Tender Process

Frequently Asked Questions - Tender Process
  1. What is the difference between a tender and a contract?
  2. Why does the University ask for a tender rather than a quote?
  3. At what level does a quote become a tender?
  4. What is the tender process?
  5. How long does the tender process take?
  6. At what point are tenders required?
  7. Who decides who to award the tender to?
  8. If I am unsuccessful, will you explain to me why my bid failed and what can you tell me about the winning bid?

1. What is the difference between a tender and a contract?


The term tender means a formal invitation to trade under the terms of offer and the documents associated with that offer. A contract is, generally speaking, a legally binding agreement between parties, where there has been offer, acceptance and consideration.

2. Why does the University ask for a tender rather than a quote?


Generally, it is the level of value and risk that determines if we ask for a quote or go out to tender.

3. At what level does a quote become a tender?


Please refer to the Tendering (> $200K) and Procurement Policy pages.

4. What is the tender process?


Please refer to the Tendering page.

5. How long does the tender process take?


From the time the tender is released, it is generally in the market for 25 calendar days. Pre-release preparation, the advertisement period, evaluations, Tender Board endorsement and agreement finalisation generally result in a tender process taking an average of 90 days to complete.

6. At what point are tenders required?


If the procurement is valued at $200,000 or above (including GST), tenders must be called, unless approved otherwise by Procurement Services and the University Tender Board.

7. Who decides who to award a tender to?


The evaluation team, led by the Procurement Services, must produce a written report upon completion of a tender evaluation and this report must be then endorsed by the University Tender Board before the outcome can be announced.

8. If I am unsuccessful, will you explain to me why my bid failed and what can you tell me about the winning bid?


Yes and this could include a number of reasons. For example, you might be too costly, or have insufficient skills or knowledge, you may have failed to understand what is required or failed to complete the documentation correctly. Whatever the reason, if you ask for feedback we will provide it as far as we are able.