERS IN AUSTRALIA - PAGE DIRECTORY


Members of an extended family of English military band and orchestral musicians (active 19th - early 20th century)

[1] John WINTERBOTTOM (1817-1897, Australia 1853-61)

[2] Maria Margaret WINTERBOTTOM (c.1829-1904, Australia 1853-61)

[3] Frank Midwinter King WINTERBOTTOM (1861-1930, Australia 1881-82), nephew of [1]

[4] Charles WINTERBOTTOM (1866-1935, Australia 1888-89), nephew of [1]


"A Notable Family. The Winterbottoms", Cornishman [England] (26 February 1903), 3

The Winterbottoms have been associated with British military bands for over century, during which period its various members have put in total joint service of over 225 years. We all like to hear of generation after generation serving with the colours, and the story of the Winterbottom family provides a striking instance. John Winterbottom, born in 1781, was, in the end, paymaster of the Light Infantry. That was in 1838. He fought many a battle for his country, and had seen extensive service. Another John Winterbottom, who passed away in 1855, was voted facile princeps of the army in small and broad-sword instruction. On his retirement, after twenty-one years' service, the Iron Duke appointed him warder of the Tower of London. And thereby hangs tale. It was while acting in this capacity he conducted the rebel, Thistlewood, to the Bayard Tower, and had charge him during his incarceration. During his period of service here fire broke out in the Tower. The British Crown was in jeopardy, but Winterbottom carried it to the chapel, an act which was duly recorded in the "Times" of that date. He left five sons, all of whom attained great distinction as musicians.

The eldest son, Thomas, was for nine years a musician in the Royal Horse Guards (Blue), and afterwards served as bandmaster of the Royal Marine Light Infantry (Plymouth) for seventeen years. He died in 1869, and was interred in Plymouth Cemetery, his funeral obsequies being most imposing.

He was succeeded his brother William (who had previously served as bandmaster of the Woolwich Division for about twelve years, and had also been musician in the 1st Life Guards), who held the post for five years.

The third son, John [1], named after his father, also became bandmaster the Royal Marine Artillery, and served for twenty-one years, and on his retirement was appointed bandmaster of the Artists' Corps, London.

Henry, the fourth son, likewise won distinction as bandmaster, being fifteen years in the 7th Royal Fusiliers, the 18th Royal Irish, and the Royal Marines, Woolwich.

The fifth son was the late Ammon Winterbottom, the father of the popular conductor of the Royal Marine band. He was long known as a distinguished double-Bass player, being a member of the late Queen's private band, the Royal Italian Opera, the Philharmonic Society, etc., etc.

Remainder of the text, concerning Ammon's son, [3] Frank Winterbottom, given under his entry below.




WINTERBOTTOM, John

Bassoonist, conductor, entrepreneur, bandmaster, composer

Born England, 1817
Married Maria Margaret COZENS, Camden, London, 3 June 1847
Arrived Melbourne, VIC, by January 1853
Departed Melbourne, VIC, 17 December 1861 (per Result, for London)
Died Putney, England, May 1897, aged 80

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)

http://nla.gov.au/nla.party-680052 (NLA persistent identifier)


WINTERBOTTOM, Maria Margaret (Miss COZENS; Mrs. John WINTERBOTTOM)

Actor, pianist, vocalist

Born c. 1829
Married John WINTERBOTTOM, Camden, London, 3 June 1847
Arrived Melbourne, VIC, by January 1853
Departed Melbourne, VIC, 17 December 1861 (per Result, for London)
Died Surrey, England, 9 November 1904

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Maria+Margaret+Winterbottom+d1904 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


WINTERBOTTOM, Leo John (born VIC 1853)

WINTERBOTTOM, Amon Henry (born VIC 1861)


"Winterbottom", watercolour sketch, George Gordon McCrae (1833-1927), c.1860, detail: Winterbottom conducting, with his bassoon sketched in, resting on the music stand; National Library of Australia

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-139397719




Summary

A member of a British military-musical family, Winterbottom was a business man, as much as a musician. He made an instant impact with newly cashed-up Sydney and Melbourne audiences, entrepreneuring not one-off concerts, but month-long seasons of nightly "Grand Promenade Concerts A La Jullien", advertising himself as "the sole projector of these popular concerts in the Australian colonies", and a regular cohort of featured soloists. For these and his later trademark "Monster Concerts", new prosperity delivered not only large mixed audiences, but also allowed him to fill his orchestra with other hopeful recent arrivals; as he claimed:

... the vast influx of population has enabled him to form a band, selected from the finest orchestras in the world, artistes as well capable of interpreting the sublime compositions of Handel, Beethoven, or Mendelssohn, as to delineate music of a lighter character.

His rather unexpected transformation from a London instrumentalist into a colonial entrepreneur was newsworthy even back in Britain, earning "AUSTRALIA" one of its earliest notices in the The Musical Times

Mr. Winterbottom, the performer on the bassoon, is catering for the mixed public of Melbourne by giving promenade concerts, in close imitation of M. Jullien, to vast audiences, and with corresponding profit to himself.

Winterbottom also started selling himself as a composer. For a "monster concert", with "100 performers", in Sydney on 26 May 1853, he announced his "intention of presenting each Lady in the Reserved Stalls" with a New polka, "beautifully illustrated by Walter Mason" (who, formerly of the Illustrated London News, was also part of the recent "vast influx", having come from England in 1852).

Probably in response to market forces, Winterbottom's programs increasingly rationed the "sublime compositions" of the masters, though what The Musical Times called his "mixed public" seems to have welcomed his virtuoso bassoon solos as a Classical curiosity.

Numerous musical prints of works by other composers, both local (notably Edward Boulanger) and imported, were billed as, for instance, "[performed] with immense success, at Winterbottom's Promenade Concerts", or "Played by Winterbottom's Unrivalled Band".

From being an opportunistic outsider at first, within two years of arrival, Winterbottom was part of the theatrical establishment. At the Royal Victoria Theatre in Sydney on 22 August 1855, he composed music for "a new Electro-Biological Burlesque Operatic Extravaganza", Alonzo the brave; or, The fair Imogene (to a libretto by Sidney Nelson's son-in-law, H. T. Craven). And on 26 August 1856, at the Lyceum Theatre, the evening's performance commenced with "the new Dramatic story", Eva; or, Leaves from Uncle Tom's Cabin

... (second time) ... The overture and entire music composed and arranged by M. Winterbottom ... the nigger dances and serenades by the Ethiopian Minstrels engaged expressly to give effect to the delineation of slave life!

In Hobart, when the new Theatre Royal opened in summer 1857, Winterbottom directed the music and composed an overture Theatre Royal, which the Mercury described as "a spirited composition ... extremely well performed by the Orchestra". He was also credited with having "composed the Music of the drama", billed as Cinderella. Winterbottom later also directed the music at the Prince of Wales Theatre in Sydney, where in November 1858 he introduced a new "Grand Musical Burlesque", The yellow dwarf; or, The king of the goldmines, "Music by Winterbottom". Recently published in Sydney in March 1857 were his Hermione valse.

Apart from these, only two more Australian printed compositions survive, both issued close to the end of his Australian stay, The Lady Don valse, and The Zoe galop. The first was introduced at the Royal Victoria in Sydney in June 1861, to celebrate the last night of the season there by the visiting British burlesque artiste William Don, and his wife Emily in Sheridan's The rivals. Four days later, Winterbottom took his first Sydney "farewell", at the Masonic Hall with the Howsons and bandmaster Douglas Callen as his co-conductor, only to turn up again at the Lyceum in July with a performance of the Zoe galop "dedicated to the owner of that celebrated race-horse, Mr. John Tait".

Winterbottom and his wife took their final Melbourne benefit on 26 November, "on the eve of departing for Europe".




Documentation
1853

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1853:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1853 


[Advertisement], The Argus (25 January 1853), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4789243

PROMENADE CONCERTS, a la Jullien, Olympic Circus, top of Bourke-strert, east. The Public are respectfully informed, that this Establishment will open on Saturday next, 29th January, and every evening during the week (for one month only), the Promenade will be splendidly decorated and brilliantly illuminated, after the style of the original Promenade Concerts given by Monsieur Jullien in England. Band of forty performers. Mrs. E. Hancock, will sing the favourite ballads of "Trab, Trab," and "Coming through the Rye." Conductor, Mr. J. Winterbottom. Doors open at 1/2 past 7, commence at 8, and terminate at 10 o'clock. Admission One shilling. Dress Circle, half a crown.


"MUSICAL FETE AT THE BOTANICAL GARDENS", The Argus (8 March 1853), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4790474 


"MR. WINTERBOTTOM'S CONCERT", The Argus (15 March 1853), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4790691 

As we predicted, the splendid entertainment presented last night by Mr. Winterbottom drew a crowded audience, the Bourke-street circus bring quite full, and hundreds being disappointed in obtaining admittance at all. This just proves what we have always said to the committee of the weekly concerts and others, and we now repeat, that if good musical entertainments are offered at a reasonable rate, any room that can be built will be readily filled; so as to afford very liberal remuneration indeed to all the first class of talent to come amongst us. The Exhibition Quadrille, with the combined force of the two bands, &c., was the grandest specimen of music ever heard in Victoria, and was most rapturously applauded. In regard to smoking, Mr. Winterbottom did not quite act up to his word, although during the first part of the concert not a whiff of tobacco was discernible, showing how easily the execrable habit might be checked with a little management and determination. This must be seen to, if the conductor of this establishment wishes to see ladies at his concerts, and we are sure that he will agree with us that a concert is but a melancholy affair without them. Last night's experiment shows how large a fund can be contributed for the preservation of order, and therefore the public has a right to expect that a due attention to the proprieties should be enforced.

Links: Exhibition quadrille (D'Albert)


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (28 April 1853), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28644481


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (6 May 1853), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12946140


"AUSTRALIA", The Musical Times [London] (1 August 1853), 235

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=FmwPAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA235

Mr. Winterbottom, the performer on the bassoon, is catering for the mixed public of Melbourne by giving promenade concerts, in close imitation of M. Jullien, to vast audiences, and with corresponding profit to himself.


"WINTERBOTTOM'S LAST CONCERT", The Courier (10 November 1853), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article2238725

1854

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1854:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1854 


"M. WINTERBOTTOM'S GRAND CONCERT", Illustrated Sydney News (6 May 1854), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article63614269

On the evening of Monday last, M. Winterbottom's Musical Festival collected in the Bazaar-Saloon of the Royal Hotel a more crowded and brilliant assemblage than is often brought together for any purpose in Sydney. Indeed, the sitting accommodation was quite inadequate, and not a few were compelled to stand during the entire performance. Mrs. Hancock and Miss Flora Harris delighted the audience with their "most sweet voices" - but we must say that the pleasure would have been still greater if the selection had been more judicious. M. Winterbottom's bassoon-playing, however, constituted the chief attraction; and, certainly, that gentleman's complete mastery of this very difficult instrument was something marvellous. M. Winterbottom, in fact, seems to have in his chest a sort of "Inexhaustible Bottle", from which issue in bewildering profusion the very eccentricities of an intricate and yet most harmonious melody. We trust that we shall often have the pleasure of attending M. Winterbottom's Concerts. If due attention be paid to the selection of the programme, they cannot fail to become the most fashionable entertainments of our city.


[Advertisement], The Argus (18 August 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4796537


[Advertisement], The Argus (1 September 1854), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article4797098

1855

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1855:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1855 


"Mr Winterbottom, the eminent musician", Walter G. Mason (Sydney: J. R. Clarke, 1857); National Library of Australia

http://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-138435786

This image originally appeared in The Illustrated Sydney News (5 May 1855), but captioned "MR. WINTERBOTTOM, MUSICAL CONDUCTOR AT THE VICTORIA THEATRE", and signed as here "W. G. M." [Walter G. Mason], but additionally at bottom left "C. W. A" [Charles William Andrews]; my thanks to Richard Bradshaw for bringing this to my attention


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (22 August 1855), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12973221

1856

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1856:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1856 


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (26 August 1856), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12986360

1857

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1857:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1857 


"THEATRE ROYAL", The Hobart Town Mercury (11 March 1857), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article3243199

1858

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1858:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1858 


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (10 April 1858), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13008552


[Advertisement], Bell's Life in Sydney (13 November 1858), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59869566

1859

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1859:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=185&l-year=1859 


1860

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1860:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=186&l-year=1860 


1861

To call up all the TROVE tagged newspaper items for 1861:

https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/result?l-publictag=John+Winterbottom+d1897&q&l-decade=186&l-year=1861 


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (22 June 1861), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13065821


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (22 June 1861), 7

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13065807


[Advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (26 June 1861), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13062571


"MR. WINTERBOTTOM'S BENEFIT", Empire (8 July 1861), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article60494595

. . . We feel confident that it is only necessary to advert to the fact that, owing to several unsuccessful speculations in the neighbouring colony, Mr. Winterbottom will return to England, after many years of unremitting toil and assiduous catering for the public amusement.


"OPENING OF THE LYCEUM THEATRE", The Sydney Morning Herald (10 July 1861), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13066952


[News], The Melbourne Leader (23 November 1861), 11

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article197521336 

On Tuesday next, Mr. John Winterbottom, whose name is a familiar one to all musical people, takes a farewell benefit at the Theatre Royal. We understand that Mr Winterbottom is under engagement to proceed at once to London to join the orchestra at the Royal Italian Opera, Covent Garden, under the leadership of Signor Costa. As a bassoon-player, Mr. Winterbottom had achieved a wide reputation before coming to Australia ten years ago, and, if we are not mistaken, was one of the chiet performers in Jullien's celebrated band. He was the first to bring together a really good corps of instrumentalists in Victoria, and has always maintained a first-class position amongst us as a musician. Mr. Winterbottom's skill as a fencer has also contributed to bring him into prominent notice, and at the various assaults of arms he has generally managed to hold his own against all comers. We believe that his claims deserve recognition from the public, and we hope to see a good house assembled on the occasion of his last appearance before a Melbourne audience.


[News], The Argus (26 November 1861), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5706345


[News], The Star (2 December 1861), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article66332407

To-morrow evening that accomplished swordsman and equally accomplished performer on the bassoon, will take a farewell benefit at the Theatre Royal, previous to his departure for England in the Result. The entertainment, which is under the patronage of Major Wallace, Captains Campbell, Smith, and Drury, and the Ballarat Rifle Rangers, is to consist of a comedy, followed by a vocal and instrumental concert; the strains of the Rangers' Band; an assaut des armes, involving the presentation of a prize medal for the best broadsword player; Mr. Winterbottom's own feats of skill in swords-manship; and a new burlesque! With such a dainty and tempting bill of fare, surely it cannot be necessary for us to urge our readers to be at the feast, though we rather think that the better motive will actuate them - that of visiting the theatre out of compliment to an accomplished and worthy man.


"SHIPPING INTELLIGENCE", The Argus (17 December 1861), 4

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5706985

The Blackwall ship Result leaves this day for London with a very valuable freight. Among her passengers are Sir Henry and Lady Young, and family . . .

After 1861

[News], The Argus (23 December 1869), 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article5809246/224675

For the following items we are indebted to the "Anglo-Australian" of the European Mail: ". . . John Winterbottom, another old colonial favourite, has charge of the orchestra at the Olympic [London] . . .


[News], The Sydney Morning Herald (9 February 1889), 10

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article13713550 

THE Volunteer Artillery Band will, by kind permission of Colonel Wells and officers, perform the following programme in Hyde Park at 3.30 p.m., under the direction of Bandmaster C. Helm: . . . gavotte, "True Love" (J. Winterbottom) . . .


[Advertisement], The Argus (19 February 1889), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article8589944 

MELBOURNE CRICKET-GROUND. OPEN-AIR CONCERT By a FULL MILITARY BAND. Conductor, H. WARNEKE. WEDNESDAY EVENING, 19th FEB., 1890. PROGRAMME . . . 4. Gavotte, "True Love" - Winterbottom . . .


"Mr. Philip Langdale", Table Talk (21 June 1889), 15

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article146024414 

. . . Subsequently Mr. Langdale had occasion to plny at the Olympic Theatre, London, with Mr. Winterbottom as conductor, but that gentleman cast a wet blanket over the young man's hopes by declaring he never would make a bassoon player. This statement is all the more remarkable, as Mr. Langdale has been the only bassoon player who has caught the public taste in Melbourne since Mr. Winterbottom's phenomenal success here . . .

Links: Philip Langdale


"A FAMILY OF BANDSMEN", The Mercury (12 May 1892), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article12741372

Mr. John Winterbottom, who has completed 21 years of service in the Royal Marine Artillery as bandmaster, [h]as] just retired from it to take up the appointment of bandmaster of the 20th Middlesex (artists) Volunteer corps. From 1799 to the present time, Mr. Winterbottom's family, - who came from Saddleworth, Yorkshire, have (according to a writer in Lloyd's News) put in the unique service, in the army and navy, of 213 years. His great uncle (John Winterbottom), who enlisted as a private in the 52nd Regiment in 1799, was given a commission as ensign and adjutant for galant conduct in the Peninsula War in 1808, having fought with great distinction at Bajadoz and Waterloo. His material grandfather was 30 years in the 1st Life Guards, and as quartermaster of the regiment fought also at Waterloo. His father served 21 years in the 1st Life Guards, and was the first sword instructor of the army; his portrait, by command of William IV, was painted and hung in the Waterloo Gallery at Windssn. Mr. Winterbottom's three brothers have all been bandmasters, and the four have put in a hundred years' service. The elder generation may remember the subject of this notice as a solo player at Julien's Promunado concerts at Drury Lane; at the Monday Populars at St. James's Hall; and at one time as musical director at the Olimpic Theatre; while Australians will not forgot his carrying out a concert in 1856, at Sydney, for the benefit of the survivors of the Monumental City, which went down with nearly all on board. During a residence of ten years in Australia Mr. Winterbottom earned the esteem of all classes, and left, as he does at Portsmouth, the record of an honourable and distinguished name. There was a Mr. Winterbottom, probably the musician here referred to, who played the ophicleide, in the orchestra of the Theatre Royal, Melbourne, for some years, and whose wife was a soubrotte actress at the same theatre.


"A REMARKABLE RECORD", Timaru Herald (23 May 1892), 3

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/THD18920523.2.29

Mr. John Winterbottom, who has completed 21 years of service in the Royal Marine Artillery as bandmaster, has just retired from it to take up the appointment of bandmaster of the 20th Middlesex (Artists) Volunteer corps. From 1799 to the present time, Mr. Winterbottom's family, who came from Saddleworth, Yorkshire, have (according to a writer in Lloyd's News)  put in the unique service, in the army and navy, of 213 years. His great uncle (John Winterbottom), who enlisted as a private in the 52nd Regiment in 1799 was given a commission as ensign and adjutant for gallant conduct in the Peninsular War in 1808, having fought with great distinction at Badajoz and also at Waterloo. His maternal grandfather was 30 years in the 1st Life Guards, and as quartermaster of the regiment fought also at Waterloo. His father served 21 years in the 1st Life Guards, and was the first sword instructor of the army; his portrait, by command of William IV, was painted and hung in the Waterloo Gallery at Windsor. Mr. Winterbottom's three brothers have all been bandmasters, and the four have put in a hundred years' service. The elder generation may remember the subject of this notice as a solo player at Julien's promenade concerts at Drury Lane; at the Monday Populars at St. James's Hall; and at one time as musical director of the Olympic Theatre; while Australians will not forget his carrying out a concert in 1856, at Sydney, for the benefit of the survivors of the Monumental City, which went down with nearly all on board. During a residence of ten years in Australia Mr. Winterbottom earned the esteem of all classes, and left, as he does at Portsmouth, the record of an honourable and distinguished name.


"DEATH OF MR. JOHN WINTERBOTTOM", Portsmouth Evening News (15 May 1897), 2

The great majority of our readers, taking an interest as they do in Portsmouth and Service matters, will share the regret feel in announcing today the death of Mr. John Winterbottom, formerly bandmaster of the Royal Marine Artillery at Eastney. The sad event occurred on Thursday at Mr. Winterbottom's residence, 27, Spencer-road, Putney, and the funeral is fixed take place on Monday, when the remains will interred at Kensal Green Cemetery.

Mr. Winterbottom, was for many years a notable figure in the Military musical world, belonged to distinguished family, whose aggregate services the present century already amount to 218 years. The father of the present generation served the 1st Life Guards, and subsequently, while warder of the Tower of London, had charge the rebel Thistlewood. Mr. John Winterbottom, now deceased, started learning music from a bandsman in the Life Guards, afterwards taking lessons from a private master, and year after year attending the weekly practices at the Royal Academy of Music. His first professional engagement was as a bassoon player in the orchestra of the Princess's Theatre, with the English Opera Company. He also played for a number of years at Chappell's Monday Popular Concerts at St. James's Hall, and was solo bassoon player at Mellon's Popular Promenade Concerts at Covent Garden. For a time, too, he was musical director at the Olympic Theatre. He first came into prominence in the musical world, however, a solo player at M. Julien's promenade concerts at Drury Lane. After this he went out to Australia, where for ten years he was conductor of the English and Italian Opera Companies, of which Catherine Hayes, the English prima-donna, was the leading artiste. Then he returned to England, and in 1870 was appointed bandmaster of the Royal Marine Artillery. This position he filled, with credit to himself and advantage to the corps, until March 31st, 1882, when he retired by the exigencies of the Service, and left Portsmouth for London to take up a new appointment as bandmaster of the Artists' Corps of Volunteers, the 20th Middlesex. Prior to his departure from Portsmouth, two complimentary concerts were given in his honour by the professional musicians of the town, and he was publicly presented by Mr. Pillow, on their behalf, with a pair of gold spectacles in a silver case. Mr. Winterbottom had been the recipient of many such marks of esteem in the course his career, and among his prized possessions was a scarf-pin, from a fellow-musician, H.R.H. the Duke of Edinburgh.


"MR. J. WINTERBOTTOM", Army and Navy Gazette (29 May 1897), 11

Mr. J. Winterbottom, whose death at Putney, at the age of 80, is announced, was for many years Bandmaster of the Royal Marine Artillery at Portsmouth; subsequently he became Bandmaster to the Artists' Rifle Volunteer Corps. His was the fourth generation of long service in the Army. His father, whose portrait, painted by order of King William IV, hangs in Windsor Castle corridor, was the finest swordsman in the Army, and fought at Waterloo in the Life Guards, as did four others of the family, whose military services in the four generations extend to 215 years. The deceased began his career as a bassoon-player in Jullien's orchestra, and for some years he was band conductor in Melbourne and Sydney.




Musical works (John Winterbottom)

KEY: Extant works (published or MS); Lost works (or no copy yet identified)


- - -







WINTERBOTTOM, Frank Midwinter King (R.A.M.)

Cellist (Adelaide String Quartet Club), pianist, composer, conductor, arranger, military band director

Born Kentish Town, London, England, 21 March 1861 (son of Ammon WINTERBOTTOM and his wife Rosa)
Arrived Adelaide, SA, 2 August 1879 (per Collingrove, from London, May 1)
Departed SA, after March 1882
Died January 1930

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Frank+Midwinter+King+Winterbottom+1861-1930 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


Documentation:

"Shipping News", South Australian Chronicle and Weekly Mail (9 August 1879), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article93969050 

"GENERAL NEWS", The Express and Telegraph (29 April 1880), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article207588479 

. . . Mr. Winterbottom, a gentleman who has recently arrived from Melbourne, next favored the audience with a Siciliano (by Pergalese [sic]) for the violoncello; and we may safely class this as the gem of the evening; on being loudly encored the "Cradle Song" was given in response; Mr. Winterbottom will be a great acquisition to our musical circles, as he is undoubtedly an artist of no mean ability . . .

[Advertisement], South Australian Register (18 September 1880), 1

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43149396

"CONCERT OF THE ADELAIDE LIEDERTAFEL", South Australian Register (13 October 1880), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article43152882

Mr. F. Winterbottom afterwards played on the violon-cello with his accustomed good taste and expression one of Schubert's songs and Gounod's "Berceuse," the latter being especially masterly, and eliciting loud applause.

"ADELAIDE STRING QUARTET", The South Australian Advertiser (27 April 1881), 6

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30815117

"ADELAIDE STRING QUARTET CLUB", The South Australian Advertiser (12 May 1881), 8

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article30815692

"SONG AND DANCE", The Mail (27 June 1914), 9

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article59646102

"MILITARY CONCERT IN BATH", Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette [England] (20 May 1897), 2

. . . After the Bath Military Band had occupied the orchestra for brief time the Marines came on. Mr. Frank Winterbottom having to attend the funeral his uncle, the famous bandmaster, Mr. J. Winterbottom, could not conduct his band in the afternoon, but he was in his place in the evening . . . Humorous variations on the "Carnival of Venice," Mr. F. Winterbottom's own providing a variation for every instrument, were given by request, and amused the audience that this case also encore was experienced. As appropriate to the Record Reign year the able bandmaster has arranged a fantasia, to which is given the title of "V.R." Various leading events in Her Majesty's reign are described by suitable airs, and as finale "God save the Queen" is played . . .

"A Notable Family. The Winterbottoms", Cornishman [England] (26 February 1903), 3

The commencement of this article is transcribed at the top of this page

. . . The fifth son was the late Ammon Winterbottom, the father of the popular conductor of the Royal Marine band. He was long known as a distinguished double-Bass player, being a member of the late Queen's private band, the Royal Italian Opera, the Philharmonic Society, etc., etc. [His son] Mr. Frank Winterbottom was born in the capital of the empire in 1861. He was educated Bruce Castle, Tottenham, and for ten years was devoted student of music under his uncle, the late William Winterbottom, so well known as bandmaster of the Life Guards. In 1890, having already filled number of important posts, among them Professor of Music at the Dulwich College; conductor, Addiscombe Orchestral Society, Croydon; conductor Clapham Orchestral Society, etc., he was appointed bandmaster of the Royal Marine Light Infantry, an office which he continues to hold with marked distinction. His favourite band principal instrument is the violoncello, on which performs with remarkable ability. A popular educator in the truest sense of the word, Mr. Frank Winterbottom arranges symphony concerts during the winter months which are given in the Town Hall, Stonehouse. These have grown to be among the most important musical functions of the West-country, and attract the elite of Plymouth and the neighbourhood. None but classical works are performed at these concerts, which engage, perhaps, more than anything else outside of his regimental duties his heartiest interest, attention, and energies. Mr. Winterbottom is a lover of classical music, but notwithstanding his earnest efforts to popularise it, he prepared to submit to popular taste at times. He ghtly regards his audience as a wide one, and is not above making an effort to meet their wishes. Thus one finds now and then programmes of his concerts including descriptive pieces and selections from the operas. Occasionally he introduced unique features. At one concert the audience were almost convulsed as the result of a series of trios - one for horns, another for trombones, and a third for bassoons! In addition to much music of a severer type, Mr. Winterbottom has himself contributed largely to the repertory of popular military band music, notable instance being his descriptive fantasia, "V.R.I.," a composition presented for the first time in 1897 at a concert organised by him in aid of the Indian Famine Fund. Socially Mr. Frank Winterbottom is highly esteemed in Plymouth, where, in the performance of his military duties, in the perfecting of his band - of which he is so justly proud - and in the composition and arrangement of an immense quantity of music of diverse kinds, he leads an exceptionally busy life. He enjoys the rare and valued distinction of being an honorary member of the officers' mess of the Royal Marines. On the occasion of the recent visit of the King and Queen to the West-country, Mr. Frank Winterbottom was not only the subject of royal compliments, but the recipient a special mark of the beloved Monarch's esteem. The band had been playing on board the royal yacht, and the conductor was presented to the King by Commodore Lambton. At later stage, his Majesty in person presented him with the Victoria Medal, at the same time expressing his admiration of the performances the band. One of the most interesting relics preserved in the Winterbottom family is a doll's house, with which her late Majesty the Queen frequently amused herself while a child. It formerly belonged to the daughter of Sir John Conroy, who was champion of Princess Victoria, Sir John at that time holding a position in the household of the Duchess of Kent, Kensington Palace. Mr. Frank Winterbottom married Miss Ellen Newbold, daughter of Ed. Newbold, Esq., Scarrington Hall, Notts, and has five children. When I add that a grandson of the second John Winterbottom, whose Christian name is Thomas, is fleet paymaster in the Royal Navy, with which service he has been associated for over thirty-four years, it is apparent that the genial, clever, good-looking, and popular conductor of the R.M.L.I, holds family record which almost unexampled. FREDERIC POPE.

[News], Royal Cornwall Gazette [England] (16 June 1910), 1910

Mr. Frank Winterbottom, the bandmaster of the Plymouth Division R.M.L.I., has applied be allowed to retire. It is twenty years ago since Mr. Winterbottom, than a well known 'cello player in some of the London orchestras, came to Plymouth as head of the Royal Marine Band.

[News], Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer [England] (27 January 1930), 2

Mr. Frank Winterbottom, for many years bandmaster the Plymouth Division Royal Marines, has died in London in his 68tn year. The family originally lived Saddleworth, Yorkshire, and there is a memorial in Saddleworth Parish Church.


Bibliography and resources:

http://www.royalmarinesbands.co.uk/history/Sea_Soldiers.htm

The heritage encyclopedia of band music (1991), vol. 2. 289; Self-portrait of Percy Grainger, 20

http://books.google.com.au/books?id=Q_-DqI_uq70C&pg=PA20





Charles Winterbottom 1866-1935

WINTERBOTTOM, Charles Henry

Orchestral musician, double-bass player (Centennial Orchestra)

Born Clapham, Surrey, England, 4 November 1866
Active Melbourne, VIC, July 1888 to March 1889
Died Hornsey, Middlesex, England, 12 November 1935

http://trove.nla.gov.au/result?l-publictag=Charles+Winterbottom+1866-1935 (TROVE tagged by Australharmony)


See full documentation on Centennial Orchestra:

http://sydney.edu.au/paradisec/australharmony/centennial-exhibition-1888.php 


Documentation:

"THE ORCHESTRA", The Argus (2 August 1888), Supplement 5

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article6896635 

. . . So we have in our Centennial orchestra in Melbourne, 1888, as follows, namely - . . . 6 contra bassos, by Messrs. Ceschina, Winterbottom, Brown, jun., Briese, Peters, and Pickroh . . .

"POLICE - THURSDAY. Before the full Bench", Mercury and Weekly Courier [Melbourne] (31 January 1889), 2

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article58465359 

Charles Winterbottom sued Mary McWilliams for the illegial detention of a double-bass, valued at £35. Plaintiff is a member of the Centennial orchestra, and lodged with the defendant. He left her home, intending to go to England, but she detained the instrument, on the plea of having extras to be paid for. An order was given for the restoration of the property, with £2 12s costs.

"WINTERBOTTOM V. McWILLIAMS", Fitzroy City Press (1 February 1889), 3

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article65676547

This was an action to recover a double bass-violin, valued at £35. Mr. Winterbottom was one of those gentlemen Mr. Cowen brought out from England for the Centennial orchestra. He went to lodge with his wife at Mr. M'Williams'. They paid their board regularly, but Mr. Winterbottom having to leave rather unexpectedly for England, told his landlady that he would be obliged to go. This did not please Mrs. M'Williams, who at once demanded a week's board merely in lieu of a week's notice. Mr. Winterbottom refused the demand, and the irate landlady seized the unoffending "double bass," and banged its unfortunate neck against the wall and broke it ...


Bibliography and resources:

Charles Winterbottom collection; miscellaneous UK concert programs 1877-86; Royal College Of Music, Library, London

http://admin.concertprogrammes.org.uk/html/search/verb/ListIdentifiers/set/agentName/48447 


My thanks:

To family historian Jenny Stroud, for kindly identifying Charles Winterbottom as member of the Centennial Orchestra (1888-89), and for allowing me to reproduce the splendid photo of Charles and his bass above. In her email of May 2018, Jenny wrote:

I am in the process of writing a book about Charles Winterbottom, probably the most accomplished musician (in his field ) of all our Winterbottom ancestors. He played in 3 royal bands (Victoria; Edward VII, and George V); was a founding member of the London Symphony Orchestra; a professor at the Royal Academy and Royal College of Music; he created a new fingering technique for the bass; was a friend of Elgar's; and is regarded by bass historians as the most eminent British bass player of his generation. His bass, known as "The old lady" was also famous in its own right, believed to be one of the few Maggini basses in existence, the head of the instrument possibly sculpted by 16th-century maker Cellini.




Bibliography and resources


F. C. Brewer, The drama and music in New South Wales (Sydney: Charles Potter, Govt. Printer, Sydney, for the New South Wales Commission for the World's Columbian Exposition (1893: Chicago, Ill.), 1892), 59

https://archive.org/stream/dramamusicinnews00brew#page/59 (DIGITISED)

Winterbottom, who in London was one of Jullienā€˜s celebrated band, arrived in Sydney in 1853, and at once organised a series of promenade concerts, on the model of that "Napoleon of Quadrille," as London Punch styled him. These took place in the only hall available, the Saloon of the old Royal Hotel, commencing on April 20. The principals were H. Marsh (piano), Richardson (flute), Evan Sloper (saxhorn), Kohler (cornet), and Mrs. Storr (harp); the vocalists were Mrs. Fiddes (soprano), John Gregg, said to be a pupil of Staudigl (basso), and afterwards Miss Flora Harris. Winterbottom's instrument was the bassoon, on which he was a fine performer; and he also conducted in the style of Jullien, quite a feature of the concerts. They were a success and ran a month.

ASSOCIATIONS: The author, Francis Campbell Brewer (1826-1911), who began his long career as a Sydney newspaperman as an office boy with the Monitor in 1836, would almost certainly have seen and heard Winterbottom himself in Sydney in 1853


Brown and Stratton 1897, British musical biography, 453-54

https://archive.org/stream/britishmusicalb00brow#page/453/mode/2up 

Winterbottom, a remarkable family of military musicians, consisting of five brothers, sons of John Winterbottom, of the 1st Life Guards, who fought at Waterloo, and was, on his retirement from the service, appointed one of the wardens of the Tower of London. He died in 1855. Thomas Winterbottom, the eldest son, was in the band of the Royal Horse Guards nine years, and afterwards bandmaster of the Royal Marine Light Infantry, Plymouth Division, for seventeen years. He died at Plymouth in 1869. William Winterbottom, born about 1822, was a trombone player in the band of the 1st Life Guards. Then he was bandmaster of the Woolwich Division, and succeeded his brother at Plymouth, thence exchanging to the 2nd Life Guards. He died at Boulogne-sur-Mer, September 29, 1889. John Winterbottom, tiie celebrated bassoon-player, was born about 1817. He was a member of the famous Jullien orchestra when a young man. From about 1852 he was in Australia, giving [454] promenade concerts at Melbourne, Sydney, and elsewhere. On his return to England he was appointed to organize the band of the Royal IMarine Artillery. This was in 1870, as he completed twenty-one years' service November, 1891, and retired March 31, 1892. He then became bandmaster of the Artists' Rifle Corps, London. He died at Putney, May 18, 1897. Henry Winterbottom was bandmaster of the 7th Royal Fusiliers, the 18th Royal Irish, and the Royal Marine, Woolwich. Ammon Winterbottom was a double-bass player, member of the Queen's private band, Philharmonic orchestra, etc. He died in 1891.

Frank Winterbottom, son of the last named, was born in London in 1861. Educated at Bruce Castle, Tottenham. Studied music under his father and his uncle William. Held appointments as professor of music at Dulwich College, and conductor of orchestral societies at Croydon, Clapham, etc. In 1890 was appointed bandmaster Plymouth Division Royal Marine Light Infantry, a position he still holds. He gives symphony concerts in the Town Hall, Stonehouse, during the winter mouths, also entertainments in the divisional theatre, etc. His compositions include: Overture and ballet music, "Jorinda;" interlude, "Phaulos;" Illustration of Shakespeare's "Seven Ages," Portsmouth, 1892; a descriptive fantasia, "V. R." Also string quartets ; pieces for violoncello, upon which instrument he is a skilled performer; selections, arrangements, etc.


Farmer 1912, The rise & development of military music, 131, 135, 149

https://archive.org/stream/risedevelopmento00farmuoft#page/131/mode/2up 


Lyndesay Graham Langwill, The bassoon and contrabasson (London: E. Benn, 1965), 180

http://www.royalmarinesbands.co.uk/history/Sea_Soldiers.htm


Graeme Skinner 2011, First national music, 318-321

http://hdl.handle.net/2123/7264 


Trevor Herbert and Helen Barlow, Music & the British military in the long nineteenth century (Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2013),

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=nr3ANASf_ywC (PREVIEW)


http://www.royalmarinesbands.co.uk/history/Sea_Soldiers.htm






© Graeme Skinner 2014 - 2018