Upcoming events

Events list

Subscribe to this selection
  • Date
    Time
    Event
  • 16 February 2016
    1.00pm - 2.00pm
    A/Prof Grant Brinkworth

    Long-term health and safety effects of very low carbohydrate diets for diabetes management

    This talk will discuss the findings of a large, long-term, randomised, controlled clinical study comparing the effects of consumption of either a traditional HC diet or the very low carbo, high unsaturated fat diet while participating in a structured exercise program on multiple health outcomes.

  • 1 March 2016
    1.00pm - 2.00pm
    Professor Martin Yeomans

    Satiety: the integration of cognition, sensory and nutritional signals

    A simple model of satiety based on gut hormone release cannot explain a wide range of behavioural satiety data. There is ample evidence that beliefs about the effects of products and their sensory properties all modify satiety responses, and recent work has elucidated some of these effects.

  • 1 March 2016
    6.00pm - 7.30pm
    soda100

    Sydney Ideas - Soda Politics in the US: Lessons from the food movement in action

    Leading US nutrition academic and author of Food Politics, Professor Marion Nestle, discusses the success of the public health campaign against soft drinks in the US, despite relentless marketing and political pressure.

  • 11 March 2016
    4.30pm - 6.00pm
    Carl Wieman thumb

    Sydney Ideas - A Scientific Approach to Teaching Science and Engineering

    As society demands an increase in student uptake of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subject, what do we know about the best way to teach these subjects? Leader in science education in the US and Nobel Laureate in Physics, Carl Wieman, shares the latest research.

  • 22 March 2016
    1.00pm - 2.00pm
    Professor Andrew Hill

    The psychology of food craving

    Professor Andrew Hill from Leeds University will focus on food cravings during pregnancy, weight management, and after bariatric surgery. This functional view also reveals the potential for psychological approaches in the management of food cravings.